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Delaware gazette and state journal. (Wilmington, Del.) 1883-1902, April 21, 1892, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053046/1892-04-21/ed-1/seq-4/

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GAZETTE AND JOURNAL
It
= j dato
i PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
Ar ._! Wo
•*. E. COR. FIFTH AXI> 6H1PLKY STS. tho
EYERY EVENING PRINTING COMPANY j
IIceISk YEA R m AD VANCE |
WÏLMI soTOX, TitrttsitAT, April ~ /
J by
when
down
A Free Will Offering.
That the strained relations between
the United States and the. Italian gov
ernment, growing out of tho Mafia
lynchings at New Orleans, have been
adjusted to the satisfaction of both na
tions, is matter for general congratula
tion. Unquestionably in this caso most,
if not all, of the victims deserved the
fate that was meted out to them with
the approval of the whole community
which they had sought to terrorize, and
the dose of mob justice was extenuated,
If not morally justified, by tho proved
Inability of the local authorities to cope
with the emergency. Still, there was
some reason for the Italian government
to take offence, just
should have done had a lew American
one
made
our
this
that
Tho
twine
to
deep
west
the
ating
them
In
tho
tteeu
a
it
the
and
tbo
on
to
the
the
tics
ber
is
n
re probably
assassins been thus irregularly done to
death in an Italian city, and there was
in some sense a precedent for the pay
ment of damages by this government,
a matter of obligation
gratia, in the
not
but purely
case of a former New Orleans riot
1850, in which Spain was tho
plaiuant and the Spanish consul, Scnor
Labordc, the aggrieved party. In that
case, however, tho official character of
the consul formed an ingredient of Sec
retary Webster's willingness, while dis
claiming any responsibility or obligation
under the law of nations, to recommend
that a just indemnity be paid,
purely voluntary reparation. In the
case of the Chinese victims of a mob at
Rock Springs, Wyoming, in 1884, Sec
retary Bayard, while still more explic
itly disavowing any national obligatic
to do so, suggested that "it may reason
ably bo a subject for tho benevolont
consideration of Congress whether, with
the distinct understanding that no pre
cedent is thereby created, or liability
for want of proper enforcement of
police jurisdiction in the territories" to
grant pecuniary relief to the sufferers.
Neither of these cases stood on the
same footing ns tho Mafia lynchings,
wherein the victims wero shot down
and strung up, not ns Italians—r
matter of fact some of them were
naturalized American citizens—but
public enemies whose death was de
manded in tho interest of that law and
order which, inherent in the people at
large but usually delegated to regularly
chosen agents, a considerable portion of
that community felt necessitated to take
back temporarily into their own hands
because of the long-standing failure of
their constituted agents to administer
that justice which the public safety, in
their opinion, imperatively demanded.
Still, viewed coolly and dispassionately,
tlie lynchings, though practically tho act
of the whole city, were legally unjusti
fiable and no discredit attaches to the
implied admission of this embodied in
tho expressed willingness of this
government to render such reasonable
reparation therefor a3 it has shown a
disposition to insist shall be allowed by
Chili in the event of a similar moral re
sponsibility being shown to have at
tached to the injuries inflicted upon
• American sailors in Valparaiso.
It is prudent i
to go very slow
impossibility or improbability of any
thing. Only a few days ago a scientific
journal of authority demonstrated that
aluminum could never be counted upon
to compete with brass
alone i
this progressive age
predictions of tlie
a
• copper, let
, in the fabrication of utensils
of every-day, since it was apparent that
its minimum cost of production coukl
not bo gotten below about 50 cents a
pound and that, except for a few
special and limited uses, would be a pro
hibitory price. Now comes the news of
the i
rporation,
Colorado, of tho American Aluminum
Company, with a capital of
to exploit a
aluminum, the discoverer of which, Ed- i
ward C. Broad well,tells the Philadelphia
Ledger," at close pushing we can soil the
metal at a profit for 15 cents a pound."
The new corporation does
is wo gather from tho Ledger article,
contemplate cutting prices down to this
figure, but only "to put aluminum
the market cheaper than copper" c
sidering tho rclati
metals.
1er the Jaws of
000,000,
: method of producing
j
- j
-t, however,
'eight of the two j
Being 34 times lighter tlia
copper, aluminum at 35 cents per p<
will compete with copper i
The new process is described by the
s based
10 co
a combination of
chemical and electrical methods, unde r
which he claims to be able t<
ventor
pound of commercially pure aluminum
with ;
expenditure cf but one elec
trical horse-power, instead of 22 times
that power as heretofore required to ac
complish the same result. It is reported
that the
î
j
$500,000 plant, at some site yet to be j
determined, but convenient to adequate !
water power, with a productive capacity
tw company will erect
of 5,000 pounds of aluminum per hour. J
Delaware's "relic of barbarism"
comes in for another good word, by
proxy, this time from Judge Cowing of
New York city. Frank Sumner, a boy
of seventeen, arraigned before the jus
tice, pleaded guilty, with unabashed
effrontery and an impertinent smile, to
a charge of forging tho name of Emil
retired druggist, to a
Kinderman,
check. Judge Cowing declared himself
at a loss what to do with the young
reprobate. "If 1 send you to the Elmira
r«:formatory," said ho, "J
will corrupt all of the young men thero
that
afraid v
i trying to turn over a
If I send you to the penitentiary
state prison you may c<
worse th:
ew leaf.
0 out CVCI
a statute in this slate, ns in Rhode
Islaud, that permitted corporal j
ment. I think the
lish
lashes laid
foul J be just ah
« n by tho public whipper, and
should
like to have him a particularly :
. T will remand you for tin* j*
and think «»ver your case and determine
•what I will do."
Dinding Twine.
It takes a Republican organ to eluci
dato to a nicety the essential difference
between tweeclle-dum and twecdle-dee.
Our
an
and
that
of
ringing
the
for
the
natural
choice
time."
the
1. »
reform
tho
to
lessly
by
finance
To
should
should
vised
regard
and
2.
with
the
pure
of
land
that,
of
and.
of
heard
action
Wo are led to make this reflection by
tho Lalf-coh.m., ' solicitude which the
Morning Nexen betrays that some of its
readers may fail to seeclearly tho benign
°' w ^ pub11 "" lo B Uto ' to " nn
disastrous legislation
contrasted with the
contemplated
by a Democratic House. Everybody
should of course bo able to see that
when the McKinley bill cut tho duty
foreign pauper labor binding twine
down Î
34 cents to seven-tenths of
one cent per pound, it was
made "with due regard for tho rights of
American labor and the preservation of
our manufacturers.
reduction
But when the
wicked Democrats propose to lop off
this remaining seven-tenths of a cent,
that means, oh horrors, "free trade!"
Tho real explanation of this binding
twine cut of the Reed Congress—
pugoant to the spirit of tho McKinley
bill—was that the Republicans were, as
to this item, between tho devil and the
deep sea. Tho farmers of the north
west were clamoring for free twine and
the anxiety of the McKinleyites to
placate the agriculturists without alien
ating the manufacturers
them to essay a compromise on If cents.
In his report from the committee on
ways and mean3 submitting his bill to
tho House, dated April 10th, 1890, Mr.
McKinley said:
These libres (jute,manillaand sisal) have
tteeu placed on tbo free list, and the duties
cordage and twiue manufactured there
from greatly reduced, the reduction
binder twine being from 34 cents per
pound to li cents per pound. Notwith
standing this, when hemp hits been given
a fair trial as a binder t wine it is believed,
from the facts before your committee, that
it will displace that manufactured from
the foreign grown fibres with a cheaper
and belter article.
When the McKinley bill reached the
Senate the binding twine trust got in a
little work and succeeded in getting tho
proposed 1* raised to 1* cents. Then
tbo Republican farmers of tho north
west kicked so hard that the committee
on conference had finally to come down
to seven-tenths of a cent, and that was
the rate finally adopted. Tho result of
the reduction was the crippling of tho
trust, the cheapening of the twine and,
gather from the
government reports, a falling off of im
portations. At least the official statis
tics show that the
"cables, cordage and twine
from 237,200 pounds f
ending September 30th, 1800, to 191,509
pounds for the quarter ending Septem
ber 30th, 1391. But tho obvious moral
is that the Republicans» after having
themselves cut down this duty from 34
cents to seven-tenths of a cent,
n position to make mouths at tho Demo
crats for wiping out tho fraction of a
cent that is left.
re
trained
a
place
and
they
well !
importations of
füll off
tho quarter
ruff
Rock,
to
of
not i
Census Bulletin No. 175 gives statis
tics of the population of tho New Eng
land states. New England
exhibits a gain of 17 per cent, from
4,010,529 to 4,700,745, for the decade
1880-90; but two of the New England
states, Maine
a whole
I Vermont, show an
actual decrease of population during
that period. In fact Maine had
inhabitai
liis
by
ago, in I860, than
she has to-day. Now Hampshire, too,
though showing
the last decade, falls a little short of her
18(50 enumeration. During the 40 years
increase
slight gain during
!:•
unding 1S90 there has been
for the New England states of 1,972,(529,
or, by sex, 955,732 males and 1,016,897
females. The women outnumber tho
except in Maine and Vermont; the
total for New England being: Males,
2,813,755 ; females, 2,386,990. Most of
this surplusage is due to Massachusetts,
where there
tent
Two
..ear
and
* 1,151,234 females to
1,087,709 males, showing a preponder
ance «ff 63,525 of the gentler sox. What
a field for the exercise of woman's leap
year privilege! With the
ont, there has been a very material
increase in tin- foreign population «ff
each of these si
a
of
;ption of
He
Ye
33 since 1880, In
New Engli
fourth of the* present populati
eign-born, while 40 years
eight-ninths were natives.
li;
a whole,
jarly
i per cent,
the
of
is for
tgo nearly
The negro
element is very small, reaching only
In New Hampshire there i
T
only
and Vermont there arc over 400 whites j
•o. Even with the influx ' « i
of foreigners, Maine, New Hampshire •'>'
and Vermont, particularly the second, | 1
j exhibit a staguatii
that they lmv
- j New Hampshire had only 4T9
> in 1890 tin
to every
vhicii
indie
seen their best «lav,
; Sat
:
* his
two j in
iu F 50, forty
years
'The actio
nventidii," says the New
'shows how rapid
«O free silver m«
part of the country
•k /■:
of
r
is the
>1 lapse of
where this movoi
cel strong
ac
Nobiaska.
Re pu hi
id Dei
era ta
alike appea
I
be
ried away by
t
the v
•/.«. Tlie K:
s Republicans
î their state conventio
j resolution
be j free coirnc
! oppose«l and vi -
tue late liernocru
f 1890 adopted a
declaring that 'we demand
i of silver, :
ensure strongly
»sly denounced by
administration, led
Cleveland.'
J by ex .j
",' r
by ",. r r .' V
same year
:i adopted a platf«
t Republicans for their unfriendli
ness to silver, ;
clare
ago of silver.' The freu cot
went to
venti
of
boy
jus
to
Emil
a
1 saying that'NYo do
-*s m favor < >f the free coi
V (Thursda
) O
expecting to repeat tho declara
:r of
.'solutions
tioi
, b
only on«
thero
the whole
favored such a delivi rane«:
nnuttee «

Some mon achieve g re
greatness thrust upon them,
out pre judice
John Amiable Brother Wilson (or «loi
tho former, Tub Gazette
lates him over tho fortuitous combina
stances that has made him
•S3 and some
ha
With
the capacity of th«: Rev.
leaf.
CVCI
ion of cire«
Rhode
to be eagerly nought after
lish
etropolitan church.
iTic.sc c
laid
of
Wilmlngt
Coiift'Din-f
the
and the
should
Tiduity
.1 enterprise
•rs in giving the
f Wilmingt«
idcst publicity j
it session,
's good health, and
to the proceedings of the sc
Here's to Dr. Wil.s
may he live long and prosper.
Our morhing neighbor discussos the
currency plank of the Pennsylvania
platform in a tone calculated to betray
an apprehension on its part that the
Democrats may carry Pennsylvania in
November. We hardly look for this
and shall not venture just yet to place
that Republican stronghold in the
doubtful column. Rut the Democrats
of Pennsylvania have put forward in
ringing words the issue of the coming
campaign and tho man who stands in
the eyes of the whole American people
for that issue—the
Secretary Whitney well said yesterday,
the course of events has made "the
natural leader" and "tho necessary
choice of the Democratic party at this
time." In the following two paragraphs
the Pennsylvania convention has ad
mirably set forth the "in hoc signo
vincemus" of a national Democracy :
1. » That the paramount reform now de
manded of the Federal legislature is the
reform of the tariff laws, on the basis of
tho Democratic national platform of l.sss,
to the end that no money shall be need
lessly exacted, from the industries und
necessities of the people;'and that, our in
dustrial interests shall not be prejudiced
by excessive taxation, false systems of
finance or extravagant cost of production.
To this end the McKinley Tariff bill
should be repealed, the essential
materials of American manufactures
should be put upon the free list and u re
vised tariff should be adopted, with due
regard for the rights of American labor
and the preservation of our manufactures.
2. That, consistent with this issue and
with this demand, the sentiment of 1*
sylvunia Democracy is overw helminglv for
the renomination to tho Presidency of the
who gave to his party intellectual and
political leadership, and to the country a
pure and elevated administration. Wo
decl'areourconviction that the best interests
of the party and the country demand the
nomination and election of Grover Cleve
land us President, and we are confident
that, under his leadership, the principles
of Democracy will win a glorious victory;
and. to the end that the vote and influe
of Pennsylvania
heard and felt,
chosen are directed to act
matters entrusted to their charge, Maid
action to be determined by the vote of the
majority of the deleg:
A
whom, as ex
a
ay be
»st effectively
delegates this dav
it iu ail
atooxs n ix eh u i lled .
Authorities At tuck Thei
und Capture
Their Illicit YVhh.liy
April 19.—A dt
* lie United States a
• I ■
Little Rock, Ark
'They
perato tight, bet we
thoritics and a band of moonshiners
place this morning
Craighead count v, i
*.
ar Big Bay, Ark., in
which
tnsliincrs, T. Berryan, was killed.
Tlie authorities were led by Deputy
Marshal Faulknerbury and a deputy
sheriff . They captured'u quantity
and whisky and
they will bring t
>f tiic
for
beer
this « itv
men
were
JX
A EKAL.
Ex-State Treasurer William E. Wood
ruff of Arkansas, was acquitted at Little
Rock, Monday, of the charges of
bczzlement of state funds.
Tv
propellers which started from
Friday, f
return M
fire.
Duluth
obliged
to t'orco their way thr
Superior.
The body of an unknown man. found
floating in the Ohio river at Brooks burg,
Indiana, Monday, is supposed tu be
of the victims of the stet
destroyed by tiro
A lire occurred i
Sunday night,
coming panic-strick
g
Buffalo, were
lay, being ututblo
gh the ice iu Lake
wer«»
und
one
'incinnuti reetmtly.
a building iu Boston
i the occupants be
, several of them au«t
the windows. Minnie and I
probably futility in- of
Tho
the
('.
but
had
ri"!i
ml f
a Mule
: I
M.
lay struck across the back
bar i
the hands of
Night Watchman Edward I'erry. Three of
liis ribs w
by t tic bl«
<1 liis si.
W. li. 8pence
Spence, of K;
1 liis brother, Frank
x»ol, Ohif
eel Mond
l.iv
îously w
>y Wil
ooting being the out
fectlng W. II. Spence
!:•
sa, the
«»l a he.
Two China
woumled in ;
Sund:
•ere shot
ml mortally
; t. L
staur
ht, by "high-binders.'
I to bo the
kill all Chri.stia
nude.
The
• of an in
Chimuuen.
tent ion
Two arrests huve bee
u
tlie
A barn on the stoek imin of Klihu < 'arr,
..ear Charlestown, Ind.. was struck by
lightning at. 4 o'chtck Monday morning,
and the building, valued at $2,0(io,together
with uriock of thoroughbred horses vul
Chari
li. Hatch, 31 years of ng«', com
fitted suicide by shooting him
New York, Monday
df in the
morning.
elevatc«l
unable tu:vff,
have unhinged his mind,
er known at White
Wunduv night.
•cted s
land.
He had i
ilrond which lie
issupp
hull. 111., fell there
•ell levee,
unis of :
The
evural
costly
•oniity bridge*
li;
« .ÎÂT
tli..,;-:
T ■
1 i
wh
rul
is 111
i«*d
All th
Him* incendiary lires occurred in 8
Saturday night, bv
lut $1 '
fur
Antoni
Tex;
Ind Slit
anonymous note saying that tho
only just begun." A
; ;
j
' « i ...
•'>' i'*
| 1
m iu
of
s has 1
protecttfie
^
drolling tfie
• >n the ineen
i ,J
koper (.'as,4 ami Willi»
al of
Spat
in
; Sat unlay evening
: Sunday
g Ci
d «!•
d it
his
itli 1
liis
■If,
fatal wound!
!
«li
Both
•I
*•* "t 1
tin: «let
.f
h father in
A tel
that the upper w
Smelting ( ompai
fr.
But
, M«
tlm A i
rep
sod
it
-I
ha
'IV i
with nth
•pper producers
!>•
«: the proflu»
aid thereby :
Migthe
the
Ah
market,
of work.
t Hr
Mrs. Philomena Beck
N. M
ay fr,
<'tq
II.
ion." 1 He'
bis wife's illness
V P»
lie w;
P
Th.
>h y
lie was
and h
ed a
pre
il i
hour 1:
The otrik
i t he A
Ulli«
1 Assoc
!•
•'•! Work
•liich
18th Of I:
i Co
in î ivd
•ed
1 the :
at liber I
•r they
. Tbc I,
oil'
- the
al
ck
Lcb; ,U
the part
fhe I
of up
co Mon
V
■ :
the i't
2«1
•I held tb:
there
fr
» produce the ec
•t of July nth,
ip first coming
tl
to provi
i. in the
i
While u
Watertown
tin: R
il road wt
. VVi
Sat urday morning,
1 and the
lother !
in
of
Tw
die« I.
.
V
Math«
I Brakem:
I'errigo, were in j
r locomotive, but
'they acknowledged that j
•it tin: time of the col- '
j
'^aperi unhurt,
,liuy a ' !ee
.
out by "tor
the road/
J successive hours spent
)
SEVEN MEN TORN TO PIECES
Frightful Results of a Powder
Explosion.
A SHOCK LIKE AN EARTHQUAKE
to
Only a Few Fragments of the
Victims Remained.
An Awful Disaster at tho Worte* of
American For cite Powder Coin paar,
l.itko tlnpalcoiig, N. J -- Soven !>Icn
Pieces und Other* Injured.
Mount Arlington, NT. J., April 18.-—
Tfie works of the American Forcite Pow
der Company,
liopatcong, ab
up at ab
seven
names of live of the men killed are as fol
lows : J. D. Smith, superintendent of the
works, married ami leaving a widow und
child; Jacob Carlson, aged 35 years,
married, and leaves five children: Wil
liam Pierce, aged 28 years, married,
and leaves si widow anrl two children;
James Vagh, aged 29 years, unmarried; A.
Johnson, aged 30 years, unmarried.
body 1ms been recognized as that
Swede, whose mime is unkown.
injured. One of them.
Benjamin Cassini ore, is so terribly burned
d mangled that he will probably die.
The explosion occurred a lew minutes
after 3 o'clock, and five buildings were
shattered. What caused tho explosion will
never be known.
The works of the company consist of a
number of small buildings scattered at
distance of 3(Ni (cot from each
other. Most of the buildings Were used iu
the mixing process, and only
the shores of Lake
a mile below here, b lotir
3 o'clock this afternoon, and
■ blown to pieces. The
Another
of
'1 v
ab«
:h. The other buildings,
mv from the lake
sod for
which' stand further
tlie side of the mountain, nr
the storage of dynamite, intro-glycerine
i detonators. The works have been fre
quently the scene of explosions, but never
to such an extent us to-day.
The explosi«
a occurred while all tho
■<>rk and created a panic,
rking in buildings dish
up first heard a r.
in which they w*
Tho
1'ronv those bl*
and the buildings i
working shook ami trembled for'fully a
minute; then came an explosion, which
sounded far louder than the simultane
explosion of half a doze
cannon. The startled men rushed from
cloud of dust and
of the largest
• I ■
smoke living through the j
lower part of the company's grounds.
'They knew in a moment what find h ip
pencil, and fearing tiiat the cone
might set off tho explosives in the
buildings, (hey-took to their heels
imitai n side. After a few
further
the
for the
moments, when they saw that
danger was imminent, they cautiously all
ied to the scene of the explosion. " The
re and was
m went to work ut
search of the
work in tlie ruiiied
wreckage was already
burning fiercely. The
o overhaul the wreck i
men who bad been
buildings. Within a few minutes they
needed in finding two men, both of wh
were badly injured. These
tho company's office
nt for. Meanwhile the >
quickly
removed i
1 a
puny's tiro apparu* us
fire. As
ami
the lake was used to light «I
s tfie lfi
4 the roll *>f the company's em
ployes was called und it was found that
» missing. A search for their
bodies was then lieg
wer«» mostly old employes of the colli pun;
und knew that in a « use like the present
one it was useless to search among the
ins. They found fragments of flesh
»vend
au«t tume*
I ground.
of flesh and bone,
mains of the bodie» of the victims.
What couM be found was gathered upin
boxes and will be buried by tlie company.
Tho two injured men who were taken
the company's office were attended by Drs.
('. K. Molden and N. E. Jacobus, of'Stan
hope; Dr. lavlor, of b'uccossunny, and the
company's « lie
A representative of tho company wh
seen alter tho explosion, said that i
would be impossible
caused I lie explosion,
numerous explosions, he said, at the works
but none so extensive as that to-day. Tlie
gentleman said that the company
had pever expected that such a big exp!«»
ri"!i could occur. Tho buildings being
d and each independent of the
was seldom that
« scattered
In fact, they found 150 p
which is all th
nvsof
of
of
_ ascertain what
There hod been
mro tin
All of tho ex
the houses
explosive and the
never before been
man's life was in danger,
plosions of the past hau bee
for mixing tli
storage-rooms hud
u fleeted.
When asked if an investigation would be
made lie said it was almost useless to hold
The explosion had left little of the
building. It would 1»«; impossible to ascer
tain how tlie explosion occurred
tlie simplest tiling about it. The
by
•ssiblo might have
able to havo told tho story, hut ho
a an at whose bench the first
scquently ho
•a:- the n
plus!
The lustjjxplosi
at the works occurred
which time
ere killed. Suporiiit«*iidcnt Smith
had been iu the employ of tins company
wnlhad been superintendent
bv
fur tin
The explosion siialtered all the windows
within two miles of the scene of th «3 ex
plosion. The g las:
Schaeffer's Hotel
guests iu the house w
ding the rail j
itil the beams cracked
tho
in the bar-room of
're broken ami the
of
greatly startle«!.
^ At I.
the building, ils well
• houses around, were blown out.
i ,J
of
those i
in I Ins vicinity. 'The At!:
•T powder
impunies
it
::
îville, throe miles
.0 de
s at Dover, which is
the scene of tlie
as plainly felt
oyes at work,
and the 1 ni

!
about seven
"t 1 Ke
itiki
ks which lia«l blown tip, left their
benches.
I , April 13—The explosi
■d at I.ake liopatcong to-day
was heard plainly here. I he I'nited States
>upplv dej
Dove
N.
Which oe
-I
i- located near this place, ami
m supposed that it was this
!>•
bad bl,
Hoc
.. April 1
Thc
ghtthat an
red when the. powder
I.ake H'jpaiiong exploded this
afternoon. They left the mines, but so far
us known
work i
trthqimkc had oec
s ben: tin
It t lAACXOE.
ltest I it/.simmons it
II«
itoumis
1*:
too. April 2o.—I
1/ugiliM James J.
i* ville that he has
beard Fitzsimmons will challenge him i
he whips Sullivan. Heuikks:
will
l Regiment
tic
• I
hi. I will also consent
s, and if I fail to
! ■ ir rounds, (jucens
ummons, to take tlie
lit: acceptance of this
rules. In* !•
•posai
\ present
y way interfere i
■ntsMr. Fitzsimmons
until after 11
s ! will
•lock if
• KcmiiII ill it I amity <_Mi;ii rol.
Nkb., April 16.—Because Mrs.
i Miller and Mrs. John Rockhart ut
iiiterfiac in a family quarrel
Hardlin and liis wife,
into the house, and, before
of range, lie fired
them. Both
and a
•h. Tlie
F «
t-guii
bit ni tbo grot
rous wound inflicted
IT child. Hardlin was ovorpo
■vend neighbors ami terribly be
ale ' •
j Accepts the Wt*
Gur«
j Louis,
' '
eight Fhullengo.
fuck Wilks of SI.
relier- weigh t., lias accepted a
a finish for $5,000 a
: offered by the South
ago, April
challen
side and a <5l,2ÖU l
Omaha Athletic Uuu,
fight to
A STARTLING REPORT.
Three California Towns Said to Have Been
Earthquake, This
Destroyed by
Alorning.
San FnANCiSCO, April ID.—It is reported
hero that the towns of Dixon, Winters and
Raville, wore destroyed by earthquakes
this morning. The wires to these places
down, so that particulars havo not
been obtained.
A HEAVY fillOCK IN BAN FUANCIBCO.
Han Francisco, April 11).—An unusually
heavy earthquake shock was felt here
shortly before 8 o'clock this morning,
rousing people from their sleep. The
vibrations lasted some seconds.
DAMAGE
Winter, Cal., April 19.— An earthquake
shock visited this section ut 2.45 o'clock
this morning causing general destruction
to property. A large brick hotel, bank
buildings, Bartolet's two-story building
and, in fact every building in town w
damaged. The loss will reach
$80,000. No one was hurt.
The contents of stores and dwellings
•ere all piled on the floors in promiscuous
*s. The shock was from east to west,
PROPERTY.
i< ait
heaj
and lasted about live or six seconds.
IT stopped and started the clock.
Mp.rcedk, Cal., April 19.—Two distinct
earthquake shocks were felt here this
rooming. The first occurred at 2.47 o'clock,
stopping the clock in El Capitaii Hotel;
the second, three minutes later, starting
the clock again. No damage was done.
STOCKTON PEOPLE EXCITED.
Stockton, Cal.. April 19.—A severe
shock of earthquake was felt hero ut 2.50
this morning. No damage is reported but
people were excited for n time. It
sharply felt at Nevada, Nicolas, Auburn,
Chico und other places.
April t0.—The
earthquake which shook up northern und
utral California early tins morning
the heaviest and longest known here since
the great earthquake of 'OS, while the
damage caused was far greater. Thus far
loss of life is reported, but many per*
bruised und there was a large
San Francisco, ('
loss of property.
Vacaville, centre of the great fruit in
dustry, is most badly damaged. The
• f nearly every brick building in
ire thrown down, and iu many
cases the whole structure is ruined and
will have to be turn down. These build
ings are very poorly constructed, usually
of a single course of brick, and the up
heaval of the earth brought the walla
tumbling down in every direction.
It was fortunate that the.shock «lid
occur during business hours,
life would have been het
ooden
a
the loss of
•v. Most of the
;1 only chimneys
Buffered. But few brick dwellings
ruina. The safety of the ocynpants l.s due
to the rapidity with which they got out of
doors.
Reports arc coming into Vacaville of
heavy damage in thccountry, where many
brick residences are ruined and frame
buildings were burned by tlie upsetting of
lamps. Vacaville was undoubtedly the
centre of this seismic disturbance.
At Dixon several brick buildings fell,
but a majority have walls cracked und
several are in a dangerous condition.
the shock was severe and
guests in the big hotels wore badly fright
ened, but no damage occurred.' In the
eight-story Chronicle Building the last
form had just been locked up when tlie
shock cam«. The building swayed like a
pendulum and the frightened printers ex
pected to see the ceiling drop, but nothing
was even cracked.
ut
lu ' Frise
a
JE ALOIS or A TEACHER.
Why tho Wife of Samuel I* Clayton Want»
a Divorce.
Chester. Pa., April 10.—A dispatch from
Chicago, 111., stutca that three month» ago
Mrs. E va L. < 'layton.wifcof Samuel L. Clay
ton, a son of Judge Thomas J. Clayt
this county, had instituted
Conk county court, alleging
«iesertlon. Mrs. Clayton, who is a daugh
ter of a Chicago merchant, refused t«> be
interviewed, but her father, Air. Part ridge,
consented to make a statement. ".Shortly
after the marriage of Mr. Clayton to my
daughter," hesaid, "Miss AliceGoodley,a
school teacher of South Chester, sued film
for broach of promise. Miss Goodley wrote
several letters to my daughter, and a quar
rel ensued. Mr. Clayton left for Europe,
sin«« which time they have not lived to
gether. Wo decided to apply for u liivorc«?,
and the ease was set lor last Saturday,
April 10th. When the case was called the
attorneys of Mr. 'Clay
tinunuee. which was granted by tlie court."
Mr. Clayton, who has jii.st returned
from Europe, is now with hi» father at
Thuriow. The father, Judge Thomas J.
ju at his office in this city
as sub
ivaa tlie
of
suit for <li
skcil for :
luytuu, wa
to-day. and he f.ui«i the story w
stuntially correct; tho only error \
fact that liis attorney had asked for a stay
of proceedings. The aff air has created a
great sensation here, and tlie breach of
promise suit of Miss Goodley for $19.090is
vived. Miss Goodley is
most beautiful women of this country.
•She is lirst assistant teacher in tlie high
school of South Chester, and she says she
has abundant; proof to establish her cas«»
if the defendants will allow it to eoine up
in court.
Sin* says site lias a very Interesting case,
and it will makegood reading. Judge Clay
ton said: "Miss Goodley lias been the
cause of all tins trouble. She has been
writing letters to Hi
got j
live with her,
take him with
of the
n wife until the
jealous that lie could nut
he came home ami begged
' to Europe, winch
I did. He will not live with her again."
WKA TH ER R CIA. ET IX.
Cloudiness
Prevail
This
Locality.
AVa- iMNiiTox*, April 20.—Tlie storm has
nun« d very slow
„ . . northern P
. Rains havo occurred in the
of this storm in tlie
he middle Mississippi and Power
valleys and tlie south Atlantic
stat.-s. The clearing condition has re
mained nearly stationary north of Lake
Superior ami lias been followed by a
comfition, which 'has
♦ -î \ -
IV
ast quadr;
Miss,
fed from the
A remarkable ridge of high press
t"inis froui tin* mirt h Atlantic through the I
lake regions and Manitoba to the north *
rili Pacific to Alberta.
of 30.50 from Calgarrj
Olimpia. The temperature
fallen in tin: Arkansas
ri valleys and the south Atlantic states,
cpt in Florida; it has remained nearly
• »nary elsewhere.
•r 24 hours beginning nt 3 p.
Delaware, fair
showers to-night;
ing; r;
I lo
Mis
:
at her, 'followed by
sterly winds, iucroas
Thursday.
PIllLADELPIII
Arthur Furr el, aged about 40 years, was
run over and killed Tuesday evening by a
Market street cubic car.
A EFAIRS.
M
rears old,
over and killed Tuesday on the Reading
railroad ai Ninth street und Girard avenue.
A. man supposed to he Gustave Ludwig
felt from a freight train ami was killed
tho Pennsylvania railroad,
near tjie Zoological Garden.
The body of a man supposed to be that
of Henri Hoppr
the Delaware
Tiu*E«lay, ;
d«*n morgue.
The Pennsylvania Railroad Company
has reduced tin* «:aritying rates on uuthra
cite coal from $1.70 to $1.41 per ton. The
Heading company, it is understood, will
make no reduction.
Tuesday
f.
1 Hot
off Gloucester t'ity,
to the C'am
i was removed
The city
..has addressed letters
to hunks calling tli«.*ir attention t«»tlio«»rtli
uaiice providing for the payment of inter
city «leposits and requesting the
hanks to notify him by April 30th whether
they will accept tho conditions of
the ordinance.
The coroner's jury found*Tuesday that
Michael V. Needham, 2 t years olu,
lay of he
died
»rrlmge of the brain.
UttO to injuries inflicted by John Ruck nna
that William Ly«
the crime. I'u
await t he action of the grand jury.
John ('. Bullitt has sent a written opin
ion to Dillwyn Wistar, chairman of the
mi mitte««, giving at length his
reasons for believing th«: seven trolley or
dinances of March 31st to be invalid, and
expressing the opinion that it is by
means curtain that t he proposed agreement
which the Traction Company has offered
to sijjn could be enforced.
accessory
wore committed
Uni
AN ANTI-LOTTERY VICTORY
Foster, Democrat, Elected
Governor of Louisiana.
FIVE FULL TICKETS IN THE FIELD
Tho Lottery Candidate Car
ries New Orleans.
But, Despite the Division, tlie Antl
ioltorj Democratic Ticket Is Successful
In 1 lie State by About 10,000 lMurulity
—A yulct Election, With .Much Scratch
lug.
Kf.w Orleans, April 10.—The elccti
to-day in Louisiana was ono of the most
important ever held here. Tho people
voted for governor and other state officers,
for a full legislature, »emite and house for
four years, ami for district, parish and
local officers, and those of New Orleans
voted in addition for all their municipal
officers from mayor and eouneilmeu down.
Three amendments to the constitution
were also submitted to the popular vole.
First, authorizing the city of Now Orleans
to fund its bonds at a lower rate of interest;
amendment authorizing the
police juries to levy an additional tax for
school purposes if authorized by the votes
of the people of the parish, and third, the
famous revenue amendment extending
tho charter of the Louisiana Lottery Com
pany.
The amendments to the constitution
voted for havo been lost sight of in the
existing tight over tlie state offices, but tho
first is of great importance to New Orleans
and will save the city some $ 200,000 a year
in interest. This amendment authorizes
tho funding of the eity debt, and will
allow the issue of her new bonds at.4 per
cent, to take up those now falling due at 5,
0 and 7 per cent.
The second amendment is for the benefit
of the country parishes, authorizing them
to levy higher taxes for school purposes if
the people so vote. The third, or revenue
amendment, is dead, the propositi*
taineil in it having been withdrawn and
all the tickets printed against it.
There were five district state tickets in
tho field—-first, the regular Democratic
ticket, with Judge8. D. McEnery for gov
ernor; second, the anti-lottery ticket,
headed by Murphy .1. Foster; third, the
Regular Republican ticket, headed by A.
II. Leonard of Shreveport; fourth, the
Republican ticket, headed by John
Kbreaux. for governor; tilth the People's
parly ticket; for governor, R. L.Tannehill.
The regular Democratic nominee for
mayor was John Fitzpatrick, who favored
the election of the McEnery state ticket.
His opponent was Joseph Shakespeare,
the present incumbent, who favored tlie
success of the I''
On March 22d last the Democratic fac
tious. headed by S. J>. McEnery and
Murphy J. Foster, submitted their re
spective claims to white Democratic
primaries, the agreement being that the
reiving the highest vote should he
the nominee of the party. In this elec
McEnery received a majority of 1,7/it 1 votes
the face of the returns. "This vote was
canvassed by n hi cud consisting of three
McKneryitcs and four Fosterites. in the
parish of Orleans about 3,0<K» votes wore
thrown nut by a
for alleged frauds, thus giving the
nation to Foster by a majority of 549. This
the Mo nory people refused to accept and
declined to abide by the decision.
Advices so far received indicate that
Foster lias secured the state by about 10 ,
00° plurality, t lie Republicans have car
noil about six parishes, claiming ( oucordia
among them, but McEnery, (he rival
Democratic candidate, will be second in
point of votes. The McEnery majority in
the city has been reduced, but .lohn Fitz
patick, the McEnerv nominee for mayor, 1
»Äfe'Ä«
the scratching in the city is unprecedented.
of
of
of
a
factional deeisi
be
to
the
at
J.
tlie
of
<li
GENERAL POLITICAL NOTES.
Tlie New York senate yesterday pussed
the Excise biff by a party vote, and it now
goes to I lie governor.
The Democratic convention of the 13th
district of Massachusetts yesterday elected
delegates to Chicago and adoptcil Cleveland
resol utions.
Congressman (L \V. Cooper was yester
day renominated by tho Democrats of the
5th ludiuna district.
The Republican confer rocs of Hie 24th
Pennsylvania district ycsb-nluy nominated
Ernest F. Acheson «>f Washington, for
Congress on t he first ballot.
Tlie Republican convention of the L'bili
w York district, ut Schenectady, yester
day. adopted resolutions endorsing Harri
son's administration.
Ne
THE CIRC VS JS COM 1X0.
Advent of Fnreimugli'a Fatuous Shows in
This City May 2d.
The arrival of the advertising ear in this
city Tuesday of tlie Adam Korcpaugh
shows, which is now standing on tlie
Philitdelphiii, Wilmington A: Baltimore
railroad track at the foot <>f Front street,
is but a confirmation of the rumor started
by the enterprising small boy some time
that the great sli
ras coming.
Already the small hoys have begun to
horde up their stray nickels in order to see
the elephant ami tho monkey and the
scores of other objects to bo exhibited at
the circus which 3nows here on May 2d.
It promises to i»o even more remarkable
than any exhibition given in retient years.
"The Faff of Nineveh,
celebrated Forepaugh shows, is
magnificent spectacle. It is described as
being an exact production of the
brilliant scenes of the first capital «ff the
world. It is stated that tho production is
made upon a scale of much lavishness ami
tliut 10,009 people can witno.3 the magnifi
cent sight at one time.
The circus is equipped with
pendons collection of animals and other
attractions than ever before, and ranks
ng tlie loading shows of the coun
try. The tremendous shows, which appear
May 2d. will no doubt draw to
nf tho largest audiences ever
in the city.
a
a
s shown by tho
I beneath thecanvi
* -_
ret Ik
The Modus Vivendi Kutilicd.
Washington, April 19.—In hip message
transmitting the Bering Sea modus vivendi
convention to the Senate yesterday the
President said : "As the value und effec
tiveness of this agreement depend largely
upon its being put in force at once, I re
spectfully request a prompt consideration
of the subject by the Semite." The Senate
acceded to liis request with tho greatest ex
pedition. The treaty was received ÿester
thc committee
jted niton it
;> the Senate
«lay afternoon, referred to
foreign relations, which
dus morning, ami reported i
favoruhly this afternoon,
hours was the treaty discussed,
1 then it
was ratified with substantial unanimity.
By its terms tlie British government pro
hibits, during peudency of arbitration,
seal killing in that part of Bering So:
tin: line of demarkution of
if the treaty of cession, and
tnisps to Use best efforts to sec
hibition by British subjects and vessels.
The'Uni teil States agree to prohibit scaling
save 7,5u0 for subsistence or natives. Pro
vision is in ado for the seizure of offending
vessels; for continuance of tlie clause
allowing British agents to visit the seal
ward fr
Suu-i.lc of FitzluiKli I'«-«:'« N«*i»liew.
Sr. Louis, April 16.—Hi
prominent banker at Wheeling, W. Va.,
1 nephÇW of General Fitzhngh Leo. at
tempted suicide here last evening at the
Hotel Bur mini, swallowing three ounces
of laudanum. Ho is expected t«J «lie.
lie is a
institutes."
heard to say that he would give much if ho
had never tried the c
of
"graduate
and he lias boo
two Keel y
n often
. lie is 2.JVC
hard drinker and for
>. Jlis reasons
not known
rin the hands
old and has been
that reason sought the
for attempting suicide
though letters left by him
of friends who refuse to divulge their e
Torrid Weather In Texan.
Denison, Tkx., April 19.—A torri«! wave
has reached here, tho thermometer at 3 p.
ru. yesterday registering 90° in the shade.
'oather is .stiffing and the
extraordinary experienced at
u number of years.
IT.**
this season
T11E LOSS AT AT HE $1,000,000.
An Extenilve Fire iu Kenosha, Win.,Tues
day Morning-Four Blocks Burned.
Kf.nosha, Win., April 1!).—An extensive
fire broke out here, this morning, und
after burning four squares was brought
under control. Tbc Harnes drove out tho
occupants of tho Western Union telegraph
office in the Simmons Building, but did
not burn the building,
ters were improvised in
distance from tho sccno of the
with which the ''company's wires commu
nicated.
Engines from Milwaukee and Racine
aided in averting a more terrible catas
trophe. Tho telephone
temporarily threatened, the lire reaching
into tho next block. The North-western
Wire Matting Company and the Huther
again the
Temporary
a building at
quar
sumo
U and
land Lumber Company were
chief sufferers. No loss of life w
ported.
Estimates of tho damage wore almost im
possible to obtain, but ono authority put
the ligures ut probably $1,000,090.
a noun throws ix raltjmore.
It Wrecked tlie Window* und Doors
Several Harrison Street Houkoh
Baltimore, Mi*., April 19.—The exi
of a bomb this morning in Harri
street wrecked the windows and doors of
No. 1774 und broke the glass of the win
dows of seven houses
of t he street. No on«
Mrs. Wink, the owner of the house, sa vs
that some unknown persons have a spite
against her and that in the past, winter she
her step,
arching for the criminal,
for the practical joker, and if appre
hended severe punishment will be ad
ministered.
>lo
the opposite side
hurt.
found coal oil and matches
The police
a Noted German Writer.
Berlin, April 19.—Fridrich Martin
Bodcnstedt, the well-known German
writer, died to-day. Among his
prominent works
Di U I
The People of the
Caucasus and Their Wars of independence
Against Russia," "Thousana-and
•vs in the Orient" and a drama,
"Demetrius." Herr Bodcnstedt was born
at Heine, Hanover, April 22d, 1819, and
has for years been
tributor to various newspapers, in 1850ho
was editor of tho Weiser Zeitung.
J*
voluminous
Tho fleml of "The Century" Dead.
New York, April 19.—Roswell Smith,
tho President of the Century Publishing
Company, died at 7.10 o'clock this inorn
' liisfhome No. 21 East Fifty-first
street. Mr. Smith had been ill fur the past
three years of chronic Bright's disease,
and during that time has lmd three paraly
tic strokes, the last of these occurring at
the Vailin'!/ office last, week. For the past
mouth he has been unconscious.
- 1 1 -
FitzMiinmoiot-lIfill Fti;!it.
h», April 19.—A telegram fr
President Noel of the Olympic Club, New
Orleans, received last night, announces tho
acceptance of tlie offer of Bob Fit/.sim
Tlie acceptance contains tho proviso that
the fight shull take place the same week us
the Suffi van-Uorbctt fight.
r
tight Jim Hull before that club
of $12.000
i $5,i)uo a side.
A ItellrtMl Officer'» Death.
Washington, A pail 18.—Chief Engi
... r N. B. Clark, retired, died at his
residence in this city this morning. lie
was retired in 1868, and has been almost
disabled ever since with rheumatism.
Philadelphia, April 18th. 189*.
T on don IS tilt* llOlVlP of
^ ont Jon lb Lilt, nome OI
ClHiard and Galatea StlTpCS.
i»r 1 , • . \
Wanainaker S IS their /VlTieri
can home. Delightful stuffs
f or Boys' Suits and Women's
and Girls' Outing Costumes.
10 styles Cunard at 35c.
15 styles Galatea at 30c.
That long counter of finest
Ginghams is in new dress. It
could be in new dress every
day for weeks and not dupli
cate a style. Hundreds of
patterns, every sun-checked
beauty that Ginghams ever
had. 25 to 75c. the yard.
Just across the aisle are the
Brandenburgs, Organdies,
Linen Lawns, Dimities, Mous
seline de l'Inde, Como Batistes
and others of the thin, thinner,
thinnest things.
WiMinmaners.
Beautiful Bedford Cords.
To the forefront of favor at
a bound, and there they stay.
Rich but unobtrusive; elegant
always, in good taste always
where anything out of the
sombre will do.
For a Street Costume, for
a Morning Gown, for an Even
ing I )ress, for a Moujik Coat,
for—almost no matter what, a
Bedford Cord is as surelv "the
thing" as any woven stuff can
We have an unequalled col
lection of them.
39-in. Bedford, 75c.
39- in. Bedford Vigoureux, 75c.
40- in. Bedford. $1.
45-in. Bedford Melange, $1.
45-in. Bedford Vigoureux,
$1.25.
45- in. Plain Bedford, $1.25.
46- in. Bedford in three grades,
fU.50, $1.75. $ 2 .
48-in. Bedford Diagonal, $ 2 . 50.
be.
There's a I.aasdowne love
liness as peculiar to itself as
the soft light of a pearl and
the hlazo of a diamond are
peculiar to them. Tints soft
as in the heart of a shell or
the petals of a rose or the
faint flush on beauty's cheek.
(July a patrician stuff could
take such dyes. The Silk, the
Wool, the spinning, the weav
ing—all must be of the very
best.
We have the only complete
stock of Lansdowncs to be
found in Philadelphia. If the
makers bring out a new ele
gance in it you'll find it only
on our counters. More than
forty shades, 40 inches, $1.25.
The beautiful Ribbed Lans
tcanmuaftfr s.
dowries are 42 inches, $1.50.
French weave wit was never
happier than in the delicate
All-wool Crêpons,
some, only half says, good.
Two special lots: Arousing
$1 quality at 75c.—17 shades
—and a $1.25 quality at $1—
Each sort
Hand
1 1 .shades.
40
inches.
Certain of the All-wool 1
Dress stuffs, mostly stripes, I
have dropped from $: to 75c. I
This sort of thing is happen- I
ing in many spot where a I
heavyish weave feels the fore- ]
touch of Summer.
The beauty-specked Plume- j
tis (85c.) are slipping out fast, j
A scoop-net sweep at two
of the Black Dress Goods
sorts.
Black All silk and fiilk-and-ieool
Grenadine and Jfernani —Plain,
figured and striped, singlo and I
double width, probably tho largest
and richest collection in any Dress
Goods stock in America. Prices
50c. to $5.
Figured Black Goods —Troops of
patterns at 75c., $1 and $1.25—
stripes, plaids, chevrons and diag
onals and woolen figures, colors,
weights, finish and designs
newest and correct.
19 styles at 75c. 29 styles at $1.
2(5 styles at $1.25.
If the Silk Warp Bedford
Cords—those elegant new- /
comers—hadn't been so be-»
lated the price would be $2.25
and 52.50. The maker mourns
the delay and you save $1 a
yard; 40 inches, $1.25; 4É
inches, $1.50.
Colored Silk Warp Henri
ettas share favor with the lis
somy, lightsome Landsdowne.
Twin sisters of loveliness.
Henriettas that won't slip. $1
for 38 inches, $1.25 for 40
inches. Lansdowne, 40 inches,
ÿi-35- _
(
"White Goods" have caught
the spirit of the season.
Choosing at the manufactories
means two things—getting the
pick and getting bottom prices.
Some of these sorts were
never in this market before.
Dotted and Figured, Bieiss Muslin ,
32 in.; dots, pinhead to nickel size,
32c to 70c; figures in largo varie- *
ties, 3 r c to 85c.
•Bilk Malls, 47 i
cream, black, pink, blue, cardinal,
maize. Nile, lavender, heliotrope.
Silk Mull with soft finish like chif
fon, 45 in., 50c to $1.10; white,
and black.
French Nainsooks, 47 in., sheer,
medium and heavy, from 25c to
$1.15.
French Batiste, 40 in., 28c to $1.10.
Cotton Chiffons, 47 in., 28c to 60e.
French Jaconet, soft finish, 47 in.,
35c to 65c; 30 in., 25c to 50c.
French Organdie , 48 in., 22c to GOc.
The Spring Harvest of
Swiss Embroideries has been
housed—mostly. You know
Snowy
beauties; made as only St.
Gall can make them. From
the machines in Switzerland
straight to us—to you. Not
a cent of unnecessary cost
added.
Swiss Embroideries on tl/e
bias if you choose. 3 /J to 6
inches, 9 to 40c. We hear of
them nowhere else in town.
40o to $1; white,
what that means.
Astonishing how a Reefer
brightens the little boy's rig.
Jaunty Jackets they are. With
anchor trimmed collar, $3.50,
Serge or Flannel; with heavy
military beading, $4.50, Flan
nel; with bright brass buttons
and Soutache braid, $5, Serge;
then step by step to $8.50—
all in blue and all for 3 to 6
year olds.
4 to 14-year sizes, $4.00 to
$ 7 - 50 -
Natty Nassau Suits— Jacket
and Short Trousers tipped
with ribbon, how and buckle
—are delighting everybody
who buys for hoys of 3 to 6.
More than 50 styles and stuffs
£4.50 to $9. The Huffy-front
Blouses to go with them arc
jii to $3.50—Silk, £4.
Puritan Refriget alors.
Simple, sensible, scientific.
Years of trial heap up the
proof; that's why we keep
Puritans at the head. Easy to
run, easy to clean, economical
of ice.
Uprights, $12.75 to $50.
Sideboards, $12 to $30.
Ice Chests, $4 to $14.50.
Perhaps half a score of
scratched Puritans—perfectfor
service—$11.25 to $20.
John Wanamaktou

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