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Delaware gazette and state journal. (Wilmington, Del.) 1883-1902, February 25, 1892, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053046/1892-02-25/ed-1/seq-4/

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GAZETTE AND JOURNAL
ing
as
to
►PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
AT
N. E. COR. FIFTH AND SHIPLEY STS.
BY Tn«
EVERY EVENING PRINTING COMPANY
•PRICE $1 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
WILL Ml NOTOX, THURSDAY. FEB.
• Doe« Not Interfere With Business.
* After tho reading of Chancellor Sauls
jVtiry's decree in the Levy Court Thurs
' day morning, President Buckingham,
■A* roported by the Morning News, said:
•*! do not see anything in this to prevent
Those in
assessment may
begin on the property transfers."
President Buckingham was right, no
•grasped tho situation at once, and with
A decisiveness and completeness that did
Aim credit.
The Chancellor'« restraining order
does not interfere im tho slightest degree
with tho butincM of' the Levy Court. If
jt were to continue! in force for 20 years
Ao public busincsH j would suffer in tho
llightest degree. \Iad. that order been
kauod in 1873 arid remained in effect
until 1891 all the qusiness conducted by
iDemocratic Lory I Courts during thoso
\18ÿ
ms it did without t[ho slightest interrup
tion or inconven
i This buaiiutea of the Levy Court, so far
as the assessment J lists are concerned, is
cloarly defined by law. It is to reviso
and correct tho] same, just as has
As going on with our work,
chnrgo of Mr. O'Haifa's : -
would h
precisely
gone
al ways been done| heretofore, and to add
to the lists the
omitted, at the tii^ie and place and in the
.manned prescri
vision and confection applies to the
(transfer of irregularly assessed taxables
names of persons
by law. This re
.to their proper districts and the augmen
tation or diminution, as prescribed by
law, of the amount of any taxable'
«egsment. That! is all. There used to be
a provision for eltriking off the. names of
delinquent taxa/bles, after the reception
of the duly certified delinquent lists; but
there is no Ion
01
any delinquent list
no delin
and consequently there
quonts to be stijickenoff.
Hence it follows, as President Buck*
~^ngham very properly remarked, that
the Chancello
j not "prevent 1
work." of c
iho Levy Couijt were satisfied to confine
its attention
restraining order does
from going on with
urse it docs not* and if
this "work"—to legiti
mate public {business—tho restraining
(Order might romain in force for the next
À hundred years without any danger of
['infringement. It is only when tho Levy
' fCourt departs from the business before
it and attempts to prostitute its powers,
Under tho/'six beats five" rule, to un
lawful partisan ends, that the restrain
ing order steps in and says: "You must
■not do thisj^ntil you show to tho satis
faction Sis court that you can find
war«jftblv eonw for so doing." That is
^acittMnC° urt has claimed the
dent in tieb outside of the public
und Statêafs understood by all its
taxable ftnd tQ U3Urp ^ f or p arty
and not business ends, power never be
fore exercised by any Levy Court of
New Castle county and not believed by
a very large portion of the tax-payors
f to be warranted by any legitimate con
struction of the letter and spirit of the
law. The State judiciary being invoked
to prevent this threatened usurpation
says, through Chancellor Saulsbury:
: 4 'You shalfl not do this until you have
established tho legal warrant therefor."
> If the Republican machine succeeds in
t establishing this legal warrant, all law
' abiding citizens will submit of course.
But in ihc meantime all that has
hitherto been held
business may go
though 110 restraining order had ever
been heaifd of.
legitimate public
just as freely
Tho
ojcctcd electric railway be
tween St\ Louis and Chicago—wo put
ßt. Louis first because the project orig
inated it# that city—is to be an under
taking |')f colosBal possibilities. The
road is t)o be practically a straight line,
•in tho neighborhood of 250 miles long,
and through trains
the two cities at a speed of 100 miles
'hour. The lino will be divided into
to run between
•blocks of ton miles each and will avoid
grade crossings
The po|wer will bo generated at a sta
tion lofcated in n coal district along the
route; tho proposition being to use the
refuse of the coal as fuel and to sell the
far
practicable
'marketable product of the mines; the
.milling itself to bo conducted by elcc
'tric power. A fine boulevard is to ex
tend o ja each side, the whole length of
the road, and quarter-acre lots fronting
tb*i same are to bo sold for suburban
Tcsidejnccs. This idea, if carried out
its entirety, will obviously in time build
np a railroad town 250 miles long, coll
iding tho two cities. Residents along
$he lime will be supplied with electricity
in quantities to suit, for illuminating,
beating, cooking and manufacturing
sAind farmers for 0110 mile <*r
each Vide of the line will bo furnished
with the same facilities. The projectors
appear to be in earnest unci talk of having
,the line in operation
World's Fair. For the benefit of resi
dents along tho Mine accommodation
ruther cars, will bo
extra tracks, ut frequent intervals.
time for the
», on
Amid conflicting rumors
is to what
be done to provent
«ht
may
the Reading Railroad Company from
becoming the biggest thing
the United
wheels in
of interest to
tes, it i
dladelphla papers getter
deal and do not wish
that tiie
pot
ally approve
to see it disturbed
either governor ut judiciary. Tli
Inquirer. Rep., «ays
"the success of the consolidation is as*
interfered with by
the
Thursday that
pu red"; that "the report that the admin
istration would interfere in the matter
is, at least, premature, and there is no
>n to believe that it will," and that
aiversally approves *>f the
molidation," because it
other great trunk to Philadel
to benefit
Even if tho courts should be
lied upon and should adjudge the
void, tho Inquirer says, "a general
greement to policy U not (void), and
his will prevail."
"the public
Itnading c
brings
phla "and will do all it
the city.'
x Sa*
Ifneqnn! Lavri.
An Associated Press dispatch from
Portland, Me., says:
Tha arrangements for inspecting the
maple-sugar work in the district compris
ing Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont,
made necessary in order to pay the bounty
provided by the McKinley bill, have been
completed. Montpelier has been selected
as tl»o government headquarters. It is
estimated that the maple-sugar bounty
will take $1,500.000. Only a few licenses
have been taken out by Maino sugar
makers, because it pays Maine men better
to make the syrun than it would to make
sugar even with the government bounty.
The farmers of Delaware may reason
ably ask why a bounty of 33 per cent
should bo paid to tho growers of maplo
sugar in Maine and Vermont, when not
out of ten of the growers of corn
and wheat in this State, by their own
declaration, makes ftvo per cent net
profit over and above tho cost of pro
duction.
off
an
in
But their wonder will not be lessened
when it appears—as per the above dis
patch—that even a greater profit than
33 per cent is found in making maple
sugar syrup.
So that it would seem McKinleylsm
follows the scriptural injunction "to.him
that hath much Bhall be given," while
from tho Delaware consumer ''shall be
taken away even that which he hath."
Is it strange that farmers should be
poor, with protective tax laws and
bounties draining their pockets day and
night?
f
a
Whilo agreeing with much of what
tho retiring department commander of
Delaware, Colonel A. J. Woodman, said
his generally admirable speech to tho
Grand Army posts, Thursday, Tiie
Gazette does not concede the sound
ness of the logic embodied in the follow
ing paragraph from the report printed in
its columns to-day :
In regard to pensions, he said: "The
■" nt who offered their lives a willing_
fice upon the altar of their country have
not yet been too liberally dealt w ith by t he
national government, in fact they have
not yet received in all even what is their
. The aggregate loss to the soldiers
who suppressed tiie rebellion, in tho pur
chasing power of the money in which
they were paid, was $507,636,063. Add to
tins mtercst to date and you have near)v
$.*.000,000,000, more inonev than c
paid in pensions in 100 years at the present
. Pay the soldier what is «lue him,
and what, by right lie ought to have_
then, and not before, may Congress repeal
its pension laws."
:
The answer to this, it seems to us, is
that the soldier received his pay i
cisely the currency ho contracted to
take, which was the same currency that
every other man, woman aud child who
aided in conducting the war to a
cessful termination had to take and be
satisfied with. Tho war was not con
ducted solely by tho men in tho field.
The workmen in tho du Pont powder
mills, in the Bridgeport gun factories,
on tho monitors built at our ship-yards,
the women aud girls who made knap
sacks and haversacks, the farmers who
raised the grain on which tho troops
were fed and tho horses on which the
cavalry rode, the mechanics who built
the ambulances and supply wagons, tho
employes in the factories where cloth
ing, tents, shoes, blankets and
dred other articles of camp and march
ing equipage wore made—all these
tributed to the success of our troops i
tho field, and all were paid in the
depreciated currency. If the men who
fought are entitled to be reimbursed for
in tho purchasing power of the
money iu which they were paid, then
surely the
who furnished the supplies and tho
armament, without w
could have been done,
the same consideration. The soldiers i
the field wero not tho only
saved tho
Dre
is
of
in
BUC
hun
con
hr
■a, women and children
.'hich no fighting
entitled to
s who
:ountry, and, besides, they
did not save it for others alone, but also
for themselves and for their children
and their children's children.
Lawyer Bradford
looks back a fei
st reflect,
, that it w
tremely fortunate Legislator Bradford
did not carry his point when, in 1881, he
opposed tho amendment which interpo
lated tho word "legally," upon the
atruction of which this
he
:■
be
'hole Levy
Court contention hinges. In 1881 ho
voted against the very amendment
erting all his ability
and ingenuity to eulogize and amplify.
His argument Tuesday wi
creditable
• hich lie is no
a very
!. Any member of the bur
well satisfied to have
material as well and
Mr. Bradford did.
sta
the
the
the
might have bo
handled tho san
as entertainingly
In paying this merited tributo to Mr.
Bradford's argument
must record <
a whole, we
impression, liow
that he went a little nut of his way in
ascribing to "the newspapers
have had
the
ex
of
resi
■'li ich
much to do with trying
answer which
n from Mr. Lore in the
d which, quoted i
eases lately," part of
ho hud draw
morning,
entirety,would have been much stronger
than in the incomplete shape in which
Mr. Bradford, doubtless us
its
lapsus
memorirc, criticised it as his recollection
of "s
•tiling said by tho newspapers."
But if Legislator Bradford had had his
way in 1881, Lawyer Bradford would
A have bee
court at all.
A 1 . 1 / n r.
SpsetalCorroftpc
zetto and Journal
An interesting
rî Saturday after
laymont (iunning
irul.b'B Corner «*lul». Tim
the field of Levy
iruhh's
the
l-'eh.
shootii
took pi
the Cl
cont»
I .1*
111)
!
on
Murtmun h
or. Tl»e.it
N. Gmbh, ne
us u bad one, b
h
pleasantly exoitmg, the ('lay
inning the match by the ful
mont el ub
lowing score ;
from
Wifi ia
William Cloud
William Knigli
G. Ve
.11 out of 15
in
to
V.
wish
! '
Williams. Bird
11
If
Jesse 11...
George M
Theodore Willi
>p
as*
M
15
by
ID
15
the
>ut of 105
that
I.NEK CLUB.
Taylor Pierce..
s Bird. J
William Pierce
Al. Vance.
W. Sillc.toe.
« out of 15
no
that
the
it
be
the
and
Tli
y,
J
i *
15
II
Ne
ty.
:
15
Al. H
n
15
Total...
Another contest wifi tuke place between
these elubs ou Saturday afternoon next ut
Cluyraont.
Misa Elia Moore of Wilmington died at
Moores Station. Sunday afternoun, of
pneumonia. Mis« Moure was u sister t<
Mrs. J. Horace Rudolph, und a daughter
of William Moore of C'lav mont, who is al
most Brustr^ted WUtrfirief at the sad event.
.f 105
SHOT INTO THE CROWD.
Serious Accident
u Mo...ting Match In
Newark Friday.
Special Correspondence Uiizocto and Jounr
Newark, Fel>. 23.—An accident that
came very near being a fatality of rather
large proportions happened here yesterdav
afternoon about 3 o'clock when a gun in
_ , rs. colored, went
off and sent its fall load of shot right into
the crowd of spectators who were watch
ing a shooting match, tho result being I he
Injury of four men—two of whom are seri
ously hurt and will each lose the sight of
an eye. Tho injured 1
: Joseph Jacobs, literally pep
pered with shot in the breast and face and
sight destroyed; will
unless c
fclie hands of Charles P
and their in
Juries
probably
plications
, colored, shot in
•orge Bat
face und the sight of
an eye destroyed. George Mcssiincr. shot
in face. Charles McCarthy, slightly in
I.
Sometime ago some colored men. headed
by Isaac Smith, purchased a day pigeon
•hooting trap, by which targets
jectod into the id
pro
Yes terday being a
owd of white and cuiorcd
1 a lot
>liday quite a (
on gathered t
New London
avenue to witness a shooting contest.
There had been
shooting from the
f un—a double-barrel breech-loader— when
•eters stepped up to tuke a shot. He had
taken one and wus just about to shout
again when his attention was arrested by
remark and the gun
senmsly pointed toi
Standers, a dozen ot
At that instant it.
and emptied its charge i
which w
rani tho crowd of by
more in number.
lentull
off
•d,
ot 30 feet away. Ktrange as it
y seem, only four men, as fur as 1
learned, were hurt. When the exe
found that
Jacobs aud Batson were bleeding pro
fusely aud were much hurt. They were
all taken at onCo to Die physician's and
dsjdrussed. Jacobs, who
about 40 years of uge at
\ employe of Curtis «fc Brother's mill,
as found to have at least 60 grains of
shot deeply imbedded in his face and
head. One eye was destroyed aud lie was
suffering much from the shock, although
Dr. Koliock thinks he will recover. Batson
is a young colored niuii employed by Alfred
A. Curtis and is injured only as to Ids eye.
The others are only slightly hurt aud will
about. The whole affair
purely accidental, although it is said
around town that Peters was always im
less careless with firearms.
la
ment had subsided it w
had their
a married
ACCIDENT
OLA snow.
El
n, Feb. 22.
19, son of Levi Hug.
ware, about three miles from Elkton. w
seriously ami perhaps fatally injured .
Saturday by tiie accidental discharge of a
mm. Thu Glasgow and Kirkwood Gun
Clubs were shooting a match a»
when a gun in the hands of
members was accidentally discharged.
Huggins was standing u short distance
ay. keeping tho score. The contents of
** ^»m struck him in the left sidu,slmtter
left arm and penetrating
lung and stomach. A physician a
, ' >'ho dressed the wounds. He
thinks they will prove fatal.
*rgc Huggins,aged
it Glasgow, Delu
live pigeons
.* Of till!
:
til
is
to
D ELA I Y A li E VI TV.
Special Correepoi*lonoo of « >u
oand Journal
Delawahb City, Feb. 19.—U. li. Win
gate, station agent at this plate, was
ried to Miss Bertie, daughter of T. T. Vail
of Delaware City, on Wednesday morning
9 a. in., by the Rev. 8. N. Pilchard of
Laurel, Del., former pastor of the M. IS.
church here. There were no bridesmaids
groomsmen. Maude Wingate, a niece,
aid of honor, fne wedding
ras played by Miss Nellie Vail,
the bride. The bride was attired
handsome fawn-colored t
dress. After partaking of a w<
breakfast tiie happy couplu left o
10.28 a. in. train for Baltimore ami Wash
ington. where they purpose spending a
few days. Among the invited guests n
■re Mr. and Mrs. W. Vail, Mrs. Cum
mins of Wilmington. Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Phillips, William Wingate, hr.. J. Hussey
Dilworth und Mrs. Charles Wingate.
I h*
iece «»£
redding
ly
Delaware City, Feb. 20.—The funeral
of Clarence H. K
. took pince yesterday
the house
aid
nng.
by the Rev. Henry L. C. Bruddo
of Delaware City, at !» 11. m. Only relatives
and a few intimate friends were
Tho body was then taken to Porter's Sta
tion, and there placed on the train for
Philadelphia. Only immediate relutiv
anil the ofiiciatvn
the renin
at Broad
l'
accotup
: 1 « -
ival ofthetrai
, the body wa3 pi
in a hearse, and taken to Woodland «
tery. where the interment took plat
the family lot.
George Rupp of Newark has beer
pointed BeiMioU b<
City and 1'orter's.
:et stall.
d
to
in
ap
betw
Delaware
■«•eed George 1).
a takes effect
gnat*«
V
H. C. ('lark u
nth his fishing i
ho has felt c
.'I I.
so fully occupied
»•rests tins spring, that
pel led to resign ins po.MMon
of tiie Philadelphia ,fc
of local agent here
oaiem Navigation Goiup
Wingate will probably
hurles S.
he
he
occ.ed him.
Delaw»
•d rep
sentative deleg
child Bran
*u D
t Church
Junior Auxiliary
.•h
he
al
of the Di.
Bi
auch in Wilmingtm
present from here,
ver«; Mrs. N. «i. i
Sat
Tho
h
sides the
Miss A
Olive, Emma Jon«
lap, and -May and Margaret 1
ho
• E. Hunt
I Mi,
Il
crengam.
Dklaw
The people
intelleetiml
of Delaw
given
11 mg at the A
when the Rev. Dr. Baum gi
qn tiie "History of the Christian < luire!),"
illustrating it by nearly imm ri«;hly-« olor
stereoptiion views, embracing nearly all
the old English eat tied rals and churches of
note. (living, as lie did, I
it entailed upon bi
of condensing th
bur
1 lily Hall,
liis lecture
ed
it one Jeetu
y «liliiciilt
we
lect
Consequently,
in
il
ity. "mit
i* small, ti
The
ich
the
ot
at tract ir
hut th
'rapt J
sh
.v hi hi
<1 h
t ha
. The lee
P
r spoke f.
•oiil.l huv
hi
■t
•Rich fur
shed the ill
, bee
nututg po
expended.
its
1 for that ti
n hud chiirg«
w. Ï;
f Dies
Delawa
24.—Kaufman
ight; o
liladelphiu,
ently.
Mank
d family left last
!*•,.
the
for
1*1
his
»her
hey wifi
Del
los."
HHi l.itSi
de'
of t!
large family
Mr. Mank*'
-, h.
lit up
well,
the clothing bti.si
! '.,h
I i
»s during liis
leuee
here.
other
use «>f diphtheria is rep
"Iarone«
teil
Tim
youngest chil
of tim late Joseph Me
lohn Keane's three children
«• p
•ablv
k;:
ing of tho oy
by the ladies of Um M.' ii. Ghureï»
great siiecess financially, tho m i pro
R1
h
.
ful
The pupils of the public school are
sing nightly for thei
to be given «. " ' '
benefit of the publies
lowing plays wifi be 1
Tell."^ "The ^Investi
hi
it
1
ening for
.1 f
<1. The fob
15
ted: "William
V.
'ting
"A
b
If
erspersed be
the
Win
might I
f.'harlcs Bright of Salet
aloft on
fell a dis
An effort
15
pen a fatal
«ident
!«1 o
Fo
15
N. J
i.«
51 high scapolding. idippi-d :
105
I.
I«!
if his C
which
right's
15
hi
fall,
y, I partially sue.
J i «truck the oth
ful. I>
:
ail in U10 eh
15
painful injuries,
»sly l»uri but
««»mil : The R<
v 110 f.
Botl
15
IV
Dr. B.
♦ h«. pa
1 G.
15
W. pro»
have bee
hinter has n
;
M
left
\\
f«*;
ut
at
of
t<
al
105
1. Fa-Mi;
.■d It«*
Wil
ngton—Joseph Emiie«
Fhiladciphia this morning.
A car load 3i) tons of broken stone
:u« shipped frmn the jail to Iievy flonrt
»an .lolls, Tuesday, for tho iraprt.v«!
«•f'the roads in tha vicinity oi Alt.
Y
y JEW CASTLE.
Ni'or«ial CorrnepoiM.ui.m
unzette und Journal
Castle, Kelt. 13.—A rngsowing and
y wus given ut tho rcsidem«;
Jr«. John B. Manlovc, last
verv onjoyuble
, ...jo. Tho young
n pel led to thread
while the
Ne
>f Mr. und M
T e
sing o
present w
their needles and
of tho fair sex used ham tiers and nails.
Mrs. Lizzie Hoffman won tho prize, a
hatchet, for driving tho straightcat nail,
while Joseph H. Atkinson did the best
d was uwarded a hem-stitched
sewing
handkerchief.
The British steamship Intrepid, Captain
Hodge, which passed up from a South
American port yesterday, met with a ter
rific tidul wave on her voyage, which
ept the decks and nearly caused tho Joss
of the ship and crew. The captain
that when the gulf stre:
cyclone struck the stc:
:
Î
died a
soutii
;t Rally
•r from tin
.1 for three days she was vi
hove to, with to
?r pouring o
her deck. O11 the 13th another huge
veloped the steamer, smashing one of
the bouts, carrying uwav bulwarks an
of the (trek fittings, Walter Brown,
seamun, had bis leg bro
William W. Simpson of this city,
telegrapher, has in his poetess»«
nul Morse telegraph key, wbidi he prizes
very highly.
old
origi
Ne\
Castle, Feb. 19.—The missionary
meeting held at »he M. E. Church.
a very interesting as well
xessful affair. The Rev. T. E.
Murtinduie introduced tho Rev. W. I*.
Schwartz of Central Presbyterian Church.
Wiimingtou, who spoke interestingly of
the missionary cause for nearly un h
He related his own personal exponent
a missionary to India and gave many ind
icted with his work there! The
Rev. L. E. Barrett of St. Paul's M. E.
Church, Wilmington, was the next speaker
ami ho delivered an able address. He
urged upon bis bearers the necessity of
giving liberally toward the advancement
of Christianity among the heathen nations
of the world, who now and have been for
years, he Haiti, crying for aid. Mr. Martin
dale made a brief out pointed address,
after which a collection was taken. The
choir rendered îuuuy fine selections during
A seven-vt
last night.
t
.rs-old girl fell through the
's ponu yesterday and nar
rowly escaped drowning.
Ellen, tno three-vears-o
Jacob Vundogrift, died \
I : -I
Id »laughter of
>rday.
k, Fob. 22.—The Republicans
e will hold u public
Saturday night to nominate u fu
to be voted for at the municipal
April 1 ül 11. li, F. Blackburn is
a candidate for the mayoralty nomination
•ntioned last week,
i of Edward Dal by is spokcu of
tiie candidate for assessor.
citizen,
of New t'astl
ickol
in addition to those
The
Joseph li. I'ctinill, a well-kn»
rday morning
et. after a brief illness
monta, lu his 49th year. He hud'been
confined to his bed only about u week, and
lie was thought to be improving up to
lute Saturday night, but early the follow
(liienlv
l. i I:
pno
ing his
conditio
changed for tho worse, and lie expired
few hours afterward. Tho deceased
•herefrom Philadelphia about four
ago. He was a brother-in-law of J.
Ji
dson of tiie Riv
*H 1
id»' Ire
ritli
i'hich he was einpioyed as
ater. He w
eral children. The remains will be token
Philadelphia fur interment in Mount
Moriah
with sev
«
ill
received two
carload
»f broke
one from the jail last
hich will he used in improving the
lity «»f Townsend,
rived fur tho jail via the
li
is in the v
W. «fc N. Railroad.
Ti.K, Feb. 23.—Now Castle <tid
ontrihute much ttuur «»rpn
: -'s starving millions but she did bu
for
R
thani her shore of red lire and pow
wishing tlio steamship Indiana Gud
■rey. The
ival here
d(
1 on her e
! *.f
sp
I
of the Indium
d from 5
clock in thcafternoi
tb
: front was black with people who
dy to tcmler tho vi'ssel
when she put i
were Hying all along tiie'
tels und small cruft.
*«• displayed a be
vhioli translated me-...,
li you a safe voyage." Tho
s surmounted by the
x o'clock «
it appeared. Everybody
aid of
appearance. Flags
frofu tho
The
HtS Of V
Maritime K
in
fill
le of Hags,
■ VV
id
and stripes,
the Intiiana hud
to feel
being disappointed in seeing h«
î passing Thurlow
:
he was
reported us
'
1
h thought that she had either
:horud
niTwitii
Deep Water Pni
for the night,
!
they gave up tho idea
' liis time it was quite dark, und ull the
Hags wero taken in. But. suddenly, the
f seeing her. Bv
waiting tl
Delaware
; saw the whole of the iipj
pletoly lit up,
rigiit away thut
the Imli
not far away. She
owing to her gre:
mmuliis la
this
-s running veryslowl
draught, hut
she
whistles
57 of the I
opp.
T
if a tugboat
'y
I
N
VV. & B. rail
1
fir«xi and red fire
Tiie Indiana 1
blasts
night
line, wiifell
throwing six
d fireworks displayed,
sworod with three distinct
f her whistle
«nuis of the A
ed light, a roiu
•d hulls, full
d light fro
fill o
ull wh
look when she 1
and u half-hour lat
■uilllll!
•cd by
sigli
«1
ill he long
sed it. It
issed here
ih
.
she
tl
:
:
Atlantic. She p
ire midnight and
d
e Break
on her w
Ru?
Feb. 21.—The hoard of
nthly
inittee on
la
iglit. Tho «:.
die
from l'rof.
eke
filer for intro.

«•mg
h« .schools. The
r, alte
di
indefinite!
I'0St 1
1 I
I t
fo
the quarter's sal
i janitors. Bills
VV bite, $2 for printing, and is
$•* for replacing the ting staff
N«. L we're allowed. The !&
'o the proper not
re«* »numb
«lay. March 5th, printed und |
.r the
mihc.
.f .1
1 R
school
,
•«1 to 1
for th«
•1«
of th
d.
qi-et
I .loin, Will
uit for the el
1. if tl
'
•d tl
Jama
distant ids.
M
1 .«
icleetcd
; *
i 0
Principal J
wed the t.
.
pu,l.
sin
dal :
lie 4
iunee,^ 110; ^ :
average a
s, 10
1.0
• I'll. I: mi
*P
1. IU
Tl
P
'ing of s|
da
u for
«h
I.
death of Mrs. Rei
Jay,
The
I greatly
derson
to the
Wolf.
hock
nitv.
ki
She hail
Iv
i, l.i
I he shoe!
il.l.'i
.
»PP
k
o »
ye»«'.
bat she died a!
h.
•iii'iw
•f Du
•1 I
Wolf.
ull k
er «.f
■1 fi.
•lurk forthu
his
I the
oth«
f Dt
Wolfe. .1
f*.r
erjyshippi
Debt wan*
«»rks.
her living reluti
-h
1
d
lu
.••h
pi red. II
Ih
utli grief. The funeral wifi take pla
schooner Mary lluhl
f ibis fit
ly wrocL
. while «
al vent on.
Mrs. Tru
und yesterday t*.
ill probably leave s
1 :
«1. of which
J. Winfield T
has been tol
gulf«.! M«'.\i
New York to
»lived, although
.tl
all
u-.:
1:
i D
fr.
Ml I
fH-i
ith great
litti
I a tele
from hcrhuHb
■fl«
!., ■
une Itère.
Another W. «V N.
en un fortunate I;
ilroad shifter 1ms
It jumped tiie
'urd <»f tb«! Dcla
truck
tl
works, on Monday, and
»named off until u force of men from Wil
mington arriv«*d yesterday afternoon to
plnec* it on the rails again. '
„William B. Deakynebas purcbaaed'from
William Herbert tlto brick residence <
Union street, neartioutfr,now occupied by
Edward H. Naylor.
I
MILFORD.
Special Correspondent«» of <iaze
, Feb. 17-—The
Presbyterian church
tables la;
ttemied. The programnto «
.•lulled amusing
i of the
! the fourth of a
Mil
be
series of si
fairly well
interesting
entertaining readings by M
lund ami Katie H
's LizzieVree
s. Miss A
ie Key
ilds also oavo two vocal solos which we
well
The
new hose was tested
cwly-orgtumcd fire .
was turned on the (
which is about the highest
town, being fo
stream was throw
building, with a press
The test was very satisfactory.
terday by
patty. A
ntral Hotel,
building in
stories in heighth. The
about .*!0 fee
of only 70pounds.
the
the
in
at
MiLFoiti», Feb. 10.—James Jones, a
farmer living near town
Î ured yesterday by being
11 engine, which passed diagonally
his body from the left shoulder to
the right hip. Dr. G. W. Marshall whs
summoned and relieved the sufferer. He
:d internally and the full exte
of his injuries is not yet known, though
internal hemorrhage was produced.
Mr. Jones was driving the traction engine
when the horses attached became fright
ened ami throw tho unfortunate
it to the ground, the machine pass
ing over his body. His inj
thought to bn futul.
Yesterday Nchemiah Scott,
highly
, wus seriously in
b ;
wus inj
K
aged and
, living in
Milford Nock, died very suddenly. Deputy
Coroner Hill went down to investigate the
case and if neccssury will hold an inquest.
Milkoim», Feb. 22.—An entertainment
ven in Reedy's Hall Friday evening
l»y local talent for the benefit of the Mil
ford Li bn
largely
rary Association,
ended, and pro
a financial si
hich was
i to be a social
•ss. The p
gramme included a vocal solo, by Hinieon
VOOal duet, by Mi-.s Bessie
Bhurp; recitation, by
Miss Minnie Sipple; solo, by Miss Mattie
Pretty man; duet, by Misses Sharp and
Davis; vocal solo, by Miss Annie Reynolds;
solo, Charles Hoizmuellcr; recitation,
Donald Marshall; p
Barker and Katie Hi
Sharp
accompaniment. After
t lie programme refresh
by the ladies, and the young folks indulged
in a social dance for a few hours. Music
was furnished by the Milford
with fr "
Tiie big 'li
Be
•will;
Davis and Alias 1
iltllO tllll't, Mihs
Ida
duel, M
will, with guitar
he conclusion of
jrved
1\
in
chcatra,
' i
killed at Felton 1
day was brought hero yesterday by I
uolds Cook und ira Melvi
it from Joshua Roughlc
sser, for $48,. 1
hero
rhô purchu
I !
If
xhibil
It is
d e
rda of ) __
isited it und pronounce it tiie largest ever
A very pretty homo wedding was solemn
ized at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Wilson.at Houston, las
W. Ingram was unit*
lock to Miss Bessie Marvel, sis
Wilson, by the Rev. W. B. Guthrie, pa
in charge of the Houston circuit. Tim
ceremony was
nessed by only the immediate family
of tho contracting parties. The bridal
couple-were attended by Miss Hello Tallov
and Mr. George Mell»
igbt.wh
«ïli
I i
■»•d
of
of M
T
of
it
as maid of honoi
•ly. They left «.t
dug for Wilming
York and Wash
Philadelphia. Ni
ill
spent. Upon their ret
iu Houston.
they will
id'
. Feb. 23.—The 31st
anniversary «if tiie Presbyterian Hunday
suhool was held last evening in the main
<»f the church. Tho churcli
dedtothe doors by the memliers
the school and their friends. Tbopro
After th»! conclusion «»f
«• the immibers of tiie school
the Bunday-school room bo
A full dress Imp w
Madeline White at t he h
nal
auditor!
gramme rcMidered
interesting
the progn
as.>inhled
rus held.
by Miss
f Mrs. E. M.
1
Thaw, in honor «if her friend and guest,
Wesson of Contrevilii
• present included th
Miss
Tho
hist «welling,
elite of th.!
y enjoyable time
kept up until quite late,
morning Annie, the wife of
Willey left him. Who
orning she was
of the ordinary but
e ut noon she had
Tol
he loft for
his work in the
1
cl did lint :
when he returned h
packed all her things and left for Pennsyl
* g disposed of all the
lie could, she took their
with them. Mr. Willey
s»e for hif
i.l said thei
» i>"i>i>y
hi
hold good
<*ld Hf
could give
always i>ce
been umrriml 2!
drei», lie left >
married life has
ion. They have
iay ufte
purpose of bringing back"tho
e livochil
child.
DOVER.
# Tho» OUrn * 1
. l ei
.U—Willis
i of assault i
.
tie c«
•urt, lias be
*f that p
reprieved h
hi
>f tl
•quiriug hii
hs. Up«
<> i.e
imp
•d fo
»1 Ih
of
:
•1
it he
ill lie liberated
who has been <•«
• H
hit
II:.
b
ry (
for the 1
«I
I!
as
Willi
-•leeted di
md Andre
•d him.
V.
Buti-iiu
Alfred VV. La
Riggs, both of 1
ik and
rgianu
mcci plier.
v. J. F
' h " m< i'rduy
lie 4.19 train, 1
reddi

igureeep
as held in the n
'.•
The next meeting of tiie F
tute will beheld at Kelt..
ors Insti
Wotlnesday,
o'clock, p. in. K. II. Ban
ts the inst.
M
h 2.1, ut
croft will add
Make Fi
ml G. G , Bro
al Roads."
; und
it .
««I ho
od Re
rgc V.
e|.
liority, that H
urged for tin
the 8up
h of Justiei

•me Bench,
Bradley.
se«l by the «I
Bishop A
coining ses
VVilnii
the
lied :
able
the M. E. Cl.
to u larae
.1 ein
1>
«l'ii
«•li lier«!
di
.
ten
iu! life..f
which lie
held the «•ungrega
lienee
His th
al
al
dealt with the sub.j
fo
In tl
he
i.lr
1 tiie Sunday-school
ik. it
ry day
Th
t Miss A
, !
iarg
omit, Ç.7).
In Hie
D. D.
h* i
J. li. ( aidwell.
lu-d
r hi
«■nee. Presiding Elder
ill preach next Sunday.
J. A. B.
Wils«
I'Vb. 23.—Bishop Andrew
ary heuring
lav

P.r«!li
iiues;
both
. tho
di
purpose of g
Aurdncss
«.f il
J
.f P
iding Elder Wilson
i'irst M. K.Church,
»!>
i.
.1,
hu 1
Ii
f K»
it .'m h
hishot
Hie
follow in
•bundle,*.
Felton. Willow
-.1 :
D.
St . J
himself, Im». IU<t
out the hearing,
!.«. The bisi
voul.l
liroiigh
i ;
«»ally asking que«
.VI« -ek lie wo
At
to til
Elder Wilst
of Mr. Wils.
It
a lurge
rVnds had a«
100. Tim foi -
delegu
j officially
•P
I.
Little ( '
1. Mills!
I i
« 'I
1», Mil
ugh. Ell
dull
Milt
I
icai
•lit. II
1 i
bridge, Beckwith,

ii
•r.-ek, Taylor'
t, lluriock's,
burg, Fudcrulsburg, Wil list,
«ville. Reso
Island, Vi
I).
li:
, Denton
«1 Burr!
»titer el
lies
Dr. Wilson. The h
ul
ongly end
ring wus strictly
one but thus
, irned being
the room. The friends of Dr.
• very jubilant and feel confident
thut they have exonerated bau
«dialled made u^atuet, him.
afin wed i
Wils
ull the
LEWES
and Journal
tho sailors
cine of at the
* peculiar charac
ters. A lew weeks ago the schooner
.Samuel Morgan put into the Breakwater
and landed two men, who were disabled
while oil' Barnegat in a gale of wind from
»rth-west. One of them wus badly
d the other, Joseph Me
12 years old, was injured in
the deck. Me
Spectnl Correspond once of
Lewes, Feb. 20.—A
landed here and take
the
frost-bitten
Gregor, a 11
the shoulder by
Gregor is a
full
fc of Scotland, having left
•lien he was stvon years old, and
red tho sea the greater part of
the
hus foil
He was in California i
1841
his life.
1850 and amassed considerable wealth at
leml it in a short
the
liggings," buts* 1
>lis liome bus bee
principully i
the .south, and he had so
in Alabama or Arkansus
(bellion he
and was severely
but came out of i
was present and on duty
at Appuinuttox, and sa.v
exchange hi* musket (or u biscuit, lie is
very reticent ami it is impossible to induce
him to give detailed ex pc
vice in the Confederate 1
shoes or stockings
property
ie time. Dttr
Lee's army
several times.
H stalwart. He
the surrender
ingth
red i
ouuded
•a he wus glad
:es of his :
army. He we
d doe
: cold weather, llis ship
11 good sailor and able to
duties on ship
11 is appearance indicutes physical
Rs and his actions uro more like a
one of 72 years. He is
and will be reudy to try tho
iiui
perfo
the
Huiindn
^if 30 Ilian
There is
dred, a few
county,
living in Indian River him
Mills boro, this
aged couple, Nathaniel Car
d his wife, Mima. Natty, os he is
('tilled, is about 85 years old,
bo 1«) years of age. Hho bases
the îoilowiijg recollée"
il es
d his wife
«•I.1
her ciui
She re
f 1812, and was
the time, and also a
ind in September. 1816, and
of age. At
ntorview had with her >1 few months
lier mind seemed to be bright and
i from other incidents i
rsation impressed the person who Us
her with the 1 ruth of I
The interview
>1 from a thorough examination iff «1III
•iul records regarding the purchase of laud
interest verified the
Mil hers tiie w:
about 30 vears old
treat gale of
1
claim.
transaction
in which siie bad :
fact of her being 105 or nu
.sin-is of mixed Indian and negro blood,
d some of lier remote ancestors were of
lie tribe of Indians who originally owned
d fished and hunted on the land she
t'armean's second wife
children have resulted therefrom,
probably
iccupies. She i
Mi
fr«
lier
■ 1;
! •
ways
led u retired and peaceful life. Nat In
de u livelihood by catching
llah and "progging." It is reported they
uro both in feeble health at this time.
:
it
:wr.s, Feb. 24.—Tho appointment of
heritT Eli R. sharp as deputy collector
«toms for this place is not altogether
satisfactory to tho
L
of
1 !.
Mr. Sharp_perse
ally, no .
comj
a fight against Lewes
hut. so
and Rrlioboth hundred and claim Dial the
place should be tilled by hi
T here were four applicants hero cither
of whom would Jmvo filled the ollici
it ably.
•die \V. T
Milled the
feel it
innell anil E. J. Morris at
•cting of Cape Ilunlopen City
•rs, held in Wil ' '
«lay. The P.. W. A B. railroad are
considering the feasibility of puttingo
ira fast train during the coining season
d affording other facilities to ace»
dato the visitors
Hcnlopu
Burton
The Bright H
Graham of Do
A spöcii
held Mon .
ing the street lamps w
n P«
.this resort. The Hotel
nil bo managed by Walter
will be used.
• will lie kept by Mr.
d electric lights
, the present «
iul
• of the town board w
bids /Of light
..
opened. Ben ja
in Derricks
rorded tho contruc
for $9 per Inmn, to bo lighted at sunset
extinguished at 12 o'clock, on all dark
March 1st 1:
i
JXt.
1 Dr!' William !>'. \\\ Hall, son of Dr.
David Hall, hero, lias purchased tho drug
d good will of the practice of the
ael Marshall, ut Sixth
Philadelphia, and will pruc
there.
of 8t. Peter's Episcopal
'ning plans and c«
a new rectory
;
ice his prof«
The vestry
1 h
ch lien* are
suiting alunit building
their lot adjuiniiiL the churcli.
The sch« mner H. W. Laws, trading fn
Milton to Philadelphia and owned by Gap
tain Elijah Register of this place, parted
her chains und tiatne ashore abo
ile above here. .Shu iiad a small cargo of
inen-handise from Philadelphia for
chautb in Milton, this o.
Tho schooner 8. G. Hurt, wrecked in tho
"gapway" sonic tiino ago, worked over the
• *cks and came ashore on Monday after
mon during a light gulu from tlie north
ast. and broke through F. G. Muull's pier,
li*
On M
the pilot 1«
i
E,
W. T ^
uell w
i'Cÿ
at. the i
sf.
the wind.
•Inch
rth-east,
blowing hard fro
lie
the (»each.
Only by tin* .skill ut the pilot i
she saved from shipwreck. Shu
> put pilots on board
coming in the capes
. C. Chambers, one
very
idle in a perilous
charge was
erai
mg o
sth
I"
tho li
. 1*1 lut It
of
her ow
s, and other*
utclied her
v
as they
position.
MIDDLETOWy.
Special Cor
1 Journal
Fell. 18.—Thu funeral of
-•curred lier«!,
one of the largest funerals e»
immunity. Presiding Elder
Sated by tho 1
Mrs. Iu
! Rohe
Hi,
. N. M. Browne,
du
i. Interment wui
Miietety.
d the serv
lade
he Met it od is
The f
till!
Lake street, al
3nil of Mrs. A
Dickinson,
fro
•sideme of her huslu
I. <
•d here tHi
ing. tiie 1
N. M. Browne
1 tiie R
of Odessa, delivering i
H. S. Thomi.sc
: :
pr
\ li
.1 buggy belonging to F. M.
1 driven uwav bv *.—
G.VV.VV. Naudiiii
Rotiiwell w:
rr«
(Tel icc
ago.
•urd by parties
f«!\
h
.1«*
iviio hud
« in pursuit of it.
Mum
■ wx, Fel.. 2D.-A. II. Crow,
tho R. T
siding
>c
:he-t.
idcnly ut: acked by
igo while driving, and
the gri|
few da
al
. Upo
>k the combined
ival Im
e, it
strength of h
mtri.l hi
1 l.y the attending physi
rill return with his
. It is.
In
that hi
23.—Tho body of
mnuHly,
Rev. George VV. Keunedv, f.
« brought here by
own. Feb.
M: ■
•arah Matilda Iv.
the 1:
l.v «.f tl
Fore
ere held
tiie
tery. he _
Oliurcli. Mrs. Ke
Pres I iv l.
sided ' li
«•dy re
id ut Smyrna, Del.,
lie
of her life,
here both h
gr«'
self and hush
children s
, Mr«. Robe
. Wil
.•dy of
id Dr. VV. F. Kennedy
of Wilmington, Dr. Stile« Ke
Loui
Mid».,
-I Mil
Tl
»roko into the hennery of L. G.
Sunday night
lot of finely bred poultry,
«.•s and Brahtnus.
Mc I
II A Me
I
ing of Wy
:■
ml
n , Feb. 18.— Cond uctor I «eg!
yrna branch road, while,load
yesterday, fell between
dear, lacerating
Of til
ing freight iter
the pint fur
>eg
fearfully, tearing the flesh fors
irai
ill incapacitate him
fre
duty f.
reported
"Wooitown," a
iveral weeks.
so of small-pox in
•lorod settlement, ami
suburb of Clayton, gave the
inhabitants of Huit part of the
considerable scaro; but
by Dr. llarmo
\
investigation
, president of tiie
board of health, it turned out to he
basics.
\V. F. aud J. R. Clements, hardware
merchants, have bought the store adjoin
ing them, formerly occupied by VV.
Tood, which they intend to occupy
about the 1st of March, thus enlarging
their business facilities.
•rely a case of
SMYRSA.
Gazette and Journal.
Spec BlCorrospo
Sm y un k. Feb. IS.—The outpttt of the
Smy
i.aw
month
18,000 quarts
•amery the past
ds of butter fro
rx:
Tho Loyal Legion of this town will
lest for ihe lie .
declamation, the best disclaimer carrying
olT tho silver
a public
•dal.
Mrs. M. Rebecca Paries, widow of the
H. Furies, received this
of $310 fre
late Is
through O. A. TVick tho »
tho Delaware Masonic Mutual Aid Asso
dation.
Dr. GonawAY of Loipsic has a patient 1
the person or Henry Denney of the
town, who ha* been hiccoughing for live
days and night, with but two intermissio
of about lu hours each. The latest report
yesterday was that he had got relief again.
it'ana ma Her s.
rniLAOELrnu, Fob. 93d, lMi
So much has been stated in
this column of the glories ol
the rich, rare and beautiful
stock of very fine Dress Goods
that you may perhaps doubt
whether the plainer and sim
pler goods have equal care.
Dismiss that notion,
upon the cheaper stuffs and
see what 25 and 3 7 cents
will do. Neat mixes at 25c.,
36 inches; half cotton to be
sure, but, price considered,
none the worse for that, and
the big range of brown and
gray
bockers, at Zl'A c., 36 inches.
Extremes do not meet in
Dress Goods here. Wc have
both and all the intermediate
grades. Too many between
lor them to meet.
Call
Tweeds and Knicker
Fifty-ecnt J Fool Dress
Goods. A casual glance, a
moment's counting, sixty
seven styles in a single row.
Just a trifling bit of testimony
to the bigness of the great
Dress Goods stock. There
are many designs. Some are
chevrons, some have chevron
stripes, some plain stripes
that are elegant in simplicity.
Some have Angora Wool (the
Camel's Hair of traffic) mixed
with the Sheep's Wool and
that gives the softness so much
desired nowadays.
But the quantity and variety
at the moderate price would
surprise you elsewhere. I lere
the leadership at all Dress
Goods points is so natural that
you are never surprised at
anything. And your calmness
over our successes is the best
compliment you could pay us.
Just the oddest sort of a
Border idea is cropping out in
some of the richest Dress
Goods. Narrow Borders—
inch or two inches; some
times in cream, sometimes of
quarter-inch stripes. The
stuffs are two-toned and if
there are Border Stripes the;
arc always in harmony wit!
the body of the goods.
Quaintly nondescript styles in
the stuffs themselves.
The face of this one is
thickly covered with wavy
welts like giant pen
strokes in ''lines of beau
ty." A blucish, a gray
ish, a tanish, a pinkish.
Width 48 inches, $2.50.
Another is a broad Diag
onal with silk threads
glinting in and out all
over it. 48 inches, 5
shades, $2.50.
Still another is a Melange
Cheviot, 48 inches, 4
shades, £2.50.
None of them have been
long enough on the counters
to nod to their neighbors, and
right handsome and high
toned neighbors they arc, too.
One of the most striking ef
fects comes from a jumbling of
queer figure-3-shapes on a
prettily speckled melange
ground. 44 inches, 5 shades,
$'•50.
Think of a school of dol
phins' full swim through a sea
of rose water and you have a
hint of one style in another
novel stuff. Think of seas of
four tints and dolphins of four
colors and you have the varia
tions. Goods 46 inches wide,
price £3.50.
Cloaking Stuffs make a very
pretty show. Your only trou
ble will be to choose where all
are so mellow to the touch and
so pleasing to the eye.
54-inch Cheviots in small
checks, stripes and mix
tures, $1.50; tans and
grays.
54-inch Cheviots (soft
twills) checks and stripes,
$1.50; tans and grays.
54-inch Tweeds, checks and
Wmutmaftrr'f.
mixtures, $1.75; tans and
grays.
54-inch Bannockburn Chev
Diagonal, $1.75;
mixed tan and gray.
54-inch Dash-figured Chev
iot, $1.75; tan and gray.
54-inch Chevron Cheviot,
$1.50; tan.
54-inch Pin Check Tweeds,
$2; grays.
54-inch Velour, small and ■.
broken plaids and stripes,
$2; tan and light brown, i
54-inch Twilled Cloths,
checks, plaids and stripes, :
$2; tans.
54-inch Crepe Cheviot,,
£1.75; navy blue, black
and tan.
54-inch Crepe Bedford
Cheviot, $2; navy blue,
black and tan.
54-inch Meltons, $2;
tans, cardinal, navy
black and green.
54-inch Twilled Cloth,$ 1.25;
navy blue and black.
54-inch Diagonals, $2.00,
$2-50. $3. ?3'5°; black.
lOt,
I
I
Long Cape Newmarkets
and Ulsters will be the Spring
favorites. Can you imagine a
more cosy and comfortable
Wrap? Stylish, too. The
very newest have deep de
tachable capes cut exactly in
the West Point style. You'll
be surprised to see how much
of elegance and luxurious
seeming comes from the length
of cape. Not a suggestion of
skimpincss anywhere about
these Newmarkets —unless it
be in the prices.
Take this one at $12; good
quality serge in coaching
shades, Camel's-Hair finish,
detachable Cape, half lined
changeable Silk; seams
neatly bound.
At $14, better quality
throughout and the Cape is
full lined.
The Queen's Own moults
no feather of fitness or fine
ness. Still the standard of
excellence in its class. Latest
weaves, blues and tans.
with
One of the always busy
corners of the store is where
the Handcrchiefs are. They
come in quantities that make
the very lowest possible prices
certain.
Women's pure linen Hem
stitched Handkerchies, Jit.
a dozen—good quality.
Women's pure linen Hem- ■
stitched Handkerchiefs, 1
neat revere of open work
inside hem. i2)4c. each.
Women's pure linen unlaun
dered Hemstitched Hand
kerchiefs, initialed, at
12 y. c. each.
Men's pure linen Hem
stitched Handkerchiefs,
I2j/£c. each. You'll be
asked 16c. to 18c. each
for no better in other
stores.
200 dozen Women's Em
broidered Japanese Silk
landkerchiels, scallopen
edges, at 40c. each. Have
been quick value at 50
and 65c. each.
Scalloped and Embroidered
Japanese Silk Handker
chiefs, at 20c., 30c., 40c.,
50c. and 75c. each. Not
a trashy thing among
them.
I
There arc Towels and Tow
els. One that's soft and
smooth and sops the water
easily is worth two of the har^
harsh kind for most uses. You
can get here whatever proper
kind you wish.
Heavy unbleached Turkish
Bath I owels, large sizes,
22x48 inches, at 12J^c.
Heavy pure Linen "Oat
Meal" Bath Towels,
tra size, 22x45 inches, at
ex
«Sc.
Full bleach Devon Huck
Towels, full
size, heavy weight,
16c. each. Fairly worth
20c.
More of tiie famous Old
Bleach Huck Towels,
washed ready for
bleached on the grass, at
^ 25c. each; $3 a dozen.
Hxtia. heavy Irish Huck
Towels,
Chamber
at
use
26x46 inches,
31c. each. See the Towel
and you'd expect to
40c. or 45c.
pay
John Wanamakek.

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