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The Weekly times. (Wilmington, Del.) 1886-18??, October 16, 1886, Image 1

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THE WEEKLY TIMES.
Devoted to Local Ne w», Literatu r e, Famil y Matt ers, In dustrial and Ceneral Information.
VOL. I. NO. i.
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE, OCTOBER 16, 1886.
PRICE ONE CENT.
9
S,
/ ■$/ Jy
4
«
*
-
A
W. H. SHERER,
Commission Merchant,
CoilryProta.Effis.Ponltry.&c.,
SICor.Eli&oraitsis
■i
EIGHTH STREET MARKET HOUSE,
DELAWARE.
WILMINGTON,
H. ROSENBERG,
T 0 NS 0 RIAT ARTIST
1
4 EAST FIFTH STREET, |
Wilmington. '
URL A WAKE.
F ell & Joseph,
DEALERS IN
Coal, Floor, Feed, Cay, Etc.,
No. 713 W. FRONT STREET,
DELAWARE.
WILMINGTON.
Telephone 299.
ART GALLERY,
813 Market Street,
George Drake,
Where lie lull on ha d a fine selection
of oil paintings, ste i engravings uhoto
grnpintres and colored etchings.
Frames of all Descriptions
OFE N IN EVENINGS.
TAMES B TUCKER,
U EXCHANGE
Tobacco TiF' :1 Cigar Store,
No. 8 EAST FIFTH STREET,
WILMINGTON,
i
I
DELAWARE.
Oignra altoaye on
JjlXAMINK AI
tlime la n
KK THE "LIGHT
I'll a
It.
DOMESTIC SEWING MACHINE CO.,
814 Mu:
J T. WALKER,
REST
Boot and Shoe Store,
No. 13 EAST THIRD STREET,
DELAWARE.
CHKAPES
I
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j
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j
I
j
j
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i
WILMINGTON,
YOU DON'T LIKE THE •
•DOMESTIC,"
'Machine for It;
it Ib the cheap
IN
y iiik a itlll
DOMESTIC SEWING MACHINE CO.,
Market; Street.
JOHNSON & BARNHILL,
Furniture
Dealers.
207 MARKET STREET,
Wilmington,
Delaware, ;
J J. GALLAGHER & BRO.,
A n i r I
A rO Irl EGA RIES
1503 and 2004 Market Street,
DELAWARE.
WILMINGTON,
0 W. STIGERS & CO.,
DEALER IN
11
T
Thirteenth and ÎJarkkt Sts.,
DELAWARE.
WILMINGTON.
A LOCAL INDUSTRY.
PAPER MAKING PRACTICAL
LY EXPOUNDED.
How O d Rags are Turned Into a
Useful Commodity by Means
of Modern Invention.
^Through the courtesy of Superinten
dent Lindsay of the Augustine Paper
tàills, a reporter of Thk Times was
shown through that establishment, and
the wonderful process of rags dissolv
ing into pulp and'then passing out of
the large rolls as paper was explained.
Fine book pai>er, beautifully calen
dered, is produced
rate of about sixteen tons daily. The
same firm, the .Jessup & Moore Paper
Company, owns anpther »mill at Rock
land, which produces newspaper, where
in the wood fiber enters extensively.
As the Fourdeuier machines
the wood pulp is put in the finest condi
tion, and the product]» excellent paper.
Some idea of the immense size of the
AugustineMillsmay be gained from the
the mill at the
used
amount Of machinery in the building
and force required to drive it. There
| are four steam engines, the aggregate
horse-power of them being 765. Water
power from the turbine wheels will add
25« horse power to that furnished by
steam.
The number of employes at this mill
is about 120, men and women. They
run three machines, four stocks of
calendeis, six washing engines, eight
beating engines, aud four rag boilers.
After the rags go through the last
named, there is no possibility of any,
germs of disease remaining. The rags
are boiled under
pressure of fifty
i introduced to
pounds. and lime is
cleanse them. When the rag pulp ar
rives at a stage to be put into the heat
ing engines, it is kept going round
through the steel knives for four
live Heure, mul here a proportion of I
wood tiher chemically prepared, resem- |
bling white pasteboard, is torn up and I
dissolved with the rag pulp. The ex
cessive heat of the water, wherein the
fresh rags are put, completely dissolves
all the woolen or other foreign sub
stances, and after being finally washed
the rags have the appearance of damp
cotton.
After the pulp is made sufficiently I
fine by the beating engines it passes j
along over endless screens moving
along in the water aud pulp, and on the j
faeeofthe fine wires is collected the j
particles that, in passing further along, !
partake of the appearance of wet paper. I
This substance soon gains body enough j
to pass along between the heavy iron
rolls, having consistency enough to
move independently of the supporting
screen. Th» n the proct ss is rapid, and
the endless sheet moving along one sys
tem of rolls to another is soon paper
i complete In passing from the last
rolls the fine glossy white paper goes to
I the culte , where circular shears cut
(
the paper the long way, and then these
slips go down to the knife anang d to
cut directly across the whole thus com
plet ing the sheets.
I If the paper mus be super-calender
! ed, it does not go through the cutting
I machine, but is rolled up iu large cylin
j del-shaped bulks and carried to the sys
j teins of calender rolls, and passing
I through the heavy irons comes out with
j a highly-glossed surface. After re
rolling, the cylinders go to other c tiers
I and the paper is formed into sheets of
j any size in eded.
The Augustine Mill supplies the
paper for the Scientific American >, a
New' York illustrated journal, whic
has a very large circulation and ncces
sarily requires a large quantity of pa
per. The size of the paper used by
this journal is 33x40 inches, and
weighs 80 pounds to the ream.
Blowing Up the "Devil."
The issuing of the first nutnbef* of
The Times was celebrated by the
blowing up of the office "devil." He
wa8 ( l uiet, y enjoying an oyster stew in
a corner of the room and a package of
fire-crackers slyly placed under his
chair did the work. It took his appetite
away.
What a pity that a big heart is so
often compelled to keep company with
a small pocketbook.
For a clean shave go to II. Rosen
l erg's, No. 4 East Fifth street.
Mr. Gibbons' O. iginality.
Among the distinguishing traits of
character of William Q. Gibbons a
blunt manner of speaking at times was
foremost, an some of his remarks
such occasions are not to be lost. He
was once troubled by a servant's idea
1 f "order" in arranging his chamber,
everything being placed in accordance
with her way of thinking. He remon
strated in the following original man
ner: "Now, if you should find the
Devil on that table, pick him up, dust
him off, aud put him just exactly where
you found him." On« day he met a
young man who had recentl entered
business, aud inquired: "Harry, have
you a partner?" "No," replied he
other, there is not enough profit yet for
two to share." "It., is very ice,
though, to have some one to share the
losses," was the ejo nder. Whi e in
his counting house once during a rain
storm, this remark was made by some
pre ent: " My gracious, isn't it
coming down 1" "Did you ever see it
go up?" asked Mr. Gibbons. Although
he arose to so prominent a position
among his fellow men, lie was not with
out an early history that in the earnest
boy gave promise of th successful
man. More th n once has he recalled a
►pot in bis life where he knew not
where the next meal was to come from,
his perseverance helping him out of his
dilemma.
I

POINTERS.
Mrs. 8. II, Whitaker is visiting friends
at Binghampton, New York.
The East Lake Park land just north
of the city, is being suiveyed.
The trees along the Brai dywine have
begun to put on their gaudiest dress.
The Citizens' Rink will open to-night
with a benefit for the Wilmington Rille
Club.
I Th8 rel ,. lvin(r of Fimrtll str( , et , bB .
| tWHP1 , »ttfÄUnjoa Je com
plated,
Not for a long time have the street
•kets been so full as they were this
week.
The
tion has about reached its lofty height
of 200 feet.
stack at the City Mill Sta
I
The outlook for the oy Her «muon is j
encouraging in regard to supple as well !
.. I
Vwn U * • ? '* a i
( )lh. ers fcclioor and Lynch aie the
champion heavy weight lifters of the .
Police gymnasium.
Chestnuts are bringing from thirty to
forty cents per quart—not the kind that '
are announced by a bell.
The merchants are displaying con- !
siderable taste in the arranging of their j
1
Fall goods in the show windows. I
House painters all wear smiling coun- !
'es, the fine weather having made I
the usual Fall work very brisk. |
The city's telegraph wires have just !
undergone a clearing of rubbish that I
has collecte oa them daring the Sum- 1
(
j
!
I
! is
te
Business improvements on Madison
street continue at a lively rate, and that 1
Western trade mart is filling with
stores.
The first story of the 'Wilmington
building, at
Saving Fund Society'
Ninth and Market streets, excites the
animons admiration of passers-by.
is
The new Methodist Church being
built at Edge Moor is nearing comple
tion. When finished it will be a stand
ing credit to the inhabitants of that
village.
William Alsentzer has a fine display
in the south wt dow of bis store. No.
414 Market street, of the various skins
from which he manufactures niufilers,
capes, caps, gloves, etc
Mrs Arthur C. Brown has gone to
Boston to join her husbaud, who is
superintendent of the Art Embroidery
Department of the Wheeler and Wilson
Sewing Machine Conquiny in that city.
Work is brisk at the Edge Moor Iron
Company's Works. A double " turn "
has been started, ana the working force
incre sed. Several other large con
tracts are in view', which, if secured,
will give steady work to the men sev
eral months.
As the proud Alva glided gracefully
from her slays on Thursday she was
welcomed by 10,000 admiring specta
tors. The half holiday given the work
men of the Harlan & Hollingsworth
Company, the gift of Mr. Vanderbilt,
was a pleasing companion of the gala
event.
a
of
so
THE CITY ON A HILL.
WILMINGTON'S ADVANCE
MENT PICTURED.
A Go-Ahead Place That is Devel
oping on Every Side. Pro
gress the Watchword.
The outlook for th future prosperity
of Wilmington is brighter to-day than
it hits
been. First to be consider
ed in thinking of its hopefulness is its
healthy situation. Standing 44« feet
above the level of the sea and on a hill
that gives natural drainage of the most
purifying kind, only the ordinary sani
tary precautions become necessary to
keep its sick and death rate to the min
imum. A fair idea of the advantage
enjoy« I in respect to its altitude is
obtained from the fact that there are
some ciiies in this country not more
than ten feet above the sea level. The
blessL gs secured by a temperate cli
mate are also enjoyed.
nd consideration is its great
natural advantages in a commercial and
manufacturing sense. Directly con
nected by water as well as rail with the
immense minerai and other resources
of Pennsylvania and the growing
I Mouth, and with capital already ceater
• ed h**ie, the busy wheels of industry i
;
must find profitable emplov ment.
Then there is a more enterprising !
spirit shown by all kinds of business
men than lias before been seen by that
proverbial individual—the oldest inhab
itant. As a result, business is increas
ing, new people are being brought to
the city, and buildings are going up in
what
called "off-places."
This interest is not confined to one
locality, although the central and wes
vere
tern sections show the greatest activity.
Two years have worked a remarkable
change. The Ninth
long ago the quiet village, is
herself light lustily. A new bridge
across the Brandywine, electric ligiits,
a street railway and the opeuing of a
large tract'' oT tarin land to the north i
being signs ef a progressive spirit that '
I
Fard, not very
jrting
will soon speak for themselves. The
I Aiding!
j l''rgei-force and other concerns promise
! '!- ot t0 1 l,e limiyiu fulluwl "K *" a '
I direction.
i The B. & P. railroad has considerably
enhanced the value of property near its
. tracks, and become a potent stimulus
along the line.
The Fiilman Car Works, the Wil
' mington Glass Works, Ford & Ry
! ing factory, Lea Pusev's ice factory, :
j William Alsentzer's seal, otter and }
Mills are preparing for a
's ;
1
:eo factory, J M. Posey's stock- j
I otlie skin wearing apparel factory, the j
! Fa rod ox Varnish Company, the Mil- |
I Kington City Electric Company, and a j
| dozen small e tablishmonts are grateful
! »'Oitlons The Ceiitral Natiomil Buuk, ,
I m he<mrl , t . y 1r " s . t S,lf " 1
1 th . e W Z b "! W ' , W 1,1 ' e Vll '
mington having rund So-iety and re
modelling of the National Bank of
j Wilmington ami Brandywine, and the ,
! Union Na ional Bank indicate financial
I strength. A new Government building j
! is now assured. A Commercial College ;
that promises a good system of special
education, the Mechanical Drawing j
School and the new High School are |
additional evidence of exp;
.
1
sive ideas, j
The growth and firm founding of the :
Women's and Young Woineu'a Ohr s- j
tian Temperance Unions in their half a
dozen attractive kinds of elevating 1
work.the permanent organization of Jtlie |
Associated Charities, th new Aims
house and the renewed activity of
older established benevolent institu- I
tions show that the progress has been of .
no narrow material. A free dispensary j
is assured- The new life that the In- '
gtitute Library lias developed is of such
a civilizing kind as to be fit company
for the other elements of success.
The spirit of advancement has even
struck the Police Department. Instead a
of a plodding and uncouth set of menas
so often characterizes such systems,
Mayor Rhoads's force has shown a de
cided taste for improvement. A gymna
sium, bath room, library and parlor, all
furnished in the most comfortable man
ner, are evidences of refinement not
found in similar departments of many a
large cities.
Wilmington may be pointed to by its
citizens withsut shame. Not only is '
she going ahead in the material ways
enumerated, but Christianizing influ
ences are at play along with the rest,
and she is trying to deserve ht r ad
vancement.
f -TEMPE^NOB NOTES.
W„bere to go to Hear Living
''-issues Discussed.
The campaign in Kent and Sussex
counties is decidedly ahead of that up
here.
Lewis D. Vail, Esq., of Philadelphia, ,
will be among the speakers at the Opera
House to-morrow afternoon at 3 30
o'clock, at a meeting under the auspices
of the Women's Christian Temperance
Union and the Red RibbonTemperance
Association.
i I 11 this city on October 29,30 and 31,
; respectively. This man, who is
The Temperance Reform Party of
New Castle county will hold a grand
ratification meeting in Institute Ilall
this Saturday night, beginning at 8
o'clock. The Opera House would have
been better for the largo crowd expect
ed, but it could not be rented on ac
count of previous engagement James
It. rioffeeker, candidate for Governor,
Richard M. Cooper, candidate for Con
gress, Major E. T. Scott, of Camden, N.
J , who is now stumping his State for
General F.sk, the Prohibition candi
date for Governor, and Lewis D. Vail,
Esq , of Philadelphia, attorney for the
Law and Order Society, will speak.
The Women's Christian Temperance
Un on and Red Ribbon Association
have been fortunate enough to secure
Colonel George W. Bain, of Kentucky,
to deliver three of his popular lectures
! knownas t,,e silver-tongued orator, is
in great demand at present, and the
dates given Wilmington were the only
ones at his disposal during either this or
next month Of
address delivered
by him at Ocean Grove Camp-Meeting,
the National Temperance Advocate says:
"We can give no outline of his address.
It was an appeal for the American
home against the saloon, which brought
conviction to every heart The vast
multitude was moved as the wh rlwind
tl,e people. At least 7,000 white hand
i -'-erehie?.: waved the-pulsation of the
' ^ ,ear * so ^ »wdience as the speaker
I sat down."
sways the mighty forests of the West.
Strong men and women wept, and
vowed eternal hatred to the saloon, and
everlasting u otectiou o the homes of
dents of the day!
was not
Thursday's Temperance Reformgath
ing in Lyuam's woods, near Newport,
was one of the grandest successes of the
campaign. About l,30o pinsons were
present, including voters or both the old
part ies. The parade
Fairview Lodge of (Laid Templars, of
Newport, GO strong, folio wed by a pio
cession of gaily dressed girls riding iu
festooned wagons, and
horsesbaek of
delegation of
the Stanton public schools were inci
An enjoyable dinner
unpopular feature. Daui* 1
Green presided, with a long list of vice
presidents. The speakers were candi
dates Hoffecner and Cooper, "Uncle
Billy" Dean, Charles Mead, of New
York, and George W. Todd ;
*'• Hubbard of Wilmington,
f»« * ,lst «wment Hand gave some
fine music between speeches. Further
meetings have been arranged as follows:
Delmar, Monday evening, October 18;
Bridgeville, Tuesday afternoon; 8ea
ford,Tuesdayevening; Greenwood,Wed
nesday afternoon; Farmington, Wed*
nesday evening; Lincoln, Thursday
afternoon; Milton, Thursday evening;
L
d the
es, Friday afternoon; Angola, Fri
day evening; Millsboro', Saturday after
noon; Laurel, Saturday evening. The
meetings will be enlivened by excellent
music, and the following speakers
among others
The lion. William Dean, Cand idate
Cooper, Horace G. Knowles, J. R.
Price, George W. Todd, 1). E. Noll,
Dr. A. C. Heaton. J. A. Peck and Cap
tain Dutton, of Virginia,
ill deliver addresses:
A Touching Inoident.
A touching instance of insect instinct
is recorded by a writer who says: "I
found a cockroach struggling in a bowl
of water. I took half a peanut shell for
a boat. I put him into it,gave him two
wooden toothpicks for oars, aud left
him. The next morning I visited him,
and he had put a piece of white cotton
thread on one end of the toothpicks,
and set the toothpick on end as a signal
of distress. He bad a hair on the other
toothpick, and there that cockroach sat
a fishing. The cockroach, exhausted,
had fallen asleep. The sight melted
mo to tears. I bad never to chew
leather to get a soul; I was born with
. I took that cockroach out, gave
him a spoonful of gruel and left. The
animal never forgot my kindness, and
now ray house is chuck full of cock
roaches.

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