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The Sunday mirror. (Wilmington, Del.) 1880-18??, July 25, 1880, Image 3

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Jmmlat; fgmor.
WILMINGTON, DEL., JULY 25 1880.
WILD OATS.
ir'd my wild oals long ag
Ai
•K
But find the
And not t
•P very
th
lick and fast— ,
ild
lack i
Th
gth is j
; the
■ Hi
They're hardly worth
bcautily the »\
>8
Wild fie
And
ild
Wild zephy
i sing,
dull.
uf
Youth in tl
(When g
I
s),
vn beyond the child
ills its hopes and fe;
must all be wild one
\...
And ■
shest Chart!
vers lose their
Wild lie
Who
fa
eked thir
Wild I
In
rth wa
ild whe
Yet both we
Till pec.pl
The Dowers
I"
poets praised an
-they never nam
Youth's life is coming, while to age
quickly going;
s very dull
gay and ki
with the w>
Ihi m 1
The '
'll» gone.
Old Time si
To youth
while «
igc—
grow old,
««cold.
îf wild thir _
vc of wild ducks, ceases.
Our Ic
And,
When yc
ildest hope h
ient Che;.
As demi
I
Bj
y be fi
Though
Fleet I
And shows th
Is ready for the cropping.
OP'
stopping,
that youth has sown
abroad the seed, and dec
.-xistence '' jolly,"
Youth ca
It mak
But in the aft
Ui
able fully.
will show
When age ii
Wild oats wen
And valuclc
UNDINE.
TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH.
CHAPTER VIII.
THE DAY AFTER THE MARRIAGE.
A bright morning light wakened the
young people; and Huldbrand lay musing
silently. As often as he had dropped
asleep, he had been scared by horrible
derams of spectres, who suddenly took the
form of fair women, or of fair women who
were transformed into dragons. And when
he started up from these grim visions, and
saw the pale, cold moonlight streaming in
at the window, he would turn
look toward Undine; she lay slumbering
in undisturbed beauty and peace. Then
he would compose himself to sleep again
again to wake in terror. When he
looked back upon all this in broad daylight,
angry with himself for having let a
• suspicion, a shade of distrust of his beautiful
wife, enter his mind. He frankly confessed
to her this injustice; she answered him only
by pressing his hand, and sighing from the
bottom of her heart. But a look, such as
her eyes had never before given, of the
deepest and most confiding tenderness, left
him
arose cheerfully and joined the family in the
sitting-room. The three others were gather
ed round the hearth, looking uneasy, and
neither of them having ventured to speak
his thoughts yet. The Priest seemed to be
secretly praying for deliverance from evil.
But when the young husband appeared,
beaming with happiness, the cf
brightened up; nay, the Fisherman ven
tured upon a few courteous jokes with the
Knight, which
good housewife. Meanwhile Undine had
dressed herself, and
could not help rising to meet her, and stood
still, astonished ; the young creature was
the same, yet so different. The Priest
the first to address her, with
anxious
he
doubt that she forgave him. So he
faces
a smile even from the
came in ; they
ir of pa
tcrnal kindness, and when he raised his
hands in benediction, the fair woman sank
on her knees, trembling with pious awe. In
a few meek and humble words she begged
him to forgive the folly of the day before,
and besought him, with great emotion, to
pray for the salvation of her soul. Then
rising, she kissed her foster parents, and
thanking them for all their kindness, she
said : " Oh
my heart how much you have done for me,
how deeply grateful I ought to be, dear,
dear people !" She seemed as if she could
not caress them
ing the dame glance toward the breakfast,
she went toward the hearth, busied herself
arranging and preparing the meal, and
would not suffer the good woman to take
the least trouble herself.
feel from the bottom of
gh ; but soon, observ
So she went on all day ; at once a young
matron, and a bashful, tender, delicate
bride.
The three who knew her best were
moment expecting this mood to
of her crazy
every
change, artd give place to
fits ; but they watched her in vain. There
was still the same
sweetness. The Priest could not keep his
eyes away from her ; and he said more than
once to the bridegroom, " Sir, it was a
jjreat treasure which Heaven bestowed upon
you yesterday, by my poor ministration ;
cherish her worthily, and she will be to you
a blessing in time and eternity."
gelic mildness and
Toward evening, Undine clasped the
with modest tenderness, and
Knight's
gently led him out before the door, where
the rays of the setting sun were lighting
the fresh grass, and the tall, taper
The young wife's face
up
stems of trees,
wore a melting expression of love and sad
ness, and her lips quivered with some
ious, momentous secret, which
yet be
trayed itself only by scarce audible sighs.
She silently led her companion onward;
if he spoke, she replied by a look which
gave him
whole heaven of love and timid submis
So they reached the banks of the
which had overflowed, and the
finding the wild torrent
direct answer, but revealed
sion.
stream
Knight started
changed into a gentle rippling brook, with
out a trace of its former violence left.
/
" By to-morrow it will have dried up com
pletely," said the bride, in a faltéring
voice, " and thou mayest begone whither
thou wilt"—" Not without thee, my Un
dine," said the Knight, playfully; "
sider, if I had a mind to forsake thee, the
Church, the Emperor, and his ministers
might step in, and bring thy truant home."
—" No, no, you are free ; it shall be as you
please 1" murmured Undine, half tears,
half smiles. " But I think thou wilt not
cast me away ; is not my heart bound up in
thine ? Carry
opposite. There I will know my fate,
could indeed easily step through the little
waves ; but I love to rest in thine
thou mayest cast me off ; this may be the
last time." Huldbrand, full of anxious
emotion, knew not how to answer. He took
her up in his arms and carried her over,
recollecting that from this very island he
had borne her home to the Fisherman on
the night of his arrival. When there, he
placed his fair burden on the turf, and was
going to sit down by her ; but she said," No,
sit there, opposite me—I will read my doom
in your eyes, before your lips have spoken
it. Now listen, and I will tell you all."
And she began •—
over to that little island
I
! and
" You must know, my own love, that in
each element exists a race of beings, whose
form scarcely differs from yours, but who
very seldom appear to mortal sight. In the
flames, the wondrous Salamanders glitter
and disport themselves ; in the depths of
earth dwell lhe dry, spiteful race of Gnomes ;
peopled by Wood-nymphs,
the forests i
who are also spirits of air ; and the sea, the
rivers, and brooks, contain the numberless
tribes of Water-sprites. Their echoing halls
of crystal, where the light of heaven pours
in. with its
and stars, are glorious to
dwell in ; the gardens contain beautiful coral
plants, with blue and red fruits ; they wan
er over bright
shells, among the hidden treasures of the
old world, too precious to be bestowed
these latter days, and long since covered by
the silver mantle of the deep ; many a no
ble monument still gleams there below, be
dewed by the tears of Ocean, who garlands
it with flowery sea-weeds and wreaths of
shells. Those that dwell there below,
-sands, and gay colored
than
noble and lovely to behold, far more
mankind. Many a fisherman has had a
passing glimpse of some fair water-nymph,
rising out of the sea with her song ; he
would then spread the report of her appari
tion, and these wonderful beings came to be
called Undines. And you
Undine."
a
as
be
see before
you, my love,
The Knight tried to persuade himself
in one of her wild
that his fair wife
inoods and had invented this strange tale in
sport. But though he said this to himself,
he could not for a moment believe it ; a
mysterious feeling thrilled him ; and, un
able to utter a word, he kept his eyes riveted
the beautiful speaker. She shook her
head sadly, heaved a deep sigh, and went
* We might be happier than our human
call you fellow
forms are alike,) but for
We and the other children
fellow-creatures, (for
creatures,
great evil.
of the elements, go down to the dust, body
and spirit ; not a trace of
when the time comes for you to rise again to
shall have perished
native sands, flames, winds, and
souls ; the elements
live, close over
die ; and we light spirits live
remains ; and
glorified existence,
with
waves. For we have
move us, obey
us when
as free from care as the nightingale, the
gold-fish, and all such bright children of
Nature. But no creatures rest content in
their appointed place. My father who is a
mighty prince in the Mediterranean Sea,
determined that his only child should be en
dowed with a soul, even at the cost of much
suffering, which is ever the lot of souls.
But a soul
while
be infused into one of
the closest
race, only by being united i
i bands of love to one of yours. And
1 ha ve obtained a soul ; to thee I owe it, O
best beloved ! and for that gift I shall ever
bless thee, unless thou dost devote my whole
futurity to misery. For what is to become
should thou recoil from me and cast
t
In
to
Ml
me off? Yet I would not detain thee by
deceit. And if I
now ; go back to the land alone ;
plunge into this brook ; il is my uncle, who
leads a wonderful, sequestered life in this
forest, away from all his friends. But he is
powerful, and allied to many great rivers ;
and as he brought me here to the Fisher
man, a gay and laughing child, so he is
ready to take me back to my parents, a lov
ing, suffering, forsaken woman."
She would have gone on ; but Hulbrand,
full of compassion and love, caught her in
his arms, and carried her back. There, with
tears and kisses, he swore never to forsake
his beloved wife ; and said he felt more bles
sed than the Greek statuary Pygmalion,
whose beautiful statue dame Venus trans
formed into a living woman. Hanging on
his arm in peaceful reliance, Undine return
ed ; and she felt from her inmost heart,how
little cause she had to regret the crystal pal
aces of her father.
leave thee, saÿ so
of
to
his
a
;
CHAPTER IX.
HOW THE KNIGHT AND HIS YOUNG BRIDE
DEPARTED.
When Huldbrand awoke from sleep the
next morning, he missed his fair compan
ion ; and again he
doubt, whether his marriage, and the lovely
Undine, might not be all a fairy dream.
But she*
tormented with a
reappeared, came up to him
and said, "I have been out early, to see if
my uncle had kept his word. He has recal
led all the straying waters into his quiet bed,
and now takes his lonely and pensive course
through the forest as he used to do. His
friends in the lake and the air are gone to rest
also ; all things have returned to their usual
calmness ; and you may set out homeward
on dry land,
brand felt as
be
the
the
as you please. " Huld
if dreaming still, so little could
he understand his wife's wonderful relations.
But he took no notice of this, and his
sweet Undine's gentle attentions :
ed every uneasy thought away.
charm
A little while after, as they stood at the |
door together, looking over the fair scene J
with its boundary of clear waters, his heart.
toward this cradle of his love
yearned
that he said,—" But why should
so soon ? we shall never spend happier
have passed in t
go away
in yonder world, than
peaceful nook. Let us at least see two
three more
Lord wishes," answered Undine,with cheer
ful submission ; " but, you see, the old peo
ple will be grieved at parting with
it is ; and if we give them time to be
quainted with my soul, and with its
powers of loving and honoring them, I
fear that when I go, their aged hearts will
break under the load of sorrow, As yet
they take my gentle mood for a passing
whim, such as
ly, like a calm
lulled : and they will soon begin to love
some favorite tree or flower in my place.
They must not learn to know this newly ob
tained, affectionate heart, i
flowings of its tenderness, just at the mom
ent when they are to lose me for this world ;
and how could I disguise it from them, if
remained together longer ?"
go down here."—" As my
u lii'n
-.
they saw me liable to former
the lake when the winds
the first over
Huldbrand agreed with her ; he went to
the old couple, and finding them ready to
consent, he resolved upon setting out that
very hour. The Priest offered to accompany
them ; after a hasty farewell the pretty
bride
band, and they crossed the stream's dry bed
quickly, and entered the forest,
shed silent but bitter tears, while the old
folks wailed after her aloud. It seemed as
if some foreboding were crossing their minds
of how great their loss would prove.
placed on the horse by her hus
Undine
The three travelers reached the deepest
shades of the forest, without breaking si
lence. It
passed through the leafy bowers : the graeçj
fui woman sitting on her noble steed, guai^
side by the venerable Priest in
the other
a fair sight to behold as the
ded
one
the white habit of his order ;
by the youthful Knight, with his gorgeous
attire and glittering sword. Huldbrand had
eyes but for his precious wife ; Undine
who had dried her duteous tears, no thought
Qfcll into a
but for him ; and they
noiseless interchange of glances and signs,
which at length was interrupted by the
sound of a low murmur,proceeding from the
Priest and a fourth fellow-traveller, who had
joined them unobserved. He wore a white
robe, very like the Priest's dress, except
that the hood almost covered his face, and
the rest of it floated round him in such
large folds that he was perpetually obliged
to gather it up, throw it over his
otherwise arrange it ; yet it did not seem
to impede him at all in walking ; when the
young people saw him he
saying, " And
orthy father, I have dwelt in the
so, my
forest for many a year, yet I am not what
For as I told
you commonly call a hermit,
you, I know nothing of penance,
think it would do
makes me so fond of the woods is, that I
have a very particular fancy for winding
through the dark shades and forest walks,
with my loose white clothes floating abouj
and then
do I
much good. What
pretty sunbeam w!u
me as I go." " You seem to be
glance
a very curious person," replied the Priest,
"and I should like to know more about you."
you, to carry on the
"And pray who
acquaintance ? " said the stranger. " They
Father Heilmann, answered the
* and I belong to St. Mary's
;
Priest,
monastery, beyond the lake." " Ay, ay ! "
rejoined the other. "My name is Kuhlc
born, and if I stood upon ceremony, I might
well call
yself Lord of Kuhleborn, or
Baron (Freiherr) Kuhleborn; for free I'am
as the bird of the air,
a trifle more free.
have a word with
For instance, I must
the young woman there." And before they
could look round, he
of the Priest, close to Undine, and stretch
ing up his tall figure to whisper in her ear.
But she turned hastily away, saying, " 1 have
nothing more to do with you
day ! " said the stranger laughing, " what
a prodigiously grand marriage yours must
be, if you are to cast off your reiations in
this way l Have you forgotten Uncle Kuhle
born, who brought you all the way here on
kindly ? "
the other side
" "Hey
his back
" But I entreat you," said Undine, " never
afraid of you now,
1
come to me again.
and will not my husband become afraid ol
if he finds I have so strange a family ?
My little niece," said Kuhleborn, " please
protecting you all
to remember that I
this time ; the foul Spirits of Earth might
play you troublesome tricks if I did not.
So you had better let me go on with you,
and
has a better memory than yours, for he
would have it he knew my face very well,
and that I must have been with him in the
boat when he fell into the water. And he
, seeing that the wave which
none but myself, and
more words. The old Priest there
may well say
washed him over
I landed him safe on the shore in time for
your wedding."
Undine and the Knight looked at Father
Heilmann, but he seemed to be plodding
in a waking dream, and not listening to
what was said. Undine said to Kuhleborn,
" There, I can seethe end of the wood;
want your help no longer, and there is
nothing to disturb us but you; so, in Jove
and kindness I entreat you, be gone, and
let us go in peace." This seemed to make
Kuhleborn angry ; he twisted his face
hideously, and hissed at Undine, who cried
aloud for help. Like lightning the Knight
passed round her horse, and aimed a blow
at Kuhleborn's head with his sword. But
instead of the head, he struck into a water
fall, which gushed "foaming down a high
cliff near them, and now showered them all
with a splash that sounded like laughter,
and wetted them to the bone. The Priest
seeming to wake up, said, " Well, I was ex
pecting this, because that brook gushed
down the rock so close to us. At first I
could not shake off the idea that it
man, and
fall whispered distinctly in HultU
" Rash youth, dashing youth, 1
not, I shame thee not ; still sWf!
a
if
speaking to me." T
Rash young soldier,
| <3^^B
J dash^H
A lit"
open pk
them, m
^jTjed into the
I
;
wT)
MABELf HAIR.
Pass the butter gcj* Mabel,
Shove it lightly «Xigh the ai
f tWïieb, love,
In
ill fir
Yoe
What fond mem'rireawakens
Of die days ere . were wed,
When ui
Oft wa
»y gdee..
laid yot little head !
□liar
Lovingly I s
In the happy da.gone by;
Now I strike them .Ay meal tTme
r or c pi«.
In the h
REVENGE S SWEET.
" I believe he hasmade love to every
girl in the village," cvd^Bel Rathbourne.
" It's perfectly scandous !"
last^ight that I
sweetest girl he had ^er met," said Tiny
Salter. V»
" He told
the
He has assured r iififty times, if
»im he would never
that if I coi
survive ijAM
a
>r a
youn
Il 11 : ' I
B/<v/ until
Knead ?
fe Fernleigh 's.
aita he rather
Éjn his private
■ love to more
Bm-any other
Be he was in
few
some, _
' i. 11
and that
enoughtl
But it did™
Oh, no 1 He \
enjoyed it. Il
club that
and
young
11 j^Hgi
lowly toward
he very day
Bis " were
j^B
heard
Mr.
the Rai
and hoi
"rakinj
whichjf
to hisS
thcmB
I
I
that
red
BK I ■
Ee all the
Ht might
cservesjbut
His heart's
c coating of
possible to
denly some
i his work
Ah, I
•wouldn't I
I h
fall in^^HI
I'm
- a- ^B
mm
^B
I lay,
aml^H
wish I coulcffl
scorch him !',
" That sour
amused boy^l
curtain, 'A B
"
Lre.
r» t . in an
^fcindow
r-old
k vaca
WiJ
ing
itc
ol
Kd !" groaned
Imagining that
Fakes me fairly
to
is
I
renge is sweet,
lou say to hav
YoT
Let
hel
ing him man
" To you ? ■
Why, WilfiS^!By ou mean ?"
" Don't you think jfaake a firs-rate
girl ? A regular heart- I*»? You neen'nt
look so astonished. Ivkfcn a girl's part
more than once in our tficals at college
account of my smoo^ce and slender
figure, and I tell you 1 mi^ stunning, if
I do say it. I've got it d tô a fine point,
voice and all. Bel, pih the wig I left
here last term ?" \
" Willie, you'
" Do you really helfe
out ?"
Rather 1 Let's begi
By St. Parick, isn'tjj
gate ?"
simultaneous
iy.
cried Daisy,
carry it
itions at once,
homing in the
PlB^
nshire '
/
comes down," commanded Will ; "and mind
you encourage him to make all the loae
can ; and you two stay here and dress me
you don't want him to know you're in the
jfcmse^to you ?"
minutes later there glided into the
HPMr the sweetest witch of about eighteen
summers that ever was, and Bel introduced
" My cousin, Jennie Vaughn, from
Devonshire, Mr. Fernleigh."
What lovely dark eyes she had,and shim
mering golden hair ! Why, even pretty Bel
couldn't hold a candle to her ! Who could
bei
resist making himself fascinating to her
And before he had left,Mr. Fernleigh had
engaged her for a drive, telling Bel,
slyly pressed her hand in parting, that of
a friend of hers, he would do al
In
course,
he could to make her cousin's visit agreeable
How the girls rushed down into the parlor
after he had left, and what a screaming and
laughing there
floor almost in convulsions, very much to
the detriment of his long train and fair
tresses.
! Will rolled
the
"What a lark it was," he gasped, " to
him sitting there, casting his killing
glances at me so that you shouldn't see
them, Bel ! "
And he went'off into a fresh outburst of
laughter, while the object of their merri
ment wended his way leisurely toward his
hotel, thinking to himself :
" By Jove, a regular beauty ! Bel herself
is thrpwn in the shade, although there is a
family resemblance. A lucky thing I
»thought of that drive ; but I'll have to be
■unfoundedly careful, or I'll rouse Bel's
Suspicions. Why, I do believe that girl
Considers herself engaged to me, the way
Lhe acted to-day ! Well, it's only polite to
Slay agreeable to a guest of hers, and I'm
Bung to do it."
H The fun that followed the next few days!
■yerywherc Miss Jennie went Mr. Fernleigh
Kas her devoted cavalier.
f " Solely for your sake," as he reassur
ingly told Bel, and " to oblige Miss Rath
bourne," the rest of the girls understood it.
_ Every evening Mr. Fernleigh took Miss
Vaughan for a stroll in the elm-groves, and
perhaps his attentions would have been a
little less loverlike, and his words a little
more carefully chosen, had he known that
behind the trees were hidden a score of mis
chievous girls with their handkerchiefs
stuffed into their mouths and tears stream
ing down their cheeks in their efforts to
keep themselves unobserved.
But the ending came,
sooner
it always does,
later, and Mr. Fernleigh awoke
one morning with the unpleasant conviction
that he
deeply in love* himself. He, the
impregnable, the invincible,
at last 1 And, stranger still to relate, with
a young lady of whose affections he
at all certain.
in the toils
not
Miss Jennie had persistently rejected all
his advances—had given him to understand
that she did not approve of flirting—in fact,
had piqued him, and close upon pique fol
lowed love ; that is, as much love as his
shallow heart was capable of feeling, and he
determined that she should yield. And
yield she did that very evening, very sweetly
and graciously, much to his surprise.
of my prize I might
at least not have been in such a hurry," he
thought, ruefully; " but I shall have to face
the music
" And you will come
announce
confidently.
How should he explain matters to Bel,
and to all the others ? What an idiot he had
made of himself! But he really loved
Jennie he told himself, and so would brave
it out as best he could.
The next morning, when he stepped into
Mrs. Rathbourne's drawing-room, he found
himself in the presence of not only Bel, but
a dozen other girls, every one of whom he
knew—alas, only too well ! Jennie was no
where in sight, but Bel, coming forward,
offered him a seat, saying :
" You will excuse us, I know, Mr. Fern
leigh, i/ we go on with our parts ;
rehearsing for private theatricals."
And turning to Tiny, she went on ;
" Oh, Jennie, my darling, but for one lit
he ray of hope ! I love you so dearly ! Why,
why do you persist in thinking I
^Bkg with your feelings ? I love you too
^^Br that, my darling."
^^Bn Tiny
^■ut, Horace, you have made love to my
and to other girls, too ; that I
Bo f."
■l may have flirted with them a trifle,
only because I knew you did not
^B; but you, my darling ! " a pause, only
^Bcn by the subdued giggle of every girl
^Bte room.
^Bhat did it mean ? His very words to
H|nie the night before !
Bmt. Fernleigh listened in blank amaze
ment. What could it mean? Had the
" Had I been
to-morrow and
engagement ? " asked Jennie,
are
girl been fooling him ?
" Young ladies," drawing himself up
you are enjoying
If Miss
stiffly, "lam happy to
a rather
intelligible joke.
Vaughan is not in I will make my adieux."
"Oh, y
" Here, Will ! " and in tumbled Will, this
time in his true character.
want Jennie?" asked Bel.
Throwing himself into the startled gentle
man's arms, he murmured :
" Horace, here is your little Jennie Î Why
are you so silent, love ? Speak, if but one
word, to your own darling 1 " and he
strangled him in a bear-like hug."
The truth flashed like lightning across
Horace Fernleigh's mind. The girls had
thrown themselves into chairs, and
shrieking with laughter. Will still held
him in his bear's embrace, pouring words of
love into his unwilling ear. He had been
tricked, duped, fooled outrageously; but
help for it
there was
With a frantic struggle he released him
seh from Will's encircling arms and bound
ed through the hall into the street, the girls'
shrieks and Will's despairing " Farewell,
in his ears.
!
" "i- 1 ..
the time being, at least,
propensity for flirting. The
d their revenge, and it was
his
girls had ha
doubly sweet.
he
;
the
§vintm «ntl fuMteto.
THE
(]
rifiAH
11
A FIRST-CLASS
J
?
of
al
r
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NEWSPAPER.
consTT-A-nq-iasra- the
Latest Telegraphic and Local News,
Interesting Special Articles,
Local and Otherwise.
Carefully Selected Miscellaneous Mat
ter, Humor and Comment,
Continued and Short
Stories.
TBBMS.
to
;
to
of
a
I
Per Year,
Per 6 Months,
Per 3 "
Per 1 "
Per Copy,
Delivered to all parts of the city. Month
ly collections.
$1.50.
.75.
.39.
.13.
D. T. BRADFORD, PROPRIETOR,
111
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n
I ,n
l!i (j
l!il
PRINTING
AND
(I
m
1 Ü
224 MARKET ST.,
WILMINGTON, DEL
FILLS ORDERS FOR
PRINTING,
RULING,
BLANK BOOKS,
BINDING AND
STATIONERY,
AT THE SHORTEST NOTICE AND
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
We are not middle men. We run
eight Steam Presses, have a com
plete Bindery fitted with the most
approved Steam Machinery, and a
full stock of every article in the
stationery line. Estimates cheer
fully given.
EDWARD F. JAMES,
Secretary and Treas.
JNO. M. WHITFORD, Supt..
B. A. QUYE 5 ,
CHEAP AND NEAT
\m\
No. 413 KING STREET,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
gftttwts.
Dr. J. T. COSLIN,
ostitis t
'9
No. 707 Market St., to the
N. W. Cor. 8th and Shipley Sts.
Has,
jved fr«
All operations performed at greatly reduced pri
ces. Sets of Teeth, eight, ten, fifteen and tw
dollars. Fresh Gas dally, for the painless ex
tion of teeth. Jy «
Drs. H. and W. R. Garrett,
DENTISTS,
Jy 4-tf 709 Market Street, Wilmington, Del,
teintiufl anil Singing.
THOMAS L. CLARK.
Practical
HOUSE, SIGN and SHIP FAINTER,
Graining in Walnut and Oak.
Special Attention Given to Contract Work
STAINING ALSO A SPECIALTY.
GLAZING SOLICITED.
Residence:
61S EAST SIXTH STREET.
Shop : Cor. Klund and Pine Sts.
Jy 4"3 m " _
WILLIAM H. VALENTINE,
flolise&Sign Painter, Qrainer,Qlazjer&kal^ominer
SECOND STORY OP TBLKGKAPH BUILDING,
Cor. THIRD & MARKET STREETS,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
Residence, 830 Pine Street.
Jy 4-3"
K. J. 8ARQEANT,
Sign and Decorative Painter.
VESTIBULES ORNAMENTED, WINDOW
SHADES LETTERED AND PAINTED,
GILDING ON GLASS, &c., &c.,
506 MARKET STREET,
(SECOND :
WILMINGTON, DEL.
jy 18 ar
D. T. BRADFORD,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
No. 4 East Third Street,
SECOND STORY.
Jy 4-t
ëxom it», ÏÏ>m, êoitmM.
J. ROSS CHANDLER & CO.,
DEALERS IN CHOICE
Family Groceries,
01)1) FELLOWS' HALL,
No. 16 EAST THIRD STREET,
jymm WILMINGTON, DEL..
L. J. EIGNET, Agent,
Teas,Coffees & Spices,
No. 106 W. Second Street.
|y Give me a
jy 1
money.
You can have more satisfaction by
buying your
THAS & OOFFSHS
AT
Bowman's Tea Store,
15 EAST SECOND ST.,-*
(Three Doors from King,)
than elsewhere. The quality of his goods
is the very best and at the prices sold, cer
tainly the very cheapest, while to all his
tomers he returns a share of his profit in
some useful or fancy article in
China, Glass, Stone or other Ware.
Mind, goods the best, prices as low as the
lowest, and a share of the profits to all
tomers.
SUGAR AT WHOLESALE PRICES.
Bowman's Tea Store,
15 East Second Street.
Jy 4-3*
buttery, &t.
James & Bro.,
are,
h
(II
AND GLASS,
MECHANICS TOOLS,
204 MARKET STREET
WILMINGTON. DELAWARE.
jy n-3
DUNCAN BROS.,
No. ai 4 MARKET STREET, WILMINGTON, DEL.
Tools, Razors, Pocket Knives, Carvers*
Table Knives, Preserving Kettles,
Stair Rods, Etc.
Jy 4-i
T. B. MOORE,
PRACTICAL SAW MAKER
No. 107 Market Street ,
Wilmington, Del
All Mill, Hand, and all ottier kind of Saws
re-toothed, straightened, sharpened and made
equal to new. Sole Agent for O. B. Paul's
CELEBRATED HAND CUT FILES«
Jy 4-3*n
CHEAPEST PLACE IN DELAWARE.
(flour, patatttfjf rovioiowo.
'9
No. 511 KING STREET.
All kinds of meat at the lowest market
prices. Everything first-class.
GKEOIE2/GKE3
RIElEljDi
Farmers' Market, No. 2 E. 7th St.,
Kept by J. H. STANTON,
you can get Fresh and Salt Mea
best quality at the lowest market
Eggs and general produce. As a specialty,
her's Choice Com Starch and Starch of all kinds,
all parts of the city free of charge.
f ..il
is the place where
kinds, of the very
Also, Bu
Eikanbraa
Goods deli
Jy 4 >
A. R. MAREE,
Dealer in
Minnesota Spring Wheat, Patent and
other choice brands of Family Flours
at reduced prices.
No. 219 WEST EIGHTH STREET.
Jy » »
Stoves and Tinware.
JAS. F. WOOD & CO.,
Metal Roofers,
and workers in
Tin, Iron, Copper, Zinc, Brass, Lead.Galvaniz'dlron
and dealers in all kinds of
Stoves, ltan«es ami Heaters,
AT A FAIR PRICE. ALL KINDS OF
Sheet Metal for Factories.
S. E. COR. FRONT & ORANGE STS.,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
jy i8- 3 m
NEW STOVE AND HEATER STORE.
ISAAC S. BULLOCK,
Heaters, Stoves & Tinware,
N. W. cor. 9th & Orange Sts., Wll., Del.
TIN ROOFING, SPOUTING & GUTTERING
j ut reasonable prices, and in a satisfac
Sole agent for Wilmington for the celebrated
Fire-place Heaters and Arl
[ment of water-cooler* and
Promptly executed.
V
.\
cooler stands.
Jy 18
JEL. O. TURNER,
ATTORNEY -A.T LAW,
No. 9 EXCHANGE BUILDING, 7th & Market,
Wilmington, Del.
J/4-iyr.

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