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The commonwealth. (Wilmington, Del.) 1858-18??, August 14, 1858, Image 1

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WILMINGTON, DELAWARE.
Eut FOURTH
• 3.0
TERMS.—8iitclr Copies,
AilrrrfiMiiiR Term*.
Larger whiertlsem
irly
OHANUE OF UOI StS
PHILADELPHIA) WILMINGTON >
and Baltimore railroad.
auna after MONDAY, June Slut, tSJS, I'aiiou
*'XjHAVB ^IllLAllEbPIIlA.
O
..lb
Fori
if

av-i
Middle«
auVln.
BbriiiA
lb
P »•
PiiwdilB
TH UW
ixagïa
h
IfelphlH to Uttltl
»re (o Phlladi'l
Sunday« at S.4
Iphis fo
; •
Intermediate places,
and Intermediate
tvi
rA lttr
Wilml
laddphia 5,40 p. in,
B. M. FELTON. Preside
CHANGE OF HOIIR^.
DELAWARE, FRENOHTOWN AND NEW
CASTLE AND WILMINGTON RAILROAD
«s®? ■
OV ,a Monday. a... . M8 , r...o
.
ladolpt
Bride«
î
.«te
r ;
Janette
11 M|
! 1
«-ass;
Arrive î
10
elpliia for SEA FORD,
H
RK
«î*«
Air
lUe
4SC
vtsagzg.
slpl'ta,
KÂï

CLâOFÏ-IEÏÏai.
WÏÏIMLIIAM IL,. BlffBO&ITH, I
DENTIST.
IVO.lt« KI,\U STREET
'
DHLAWV
UK. WIT A. gArdM,
Brandywine Village,
D Kl.
Offlce
WILLIAM S. M'CAULLEY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
158 IVI.irkul
To
Street,
Ml NOTUN
WIUIAffl EÜFFiNimJJL
A T TO U.VIC
I\o. 17 1 Market Nlrcct,
WILMINGTON DEL .
XT. X. B. FOX'S
Bedding anil ^Farnit^re^ Store.
Vi;
'KNITURE UUP.
!i>
VS
ipply
ipplle
FRIST &ALLMON.
Lato of tho firm of A. Flaglor & Co.,
RE8PBCTFULLY in
tl.,.. i
E
ly oeciplf
and Staiplc
.gin
ringe« of
M
3SSs.
. all Hi vj
CARRIAGE MANUFACTORY,
Croner of Third ij- French sts ,
WILMINGTON.
GREGG it
2LAWARE.
reject folly
sr£Si
my
•lyte
tbU •■tablm
i by
I"
&
efolly a tie nil
KriTK
Filth Ward Urn;; Store.
GEO. B. THOMPSON,
DRUGGIST A PHARMACEUTIST,
Market anti 15 th Sis, Wilmington. Del.
.m WOULD RESPECTFULLY INFORM
> 1
fj
by
ally prop««
I. > -
fornihbctl at
ffV Btnff
)«m»-ly
DRUGGIST&PHARMACEUTIST,
V
I II I I
. ..UM ll
STREET.*
Krc±
tli»i
Kill
f
)
#
Frinted and Published by W. T. .Icondcll & E. It. Pierce, No 7, East Fourth Street. Wilmington, Del.
VOL. II.
.toicpli #t. tïilIT, Editor.
SATURDAY MOKMlVG, AUGUST 14, 1858.
SfEW SERIES, MO. It.
_ SHERIFF.
w*i
> r °
>
., Ii/i. -
M ed .«.Xi
. JESTER.
'ÄW
»rJuir
FOR SHERIFF.
»rSIIBKIFI
nplfl
rty.
Vk
CAN.V.
FOR SHERIFF.
Undersigned
ronpi-ctlYlly
.SHERIFF, by
p
U BÜRGE H. AYDBLOTT.
Georg
f or siicrill.
ttf SHi
ibjpcl
i 1
J.S. VALENTINE.
FOR SHERIFF.
e'ctlully olTe
IT- b .y
my.
lly •
I
Rr,
pi
, « K \ 1
NON
8IIERI F F.
>8 of New CatlU. CuUnh/l
DNSIDEHATIO."
Fellow Cili
s
E INDUCED
•SHERIFF. I
>•
■ p:
I I
r. GEMMILL.
\y
«nue
i 1
RUHR
FOR CORONER.,
^ :? h
5ft
'tank tid.Jy
J <V . BROOKS.
lOKOMU
*»>•«
v v
aplc
«S© I
;oroni
'pU-dg
FOR CORONER.
: UNDERSIGN
«r î
^ pMglng j
0\y
4 orOner
'V.-r
I
COttO N BR, pledging
lb« l'l-nplo H I'uriy
S 11 EMI AH BPF.NCKR.
' coiion E tira..
_ . y K L LO W 0 t TIZKNS:
,S
; '
»
L-ir î
i f the P.
illy.

ni
To the V
CRIBK
THOMAS
MUSLINS! MUSLINS!! MUSLINS!
1I1AKV IllZin
ci
Mu
iBlil
Sot
|)
sr.
121!
cor* only 11 «*■
G. S. &S. S. GRUBB'S BULLETIN.
£
nytir
! BiTnt'i
igl.:
itpiku 8
a
nlphin
■ny
tily
promptly i
«'iST 1
«'iST
U i < < « 1 i< *> • «VM itlïcN
i-pt by
SÄttJ
unlly
Spit
life
sap
i pi by '
#3
Ml/
Ilom and Carriage Auction
MART IN WILIIINOTOIV
T
St.
tnAV^'i
rly
,i,.
10 EXCURSIONISTS.
i»!»
•LUKEN Cl
"
»151
ißf
I. L. LEACH.
INEKAI.
C '•
Physician» and Invalid!

itjy
by
ipplle
^TTTT"
V
ifNSBI
«*••
111!
IN AtKIN,
THE 8THANGBR ON THE SILL.
I
Between broad fields of Wheat and cum,
la the lovely bom
The |»cqcIi tree li
ia Hi«
trang
I
J B U
\
»i
I
doorway still
d
B ■
10 sill.
fo
I
is (lie barn—and, ns of yore,
■nell the bay fro
A-.
io busy swallows throngi
Ind
rnful song ;
But tho
,0 ! painful proof—
ilia alieavca uro piled to the liea
Thi
is the orchurd—tho Very trees,
They knew my childhood so well top
cd tho shudowy momci
Till my life imbibed more of «hade th
The swing fi-om the iKUgh still sweeps the air.
But the stranger's children arc swinging there.
Where 1
It bubble*; the 6hnCy spring below;
With its bulruah brook whero tho hazcla grow,
'Twos there I found the calamus root,
And watched the minnows poise and shoot;
And hoard the robin lave his wi
But tiio stranger's bucket is at
the sill.

ng—
tho spring.
O, ye who daily
Step lightly, fo.
And when yoii i
The
Have puHscd within tho
To gladden eyes that a:
>rl I
the old barr
ink V.lln
ll
THE WILL.
A SKETCH FROM A LAWYER'S NÜTÈ lîÛOK.
Wlwt w't wo live for? tell life'« fiii
To oat
ale
drink,
Sleep, love and enjoy,
And then to lo
To talk of thing« we kno
Nothing but tiling« not worth the talking of.
Sir. It. Fane, Junior.
At
rlyl
of the morning, iu tho
commencement of tho year 183—, I
called upon by a young friend to utteud
the bedside of a dying man; who
coedingly anxious to bequeath his proper
ty to an individual out of tho line of legal
succession, and therefore desired tho
rity of professional aid iu tho construction
of his will.
Alihough I Iiave always felt extreme
repugnancy to the prcsenco of sickness,
and eschewed with
sibility the sight of mortal dissolution, yet
such wem tho peculiar circumstances urg
i in this iustance, that I could
refuse to accompany iny friend to the
sccuo of death.
I waited upon the feeble aud fast sink
ing being who had evinced such particular
desire lor pcrsoual attendance, aud
than ordinary
desire lor my pcrsoual attendance, aud
found him with all tho comfofts and
tient resignation tho
aud eyeless lac.
An inclination of tho-head of tho pa
nll the recognition of my eu
trance that his emaciated and decayed
energies admitted- The friends who stood
him, bade mo be seated by
tolre thut had been placed by tho bedside,
with other arrangements for my purpose,
and I hastened to the ncconiplishmeut of
the object of my visit, believing,
reason, from the symptoms already evinc
ed. that the patient had but a short time
to live.
I' 1
caution of tho grim
I had
ged for the per
Everything
formiMiec of my office, and tho friends
gathered closer around, with a mingled do
led in who would succoed
n estate, und to lend what assis
tais they Could to tho discharge of this
sob inn right of
It was with groat difficulty, and at pain
ful intervals of labor, that the patient wa«
ablo to make himself understood.
As distinctly however, as his situation
would allow, ho made known his bequests
in the following simple form and orders :
" I give and bequeath my family
assembled, with its
so hand
Biouin which
furniture, my equipage and my gold watch,
to my good uud true friend B-," refer
ring to tho young gentleman who had
ducted mo to him, and who stood at the
bedbido supporting bis beod at tbo moment
—" to my faithful nurse," f whd stood jnst
then at the foot of the bca with a tearful
eyo and expectant look) " 1 give and be
queath one thousand dollars, to be paid to
her immediately after my decease : to—to
— Margaret—" and hero the patient la
bored as if a paroxysm of oxcitement and
painful feeling would overcome him—" to
Margaret"—ho exclaimed, with
ural strength and Bbaip
the last tear that evaded from his glassy
eye, traced its tortuous course upon his
cold nnd sunken cheek—" I givo and be
queath the rest aud residue of all my es
It
queath the rest aud residue of all my es
tate, of whatever kind and wherev
ated, nnd may God grant her a long cn
joyent of its Christian and charitable use."
Tho greatest effort seemed here to bo ac
plished. Tho patient motioned his
desire to be laid in a more horizontal po
sition, which was obeyed by those arouud
him, aud turning his faco towards me, cast
anxious look upo . tho paper which 1
if enger to bear its contents.
It was read to him, and be signifying
his approval, extended his head as far as
his remnant of strength would permit, to
plete its oxecution. I placed iho pen
in his lingers; and guided his clammy baud
as it traced his name upon tho paper.
Nuture seemed to bave awaited this deed
she completed her course. $o
the witnesses prosent sigued their attention
to tho instrument whou tho startling and
thrilling sound ol the death rattle rung
through the btillncss of the dying cham
ber.
ho
1
} of uibrtaM
ll Id,
ll 111
A long aud deep drawn breath heaved
from tho breast of tho patient—and mourn
ing friends turning their faces from tho
deserted tabernacle of humanity, told too
surely that tho work of death
plisbed.
I gazed a moment in sad and mournful
feeling upon the vacaut eye and pnrtcd lips
of tho fresh corpse as it lay stiffening be
fore me, and thought over the words of the
poet —
U0C0U1
To hear tlic dying their faint i
And watch tbo duath-gluZe »mouth the waxen
check,
fiery eyeball fiertcly roll
Tosco
A» if it v
Or h
■th
ng «u
P
I he I aal clo J cr
bl
d the hum
Thi», this is woe !
Hastening- [ru
Me mansion uf lho. dead ;
An-I
thi) set
miaei y, I repaired t ) my residence, to shake
off the sadness in which the businoBS of
the last few hours had enveloped me, not
without a determination, however, to learn
at tbo earliest interview I could obtaio with
the friend of the testator, some particulars
of his history, and of her, the remem
of whom had exoited so much emo
tion on the dying bed.
Alter the funer >1 ritos had been fuith
fully performed, I sought tho person who
hud counected
ed, and received from him (ho following
amount of the deceased, and those
nectod with him :
with the eve
desorib
A number of years ego, Charles
the deceased,
a student of medicine
in that city. At this early period df life,
being then upon tho threshold of manhood,
he had Jvii cod groat qualities df mind and
heart, and had secured his confidence ns
well
the esteem of those whd knew him.
During tho prdBocütion of his studies
hero, his society
and omidst tho
ionnble life
with which ho
much sought after,
gay and busy inaEc of fash
d I ft s hid ti able associations
surrdunded, it was not
thought strange that ho sbduld delect an
object lor his more particular atlcntidnahd
confidence. Nor wheu his marked atten
tions ovmued in whom this confidence was
placed, was the surprise oi any one exoited,
for tho object selected was just such an oue
as a noble and discriminating mind, and a
good heart might be expected to single out.
• Jri 1 * ua *""^1 then just so lar his junior
in lile as td make their disparity in years
harmonize in ft parity of thought and fool
ing, Charles looked with all the bright and
promising prospective that adorus first love,
jo hi3 glance her soft and piercing eye
gave the ovor ready response of devotion,
and every approach to her presence
cd to stir a soul within him tlint was
though she had irradiated
around him, and infused him
1
* 1
P l
L;*
A short timo of such blissful revelry
passed, embalmed in a thousand dream*
df tho luture, and Charles was brought to
tho greeu box of the collegb td stdnd the
test of his matriculation in his profession,
He passed his examination with honor,
into the world with the
thereof, under tho bcu 1 of a
respected alma
L;* lo.
un oient und
r . Chari- a hud p>»*
of the We
his [
lii- I
rents residing i
India Is
Innds, from whom he had long he
rated while * '
guardian, and engaged i
of his education, aud
mination to put i
pressed desiro tc
In a few weoks he left this port
destination, leaving behind hi
ed faith to his beträfe' ^d ty
sept
the
of a friend
•1
the completion [
he felt u deter- 1
execution a long
visit them.
Charles arrived nt the home of Ills pa*
its, but found it desolate, and ruins of u !
beautiful mansion, with the surround
ing estate attached to tho domain of i
neighboring stranger,
had lately takou place to tho island; his
father had fallen a vioti
n I
Ati insurrection
the infuriate
dnoss of his own rebellious household,
and his mother, who with other ieiuftlefl of
the island, were early placed ou board u
vessel at tho nearest port, for security had
with her companions, long since been giv
lost at sea, tho vessel never hav
ing beou heard of since her departuie from
the island.
Overwhelmed with such au unexpected
aud tragical bereavement, and thrown up
od ttio world with a prospect or »oourUj
•gainst tbc .ligUtMt vU.itudo that might
orertake him, Uharlca lost all rconllcctTon
of Ida former hope, and happinen, jni^
eaVe "? '.\Zl IS? Z'': d T»'ft
''
Years passed by, and while be remain
ed in tbo place of bis nativity, sedulously
upied in tho prosecution of hla profes
ilia only means of livelihood, the
awet t retipi.nl of Ilia plighted lovo, still
"I
awet t retipi.nl of Ilia plighted lovo, still
bound in the enduring onoin of woman's s
pure and first pledged atiootion, bent like I
the droopiog lily booeatb tbo blast of un
anticipated neglect, and in seclusion from
»ooiotî, and the exiroiee of Ohrittian char- '
itica and devotion, sought a balm for her
wounded heart.
1
In a short period a change took place in
the government of tho island on which
Charles was resident, and a spirit of re
turning justice aud hiliuanity directed tho
attention of the authorities to the destitu
tion of tho estates which bad been ruth
lea-ly seized upon by the nearest surviving
iulmbitant, aftci the dreadful and bloody
slaughter of tho insurreutiooi
The evidence of tho Claim which Was
made by Charles to his patrimony
plain and clear, that he
first to receive fiis estate, aud by it, to be
placed again in a condition of competency.
A climate to which he was unaccustomed,
the effects of the sudden disasters that had
befallen him, and the assiduity with which
ho prosecuted his profession, had however,
made such fatal inroads upon his constitu
tion a« to leave little hopo for a long or
happy enjoyment of his new possessions.
By tho advice of his own judgment,
which was the ouly monitor admitted by
him iuto his confidence, he sold for the
fir^t price he could obtain, all bis interc
iu the islard, and sailed from it with the
determination of see king a more congenial
borne aud a last abiding place, in the laud
of his youthful remiuiscenoes.
Ho arrived at Philadelphia but n few
months previous to the period of bis de
, and sought und received the
g tbo
panionship of the very few of his early :
fricuds who were seen stauding around hit
bedside in tho hour of his death. First Of
these ho had plaoed the narrator of these
circumstances to me, who had been the
means of my introduction to Ur* painful
above described, and who had been
his classmate in hi£ proiesnioual studies.
Ho ventured not however, oveu to him
to breath tho name of her to whom ho bad
devoted the first fondest affection of bis
heurt, lost to his inquiry ho should invito
a rospouse, that Im fell his weak and shut
unable to withstand.
o and divert his atten
ibl •, from the devastation
that an incurable disej.-e was workiugup
his remnant of mortality, his frieud fre
Iqeutly induced him to take a-cut with bim
jiu his daily round of visits to thoso who
1 claimed his professional relief. Ou one of
the o occasions, just as tho friends were
111
tho
too
lips
be
the
To beguile hi
,j y
, leaving the door together, a servant dress
cd in a plain ami modest livery, c
the cab, and handed a note for the doctor,
Charles pointed to his frieud, to whom
tbo note was immediately delivered,
opouing the note, it proved to bo
I lope to a fee, with the request for the im*
mediate nttundauoe of thodootor upon a
poor woman who lay iu a dangerous situ
atiort.
t >
On
I n\.
No
igned to tbo request, but
the neat female chirograpby was immedi
ately recöguiEod b> the phykiciau.
It was the successor of several familiar
favors from
anonymous patron, who
had for somo time excited the liveliest ou
riosity of tho doctor; but of whom, with
all his
i- 'y, he could learn nothing
I' .rtUir tha.u that sho was called among the
/ °lfc.. t 4 0 .Christian lady; and that most of
her ijffie &ila doVoted to visiting the needy
sick,'uml administering to tho necessities
of tho unfditunate
destitute.
The nloutidn df thesexitoUmstanccs oli
cited a simil .r sympathy iu tho breast of
the waiui-hearted Charles, and ho urged
his friend to hasten to tho direction given
in tho note, in tho hopo that they might
get a glimpse at leäst, of the being, who
could in such relitiog and ostentatious sin
eerily, exercise th'Ö true aud holy devotion
0 f Christian charity,
They soon arrived at tbC plabe dcsigtii
ted, &ud found theuisclves iu tho midst of
the most wretched poverty and destitution.
They entered tho house, tho tottering and
I rail condition of which scorned scarcely
to possess stability enough to render a
tnenUry delay beneath its ragged cloislor
seonro, and asked of one df tlm inmates
who confronted them at the entrance, to
poiut the way to tho sick woman's chain
her.
The poor woman who seemed to rocog
11; ' an i_jP°i nte d up a
»»I r " »ciiolo r o them, and shook i
rrow
head
at she muttered to them that it
over, and that it
old lady any good,
They immediately hastened lo the pa
tient, but tho great object df their Curiosi
ty was not thelo.
*b
too late to do tho
The good ludv, they
tr to their inquirids; had
just left, to avoid being seen by any stran
gers that might bo comin r in. Iü büe
corner of tho miserable
mockery df a
io table aud
■ wli >1 • furui
told i
, upon u
bed, whioh w«th a plain
incjlo chair, constituted
ot the nppartinont, iay
•tretched the ius.-ilsible dud d^ing patient.
Charles seemed to take particular iute
in the case, und his friend permitted
him lo havo tho entire diraotiau of their
proceedings. -As they had been admon
in um! at the door, they found the poor
'ast all hopo. Charles turned to the
- -F' 1 ''l^ -, ffYi -T- *
il h r i;' rlio knew anything of the
pii
t
Slio replied thut sho knew but little, an 1
with her but a few days, at the
id under the pay of the good la
d benevolent
AH that she know of this
that she lived in
had bet
request
dy, who had been
to nil the poor,
good lady
which information was eagerly received by
Charles,
kind
~~ ® ar ,. ,. , , f
b « >'!»' 1 a,lpr » b "V b# °
thought aim could dm happj.
" V ™ r ," oma " 1 1 CIol " , '" od Ch "™*'
hm c«rp MrnWrt
a ml Consolation to hef in her dying hour,
sud he Inidwa not how wretchedly destitute
ia - ,. But bia j"
a : r ' l 0 'J 3 DUrae .'„ J w 10 1111
d '™ a aa " "P°" ,
"C mrlra, replied the woman "Charles
«» tl* »nino tliot never loft ltor lip., while
s I le ji ad atrengtU lo utter tt.
"Clinrlca,' »lowly murntjirod ho-lot
ook "P 0 ," b,r , fao fl ?" d ld dd . 1 ' , . 3,a ." ,
>, ll » sle "? d •? bcd !, and ra,8od . , lb ?
' L'S>»* ' hat bad b ' d har emaciated
ftat " r " 8 from■ bim-Ui. eyes seemed to
start from tbo.r sooketa, in tho wildneM of
their glare, asm the last oonvulsion of death
od down in .his memoran
The old lady, continued to
, had
d while she
da
dciilly seen better days,
igtmtion
upon her, she
, at every interval of strength, prayed
bo spared, if possible to hoar of hersotl
scorned to.bow with Christian
to tho afflictions that
said. Slid
gnizod her.
he
his
wou] u

^
gnizod
"Mother! mother!" he exclaimed, and
fell lifeless by her side, with £is
ed around the dccreptd form.
The dying woman raised her eyelids,
and looked upon the stranger who had thus
aroused h*jr A smile passed ovef lief
pallid features, hef lips quivered as if she
look
tion
und in au Instant she had
breathed her last.
A moment passed, while all around stood
speechless aud motionless at ibis affecting
After every means of roscuscitu
tion had been U-cd upon Charles almost
without effect, his friend disengaged his
arms, and carried him in his unconscious
the cab, which stood at tho door,
h
ed
and plaoed him in it.
given, and
A few hasty directions
a purse delivered to the nurse
requisite to tho deceased, nnd tho doctor
drove with every speed to Charles's
dence. «
Early that day the corpse
to the. residence of tbo
ment conducted with every attention and
respect that oould be given.
Charles remained in l._
al days, été ho
erstand what bad taken placo.
gradually reoovered himself
: ruasoii with his friend upon the oireumstan
ou» that had transpired,
Hw mother had believod him lost to her
! fcrevor, after an ineffectual effort
cover him, duriug his absence on his visit
to the island. Sho had believed with truth,
I the massacre of her husband ; and arrived
i-, a strange place, with her health enfee
j tied and destroyed by a shipwreck that she
. bad experienced in the vessel in which she
1 had departed from tho island, she had liu
. gered out a, uiLeranie end to her existence
! In the most abject poverty and destitution.
i Ah soon as his recovering energies pef
mitted, Charles sought the hovel in whioh
his mother had lived, and dealt out the
most liberal compensation to all who bad
; in any way administered to hor relief.
But everywhere that ho sought to bestow
his reward he was met with tho assuranoo
of ( of tho uuworthincss and undoservodnossof
recipient, aud the confirmation that |
at
"
■>VI 1
, aud tbc inter
his unCofiscioits
able to
ftoto for
He
! U
to
the good Christian lady had done every
thing.
... . , . ... ™
,n g .
obb,Dg
" m°oS' tl7 d S
dr i: :\£ ?i°^ "STf "»■ r "
,i -„..l _ «V .
2 ÄÄ 1°.
itv „..-I» —lA .1 . " **
tbooharactcr and hiaSofTS.' j
A, «os however, as she discovered s o
was before a gsutlemau and a «ranger as
if chocked by aurpriao, her eyelids fall and
she drcppc,/alow P and graceful cbitance
Somewhat confused, she took her seat, aud
modestly asked, if there was noisome mis
take iu her answering to his nail.
Charles inquired a! well as he could i
to her identity as the good lad y, and being
perfectly satis'fied ou this pointf ho crossed
th, rdomi and placed himself before her
his hooded knees, begged tho ,rivile"e
of cipressing tho gratitude of a son. fol
the holy bcocyolcnce that had heonbeitow
od npou a dying mother.
A few words of explanation informed
the lady of all tho circumstances of the
reoognition in tho sick chamboti and hi""
ing diffidently requested that
should bo made to tho part sho had dis
charged to the poor lady, the benefactress
desired
To
allusion
two questions
With great calmness and a placidity of j
manacf that transcended all former
oeption of humanity that had entered Into
tho mind of Charles, she asked of him a
few particulars of his oarly separation
from his family.
"Had he been at tormcr times a
answer lo
ident
"Had he been at tormcr times a
of this city Î" and " whether he had not
received a professional eduedtiod heifoî"
To these questions Charles gave
tivc roply.
'•■Then," continued she, "perhaps you
have some recollections of a young lady to
whom you professed flomb attachment iu
your early days."
'•leg}" replied he, "and to whom I
plighted my bduor aud my lortii"
"Huro you kept that iaith to her!"
asked his fair inquisitor.
auswered Un, "I beliove I have.
I bavo uever forgotten her—I havo
dreamed of loving ündlber. uurtng a
ident
uffir
her; yet so altered were my u
thoso in tho possession of which I proffer
ed myself, that I deemed myself unaccep
table iu hor, and discharged her from
bound to me.
exo!aimed tho good
*y
obligation by which she
'Ignorant man," e
lady, rising from her chair, as if her whole
framo seemed to dilate with awakened
pride, "how little did you know of tho ti
dclity of woman's heart. Behold your
Margaret—she who plighted your first af
fection to you, and to vihoin you had re
turned your pledge for weal dr wo—see
het before you, yet under the sanotity of
honorable woman's first pledge—
swerved and unchanged through all tbc
lapse of time."
Charles
withdrew. Sho warnod him that their in
terview had been already protracted
long, and thnt their individual conditions,
lier well inilrbd habits, and his delicate
health, sinking fast under an undisguised
discaso, debarsod the faintest hope of tho
Consummation of their early promises.
Charles after a second effort and a Sec
ond intimation, siitlilar to that Which he
met at first, withdrew, and sought tbo
strictest tetiraoy of his home. The scenes
through whioh tin had passed} had opera
ted vyitb uiiich êeVeritÿ ilpbn his In altb,
and in a fctV dajrs he took his bed, never
again to ri_
At his last moment lié felt the tebuke
which his doubts had plaoed him, iu rela
,
?
to
of
to press her hand, but she
from it.
which his doubts had plaoed him, iu rela
tion to the early idol of his love, and to
the good Christian lady—to Margaret—td
his Margaret, be bequeathed tho largest
portion of a handsome estate.
-
dO?
this
yod
Mixture of Grass Seeds. —We ques
tion whether sufficient attention has been
paid to this subject i
England, and
mix several kinds df seed together, when
Ujiag «vnu tLcir lauds tu grass, imcause
grow better tbau others
feront seasons, and HS.stibh a mixture
furirsheflà succession of fresh herbage in
different parts of the
country. In
tho Continent, fanners
but
dll
iu
We
the following mixture tried, and
recommend it :
h
prepared
pouuds of red olover,
grass, five pounds of white clover, and
half a bushel of red-top. Let this be salt
ed down with two bushels of plaster.
Ten
peck of berd
Hogs should always have access to the
ground, and for breading
Ipcusibly necessary- Tho want of this has
| been the death of many a fine litter
To Destroy Rats.— When a house is
infcHted with rats which refuse to nibble
at tostod cheese and the usual baits, a few
drops of highly rented oil of rbodium,
poured on the bottom of a cage trap, will
almost invariably attract it full of the
" mischievous rodents " before morning.
Wo have known this to be tried with extra
ordinary success. Where a trap baited
with all manner of edibles had failed to
attract a single rat, the oil of rhodium
caused it to be
after uigbt, until the house
the noisome visitors.
\\
plelely orowded night
"t
Fattening Chickens.—F eed them,
round
says the Irish farmers' Gazette,
rice, well boiled, mixed with barley or
oatmeal, moistened vitb milk, and keep
the coops and trou ha scrupulously clean,
der (he chickens. They
iay also i;et a little bruised oats daily.
Haruowino Turnips. —Whero turnips
_ broadcast, they may bo safely
hafrowed when tho seed leaf is coming out.
This will check the w^cds, thin the turnips,
and yet leave pleuty in the ground for a
crop.
i
it i > indis
A BOY'S ENCOUNTER WITH A
1 • BEAR.
«r ..,
—* 7 «t
='f ° f
S ° f ,r0Ub '°' t ''° '** " ™*"' 'supposed
" Kar " r .
. inteution of releasing bis pigsbin, threw a
rulbl r '«Ä**?.*•«•
consternation, a huge bear, instead of the
j d ?*' rcli "1 ai ^« d «* h ?| d ,"P°°
o S ° S V i b "" M ' f - '»•
t,U 3' «nermea, »I nd no assistance within a
'l u " , " r of 1 m ' lc . made fora
Z ° ! ,b °5 6 ,' C iD0 l; 0 ■
torrîî th » 6 J hat
bo8, T ,b ,° hüg ,° boar
PUrttunÿ him hast,I, up tho hranchos of
he8a P hn 8'. »•""* «'"««d h,s breath,
10 for h «'P. and >" » td " I» re
lù'Af, 0 , P r0 S r E" °î b ! ä 1 " M ? ,1 * nt l b . c « a " *»
f o ak ? r tb °,;* l>ll, ^' lk bl " ruln bad cllu . t<!be . d
, , 1 braDC 1 bcs 1 "A " ' r0 " §"Pt >" d «vi
don '>y .°? ,0 " la *ÿ "P?" " d *'ntl[ tHdrsel
Sî.Ï °° '' Cd "
, p ,
6 m, „ ,,, ,
„, lb T' l d , ,cr ** med l d >' d y.
u " d cad - ,a ' orea •» bh >*k alf
paw
ap
td be almdst rtithiri
of tbo
brauches by kicking them down with his
bare feet. In this he partially succeeded,
when the bear made a vigorous stretch of
her muscles and suixed the lad by the foot,
' " of her fangs under the great
toe on the right foot, and aliohtly coratch
mg the side of the foot with her other nip
per teeib. |
At this juncture the shaking to and fro
of the sapling with their United vtcigllt
upon it, caused it td bend over liutil tho
top nearly apprdachcd thb groilou; when,
provideBtiall^r, ihe irionster lost his hold,
the branches, till he
j
sinking
provideBtiall^r, ihe irionster lost his hold,
aud young Foster, bravely clinging to bis
grasp, with unshaken nerve, was elevated
by the rising of the capling. BruiD, how
oae her determination td
üddj; riüd iigalrf s^'rdHg
ras ovidoutly t>o miioh
dog,and nipped him so tight
as to mako him r> linquish his hold. But
the courage of bruin gave way, and she
attempt to tree, whon " Keeper"
again seized her by the thigh and brought
her back. She notv made Tor a large elm,
and ascended some forty five feet, and j
perched in a crotch tosuun her assailants.
did not 1
upon hla
iuto the tree, bdt
fatigued to ii
At this stage df the Contest the lad's fath
er reached the spolj and saw the hdge
monster standing on her hind legs, her
bjdy exteuded up the tree, growling fioroe
ly, the lad nearly exhausted, clinging to
o, ouly a few^feet up, with tho bb
streaming irom InlL^tccratocl foot. Ql
|V: 1; [
slender a laddor.—
1 il-'
with a club
hand, showod a
ront,
of breath with running. His
arrived flvra another pari
though
eldest î
of tho farm, wheu they suecocded in res
cuing George from his retreat. Mean
while several oth r persons arrived
s pot î aud a lad
William add Walter
the spot, with a dog of
and courage, whioh immediate
ly seized tbj bear by tho root of tho
and in tile struggle brought him td the
got hold
^„afsi
^
« >M
dispatched for Messft
uluoril, whd tare
than
ground. Brui
shoulder of the

was thon despatched for two of our I
Ninirods, who, by a joint attack both iu
front and rear, brought her hear.hip to tho
urouud by a well directed fire .—Stradjoid
;
[Cat:tula) Beacon.
They Say.—T he following dialSgtie
which we fiud in an exobange, is sd
■Ppli-1
givo it placo in
pnper, hoping it may prove profitable
to those who may see them.-elvcs therein
portrayed ;
Mr. Tattle. —\ ou are a stranger i»
kiud of stared about
, as if tbo
cable hereabouts, that
parts, I rcckoiL mister.
r. Hollins. —What makes jeu think
1 i - < -
dO?
Ma T.—Well y
as you got out of the oarR,
place didn't ldok foiriiliaK ,
Mb. R.—Do you know a Mia. Rollins i
this town ?
yod
this town ?
Mr. T.—Is it she that lives in the b #
the hill yonder Î
lo
cottage
Mil. R.—Tho
Mr. T.—Walk I
*t say I visit
tell you r ajl about her.
had.
but I
woman. !
Mr. R.—Why do you say
anything Ibfc idattef #itb httt ?
Mil. T.—She has had a bard time of it. !
youngjthingl A mouth after her 1
marriage, aud just as she got fixed thïroj
iu the cottage, her scamp of a husband
off to California.
Mr. R.—Scamp of a husband*! Ran
off! ( Indignant.) What do you mean
himself.) Excuse
off for ?
Mr. T.—For robbing a bank. So they
that! Is
j liqo
' j
* i
Checking
did be ruu
ir?
\\ hat
aay
Mr R.—Who say ?
Mr. T.— They say.
Mr. R.—Who
I
They ?
Mu. T.—The world generally. Every- ;
body says. People say. _
Mr. R.—Can you name a single pers-n
beside yourself who says it?
Mr. T.—Really, so many people sif it
that I cannot think of any one in p'tirticu- ;
Ur.
Mr. R.—Perhaps I will quicken your
memory by-aud-by. Biff wbat of Mrs
Rollins? , .,
Mr. T.—She's on tbc point of ticing 1
married again. So they say.
Mr. R.— Indeed I To whom ?
m"' V T ,7J",rr n dw ' rd
dl (Alidt.) Her owu
(■AW.) Arc jou sure of this !
Mu. T -O, yes ! U. h.s bc,u r».- ;
d, o S ... the hoo ec with her. The, take i
romsutie te.lh. .(«aether. The wodd.ng «
to take pl.ee .u.u.ed.stely. So they
a
Mr. R.—Who say?
Mr. T.—Well, I told you. They say
Wbat would you havo more ?
Mull.—Wbp are they ?
Mr. T.—How should I know? You
tho most unreasonable man lever mu
i with. I say they say, aud you ask who
The Common .wealth
BOOK K JOB PRINTtlvil
ESTABLISHMENT.
m rt I ! ne W*" Btly. »M«J E*pe«i
tiuuaiy *r«r«3a«
*4H» . .
r«, H«*dbiil
phi
Card*» - J Mat tons* Cravar
rreiraniBt«) Ac.«
1:
Vuui-i do Kl
nr -a
nrrk .
Oflice il». 7 Km*, ill» St.,
•ay. As if any better authority could btJ
given! j> \ %
BIr. It.—Did TUti/ami. cifçr say that
you Wfro a meddtaig, > J>r)+hg. gossiping,
impertinent, • n(WpreVotia,.i uh-vriipufou?,
malicious ri^wler,of.absurd sjxijifêrs? »
Mr. Ty^lXha il ci o* ^dii mean, sir, by
such language ? I'll have you arrestod.
Lnwyej Fleeceum is my particular frioud v
If there was only a witness at hand, sir*
I d make you pay a pretty
Keep your bauds off, sir 1 ' No matter, air ;
—kick me ! I sec a witness yon*
der. I'll have you arrested for assault
and battery. Kick
for this,
if you |ike. , Jft
Mr. li.—I sliali oot indulge you so far.
But take Waruing,,oir, ,how you quoto Mr.
'Iheu Say for your Scandalous reports.—
Old They Say is a .liar; and a.ooward. .
Mr. T,— TbtU's libelous, sir. I wish I
knew y< u
MR. R.—My name is Rollins, and that
cottage op.the hill, there, ia mijic.
Mr. T,-Whcugh !'You Mr. RolUna !
Mit. R.—If be
Mn. Tt—Didn'i yotl once
Mit .H. t dnee pl'icked a
bauk in a friend's garden, wheroupon
other friend playfully
bad caught mo rqbbing a bank. 3om©
Irish laborers heard him say it, and may.
have misunderstood it This, probably,
is the foiindnlion for your story.
Mr. # T.—B ut isn't your wife goirig tl
be married T Doesn't she walk oiltovory
day with a youn
Ma. R.—Thal ÿôtlug riian is hor
oonsiimptive brother, who has
for a change of air. Let
friend, T liey S«y, to look before
another time,
tob a. bank Î
front a
marked that he

advise you,
you leap
For Tho Commonwealth.
The state of Tunis boss
same natural advantages of soil and oli
mate as Morocco. In aueien^^awas
| one of the gfnnafics of
Wheat, Maize,
THE REGENCY OF TUNIS.
nearly the
Dates, and oth<
and Indigo hav
as articles
of Saffronj^H
The pricJ^^K
Bed
parts
qgs?—,
•Sèixsxwr*
gattiercd. Tb.
î""''? cannot corn« thronsi
ÎSK
shall To pé.rmittod to enter the ports
of tho Kingdom 6( Tünis; and freely trade
with the subjects and Inhabitants thereof.,
and tho ssuio prcvMogeg arc cztedded
all vessels belonging td iHo subjects and
inhabitants of thb Kingdom df Ti/nisiu tbc
ports df tho United Stabs, each paying
the usual duties.
No official data are at hand upon which
to b ise an estimate of the character and
vnluo of tho trado between the United
States aud this Kingdom dwiug to its Iso
lated and unknown situation. There is
do direct trade, betwecu tho United States
and Tuuis, Commercial movcmeuU pass
ing mainly by way of Malta and Marseilles.
In 1852 there eutcrcd tho port of T ~
311 vessels, with an aggregate of 33,321
tons, aud there cleared 331 vessels,
j U ri
.r
aggregntc of 33,425 tons.
The total port charges
I Goletta (tho harbor of Tunis) amount to
86,51) for lights, anchorago, health office
&c. for vessels over 30 to b ; under 30 tons
half that amount These charges apply
; alike to all vessels, either Tunisian or
I Itfrelen.
entering the"
articles from the Dtlited States
which usu iHy fltid d ffltfrkbt In Ttinis
in I i( U m ( T babbo, sHiall fluiglits of Flotff,.
|
T
I i( U m ( T babbo, sHiall fluiglits of Flotff,.
| c henp c »Hon fabrics, Provisions, Cheese,,
galt B) f , Dried Beef, Hams, Pickles,
an d Pj cuit; but it would not bo advisa
blc t< ■ isk sending largo
t these articles. The coasting trado is per
mitted to all foreign vessels, without pay-,
j ing any other duty than those named in
J (j 10 tariff. Quarantine of observation is
fixed at 10 days, for which tho vessel pays
81,2fl per day. Besides ,thia them.,ay
dtbef taies levied, amounting in the wnoie
lo 8 ^, 82 " ,
.The foregoing is extracted from Mac*
grego^'s Commercial Relations,
to which farther information may be
. f
had.
!
" Do you know the prisoner Mr. J*do'ei !"
" Yes; to the bone." •
4< What is his character Î" ,
" Didn't know that he had any."
1 " Does he live near you !"
"| So Hear that ho has only «poi
filings for firewood in eight yed.s.
Is
nt five
Au Irish witness in the Worchester Po
the
j liqo Court refused
' j Bible the other 4ay,
* i reason of his stubborn
bo sworn
d whan asked thq
, replied, ".Alt'.
American I nm! What the
of getting naturalized, if I
the Yankees do ?"
devil's tbo
»'t swear
I
Paper from Béét Root. —A new.
material for paper is said to have been.
; discdferéfl in the fibre of the beet root,,
Which feniainf. after sugar-making aud
disïtfttaôop. It is twcuty per cent cheaper
than common paper, aud ha- bepu used iu
it oartr idges at Woolwich arscpql. It is to.
; introduced and tested ill this :o'tft!?v.
of the Westeru
There is a
Mrs- State« who has moved so often that when
ever «covered comes near tho,
1 fiouse, his chickens a!l march up, fall
their backs, Rod cross their legs, ready to
be carried to the next stopping plaec.
I»TE«wTj|ia 10
has forced to a sickly seDtlmootsl
bood „„„ lbau ono . h J alfof ottr mor bidly
r».- ; w#tiv , poct5 . Kilhcr .will »ilk iu iufsa
take i J ,■ uiy in curl , , lld roJ( .. co l.
« 0 ^ ä ^ f B m .„ lloo( , wQ1 brin( ,
p 0 6 My i u ' ita uorst form».
... r
say The last North Indiana .Can/creoco of,
the Methodist Church adopted a resolution.
that no person should bo, admitted as i i
You member of that body, who is in tbo habit
mu of using tobacco in (be common way, with
who out agreement to discontinue tbo praotioe.

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