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Delaware gazette and state journal. (Wilmington, Del.) 1883-1902, October 15, 1891, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053046/1891-10-15/ed-1/seq-4/

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GAZETTE AND JOURNAL
to
it
In
in
a
of
of
t*
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
%
JT. E. COR. FIFTn AND SHIPLEY STS.
BY
EVERY EVENING PRINTING COMPANY
PRICE $1 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
jNTLMINGTOX, Til Lies 1>A Y. OCT. IS.
Looking for Tin-lMate.
The New York Evening Post has been
Marching industriously and unceasingly
tor "A<i lericau tin-plate," and pig tin
J ^ver since the McKinley committee
rtod, summer before last, that tlic
ufacture of this article had passed
nd the experimental stage in this
ity. The Post has also been trying
Ml this time to buy, at regular market
fates, a ton or two of American pig tin
or a commercial quantity of home made
fin-plate, but hitherto in vain. When
the Philadelphia high tariff papers a
few days ago reported the discovery of
a real American tin-plate works in that
city, the News naturally took up the
j trail. It sent its Philadelphia
tvith instructions to find any of that tin
plate, if it was in the market. He went
to N. & G. Taylor's place, at No. 303
Branch street, where tho tin-plate was
^ .Mid to be manufactured. He saw both
? members of tho firm, but they "refused
absolutely to talk for publication."
- 'With dealers in tin and tin-plate he had
better luck. Ilis first call was upon
Merchant & Co., on Arch street above
Fifth, with the head of which firm he
held the following interview :
al
of
out
a
"Have you secured any of then
the famous Teiuescal tin mines .
of Mr. Merchant, the head of the firm.
"No," he r
have heard of
"But, according to the TVcaaand Inquirer,
N. & G. Taylor have been receiving large
' quantities of it."
Mr. Merchant's eyes twinkled. He did
I not reply at once, but seemed R> be laugh*
j ing inwardly. Then he said :
% I lors. Their busines
[ know that I
mines except through the newspap
I that I never bought any pig-tin from
' them."
. "Would you be likely to have heard of
! this mine if it was a large producer?"
J "Certainly; we are next to the bigirest
Importers of tin plate in the city. We im
port about 400 tons a year, and *tl
. about $170,000 worth. Don't you think if
a pig-tin-mining industry in
should be infc
duct of
I asked
'plied positively,
"1
;'thing about the Tav
I do
rer heard «»f the T
ca
J there w
! California
f Don't you think our trade would be
licited, and that agents would call upor
quoteprires? Nothing of this kind
has been done."
"Do you think, then, tin
California?"
"Oh, there may be some trifling mining
Ingoing on, but not enough to speak of c
• merolally, seriously. 1 suppose there
been a ton or so taken out
for campaign purposes; but
of the trade being supplied from the •
that is ridiculous. Besides, it would
I make any difference in the cost of tin
\ plute if it'were true. Pig-tin is free, and it
• would be cheaper to get it from the other
'side than from California."
"How are prices of tin-plate affected by
these alleged American manufactories?''
"Prices are about 15 per cent higher than
they were before the new tariff' law. They
not quite as much higher as the rate of
duty, because just before the
into operation the dealers secured large
supplies of tin-plate, and thus, iu a
•asure, overcame the effects of the Mc
Kinley bill."
"Do you think tin mining and tin-plate
ufacturing will ever amount to much
in this country ?"
"They may in time, in a good, long time.
Until then prices will remain high as Ion
us the present tariff is in operation,
they must go higher soon. I have bee
disgusted with some of the
the stuff they have printed
jects of late. They do n<
, strained by truth or common sense."
: The Evening Post man saw also Mr.
4 Nathan Trotter, of Nathan Trotter
'Co., No. 86 North Third street; Mr.
• Porter of O. B. Porter & Co., of No.
128 North Second street; Mr. Hall, of
'Hall & Carpenter, No. 709 Market street;
Mr. J. Hail Rohr man, of J. llall Rohr*
«te Son, No. 155 North Front
and Mr. ßpering, of Gummy, Sparing «te
Co., No. 1023 Market street. They all
told the same story. They wore ready
and anxious to get hold of Americ
tin-plate or pig tin if there was any
tho market, and they were tli
. would be called on to handle it in the
: regular way of business. But Mr.
Trotter hail not seen any Tetnescal pig
tin and was very confident that, if uny
is being mined, it is only "for campaign
purposes—not enough for commercial I
use." Mr. Porter "had never ltcurd
is mined ii
d worked up
for the id
1
fspapfrs for
r\
ft. ' »•
d,
1
■ho
)
, commercially, the California j
tin" but "would like to hear from
the
western people if they have anything to
sell."
Mr. Spering remarked that it w
"nonsensi
to say that tin-plate is being
manufactured
Philadelphia «
vicinity. Part of the intorvi
Mr. Spering
vith
as foil«
•1 !ia
•on tlie
1 tm ' •*'
he In
ior Window, but
IWih
dint.
:
Taylor £ Co. some tin.
sample sheet of what th
de tin, but wliat
do a lew slice
"
'
"Do y
ufacturing going on
hink there is
ny tin-plate
"N
ak
do
j dip the 'block st
>t think it
'1*
Un
them. Ti
would lu
Pig tii
» din tl
! the she
of d
d ii
Id-..'
;
rhu
Tuylor <te « '«
• .t
••I
.0 they use A
lorican pig
'tin for their purnn:
' "No; I «lo not.
"Why, there has
Hull lauBhcl. !
Mi
1 in tbi!
utki
- The id
But, ü tin-plate were being manufac
tured i
i
rcinl quantities In a |
cities,
dozen At
erica
e foot
goo
that tin; Melvin I«
tariff tax
\\
tumors of tin, who
rthe million, $15,000,
»Iian they
" and that It would bo cheaper
10,000 tin-plate workers good v
the year
nothing than to po
re n uni be
'0 per yea
ght
pay
0» "1! I
«1 for doing absolutely
this he»
riiHK fr.
the whole people,
pockets of a few speculative n
turers who, like Niedringliuus, will send
abroad for workmen rather the.
t«» the
»anufuc
•American wages and who, if home com
petition should at any time threaten to
pull down tho price, would at
, qoed to foim a trust aud contii
tho public all that the tariff w
le to tax
ild bear.
Tlie (civil service) iuw should have t tie
id of a friendly interpretation aud ho
«1 vigorously enforced. All
^ppoinUncnta undo: it ahouid be absolutely
faithfully
free from partisan considerations and in
fluence. Home extensions of the classified
practicable und desirable, and
further legislation extending the reform
to other branches of the service to which
it is applicable would receive my approval.
In appointments to every grade and de
partment, fitness and not party service
should he the essential test and fidelity and
efficiency the only sure tenure of office.
Only the interest of the public service
should suggest removals from offico. I
know the practical dilflculties attendin
the uttempt to apply the spirit of the civ
service rules to nil appointments and
vais. It will, however, be my sincere
purpose,if elected.to advance tho reform.—
President Harrison's Letter of Acceptance.
What a shock it will be to
President when he hears,
must if the press and the public persist
in keeping this tax receipt scandal stirred
up, that the United States marshal for
this district, the postmaster of Wil
mington, tho private secretary of Sena
tor Higgins, and various subordinate
Federal otllcials have been mixed up in
a clandestine deal (so clandestine that it
was kept from tho "personal knowledge"
of Senator Higgins himself) with a brace
of dishonest Democratic tax collectors
who sold out their party, (thoro you
have it again), pocketed the money and
then—more shame to them—didn't even
f
good
we fear he
pay their office rent. The United States
marshal is tho chief of the Federal po
lice for Delaware. Is his co-operation
in this deal an exemplification
of that "fitness and not party
service " which should be " the essen
tial test" of his qualification for that
position? Suppose his predecessor,
Marshal Newlin, had been caught in
underhand transaction of this kind with
a Republican collector who sold out his
party and pocketed tho money, would
not President Cleveland have bounced
him
quick
But Marshal N<
to make his head swim ?
wlin was not built that
ither was Postmaster Taylor.
One cannot even imagine their beiug
approached with any such proposition.
Had they been and had they listened to
it, they would have been repudiated and
condemned by all self-respecting Demo
crats, just as Dougherty and McKee
have been. But where do wc find Re
publicans repudiating and
the Federal officials implicated in this
deal ?
-ay ;
domains
Frank Melbourne, the Australian rain
maker, 1ms offered the farmers of west
ern Kansas what looks like a reasonably
proposition. lie will contract to
supply forty counties with sufficient
rain next year for a consideration of
ten cents
fail
I know
i, no pay. This
is cheap enough for watering a dry
land, and a convention of the counties
interested is to he called to consider the
proposition. Melbourne should not be
confounded with the government rain
makers who have been experimenting
with explosives in Texas. Their plan
is scientific and comprehensible; while
Melbourne's system, which has been
classified by a New York paper as the
"hole in the stable roof method," is in
comprehensible at least, and nobody but
the inventor knows what, if any, scien
tific claims it may possess.
The people of San Francisco
growling
new post-office. A lot, 350 feet square,
at Seventh and Mission streets, has been
chosen, and tho price is $1,040,000.
This property was appraised at only
$150,000. Bus!
ing that the site is half
business part of the city, charging that
the price paid by the government is out
of all
Wanamaker for selecting it in the in
terest of the Southern Pacific Railroad
Company.
now
the site selected for their
j coniplain
mile from the
js men
, and condemning John
Nordhoff reports that the temperature
at Honolulu has varied as little as24° in
iximum of 86°
whole year, fro
the hottest day of August to a mi
mum of C4°
the cold«;st «lay of
December. Wouldn't Wilmington be a
revelation to the Kanakas with a drop
of 53° i
day of last week to 30°
this
89°
Me
Monday of
eek ?
V
C1I ES TER TO WN.
Special«;
Journal
C
n, Md., Oct. 7.—Full
ived here
particulars have ju t. been
; of the
of
st auockin
in the count v for v
s. <Ju
»day last tin* ll-years-old son of Mr.
ry Gray, a pr«»
fi
t living
staffly killed by
been riding. The little fellow was i
field with the
•as al
li he had
•ho vv«*
plowing,
l when the In
o the h
cordingly pi
horse. When
a spirited you
he house
ached the ho
get off
•hen Ids fo.»t
nude «
"f the horse,
»pen
ran*. Ii
effort to g
P
the bridle
•hicli
<1 In; dashed off
rglng the boy
After }
«s broke, but
:
tin* s:
time kicking.
" 2n
100 yards the harn«
had 1
the
death.
horribly
»ruised, and Ids chin
|aw
tea 11 v
kick froi
■° ld •»«''Pj'tcr
it fruit
; of J..111! P. Nichols.
: bester
gm
badly l
•t, fatally
fall
m Monday by accident. Mr.
! - N
at
lb
a of boiling w:
then hi» lit
irl
wito
w by,
ist
lam, upsetting the pan.
scalded her about the head, breast and
; very painful,
s. The i
a |
but not nccc.-sarily fatal.
T umbe
chards in Kent
forth
t pci
cs hav«; pi
n«l
crop of bloss
; gathered thi
id ft
rhe fruit, how
bes.
I.
cwhat shriveled
of circuit
I CO
Inch will
î on tho 19th instant.
:rcst only to th
• ■ !
nil liquor
■.I! b
.1
' til
brated hull-1
•ill con
fro
A
ill end the
•a in that
it. i;
estimated that the I.
if
Aune's
$10,000 by these fraudulent oats
sale.-. Kent county
derated y
Quee
to
rind led <»«». of
!
"heat
, it if thought, by the
e than $6,000.
Captain Bryan last week
ton tiers. They
rested four
. -ere given a hearing
Phillips, of Queenstown,
horn fined $50 each. Tho
appeal to vh,o circuit court.
tie
ho
before Sqni
and three of
men took
Milford, Oct. 7.-—'Tho Willing Workers
f ;avc a delightful sociable in grange hall
ast evening for tho benefit of the new
South Milford Mission. It
tended ami prove«! very profitable
society, as the young ladies bud prep
etliblea, and, attired in costum
senting different nations,
to th<
well at
tho
•d
their
present. Coffee and cake
red after a very interesting pro
f iramme had been rendered, including
nstrumcntal solo by Miss Minnie Davis
and recitations by Miss Minnie Sipple and
William Wells.
day afternoon David Reis
hearing in Sipiire Cullen's office
efore referees Frank Reedy, R. J. Bes
wick and Joseph I). Salmons. Leo O.
Truitt brought suit against Mr. Reis for
services rendered in buying p
him to be used in his cannary li
at C'hestertown, Md., and claims to
have purchased
Reis when tho latter telegraphed him not
to buy any. Truitt had to dispose of tho
fruit and returned ho
Y
Teaches for
. Truitt.
load of fruit f<
d pre
sented his bill of $15 to Reis for expenses
* services, which the latter refused to
at once
and
pay. The referees yesterday rendered
verdict of "no causo for action" and Truitt
had to pay the c«Tsts, but says he will carry
it to a higher court.
jphet, A. F. Tuthill, of the Supreme
O. R. M., raised up the following chiefs iu
their wigwam last evening with imposing
ceremonies: H. Wispcr, Sachem; William
Richardson, Senior Sagamore; John W.
Hallett, Junior Sagamore; George W.
Pleasanton, First Warrior; Ernest Fields.
(Second Warrior; Harry Wilkerson, Third
Warrior; ('. E. F. Jones, Fourth Warrior;
John C. Hull, Guard of Wigwam: Joseph
Clark, Guard of Forest; Bravos, V. M. I».
Harrington, Herman Laws, Peter II«»
man; F. J. Rosier, First Sannap; M. L.
Clendnniel, Second Sannap. After the
of the chief the council tire w
and refreshments of ice c
cake and cigars were served.
I
raising up
quenched
Mil
, Oct. 12.—The light and water
commission have decided to erect the
standpipe for the new
Mouth Milford on Pearl stre
ning from Fro
Walnut and Washingt
««f the standpipe n:
works in
alley
streets. The base
•rived. Messrs.
Wood A
have the contract for
here has
street pipe have wri
unavoidable delay in the delivery
of the pipe, caused by the sinking of the
two schooners sent bv them to deliver the
pipe.
The contract« with the Johnson Bros,
for the purchase of the
light plant has been close«
m tin
«1 they were
:t for the enlargc
ment of thi> present plant by the addition
of a larger building,
05 feet in height, an engine
two d
be paid has
d boiler
pump. The prie«- to
out. One of
;
giv
the
•ells lias been completed.
Work is being directed to the second. It
lias been decided that two
•ill ta:
a mysterious snooting occur
ttrday night about 10.30 at th
North Walnut an,I Water atre
jgj;
I ■
corner of
i when u
d youth, Spencer Reedy, miracu
lously escaped being killed. When the
shot was fired there were many pen
who fired the
Gazette's Correspondent
» be about ten yards
'the first
lie shooter as
the street but
T
weapon,
who happened
when the shot was tired w
tho sc
Water
ny
but did not
s a dark tli<
was frightened very
!re«l blood flowing from the
.. ' the left P ' •
. Ac
.

nd
which w
sl«le in the region of
•d soon collected
suggested that probably Recdv
hud been toying with a revolver when it
went off. This he stoutly denied ai
being searched this was verified. Th«
Devi
the abdo
mi upo
who lives nearby suid that he
some one rush by iiis door immediately
after he heard the shot bnt he could not
white «ir colored,
begun but
could be found. Many th««orles
?ed ns to the cause of the
most plausible one tinder
os is that the f<
say if lie w
Search
trace of the
udv
shooting. The
existing cireumstanc
Reedy was taken for some prominent In
dividual marked for death. The wound
of
in the «'«dt
d boy's side is not a danger«
hut would have
« a little further to'the right.
The remains of Albert 8
<1 fatul hail i
be.
•-1 :
te
•ry yesterday ufter
on Friday la.
by «'aplani James Sipple while
ing from rhiluilelphia amt when just
dations ditch. He was sick but a few
ing the cause of his
the
:
hours, hei
death. He was aged 57 years and w
ineut member of Garfield I
•tiicti organizat 10
dis
No. 7.
'■
«i. A. R..
last respects
y by attending
a bo«l y and performing the
This 8«
oil by a verv heav
last night that played hi
with the trees ami electric light wi
large maple tree in front of the
of Dr. Nathan Pri
Tlie
idem-e
was broke
»ff very
tree in falling
« with it, putting
ing the town in
near the ground. The
carried the electric wire
out the lights
darkness. Limbs of
along tho streets.
i I
strewn all
ELK TON.
Spec al Correapr>u<
lit Journal.
! ».
Seth.
her of Jot
Hetli,
ding with h .
at Baldwin, on tli«* Baltimore A Ohio rail
«•(»rated to-day the 103d
?e, having been born Getobt
arof her
•th, 1738.
She had been quite vigorous f<
up
st, hi
wit inn tlie last y
rapidly failing i
md blind- 8he is
t of a long-lived^ fi
to
I lor
fail i
rod
1er«;
s dr I
Lafi
•luti.
lie;
urs. li
granit
. Her
other lived
lie a
f 104
G
f 181:
She has t
-opal Church
u
«tied at the age of s| years. ;
Methodist Epi
Wliil
:l M. Brieklev
irivi
:
: f
>t Rising Sun,
S « ho
:
Mr.
jr*»k
town, tli
i.
ii the Inir
ki<k.-l
he head
■ I
should
liar bone broken.
I h
mal
* K .
«'tin
is held ii
Brest
:liurch at
it
tli
Mrs. J. R. Miltig
i.V pr
I
*
Mr
:
Ki.kton, Mu., (Jet. 13.—Mrs. Yonkers,
iged about lift
Yonk
«•ar**, wife of William
P
«»rth of
lftcr
, committed
lu
on bv In
seif With u
th«
•liar.
Her husband ha
Ihm
to Kl kt«
and returning home
d his
this aftwnu,,,
lll( ,
ife
ght she had IT.
sit a neigh
go <1<
! tho cel
o milk, lie discovered
j her body.
•«»Id, und it is thought
urtly
st intv«-«
it ted the
after no«
Litzenburg w:i
the
Pci
<1 and
lotit
lnqiK a
George B«»
olored, aged
.-.. •• bile attempting to cross the i'..
W.A: JL railroad briilge over the Big
hlk rre«!k, an- north of Elkton, this
afternoon, atu -I of the Washingt«»
rth-b«
ight
;
N
York
struck by the locum«
the
nee fro
the
k.
Wh«
fm
K'l lu
isible.
and
unds.
j
L E W ES.
spr
d
f c
M
I
d.
•Iu.
1 co
if
Pi
;
J..I
it. McCall
•e 1 'alluwod' an
upproprii
y
IS tiilis j
of
i
oik.
,i,.rs
<1
!
in
; $10«)
-l t»ridges.
un Steph
is. baggage
t for
. Willi
\ Stepliei
s brother of Joseph I
■ i D. M. A V. I
tlie reside*
It. R.
t of cousmnpt
to I
y !
•s
y :
-•-•e ;
oklyu,
I
I ' ,I his mother, on King stre
«■ v « n »ng. aged 35 years. F
j ' vnre . held ut the residence
evon,ug ut onlock - Th(t
I
T
.
•rat .i
on Well
emuins
taken to Greenwood couietory, Bro
for interment yesterday morning.
SMYRNA,
Special Correspomlencp o( oasettnand .Tournai
Smyrna, Oct. 7.— The dreaded la grippe,
which visited every household in this sec
tion each of tho
is believed to have milde its onii
again. The wife of I)r. It. 8. W.
being a victim.
The Rev. Herman Roe, who visited the
old world during the summer mouths,
contemplates giving a lecture in the Opera
House, Friday evening. October 23d,
his travels. He gave Id's initial lecture on
his trip at Bethel M. E. Church lust. week.
Prof. Levin Irving Handy of Newark
but formerly of this town lectured last
night in the Presbyterian church
"Pntrick Henry, Orator and Statesman."
Although tho night •
house was well tilled,
the auspi
ing
of
at
in
proceeding winters,
»earance
Hi rolls
was
the
the
"
the
M
He
4
unfavorable, the
given «inder
of the Presbyterian church.
li
Oct. 9.—The revival
SmYR!
tings
at tho M. E. church will commence Sun*
day evening, October 18th, the pastor,
the Rev. W. W. W. Wilson, thinking he
will have bettor success now than in Janu
ary, the usual timo heretofore for com
mencing them.
William George Hill has sold his flve
mths-old colt, sired by Happy Russell,
to Goorge A. Millington of Dover for $2iH).
Tho Smyrna creamery's output of butter
3,675 pounds from 38,675
Iasi
quarts of milk.
The hoard of direct
tional Bank,
of Smyrna Na
ils last meeting, declared n
ual dividend of four per cent
the capital stock, payable to stockholders
on demand, clear ot tax.
Hmyrjca, Oct. 10.—Terrence Carvin, pro
prietor of the hotel at Lvipsic met with a
■ident while driving on Main
street last evening. He attempted to passu
team just ahead and in so doing, it being
«lark he ran into a hitching post
out into the dirt. In Hilling
in contact with the curb «ftone. breaking
his nose and scarring him up otherwise.
At a meeting of the school board lost
decided r«> substitute ste
used in heating tho
dashing
lie c
!
has
for thef
public school.
The following officers of Morning Star
Lodge, No. T. U. O. F.. were installed
last night bv D. G. M. G . ..
Wyoming. Del.: N. G., William F. Brown;
Y. G., C. <>. Swinney; R. 8., John Cosgriff;
P. 8., George M. Stevenson; Treasurer,
Janies Wright; K. 8. to N. G.. E. 0. Furie«;
L. S. to N. U., Harry Wood keeper: Wur
den, I. D. Berry; Conductor, E. M. Fowler;
R. S. 8.. John li. Harris; L. 8. S., \V. E.
Riggs. Jr.; O. G., A. K. Fowler; I. G., II.
B. Grieves; R. S. to V. G., W. H. Scout;
L. S. to V. G., John B. Webb; Chaplain,
John R. Cameron, Jr.
M. Fisher of
8t.

Smyrna, Oct. 14.—Work lias been par
tially suspended in the stocking factory
this week in order to place pip
building to heat it by steam.
H«« cholera, wiiicfi ^
the farmers of tlie a
has again made its upta
to be dealing its dcauli
Lcipsic und vicinity. Mr. Denney lost 2
fine hogs and Mr. Fraser 19 out of u lient
of 16.
The three schoonovs, Sandsnipe, Ewing
mid Slaymuker. which came ashore .Sun
day night or Monday morning, still re
main aground. Another boat which was
about to be blown ashore was saved by the
timely arrival «»f a tug which bud been
dispatched from Philadelphia In reply to u
A
in the
played havoc among
se.:ks two years ago,
tarance. It
blows
fits
ms
IV
tor al.l.
the
A band of gypsies in a palatial residence
wheels passet 1 through town yesterday,
rite following officers of McDonald En
campment wore installed last night Grand
Inside Sentinel George M. Stevenson : ('.
I'.. John It. « 'ameroit, Jr.; H. P., K. M.
Fowler: S. W., Willium F. Brown; J. \V
Otaries W. S
Joh
Scribe, llarrv B. Grieves;
•r, Joseph Wright; O. 8., Isaac I».
I. 8.. Abel S. Furies: G„ Georg« M.
on; 1st. Joseph H. Wright; 2d, John
R. Harris; 3d, Morris Korinse; 4th, Charles
A. Barnes.
The basket mill of Tiichudy «te Gatts will
begin operations in a few days to work up
a lot of muteriul on hand in the yard.
Trous
u.
; I
DO 1ER.
Special C
t « .«/.otto and Journal
, Get. 8.—Mr. Hutton, living
ught a peculiar water fowl y»
day morning on the mill pond,
at***nt the size of u turkey, with u
bill about 12 inch««« long, dark brow
color amt web-foot«'«!. Its species is
i>
the
It is
ger
Hoc cholera is killing a large number of
fine in the vicinity of Leipsie. Mrs. John
at 20 hogs from tho
Cal
the
has to,
P. M. Dei
; this s'e
disc
Dover, Oct. 12.—Tim
ev. Mr. Numbers
liurch yesterday
•ening owing to the ab
rho assisted
ho M. E.
morning amt
Hence of the Rt
I'. E. To
dedieati
:
IV
The
Mite Society in the M. E
$75. *
The remains of Waiter B. Purr!
Lak
s fro
t he *
sut «iter held by t lie
church last week
le ce
at
e number of relative
after
»on. A h
d friend»
The -I».
pearl button factory."
tl t«» tie started un«l toste
ered
rmwildpSi
»f tlie McKinley bid li
for some unknown r.-aso
flie fa«'
HSI
it «'«I i
the s
of the Do
about a <1
•i employe«!
aud girls.
Dover. Oct. 13.— Co. D, N. «J. D., is
booming. Drills
nightly with a good
(inUVnlierg has beei
E. Wy«
being held
Captain
n ti
emuinrc.
unsferred fr«
«I took
lay night.
!' '•
«I of the comp
my Tin
iv has
I
« liant G
mu of
« '
Co. E, Wyoiui
Do
Get. 14.—Tlie Kent
will
esilay, tho 2lst tust., at 1.3«'. ..
the report of tho legislative co
County
r
Institute
cet be
v. -i
P
is
of
it
•oived fro
Little
Cr.'.'k tlie Dtlavv
tlie tluv
this fall. The
• shore
1 si
ll<
diti
about
«sh. The m
owned by Bhilari« Ijdu
ommiKsi«
he Inihi
if
!'l
McGonigid su vs the
it out by authority .
• the lust Legislature f
al beds 1«
shells
f tlie a«
'
propagate
' f.
• realizing full
x l
-1 already large
umbers of .
he be«ls (liât w
I"
las
ri»

«lay
y
-I
i
busii
bills
all-»
-I
-»rs of the
audquuli
< h of Loi] »si- cleared
Ii
fil'd
The Method!
r*h
Pl»er held t
Une hundred and fifteen
wciv also cleared by the Little
Methodists,
inter I
y a large dolugutio
gl
«lulu
ted y ester
:
y, asking for tho
. . , of B. B. Allen to the office of
prothunoturv. Tlie dclegatio
«bout <»«>. The successful candidat
lav. as Mr. Bur
ilay midnight
apj
bored
will
probably be notified 8a
«•hciml's to
und
opens Monday
as nr nr.
Special r i
n an-1 Journa
Mo., Oct. V.
« is still
dis
»nburg.
«1 g«»t a
»« fourth well
a good supply
-.•k .1
I ilto
: i 1
'fill
»dsun
This mu)
:
z
ul
A. I*. Toad vine, a fu
cd tho
if
expcii
i.
coul.I I»
from -
planted.
»■
I. sprouted
alk bearing
•hicli,
Tho f«
.
I
I
studied, tilled U.n
.te Ur.
I t boil

"I
John Robi
f Sharpstown*
-urry oral,
son. During tho
I 1.300,(100
j have j
.
I

kc
!< I
-i
fact
1
■Ii I.
» and
kets. About
" P
I
I l.ooo,
-I -
• f
if lumber w
I
I The grand jury brought iu a hill against
! John Genly. colored, lor the munter of
Louisa Wades, colored, June 21st huit,
: Gerdy y«w brought before tJie c.
; H. L. 1». Munf<»rd vas appointed to defend
li»m. Hi* i»l« a«lod not guilty. Ilis
I 5|t for trial November 23d,
~fr
MIDDLETOWN.
Speolal Correspondence or OAcette and Journal
Middletown, Oct. 9.—The annual meet
ing of the Women's Missionary Auxiliary
of the Diocese of Delaware convened
at lu.30 o'clock yesterday morning
in St. Anne's P. E. Church, this town.
About 175 members of the auxiliary
present and every guild in the State w
represented. The visitors from the north
arrived in a special car attached to the 9.11
train, and those coming from down tho
Stato reached here on th
din.
The first meeting of tho dav was hold at
10.15 o'clock, and was merely to transact
business. The Secretary, Miss Francis
Hurd, of Newark, called the roll, and
about 175 members answered to their
names.
At 10.30 o'clock the regular
held and the sermon was preached by the
Rev. G. It. Kinsolving, rector of the
Church of the Epiphany, Philadelphia. It
was a very able and impressive discourse.
After Mr. Kinsolving had concluded and
the sacrament of tho Lord's supper hud
administered, Miss Svbil Carter of the
board of missions. New York, delivered u
short address pertaining to missio
The meeting adjourned a few minutes
past 12 o'clock and the visitors were ten
dered luncheon in the chapel adjoining
the church by the members of tho Young
Ladies' Guild of Middletown.
Tho delegates reassembled in the after
" , at 1.80 o'clock, the bishop presiding
»one but the ludies being present. All
the old officers of the order were re-sleeted.
After the election of officers and a few
other business »natters had been considered
M iss Carter again favored the congregation
with a most interesting and instructive
address on "Missions." She spoke for
•bably one half-hour, after which the
hop appealed to the people for contri
butions to build the chupel at Kchoboth.
He impressed those present with the great
importance of ibis work and made a v
strong plea for ui
4 o'clock with singing und prayer.
>neof (lie largest that
time and pr<
1 instructive
rll as the large audience who
ork.
1. The
««ting closed at
Tiie meeting was ci
has been held for s
very intorestin
«"i
the
allowed
homo guild extended its hospitality In a
fitting manner and the visitors expressed
themselves as being very much pleased
with Middletown and her people.
t with them. The
•N, Oct. 10.—Cards
s out
nouncing the marriage of Miss Clara
Brady, daughter of George F. Brady of
town, and Cuthbert 8oweil Green, in
Wednesday evening,
•her 21st. Tlio wedding will bo the
if the present month.
8t. Anne's Oh
rii «

ial ev
The first fr«
»gilt.
on fell here last
end to the
>ii 'or tliis veget
. Wells, Herring
will speedily put
>P- Tl*
able has bu..
A Co. have pi
up u big pack.
J»*
-
NEW CASTLE.
SpivMnl Correspond ««ne
rw Castle. Oct. 0 —John F. Wtlmot,
of the late James Wilruot, died Wed
sday evening, at his li
The dee«
1 ■ . ■
after a liu
who was in
popular. The
o'clock Hatur
ff his
other. Service and interment at St.
's Church. The T. A. II. Society, of
which the young man was a member, has
draped in black and will attend
body.
ho died
•ening of consumption, took place this
lorning. The A. O. II. and T. A. B.
s attended in n body. Tho Rev.
• Brady presided at the services,
held in the church.
; Iron Works
«I shipping large consign*
mts of pipe daily. 1 lie burned depart
ment is being rebuilt und will be u hand
some structure of steel.
goring illness,
fits 22d year.
ms via your, was
funeral will take pi :
morning, fror
at 9
the house
IV
the funeral
N
Castle, «
. 10.—The funeral of
Wednesday
Joh
Wilmot,
Fall.
The Delaw
full npi'rntii
. Get. 13.—The storm whicli
has been raging here for the ;
three days lias
do
•igation for small
y difficult. During the blow on
night a small oyster schooner
above here dragged tier uuclior
Sunday
■.hored
niece
the pier,
board and 1«
being tli«* w«
river for 26
li
<1 the captuin
night he bus sp
rs. At the Fin
s It
rei
on the
•s JY>i
f the wav
9 so threat
?as in imminent «tan
! against the at
'offmun anil Mrs. Mamit
en nanipd
onvention of ti.o l'resliy
Deluwure City.
that the pile «tri
ger of going t<. ;
Mr.s. !!<•;
Cal ho
the Missi
terian Church to be heltl i
Ne
left on the different trains for Wil
this morning H
«nie.
en will begin next week to tec
the harbt
ngtc
itness the great lirc
down old piei
here. The no
further
II, situated I
pier, which will be loo f<
rth. will
be beg
until
spring.
Work «
the Finn's Point jetty is nearly
>r the winter. The contractors
*1 f.
at
have already drlv
This leaves 4«Kj fee
3,3
feet of pilimr.
to he driven
which will be «h
McLean has finished all his
will finish in the sp
spring. To
tot
of the
i<l Grim
s Hathaway
EN ERA L.
John Henry Wilder Allen, of tho
court of common pl«*as of New York,
who was stricken with apoplexy in tin«
lions
Saturday, died at
the Chambers street hospital yesterday.
Evangelical General
ference, at Indianapolis, yesterday,
decided to elect four bishops. Esher
elected, aud tho
Rev. S. C. Brcyt'ogle and thu Rev. Dr.
county c
The Bowma
« '
Ho
rere als
Julius F. 1*
the old Sarve:
apolis, have made an assignment, their
faillir«! being «ine to th«; assignment of
the wheel works, in w
interested to the extent of over $130,000.
The Hardwyoke «te Ware Manufactur
ing Company, plumbers and manufac
;rs of Buffalo, applied to thes
court yestenluy for a
dissolution of partnership. The liabili
ties are placed at $150,000,aud the assets
considerably less.
A dispatch from Montreal says that it
is greatly feared that during the coining
winter Montreal will suffer a repetition
of the small-pox epidemic of 1885.
Already 40 cases have been reported
from various parts of the prov
it is felt that only extreme
the city.
Judge Hawley, in the United States
Court at San Francisco, has decided
against the Standard Oil Company's
contention that certain oil
tho Southern Pacific Railway Company
were a patented invention controlled by
tho oil company. Heretofore the Stand
ard Oil Company had no competition
the Pacific coast, owing to the ad
vantages which these cars gave it.
An Ottawa dispatch says that the
milling firm of Perloy & Pattee have
decided to pay all their hands
vanco of 50 cents, which the latter
struck for, and which they failed to ob
tain by striking. The firm say they do
idoration of the
1 the
and Addison By bee of
orks, at lndian
rime l
•hicli they were
pro
elver and for
;e, and
sert by
d*
this
proach of winto
y of the
iduced by the strike.
ap
Ity to
!n's families have
It is undcr
»«! that all tho oilier firms will follow
•ley «te Pattee's example, but that if
y «Jo not the men will go out again.
Express
w York
•h ich
b—
Ft
Tlie directors of the. Ad
Conipaiif,
toting in Ne
led Henry Sundford presi
; of John lloey, dismissed,
• Lovejoy vice-president in
place of Clapp Spooner, resigned. Mr.
Hocy was asked by Mr. Sandford to
director, but re
charge against Messrs. lloey
and »Spooner Is tho .«ale by them and
others of the Boston Despatch Express
Company and the Kinsley Express
Company to the Adams Comp my for
yesterday, el«
dent in plat
and Frede
sign his po
fused. Tue
itio
INVESTIGATING THE STEAL.
Tho Pennsylvania Senate Begli
its Distasteful Duty.
the
Governor 1'aUinon Heiuln a 8|wcltl Mm
»wi tho Known
of the IlnrtUley Steals and Urges
Take Action.
sago in Wh
11«
Fa
ih
IIauiubmgui, Pa., Oct. 13.—In obedi
ence to tho call of Governor Pattison the
Pennsylvania stato senate met here in
extraordinary session, this morning, to
take action upon the alleged connection
of Stato Treasurer Boyer-and Auditor
general McCamant with tho John Bard
sley defalcation and the Keystone Bank
troubles in Philadelphia.
After the convening of tho Souate a
special message from Governor Pattison
iceived and read.
In tho message the governor reviewed
in detail the developments thus far made
in the Bardsley stealings, together with
the inculpating McCamant
Livsey letters, and tho collection by
Bar.lsley of State funds to the
of $1,800,378.59, which
counted for. The governor also quoted
tho testimony showing that State Treas
urer Boyer had givon Bardsley $420,000
for the public schools of Philadelphia,
iu plain violation of the law regulating
the time and manner of paying school
funds. After citing all these facts, the
Ssago continues :
It also a
for
to
see
and
mint
et unac
to
portion of this
$420,000, thus improperly amt unlawfully
paid to Join« Bardsley by the state treas
ever paid into the school fund of
I lie city of Philadelphia; but that the
whole of it has been stolen
that no portion of this los
been incurred had the warrant be
at tho regular Urne,
the s;
that
and lost; und
would have
at
«1
law,
uppropriati«
other districts or thu
I submit this summary of tho facts
touching the administration of these two
departments, admitted and testified
their chief officers before
tee of the legislature, in order tin
senate may détermina the acth
priate in the premises.
y which has arisen 0
date that the school
became effective for the
by
the
appr
1 regret the nee
summon you froi
mined avocation
'
o till
he
m
if the pr«»«
criminal laws. Their frits
intensified the righteous «1»
people t lint tliei
and enf
lias o
and of the
o oliev
I
e the law;
•cl
Is ««f the ci
negli
•altli
shall answer f«
of «lut v
pons! hi fit
table
plicity in.eriin
I !..
«10
in ing wi
for the romo
The public ej
discharged without regard
vantage or detriment,
tu
at of them
peels that it
ns with you.
11 hi* met and
single
a
<1 widi
00(1 lit
!.
:
the c<
session that deliberation of
«■tilth. 1 i
kc f
•Y«
which every
demands.
cquireinent of tin
L'asioi
Previous to the mooting of the senate
zesti
the majority of tho le
gating committee presented to the gov
,'hich they exonerated
the state treasurer and the
oral from all charges of official inal
itig-doing, blntned th
"system" for the shortcomings and
recommended that changes Bhmild be
the k
transactions impossible in tho future.
In this preliminary report is outlined
the policy that will be adhered to by
the Hcpubllcati
their
the November elect!«
they will pres«;
the state treasurer and
lative i
«lit«)fgc
ado i
so ns to render
1
•mbers of the state
Shortly before
it h
irk.
nderstood
ni.m oxonnriitlng
lit.
fre
rone, but coude
any se
ing the "exceedingly reprehensible" sys
. in in vogue.
ti
STIC HISNATOllB DEMAND BLOOD.
It is strongly hinted that some of the
country senators will
with this. As a tiger that has smelled
blood and tasted of a drop, they must
have
lame
to sacrifice all his wife's
be content
as
a
gore. Tlioref«
\ like tin* late
rilling
•dArn
dations to a
t lie country,the rustic senators «leleuro for
the blood of th«* police
constables,
may be *
trat es and
few of these
îriflccd to appease the demand
for blood, and the greuter game will es
cane.
Tlie stand to be taken by the Republi
of the state t reus tirer
and auditor general is that there should
actual trial and criminality defi
nitely proven. As the evidenc«
s in the
I"'
«►t
strong enough for this they
out the progr
report
rill follow
; outlined i
«»-day's
d shield themselves behind the
ist rates, wil
in' slaughtered.
rse, party lines
Of
ere drawn i
. . g on tin;
>r. Republic
appointed because, as they s
"dynamite" in it.
pply this later. 8u
Osbourn, of Philadelphia, thill I
eutly from his colic
message of the gov
s prefuss to be dis
there
But tlie
ill
senator
dillcr
liante
! i
l cx
r sir
>ng paper, i
that if the facts ns
skI tlioop
•d are prove
pr
I':-'
reused officials
st:
should not only be r
»vod from ofti
District Attor
but
impeached.
Graham also spoke of it ;
presentment.
Tho talk i
a strong
Republic
night is for a lengthy 3«
that will carry thu sitting over the
election—then to dispose ot the whole
business in short metre.
circles to
tli« Day Shore.
outlet
Mu.
. Oct. 13.—Tli«! in
prevailed in this :
Sunday night. The wind hie
<rt h-eusterlv
constantly and at times i
1 almost
o a gale. Rain fell through«
'«»naidernble anxiety is felt for v
as tlie
st than it is inland. Repo
»uth of the Misnilli
»that the schoonc
ett, of this t
d »Irr off G
the «lay.
l'hsi'Ih that
along
tlie
.'atharine R. Ben
ashore high
blow
Bunk
be river. Th
<11 tin vcs.se
is not damaged to any great extent, prob
ably only to the amount «»f getting lier <
Nearly all the local schoi
port aud will stuy until aft
fi.
the
si I
iav afte
inert lest lids shall be a repetition of
tho storm of 'ckS.
d
•Ii ft
»lilffl
(I<1 l-'ellin
Installed.
Special C ur
»und Jour mil
Milf«
», Oct. 13.—The installment of
officers of Crystal Fount D»dge, 1. O.O. F..
took plute last evening in the lodge r
of the organization. Janie« Welch
the installing officer and those installed
appended: W. G. .Salmons, N. <».. W. E.
Lank. V. a.: J D. Hill, R. 8.; J. Y. Foulk
P. S.; James Welch, Treasurer; W. G.
Abbott, Conductor; Joshua Si»«;
Warden; I. A. White, R. 8. 9; G
Joseph, L. S. 8.; James H. Johns
to N. G.; T. James 9almn
N. G.; Walter H. I
i M. Wliitt
. W.
, R. 8.
Jr.. L. 8. t«»
R. 8. to V. (
.; H
Betts, L G.; Alexander Truitt, O. G.
!. L. S. to V.
;r T.
The sixth day's sessions of the Ecu
;ni«;al Methodist Council, in Washing
ton, yesterday, were devoted
tinuati
jeet of "The Church
The Rev. .1. T
paper upon "The Place
Lay Agency iu the Church," Bishop
William X. Ntndeof Kansas discussed
"The Deac«
Rev. Dr. Benjamin St. James Fry of St.
"Woman's Work
The discussion
of the disc
ion upon the sub
d Her Agencies."
is of Eti/jlaiid rend a
ter of
;nt," and the
read a
in tho Church,
the latter topic occupied the entire after
noon session. It w
I
papery
P
»unced that a
vempnt had been started to erect a
bronze statue of John Wesley, in Wash
as a memorwl of tho oo until.
Til K F.NOI.ISn Vit rCh ETERS.
Will
tele Ten
lawke's
Bo U
Boston, Oct. 13. — 1 Tho cricket match
between the Gentlemen of England and
the Boston Athletic Association was re
;d this morning
grounds. The alten«
When tho play was ended yesterday the
had fid to their credit ill the
ric.kot down
d K. J. Key at tin?
g ou the Long wood
lance was very small.
English
second inning, with
and O. W. Wright
defence. At lunch the score w
for six wickets. When the Englishmen
•re through the score, with tho extras,
stood at 207.
The Boston players wanted just SCO
to win, and they made only 20. The
game ended and tho homo players wore
terribly beaten. They claim, un
great justice, too, that they could not
see Woods'fust howling on account of
tidings.
lit
1 with
tho cloudy day and the
There will bo
•moi
game
PHILADELPHIA A F PA 1RS.
Tho Receiver of tho Keystone hank
diet against
a suit
yeztcrday secured
Ohas. C. Haines foi
to recover overdrafts «
Elizabeth Darby, 21 ye
trained nurse whe
Lying-in Charity to the
Mrs. Charles Tatham,
$6,073.75,
the bank.
old, a
•as sent from tho
of
Rosemont,
Friday last, confessed that she had
made three attempts to burn the house,
Sunday.
The three fires wore extinguished by the
excuse
, the fact that
;e on Saturday and twic
Miss Darby gave
servants.
for the attempt at
she desired to return to tho Lying-in
committed to prison
Chnritv. 8ho
at Mudia.
Wanamaltffjg.
»er is. 1HU1.
Sets you thinking of Flan
nels, doesn't it? Here they
are heaped up in a way to
take the chill off Jack Frost
himself.
In Eiderdown and Jersey
Flannels by long odds the
handsomest line we ever had.
The novelty effects, so fash
ionable in many dress goods,
them too—odd
appear m
plaids, ragged stripes, dots of
color flecked and specked
on the soft, fleecy face of the
stuff like rainbow splinters on
a field of new-fallen snow.
Eiderdowns, plain, 37p\, 05c., 75c.
Eiderdow
.figured,65, 75, 85c., $1.
Jersey Stripes, «
Flannels arc strong all along
the line—never stronger.
original qualities of
Shaker Flannel (4 to y/
ounces to the yard) are out in
full force. From fine, care
fully selected wools, shrunken
and made to our order. White,
gray, brown and scarlet, 45 to
75 c -
The
White and colored Em
broidered Flannels are in full
est leather.
Plain Plaid Dress Stuffs
have one of the biggest coun
ters in the store. You'll say
that the last possibility of plaid
wit and wildness have been
exhausted on them.
color combinations at 75c.
«colorcombinations nt $1.
ht color combinations,
$1.25.
More than twenty at $1.50;
as many more at £2.25 and
£2.50 and £2.75. The plaids
fully represents the great
Dress Goods stock—over
flowing with every quality
and every style ; pinched no
where.
The westward ho ! of the
Clothing, getting over on our
Market street front from Thir
teenth street to City I lall
square—spreading out into
large space and better ap
pointments until the Clothing
store is now the broadest and
brightest of all—is a physical
preparation of
the stock to mark the move
ment was ideal. The new
blood, the young sympathy
that now inspires our Men's
Clothing, marked high and
clear the notion that with the
the place
should come the presentation
of such a stock as would com
mand the admiring respect of
the young men.
The wall-flower of the
Clothing is the Custom Tailor
ing Department which is at
the extreme west. All the
best piece goods—English,
Scotch, American—are here
and good cutters await your
orders. Try the effect of £25,
S30 or $35 in a Suit of Cloth
ing to order.
This new departure includes
a large attention to Livery
Clothing and an English Cut
ter—England teaches us the
mode in Livery—who is quite
au faite in that branch of 'Tail
oring art.
Mere are some prices in
Ready-made Clothing :
Fall Overcoats :
At $10—Neat Meltons, modi
colors, very durable.
At $12—Large variety fabrics,
stylish shapes.
At $15—Nobby Homespuns, Mel
tons, Kerseys and Cheviots.
At $18—Eiqjliuk Whipcord (Iwu
Fifty-five
Forty-ni
Tliirt
The
move.
improvement in
ï
WituanuUurs
Rhades) patch pocket?, scamlc
bad
my stylish.
122—Schnable Crape in f»
shades, narrow stitched, ltali:
lining.
At *
Men's Business Suits :
At $10—Several shades good all
wool Cheviots.
At $12—All-wool black Cheviots,
double and single-breasted Sacks,
and 8-button Cutaways.
At $18.50—Choice linos all-wool
Cheviots and Cossimercs.
At $15—Homespuns in all shades,
double and single-breasted.
\
Young Men's Suits :
At $15—Light color Diagonal
Homespuns, also medium brown
Diagonal Homespuns.
At $18—Five shades Homespuns,
double and single Hacks, all brim
ful of stylo.
At $20—Ten shades of nattiest
Homespuns, newest of tho new.
Large Bays' Suits :
14 to 18 years. Light colored Homo*
spuns and Fancy Ribbed Cheviot!
have tho call in tho finer goods—
$10, $12, $15, $13, $20, $22.
Large Boys' Odd Trousers, $2.00 to
$5.60.
Small Boys' Suits :
4 to 10 years, Single Breasted Jacket
and Trousers, Floated, and
"Nassau" Suits (cutaway
vest with trousers) at $5, $<>j $7.50,
$3.fi0, $10 and $12.
14 yc
•i
. Twenty-five styles
ami Fancy Cheviots,
II
!Sp
nt $9 to $15.
Especially for tills Expositlo
have
le titre«; extr
»Herings of
School Suits for hoys of 4 to 14
1— Strong,
stripes at $3.
2— Three lots all
d u ruble
gray
...1 dark
ground, broken plaida and
mixture, at $4.50.
8—Black ground, indistinct
and red plaids, with* white
dots, at $5.
No sensational incidents are
impending in our Carpet his
tory just now, except the one
perennial sensation upon
which tlie business, Carpets
and all, was begun and is con
tinued—namely :
The public shall always
/nul the best bargains and
the best service here.
To emphasize this we set
off to-day a large variety of
Carpets. They are of stand
ard makes and qualities, ex
cellent (some of them latest)
patterns in large variety, suf
ficient to stock
one or two
ordinary Carpet stores. Look
down the list and you will see
that the varieties are numer
ous, the quantities large.
Axminsters :
75 pieces—18 patte
s—Bigelow
Axminsters, reduced from $2 to
$1.65.
Wiltons :
64 pieces—24 patterns—English
«I Hartford
•d from
to $1.75.
Bigelow, Lowell
i
Wiltons, redu
$2.50 ami $2.7
39 pieces—it patterns—reduc»/d
fr«>in $2 to $1.65. /
Moquettes :
81 pieces—21 patterns—at $1.25.
Regular values $1.50 and $1.00.
;
Brussels :
168 pieces—47 patterns
English
Bigelotv, Lowell and Hartford
Brussels, at $1.20. The $1
and $1.50 grades.
Tapestries :
180 pieces—16 patterns—at 70c.
Regular 35-cont goods.
Ingrains :
50 pieces extra Super Ingrains, nil
»flier best
Regularly
'I
makes
5 cents.
75
Nearly all of these patterns
arc complete with five-eighth
borders. The I lall patterns
mostly have Stair Carpet and
9-inch borders to match.
October Book News is
brimming with bookish bright
ness. Portrait—Sarah Jean
nette Duncan.
The price of Book News is
absurdly little—5c. a copy,
50c. a year.
More than
choicest rcadiiij
900 p a g e s 1
in the Cen
tury Magazine for 1S90—to
October. You can have it for
$ia)0 —two volumes bound in
green cloth. A year ago over
2000 of the earlier volumes
went from here in a few days.
What of the nrw Books.
Heaping in, heaping in every
day. I lore's a glance at a
few of the newest—and bright
est—for young readers.
Courage. Ruth Ogdon (author of
"A Loyal Littl«! Red Coat"),
eut. Mrs. Molesworth, $1.35
Red Grange. Airs. Molos
s Girlikin. Ida Preston
.85
8 wee
ï I
forth,
Nichols, $1.8*
Stand by tho Union. Oliver Optic, $1.10
Murcv. the Blocktulc Runner.
Castlem«»n,
?h Forest and Fire. Ed
.90
Throng
Ellis,
.90
Tin- Squire's Daughter. Lucy C.
Lillin,
The Little Now Neighbor. Mary
My Little Margaret. Mary D.
Brine,
$1.00
.75
The Garret and the Carden. Bal
Tlie" C< m *
.85
stable's
lotto M. Yon go,
ous English Statesmen. Sarah
K. Bolton,
Dutton's Holiday Annual for 1891
Sunday for 1892,
Tower. Char
.90
$1.00
.80
AS
John Wanamaker.

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