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The Sunday mirror. (Wilmington, Del.) 1880-18??, July 25, 1880, Image 4

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WILMINGTON, DEL., JULY 25, 1880.
Bathing at Coney Island.
We've been here al Coney Island just
this
Reed
and
the
years
sive
was
Man daar,
1 hour to sp
IS
: written is because I have no
walks and bathing,
What with
leisure is exhausted keeping crimpings in my hair.
te bathing! I have never bathed, you know, be
Aunt Maggie
• All
them
ships
and
but this year the Flodden Tompkyns
Likadthe
the costumes
ere I
, and lost in wonder
bagsr.
And the stockings—highest, s
ely, style of decorative art.
the custom; dress
Yes, red s
redly glancing,
ag°»
ty.
lady,
ihid (he lack of what's -called
In we go, and
cient spinsters ballot
And for all the world we look like
of
dence
by
and
of
er
go
pici
his
tion,
it.
tion,
of
the
jurer
at
the
had
to
That great god-mother of the nursery, who,
aided by her good-hearted sister, Mother !
Goose, has done much to gladden childish
hearts: !
To the shame of the American Nation, be
it said, that no record of her birth, or even
its place, has been preserved, and this dis
tinguished celebrity has passed along with a
•the curreat of time, without even a death
notice in the newspapers. Certain it is, she
a Massachusetts woman, for no other
could originate such wonderful subtleties,
doubt comprised the bulk
ncing,
Or a lot of withered i
mich collapsed and out of
laids :
If the poet had
Oh ! such shapes ! such ribs ! such elbows
nyth, (don't ask me who,) it
Who got up the antique
could not be
in his wildest dreams, he ev
• would have thought of
Eve
Ve
i stockings?) rising slowly from the foam-clad
Rising (in
Mf we're horrid, the
[ting whom I've knov
a dripping swi
When Ii
Hair all lank,
nuStache all stringy—e'en the handsomest
ing dogs, their hides all clammy ; " only this and
Swin
Yet I beg
n what I tell you ; but the truth is
The Apollo
modesty—don't na
Wouldn't make
That you will not me
Mary,
There's no beauty in a wet, uncovered human foot and leg.
ring, bare below the
ught of
and walking
On the sands, where all the tide of fashion daily ebbs and
I D
1 uneonscious of their legs, and even
To the girls, gesticulating
anwhile with their
Ii is awful ! For I'm sure, at least,among the upper classes,
Toes were always, like some verbs, things
'Twould be well to post up where this bare-legged
* (you know the line,) " but alwa
!-■ ! I
Dwd of
the
the
"
bathtrs passes.
be
« M
I've dis
Yes, it's awful, a« or no
of delicacy
rb there's nothing that o
In who
He's a der
Hoad to foot, w
n, who, all in flannel, (dark blue,) nicely
studs and collar, necktie, hat and dark
ki
lovely ! That's the style of bathing that I caH
Just
Quiet, comfortable—looking as you do
ukn
HIM
AH the
ple
A
Harfitt's Bazaar.
SKETCHES OF AMERICAN FIC
TION.
Written for the Mirkos by F. T. H.
Sketch No. 1—Mother Hnbbard.
Who has not heard of Mother Hubbard ?
and her works
iest part of classic Harvard's first library.
As a reward for her extraordinary literary
labors, which have delighted her country
people for many years, she enjoyed a long
life, and died in full hope of a restful sleep.
Indeed she still lives, for like the deeds of
all good mortals, her works live after her.
But modern ladies, envious of her enduring
fame, have endeavored to excel her efforts
and have partially succeeded in obliterating
her monumental glory. So that it becomes
the pleasant task of your humble servant,
the writer, to rescue her name from fast ap
proaching oblivion. Of her early produc
tions, but little is known. She first aroused
the world by that electric poem, entitled,
" Mother Hubbard's Dog," one stanza, of
wHich, is as follows :
Old Mother Hubbard
Went to the cupboard
To get her poor dog a bone,
But when she got there
The cupboard was bare
And so the poor dog had none,
Only equaled in sweetness by these lines
of her amiable sister :
Hi diddle diddle!
the Addle,
jSed over the moon
I h<
the fine sport,
e littl
And the
What the People Say.
Editors of Mirror :—One of the Com
mittees of the Board of Education had a
contest fer its Chairman. Now, gentlemen,
be careful. What will the school boys think
the language
of their guardians, if they
that was uttered during a discussion between
two gentlemen at said meeting. Shame
, not boys, and stick to
you.
Lindley's grammar, not street conversation.
THOMPSON.
The Cold Water Brigade.
From indications it seems that the total
abstinence army of Wilmington is again
rousing itself into activity. Meetings are
being held with a degree of regularity that
has a decidedly business aspect, and some of
thç sanguine ones predict an early revival on
this subject. Meetings will be held this af
ternoon at 4 o'clock, at Rosendale Park, un
der the auspices of the W. C. T. U., and
at Maple and Linwood Street, West Wil
mington, under the auspices of the M. S. R.
A. David Fsost, an Evangelist of some
note, was expected to address a meeting at
the Opera House this afternoon, but the
meeting has been postponed for one week,
as Mr. Frost was unable to leav« New York
until that time.
On Wheel*.
Bicycle riding and racing is more popular
now than ever before, and threatens to soon
rival all other amusements. The race which
is to tak* place at the Scheutzen Park
Saturday next, July 31st, will be the most
interesting .Affair of the kind that has ever
taken place in this city, ana be well at
tended, and will doubtless awaken a deciüea
interest in the bicycle business in Wilming
ton. The contest will be for the profession
al championship of Delaware, and the zn
ner in which it will be conducted is decided
ly novel. Persons from other places, well
known bicycle ride« are the regularly enter
ed contestants and any Delawarean who
beats them wins the championship.
young
from
ther
15
the
been
of
old
the
not
stand
DELAWARE WITCHCRAFT.
Interesting Reminiscences About a Su
perstition of Recent Date.—The
Delaware Law on the
Subject.
IIKKOK by ex-City Tr
About fifty years ago, Kent County, in
this State, had a gentleman for Sheriff,John
Reed by name, who
and enterprising. Few, if any, could get
the advantage of him in a bargain. In after
years he became, probably, the most exten
sive merchant in the town of Dover. He
was a most enterprising, useful and valuable
citizen, and I believe was the only
remarkably shrewd
who
built vessels in that county, and sent
them to get freights in Europe. Some of his
ships sailed up the Mediterranean Sea, and
brought cargoes from there to New York
and Philadelphia. He died about 35 years
of the richest men in Kent Coun
1
ag°»
ty. His widow, a most excellent and refined
lady, died in Dover some four or five years
within about 10 miles
a colored man, whose family
Living at that ti
of Dover,
greatly troubled by sickness. His resi
dence was close to a mill pond, and this af
fliction to his family was undoubtedly caused
by the malaria arising from this body
standing water. This colored man thought,
however,it was brought about by conjuration,
and suspected an old negro, who lived near,
of afflicting his family by his wiles in this
manner. There was another colored conjur
er living near Milford, and he determined to
go and consult with him upon the matter. w
Accordingly he went to Milford, saw the a f
conjurer, and made known to him his sus
pici J ons
The conjurer told him that the disease of
his family undoubtedly arose from conjura
tion, and described the old colored man
whom he suspected as being the author of
it. He went home excited by the informa- th
tion, and upon entering his house found two
of his children in convulsions. Acting on left,
the impulse of the moment, and filled with one
revengeful feelings against the supposed in
jurer of his family, he seized his axe, and
rushing to the old colored man's house, he
at once, with this terrible weapon, clove his
skull. He was immediately arrested, and as will
the laws of Delaware did not acknowledge
conjuration as an excuse for murder, the
prospect appeared to our worthy sheriff, who
had a great repugnance to take life, that he
would have to hing him. This he desired
to get out of, and he was equal to the occa- an
6 '
of
for
in
of
for
$
the
I
Philadelphia, drew a great deal of money j
! from a certain class who held this belief
About 40 years ago an old woman named
! Jaquette did quite a business at fortune tell
be mg in Wilmington. Her charges were 12 j
cents for a lady and 25 cents for a gentle
dis- man. Crowds called to see her, some with
a strong faith, others simply for amusement.
She. always gave a first rate fortune for the tt
she money. Her visitors were, generally, the ^
young, who desired to know whom they
were going to marry. The ladies were
always foretold they were to have rich,
handsome husbands. The gentlemen, gen
eraHy, beautiful ladies with good dower.es.
Who would not pay from 12 to 25 cents for f
such anticipations ?
During the first years of my publication
of the Blue Hen's Chicken newspaper, a
fortune teller sent
Special
July
who
the
to
"I
Sion.
of
At that time in all portions of
the belief existed (amongst a
conjuration and witchcraft,
then, according to our law, selected the
jury. Our Sheriff, therefore, in accordance
with this duty, summoned a body of very
respectable and substantial citizens, but
every one of whom believed in witchcraft
and conjuration. The lawyers who de
fended the poor criminal knew this,
shaped their defense accordingly, and, to
the astonishment of every one, he was
acquitted by the jury. They believed the
old colored man caused the death of his
children, by his conjurations, and that
" killing " him " was no murder."
lief in witchcraft and conjuration
State
mber) in
The Sheriff
be
caH
The
quite prevalent in Delaware not
than 25 years ago. Amongst the whites it
witchcraft. Amongst the colored peo
ple it received the name of conjuration. In
some portions of Brandywine Hundred the
very strong, and numbers of
greatly annoyed by
that charge being brought against them.
A fortune teller named Roback, living in
belief
worthy old people
?
long
of
her.
ap
of
lines
an advertisement
from Philadelphia. I of course inserted it,
then inserted
in all the papers of the country. Visiting
Philadelphia, I called upon him to receive
first shown into a backroom
filled with those who appeared to be poor
working women, both old and young. Each
waiting her turn. I sent up my card as
requested by the girl in attendance. U pon
her coming down she took me into a front
room. Here alone was a young lady with
beautiful and classic features, almost dis
tracted with mental pain. What her grief
of course never knew. Immediately
afterward the girl again came down and
took me up to the "sanctum sanctorum "of
the conjuror. He told me of his immense
increasing. The
day, and then he fixed the
hour of their appearance for another day.
My bill amounted to a good round
After paying me he informed
a "higher art," and that he
"superior" to ordinary fortune tellers.
They told "by the cards." He told by
"inspection of the stars." And evidently
not liking so much money to go away with
out getting some back, he informed
he " had consulted the planets in my espe
cial case," and that he nad a great deal to
. They had foretold to him " that I
coming," etc. Then I did not mind so
much a little humbug, for I had seen a great
deal of it, and got used to it. Accordingly
I asked him his price. If it had been a dol
I would have paid it. But he told
my affairs were "weighty," and the
price would be $15. This I thought
paying too much. I accordingly told him
" I knew some little (just a little) of as
tronomy. I was in hopes he would take the
hint, and think that I was afraid that the
planets, rushing upon their swift courses
round the sun, would not vary their speed,
and turn aside from their path in the least,
to take cognizance of the poor affairs of such
(to them, the planets) an insignificant in
dividual as myself. As I said before, " I
knew a little of astronomy. But the trouble
was he knew nothing of that science, and
did not take the hint. So I bowed myself
out and declined at present to get a know
ledge of my future. I have had my fortune
often told in my life by various fortune
tellers, but no two of them ever agreed as to
what was to happen to me hereafter, and
this discrepancy has shaken my faith a little
in prognostications. But at this time several
believed in them, and these charlatans
made a great deal of money.
Whilst Alderman of Wilmington, I had
several cases before me of conjuration. One
colored man complained of another colored
for charming his wife away, and after
gew.vn B dollars to charm her back again,
again charmed her and wanted fur
ther payment for the exercise ol his powers
in bringing her home. In the midst of a
trial before me for assault and battery, an old
colored man suddenly got up and said to the
witness then being examined, in
ting manner, " tell him she buries bottles."
This burying of bottles was a species of
similar advertisements
payment. I
business and how it
women came
that hll
a
th ■
to
lar
total
again
are
that
of
on
af
un
and
Wil
R.
some
at
the
week,
York
soon
which
most
ever
at
zn
well
enter
who
exci
conjuration. In another case, complaint
made by a
young white lady of a colored
from her, ten dollars, for conjuring her bro
ther home, and then not complyip;>Kjl£jyM
promise. These were only a few of
instances of a similar nature, occuring"v"^
15 years ago. Even in this short time tn»
community has made great advances, ard
the belief in conjuration and witchcraft l as
been greatly lessened. In a few years it will
disappear alltogether.
To practice conjuration is against the law
of Delaware. Section 7, Chapter 132 of the
old revised code, says:
"If any personshall pretend to exercise
the art of witchcraft, conjuration, fortune
telling or dealing with spirits,he shall be fined
not exceeeing one hundred dollars, and shall
stand one hour in the pillory, and may be
imprisoned not exceeding one year."
PROM THE CHESAPEAKE.
Random Notes from a Wilmingtonian on
the Eastern Shore—Things Interest
ing About Peaches and other
Matters.
pectable and educated
taking
the
ed,
in
in
so
1
w hich leaves at 4 p.
a f tert ^ e Felton arrives, next wharf above
. ,
Chestnut. The ride through the canal and
down Chesapeake Bay is very enjoyable of a
moonlight night, and on board you will find
good meals and a good berth if you prefer
to moonlight on the water. After leaving
th e canal and passing through Slackwater (
fiver, you enter the Bay proper, and on your
left, or Eastern shore, lies Kent Co. Md.,
one pf the best agricultural counties
Peninsula a country as little known to
Wilnungtomans as the Slopes of the Sierraj
Nevada. If you desire to explore it, stejl
ashore at Betterton, or Barnard s and yoil
will soon discover that you have invaded th*
far-famed peach region. Kent county, Md.^
more peaches this year than any other
th e peach g*owing counties in either
State. As many as five thousand baskets are
shipped from this point daily, to Baltimore
an ^ Philadelphia, during the height of the,
season, and about the same number from
Betterton, the next shipping point. At both
of the above places are good accommodations
for boarders, and the bathing is good and,
fishing and boating all that could be desired
in that line.
The peach growers of Kent have become
alive to the importance of evaporating a por
tion of their large crops, and "fruit dryers"
of various kinds arc going up in every di
rection. This is the only sure road to profit,
for any one who grows fruit largely, and the
comparative merits of the various "Dryers"
are being brought to the front by those in
terested. The tendency seems to be toward
low priced machines, that will not require a
whole crop to pay for, or much capital to lay
idle in seasons of failure. Good machines
that will dry from 75 to 150 baskets every
twenty four hours can now be bought for
$ 150 to 300 and make just as good fruit as
the high priced evaporators.
Like much of the soil of the peninsula,
that of Kent is adapted to the growth of
small fruits as well as peaches, and they
largely grown, and have been profitable the
I present season. One shipper at this point
j ""fd^th^gh thU count^waUW mïny
we ll kept and productive farms, and many
others t ^ at prove how hard it is to overcome
habits forme F d in slave-holding times. Build
j that look as though they had just drop
, f r0 m tbe moon> and fences strewn
around promiscuously. " Can you tell
tbe w t0 Mr N's," i n q U i re d a traveler ?
tt s j r . ^ethe next turn to the left, and
^ on t jjj y OU come to a place that looks
as though it had just been visited by
earthquake, that's the one." He could not
have put it better in that many words. But
neat £ slovenly f as t or slow, rich or poor,
wiU al / find the latch string hang
for f outside th 7 e do0 r in Kent,
0
a
■. Mi.
Special letter
Barnard's Landing, Chesapeake Bay,
July 24.—When any of your many readers
who are fond of Steamboat riding desire a
change from Cape May and other points
the Delaware, let them go up on the Felton
to Philadelphia and get aboard one of the
Steamers of the Ericsson line to Baltimore
. just half
hour
thi
Traveler.
Waiting for the Wagon.
of canine devotion occurred at the
City Hall the other day. A man from the
driving along the street, and
too drunk to manage his team, so he
was arrested. His little dog accompanied
him to the cell and remained with him for
forty-eight hours, only leaving him about
once every hour to go out on the street and
look for the team. It would hunt around
among all the vehicles it could find and then
return despondent to the cell. It 'hought
its master was a long while getting re^dy to
go home, no doubt.
it,
as
"of
the
by
to
I
so
dol
told
the
him
as
the
the
in
I
and
to
and
had
One
fur
a
old
the
of
A
countrj
A Pleasant Look.
General Butler says that he looks forwaj
to the time when the Stars and Stripes sM
float so far north that their beauty shaj^l
mistaken for the borealis, andsofari^H
that only the Isthmus of Panama shall
southern boundary.— Ex.
That's very pretty, but it has been s 2 ^H
often that the queer-eyed orator ought
ashamed of himself for the repetition.
hll
Coney.
Everybody wants to go on an excur.t
somewhere, sometime during the he]
term, and the advertising columns of
Mirror tell them where to go. P. Tj
Smith's excursion to Coney Island,
23d, has already been fully noticed in
columns, and the reputation of Mr. Smi(j^J
excursions, as pleasant and successful affala
is so fully established that, at present,
need only call attention to his advertise
ment elsewhere, which give full particulars.
To Cape May.
to read the advertisement, by the
Shields Library Association, of their excur
sion to Cape May,
will, beyond question, be the Cape May
cursion of the season. Its opportunities for
enjoyment are equalled by no other down
the-bay trip, and those who go will have
from 7 to 8 hours at the beach.

Bi
August 16th. It
Not Behind.
Pocomoke Record.
Wilmington has a very creditable Sunday
paper in the Mirror. Wilmington is get
ting to be quite a city, and don't intend to
be behind in any respect.
A Story of a Raft.
A raft of logs and spars, broke from its
moorings at Walton's ice wharf, below Third
the Christiana, yesterday,
and blockaded the creek. The tug Meteor,
towing two packets, collided with the raft.
Mr. Robinson, the bridge tender at Ma£
ket Street bridge, captured the truant raft
and fastened it at Weldin's wharf.
Street bridge,
Another Brazüid
The _
built by the Pusey & j
ed yesterday for Para, Brazil/t^^*^B
towing her but to the river. She is to ply
on the Amazon. All reports that she is
merely a " fruit boat " are incorrect.
w o\d«-wbee
exci
try,after being ch?
to their room. P
lg as ^' Law.
LIQUOR
Cusj
ing ; charged,
, a boarder at berime, with dispensing
the liquid without tjp|tate license stipu
lated by the Act of Ajémbly. Wilkinson
testified that he had]
and drank it, and pâ^
sions than one.
The defendant advahed tho assertion that
the witness never pal jfcr anything.
Ambrose Little waSfi
ed, and he swore that Hough he had drank
in the house, he ittvï*paid for anything,
either. The landlady treated.
The defendant wa* tluired by the mag
istrate to give $200 "ulo answer at court,
and Wilkinson was »«fired to give $200
bail to appear and pixfcute the
The additional chg^e of keeping a tip
pling house was then bought against Mrs.
Cassidy, by the sameA-ty.
" No, sir, I don't 1*6 no tipplin' house,"
the defendant's ray to the magisterial
inquiry as to her guillr innocence.
Wilkinson's eviden however, was again
very direct. He ha< hank liquor on the
premises, in less qua: ies than on2 quart,
(he would probably q« not been present,
in the flesh, to testify
the stuff in a more w
had enjoyed the fell
so likewise. 4
Wilkin
Geor
ght liquor there,
it, on more occa
e next witness call
?
he had partaken of
,) and,
•»thers do
Vtlm 1
what a peck
It.
■C.
P if
rnö
0331
|'s vn*»* V
"J TINNY':
N, q
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91 $
BICYi
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PROF. COl
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C. PAC||
M. W. H
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N. B. C
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deals
Light
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ipa
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lit of hi
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;
Del.
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61
EET.
Open all
ly«s«t
U a specialty.
If,
go to
G
:rs
•If
the
for
SPRT
'J
c
NOW!
It
IN
BO
'RICE
Clothi
No. £l!Pfarket Street.
Hou se,
to
1
Great REDiAriON in PRICES.
Selling our SPRING
SUMMER STOCK from 5
s marked. The great
aiu M jjFercd to purchasers.
S* i! P Y INVITED TO CALL
CHILDREN'S DE
ENT.
Y Of.VARIETY OF
its
raft
LADIES
A ü D EX h
îN
I
:ts,
ply
is
VA1
$)eio ^dmrii»eni(|nf8.
T
r h
t
I \
I
1 .
s II fill
niim
THE LARGEST STEAM
Pi
IN THE STATE.
MANUFACTURE ALL KINDS OF
>1
Camp Meetings & S. School Festivals
SUPPLIED AT WHOLESALE RATES.
jy 35 -tf
#
9
Ö- 0
■p y
0
T .0
$
oV
•>' oV „
Os 4Y
->
jy 35-s
e in the
BfThe greatest resort for a single day's ploasur
worid -Scribner's Monthly for July.
acrg'i
n
l 5
Monday, Aug. 23, '80.
Leaves Wilmington, Del., from P., W. &
B. R. R. depot at 0.30 A'. M., by special train
to Jersey City, making a quick i
ate&mer " Richard Stockton "
; thence by
direct to the
Iron Pier, arriving there at 11 . 16 .. Iio
Island from the Pier at
10 hours at this cele*
turning, leave Coney
10 P. M., allowing oi
brated watering place.
The trip to Coney Island by steamer from
Jersey City affords one a better idea of the
Harbor of New York than
any other way, and is a splendid excursion of
itself, giving a grand view of the famous East
River bridge, now approaching completion ;
Governor's Island with its defences. Fort
Columbus and Castle William, down through
the Narrows with a view of Staten Island and
Forts Tomkins and Wadsworth
and Fort Lafayette with its historical associa
tions, and Fort Hamilton on the other ; pass
ing around the end of Coney Island up along
the coast to the great Iron Pier, making a
landing in the midst of somg of the liveliest
be obtained by
nde.
the island.
At night the whole Island is brilliantly
lighted up with electric and numerous other
lights, making a sight long to be remembered.
All of the best orchestras and military bands
of New York are engaged, and give daily free
open air concerts afternoon and evening.
On the return, a grand moonlight sail up
the hay will be enjoyed.
)
fare for the rolled trip (ip
$ 3.00
clyding fier admission)
Children under 12
years of age, t
$ 1.50
•If
Sale of tick
'ust oih, at the book
tore of C
Tho
The I
in the )
bered and checks giver
ars will be
al.
I 3 . X. E. Smith,
MANAGER.
I 3 PExcellent bathing facilities,
rjy 35 ' ex
NINTH ANNUAL EXCURSION
OF THE
fîtieliî& |i!
TO
ON MONDAY, AUCUST 16th, 1880,
ON THE IMPERIAL STEAMER,
"RBPOBLIC,"
very effort to make this the .......
uiMuu w. season. Boat leaves Fourth St.
; p. m. Returning, leaves Cape May at 5 p. m.
The committee wit!
pleasant exc
$1.00
TICKETS,
jy a s t ex
WEIGHT'S PERFUMES
FOR THE HANDKERCHIEF •
ts made. We have a
Without exception the finest Ext
variety of odors, including
MARY STUART.
WILD OLIVE,
J 1 LARIOSA,
W JT STIPHANOLIS,
m ILANQ ILANG.
the best.
you will be
I'LOR & FULLERTON,
Mauggiats and Apothecaries,
No. 302 KING STB EET.
§*5} êmerite, |l0ti0îw, âe.
BEE HIVE,
306 Market Street
Now is the time to buy
DRV GOODS CHEAP
—AND—
1
J
S
THE PLAC EL
being sold at
II you would buy the Best
Goods at the most Reason
able Prices, examine our
assortment ol
Parasols, White Goods,
Gounterpanes, Gloves,
CDRS1TS, LACES, LACE COLLARS,
SHETLAND SHAWLS,
HOSIERY,
SHETLAND PALMAS, SHIRTS,
RIBBONS, LINENS,
Mosquito Netting, Lawns,
&e.
All Goods sold at One Price»
and that the Lowest.
mi
Jy 4-tf.
<tal #»iÄ
I coal I
JOS. GODFREY,
PURE. CLEAN
ENTERPRISE COAL,
9th & BENNETT STREET.
Jy 4 3inos.
I>. W. CHANDLER,
COAL & WOOD,
OFFICE AND YARD,
Cor. Fourth aud Spruce Streets,
WILMINGTON, DEI..
Oltnuns TAKEN AT H2B OB AN OU
Cellars d
!
or Coal
the Wagon, no D
;
a
on the Pa
luiwt, @il, 1 &c.
JAMES JBÜÄEJrOliD
Manufacturer of all the leading
Paint Materials.
White Lead, White Zinc, Ready-mixed
Paints, Putty, Poco Brown, Fur
niture Oil, Walnut Stain,
AND DEALER IN
Rosendale Cement, Select Calcined Plas
ter, Linseed Oil, Varnish, American,
English and French Glass,
Single, Double and Plate, '
:&c., &c., &c.,
Nos. 6 & 8 EAST THIRD ST.,
Wilmington, Del.
Jyiiyr
gjmgs ami ffilu'imcaK
Prevent Bmea.se
By the timely use of
DISINFECTANTS !
CHLORIDE LIME, CARBOLIC PURIFYING POW
DER, CARBOLIC ACID, CARBOLIC DISINFEC
TANT POWDER. COPPERAS, PHENOL
SOD 1 QUE, DROMO-CHLORALUM,
CHLORIDE SODA, GIRONDIN'S
DISINFECTANT, &c., &c.
c of the above safe
hold should be witho
disease during the hot w
For sale
No he
guards a
wholesale and retail, by
Z. JAMES BELT,
Sixth & Market Sts.
Jv
tote aid Jfltoow.
GREAT BARGAINS
ALWAYS TO BE FOUND AT
MONTGOMERY'S
—CALL AND BE CONVINCED.—
Clayton House Shoe Store .
Making and Repairing a Specialty.
SOS King street.
A. R. Stewart, Foreman.
.......
St.
m.
Jy ♦

J. B. STEWART
a
Sells the largest and best
LOAF OF BREAD
In the city, for the
SAME AMOUNT OF MONEY,
AT
207 WEST EIGHTH STREET.
jy 181
3!u(Urtato, ilpfoMraiig.
J. B. MARTIN,
II PI
r*l
h
6
?
OFFICE AND RESIDENCE,
No. 221 SHIPLEY ST,
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE.
Personal attention promptly given to calls at nil hours.
Jy 4i »
ESTAUMSHED 1806.
Xiutlxoi* W. r*almor,
FURNISHING UNDERTAKER,
No. 103 SHIPLEY STREET, Wilmington, Del.
* ' 1 at any hour of the day or night. Jy + tm
McCartney & kenny,
trer?,
No. 412 Shipley Street,
WIMUKSTOZ. BEL.
CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS AND MATTINGS
MADE AND LAID.
SPRING, HAIR AND HUSK MATTRESSES.
N. B.—All orders by mail will receive
prompt attention,
j. e. McCartney,
DANIEL KENNY.
Jy 4 - 3 ">.
îtëlmw and giqiwg.
Francis Kelly & Co.,
Wholesale Dealers in, and Rectif
1 of,
THE LARGEST AND FINEST STOCK OF
FINE EVE WHISKIES
ON THE PENINSULA.
Wilmington, Del.
103 Market St.,
Jy 4 - 3 «".
ANTON HAUBER,
Geo. Arnholt Phila. Lager Beer,
Fine WINES & WHISKIES.
with a pool table
Have just furnished my new pool roo
of the best make.
No. 200 West 2nd St., Wilmington, Del.
Jy 11 6m _ _
THOMAvS FARMER,
ICE-COLD LAGER BEER
AJ110 Dealer in Fine
WHISKIES, WINES, 8EGAES &C.
attached.
Elegant Pool Roo
Nos. 4 and 6, East Fifth St.,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
jy n-iy
JOHN E. GRAHAM,
Dealer in
Fine Wines,Whiskies, &e.
■trnsTEai'V-A.i/EiD
DIAMOND STATE LAGER BEER.
lost complete pool
The coolest
S. E. COR. FIFTH AND ADAMS STS.,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
THE
jy **•*«
! CORNUCOPIA SALOON,
No. 506 Market Street,
One door North of Adams &. Bros. Variety Store,
In Basement formerly kept by Jos. Fullmer.
B. B. Whiskey, Wine, Gin, Brandy, Nee
tar, Champagne, Cider, Lemon
ade, and all soft drinks
of the Season.
Largest Pool Tables In the City, and Excellent
Beer drawn direct from the keg. Free Lunch every
JAMES D. MAITLAND, Proprietor.
Jy 4 -'f
HI
n
i
id
A pure, refreshing, wholesome summer
drink. Its sales exceed those of all other
soft drinks.
CUNNINGHAM & CO.,
PHILADELPHIA.
John McCaffrey,
300 & 302 EAST FOURTH ST.,
WILMINGTON,
Agent for Delaware.
t^All orders promptly attended to.
Jy 4'f
SALOON AND BOTTLING
ESTABLISHMENT
Conrad JVIanz,
South-West Cor. Third & Adams Sts.
WILMINGTON. DELAWARE.
Bottler of all fine grades of
LAGER BEER, NECTAR CIDER,
PORTER, ALE and MINERAL
WATERS.
All Orders Promptly Attended to.
julyi8- 3 mos.
JOHN P. DONOHOE,
EOCSSSTBR BBSS.
FAMILIES SUPPLIED BY THE DOZEN, 75 cti.
©epot,— 0IXÏS & OWC$ W
Commission Merchants , <fcc.
SCOTT & HEISLER,
FRUIT AND PRODUCE
COMMISSION
Merchants,
No. 415 King Street,Wilmington, Del.
Jly 18-30108.__ ,
PRIZE Puzzles In Comic Monthly, fj
jy iB-tf
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