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The weekly times. (Wilmington, Del.) 1886-18??, October 23, 1886, Image 2

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THE WEEKLY TIMES.
AN INDEPENDENT PAPER.
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY MORNING
J. L. GOOD.
BOOTHE & GOOD,
S. A. BOOTHE.
Editors and Proprietors.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:
Mon tli h
■Vi:,
Oil til R
Single Copy...
be obtained free of cliarg
Sample Nnmliers cn
upon application at tl
OFFICE, No'. 404 MARKET STREET,
I all comnmnlcatloiiHHbouUl 1
Entered at the Wilmington Poat.Offlco na aecond
aUua mail matter.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28,1886.
Senator Gray utters a specious
cry for his party when he claims that
it is opposed to all sumptuary laws,
for a man of so great intelligence
cannot really believe in such a
sweeping * principle. We have an
idea that his plea in this respect is
made merely as a politician. Com
mon sense should hav
chance in this question, and not be
entirely debarred. Some kind of
law is evidently necessary to regu
late the liquor traffic, and if sump
tuary be that kind, surely it is not
wrong, for there is no other alterna
tive. Moral suu8ion is not sufficient.
Shall the country continue in its
present danger through rum, simply
because we fail to agree on a techni
cality ? The fallacy of following in
that line is shown right in our
midst. There were about 250
licenses granted in 1885 in this coun
t}' yielding a revenue of some $25,
000. Now, the offset was as follows:
The trial of Davis for killing Officer
Peterson during a drunken fit cost
$6,000 ; the trial of Becker for kill
ing Horace L. McGinnis during a
quarrel over whiskey, cost $4,000 ;
the trial of the colored man Robin
son, who, while under the influence
of liquor, committed an awful crime,
coutJfc9,00Q ; Thomas ^1. Robinson,
of Rockland, was found beaten and
dying at Fourth and Shipley streets,
after a night's spree ; Patrick Coyle,
after a two day's debauch, received
that, although perhaps
slight for a sober man, acted fatally
on his debilitated system. This is
but a hurried extract from memory
running over a short period. To
say nothing aliout the eost of per
brought to the Almshouse and
City Court through liquor, or the
misery, vice and death generally un
heard of. but caused by it, this is a
terrible showing. Tim balance is
largely against liquor in every way.
One of the cases that early helped to
give Senator Gray his position as
the first criminal lawyer at the bar
of this county was defending Thomas
who had killed his wife while suffer
ing from delirium tremens. He is
certainly willing to take a great risk
for the community in opposing anti
liquor legislation. There is an ap
palling list of murders, etc., in this
vicinity in recent time through
liquor beside the one given. Kett
ner, tin* drunken saloon keeper,
customer;, Croney killed
Maguire on election day while heated
witli liquor; the two Lists, who
•e general imbibers, killed Taylor;
Harrigan killed Shea, alter cxhilira
tion from drink. Meagre as is the
knowledge of rums work that comes
to the front, is it not infinitely more
than enough to demand any com
mon-sense means that will save
others from it ?
little
injuries
killed
M a. Walcott denies that his party
is an inferior one. How, then, did
it happen that the State Convention,
knowing that a very large number
of respectable Democrats were dis
satisfied with their party's disinclin
ation to entertain reform views,
tircly ignored local afl'uirs as if it
was a National Convention ?
en
When the Devil wants dirty work
«lone, he usually selects those better
than he ; hence the venerable Wil
liam Bright presided [at the Opera
House meeting to oppose reform.
GreatBritain consumed last year
•"$616,343,800 worth of liquors, beer,
etc., an average of $102.50 for each
family in the kingdom, and more
then was spent for bread, butter and
cheese. We wonder what per cent,
of the misery among British work
ingmen about which so much is said
is due to facts like this.
The Opera House programme
facetiously says that half the pepper
sold in Boston consists of "p's."
We know places where half the pep
per sold consists of ground cocoa
nut shells.
W E heartily thank The Morning
News , Freie Presse , Daily Republi
can , Every Evening , Sunday Star
and Railroad and Steamboat Guide
for their kind notices of The Times.
HOW OTHER 3 SÎE US.
The first number of The Weekly
Times, published by S. A. Boothe
and James L. Good, was issued yes
terday morning. The paper is
bright and newsy, and contains in
teresting editorial comments upon
current events. A very readable
article is that devoted to Wilming
ton's |mper-making industry, as is
also "The City on a Hill," outlining
the industrial advancement of Wil
mington. It is independent in poli
tics .—Sunday Star (Ind.)
The new paper, The Weekly
Times, makes its first appearance to
day. This paper has a very nice
make up, and its contents are volu
minous and carefully selected.
There is something for everybody's
taste. The publishers and editors,
Messrs. Boothe and Good, have had
practice in journalism, and have both
been engaged on The Morning News.
They are well known for their fit
ness for the work. We foretell a
successful future for them .— Freie
Presse (Ind.) Saturday, October 16.
The first issue of The Weekly
Times, to be published every Satur
day morning by Boothe At Good,
editors and proprietors, appeared
this morning. It is a neat, live-col
paper, and its price is one cent
per copy, 50 cents per year. Politi
cally it will support the Temperance
Reform party, and, as well as we
can Infer from its salutatory, it will
limit the
unins to home merchants and indus
tries, and will exclude therefrom
patent medicines and liquors. Both
Messrs. Boothe and Good are young
men who have done reportons 1 work
on Wilmington dailies. — Every
Evening (Ind.)
of its advertising col
The Weekly Times, published by
Samuel A. Boothe and J. L. Good,
made its first appearonce to the pub
lic this morning. It is to be issued
weekly, five columns to the page,
and is very handsomely printed
clean, white paper. It gives promise
of being a vigorously conducted
sheet, and its advertising patronage
would indicate remunerative sup
in charge
port. The young
have each had considerable practical
newspaper work,
experience
which will be to their advantage.
The paper is promised to be inde
pendent in politics and shows its in
dependence by supporting the Tem
perance Reform ticket. The Re
publican will be glad to see the suc
cess of The Times. — Daily Republi
can ( Rep.)
The latest local journalistic ven
ture is The Weekly Times, t.l»e first
number of which appears this morn
ing, under the editorship of S. A.
Boothe and J. L. Good, who are the
sole proprietors. If is a five-column
folio, very neat in its typographical
appearance and printed on line
good advertising
paper. It has
patronage to start with, and con
tains a large amount of local news
and miscellaneous matter,
the stand against inserting outside
advertisements or those of patent
medicines and saloons. In politics
it is independent. It favors the
election of the Temperance Reform
candidates. Although the field of
journalism seems pretty well tilled
in this city, there is probably a niche
for this sprightly candidate for
favor. It has an air of candor and
frankness that cannot fail to call
forth the respect of those who do not
agree with its opinions. The editors
are well-known young men of the
city. Mr. Good has l»een tor two
years connected with Wilmington
journalism .—Morning News (Rep.)
It takes
OPINION OF THE PRESS.
This country can't be expected to
send troops into either Ireland or
Bulgaria with the Chester and Dela
ware streams dyed in political gore.
—Philadelphia Times (Ind.)
The Knights of Labor teach the
country a great lesson in pledging
their officers of the general assem
bly to total abstinence during their
terms.— Manchester , N. H., Union
(Dem.)
The sentiment of the American
public seems to be that neither the
Democrats have sufficiently violated
their pledges to deserve eviction, nor
have the Republicans sufficiently re
deemed their dubious past to earn re
instatement. Mr. Blaine's rhetoric
cannot change that opinion.— Lon
don Times.
The corroupt politics of the day
has its centre in the lager beer sa
loons. That is where the pot-house
politicians gather, where the candi
date sets up a keg for the crowd.
Shut up the lager beer saloons and
you have done three-fourths of what
is necessary to purify the politics of
the country.— Independent.
The destruction of the town of
Salisbury could not have taken place
if the municipal authorities lmd been
wise enough to establish a compe
tent lire department. But Salis
bury, like so many other Southern
towns, is governed in about the
same fashion as prevailed in the
colonial times of a hundred years
and more. It is a matter of wonder
that even more towns in the South
are not laid in ashes through the de
plorable lack of public spirit in pro
viding what is absolutely necessary
to the safety and well-being of a
community .—Philadelphia Kcening
Bulletin (Rep.)
The leaders of the Knights of La
bor in this city doubtless know or at
least ought to know better than we
do what is best and wisest for the
prosperity of their order, but we
cannot help asking what is the ne
cessity of such a parade as they in
tend to make through the streets of
Philadelphia next Saturday night.
We do not beliéve that it will be
particularly conducive to social
order to have twenty thousand men
on parade for the purpose, as we
take it, of enforcing the "dignity of
labor," and of showing the capital
ists what a powerful organization
they must deal witji. All this pub
lic tomfoolery may be gratifying to
the vainglorious/ leaders of the
Knights of Labor, but it seems to
us that there aro many more useful
ends to which 'they could devote
their time and iheir money than
these public exhibitions of fuss and
feathers .—Ph ilaâelphia Telegraph
(Ind.) Oct. 19.
We submit tln\t Mr. Biggs made a
very unhappy application last even
ing of the Bible story of the escape
of the children of Israel through the
Red sen and the destruction of the
pursuing Egyptians. lie likened
the Democratic party to the fleeing
Hebrews with Mr. Biggs at their
head at Moses, and the Temperance
Reform party to the hosts of Pha
raoh in their chariots; and he was
quite confident that the waters of the
sea would be rolled up "on the first
Tuesday of November" for the ben
efit of the frightened Hebrcw-Demo
crats, and then would roll back
again and drown all the Egyptian
Temperance Reformers. One trou
ble with this comparison is that Mr.
Biggs is not Moses, and another is
that there is too much fraud among
the baggage of the Ilebrew-Dcmo
crats to warrant the opiuion that
Divine power will intervene in No
vember or at any other time for their
deliverance. But the main defect of
the comparison is Mr. Biggs'
tion that the Reformers can be in
jured by cold water. Obviously it
is their cold water and political re
form principles that are threatening
the Democrats, and if the ancient
miracle is to lie repeated in Delaware
on next election day we predict that
Mr. Biggs will have to play the part
of old Pluiroah himself.— The Morn
ing News (Ilep.) Oct. 21.
VOICE OF THE PiOPLE.
The Taste for Reading.
II for Tu K TlMKK.
Wi
One of the greatest blessings be
stowed upon man is a taste for read
ing. There is no stronger shield
against discontentment, and tempta
tion ; no source of purer happiness
and it is a sure safeguard to virtue,
if properly exercised. The selection
of good books and proper digestion
of the contents, tits the reader ior
the society of the wisest, wittiest,
most honorable and unselfish. The
world can appear to him all he de
sires. He can enjoy everything
fiat's good and pure, and make
those with whom he associates feel a
loss at his absence. His character
will assume a loftier and healthier
tone by constant research and con
versation upon moral and elevating
subjects.
Alas, too often persons allow idle
moments to pass without improve
ment, and exclaim : "I feel too
tired to read this or that article to
night." The time passes and also
the thought, and thus they allow
precious moments to go by w ithout
improvement. The youth thus
grows into mature manhood. He
feels the need of information on
sound topics, and looks back with a
sigh upon lost opportunity. He
then tries to improvo as best he can,
but his efforts become irksome and
he gives up in despair. When in
the company of educated persons he
is unable to take part in the conver
sation and feels entirely out of place
and thoughts of "what might have
been" come back to him with double
force.
Parents and guardians should, for
the sake of the rising generation, be
stir themselves ; take an interest in
their charges, and select for them
books, papers and magazines that
will enrich and elevate their minds to
higher planes of usefulness. A love
for reading has made men what
training of schools has failed to ac
complish, und many young men
have thereby been saved from a life
of profligacy and disgrace.
THE WILMINGTON
Commercial
College,
Fir
cats, ami
uml Mail
open
In li
Hu
ung en
'li
nly
froi
g. Individual Instruct!
rxvo
Penman
, Rapid
aw, Practica
fn

in
n-liU
Will IN
T:
it
Hnokko pi
iliicsa A rlt
Tractl«al Spelling
Bookkeeping and Business Ktlii
E
■lui
A Thorough Training School.
;y and speed. Amu
Gives alertness,
<y. Tiio
Business Practice Department
tual Bank. .lolili
Houses. A
itbe
I
Commission and
tl correspondence
i.
\i:
with diatant citiee.
Special Penmanship and Shorthand De.
partments.
Bothi
-es admitted. Sight school m
time. Call «*• **'""■■ *■'•••
). En
H. S. Goldey, Principal,
Late' chief Instructor of Bryant A Stratton Col
lege, Philadelphia.
D elaware machine works
J . F. Ac I. S. Pierce, Proprietors,
511 ORANGE STREET
llenairing of Printing presse and
mowing machines a specialty. Practi
cal engineer and machinists. Ne»
machine built to order. General re
pairing and jobbi g.
JSAAC 8. BULLOCK,
Tin & Sheet-1 ronWork
Roofing, Guttering, Spouting, Stoves,
Heaters, Ranges.
N. E. Cor. 9th and Shipley Sts.,
WILMINGTON,
DELAWARE.
JfUiANK
Merchant -:- Tailor.
No. 233 Market Street,
COUBIT,
VII.MINOTON.
DELAWARE.
The leading advertising medium in
the State of Delaware is the
Wilmington and Peninsala
Railroad& Steamboat
GUIDE.
II. M. BOWMAN,
Publisher and Proprietor.
410 Easl Seventh street,
Wilmington, Delaware.
Wedding Gifts.
Novelties in Silver.
Fancy Plated Wäre &
Silver in Cases.
C. F. Rudolph,
Market and Fourth Sts.
JANVIER'S
231 MARKET STREET,
The Celebrated Hathaway, Soule c t
Harrington Calf Bala and Con
gress $3.00. Warranted.
A. CANNON,
J.
>1
No. 505 Sill LEY ST.,
WILMINGTON,
y ^ HEISS,
Merchant -:- Tailor,
No. 4 E. THIRD ST.,
DEL A WARE.
WILMINGTON,
DELAWARE.
PRICE ONE CENT,
BOOTHE & GOOD,
Editor
i and Proprietor».
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, . 50 CENTS.
office,
WEmingtun,
For sale by Frist & Davis, No. 313
Market street ; E. S. R. Butler & Son,
No. 320 Market street ;J M. McEvilly,
No. 201J WestSecond street; R. Mc
Elmoyl, No. 2125 Market street ; and
William Gosnell, Northwest corner of
Tenth and Orange streets.
>. iOi MARKET STREET,
WMIMN,
A. P. WHIÏAKEB,
OB PRINTER
u
)
211 SHIPLEY STREET,
WILMINGTON, - DELAWARE.
0 OOD WORK. LO W PRICES.

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