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Delaware inquirer. (Wilmington, Del.) 1859-18??, March 22, 1862, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053053/1862-03-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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JOii PKiNTlNtl
Uf
very descriptif
call) and prompt! r
ed ut
WS. -131 1ÏA.21XET STftSET,
Hj: Uveen 4th ami'f.tii Streets, '
nvilmingto.v, Del.wvakr f
i
JAMES MONTGOMERY^
very doHcrib-'
/. er.^ttd 6#
■ nu., y.s any ostablJshmoRt ir. t|i<*
l.? p.
H A;' DUil/LB, •
SHOW HILLS,
LAIJKLS,
BLANKS,
. BUSIN US:
CIRCULAI«!
AU
HILL ilKAHINus.
HliO goiit&llly are re
ia auutliu jiul
ipecifull) . i. ' i*.• Uo <i m «1 in their orders.
The i
3 vv I!
mptly filled, and sent by
i.» place in the Stute.

!
THE CRYSTAL
E VTLNlji SALOON.
•üaHöuiüiit ot savmo's Building,
w Onkci!'^iütli àn8<i Markt Nt«.
WÎI.MINO TON, DEL.
UBFE, l'ropriet
CHARI.
■pb;
Vili
• l.v
Id
Ik
i.P
.11
.
"4
non
IKY STYLE.
I' ALL U')URS.
Ml
IAS'.*
I
I L i-iSrS
•tod I
rl
From J
:
V.
linl 1
» v
r
LI AltUi.' M
stoiiMc & fW«wia
KalUxiiia.
• UHVAH »TSIBRT.
Tsai'- S'lhiosi
k UPMlA.
» i- ;
FOl&I>, PROPKll
i « u. a tv o u
J
N
ms c
;.
T.
in D,
1 Dint
tl,
:
ikldelpli!
'■
1»'
visit. I>"
■ h.
ill and I.
th.
.tjtvctranacM ää<sivl am<
Etatanrant
No. 1 North Hide oj fourth Street, bettvcch Jfitr
Wilmington, Dit.
l Sh
UHN T. McNE
fiî ÎT
L'hc
M
;
"P-
•und
• id
Up
»»»U#

■)fh
U
Mr
IF l.-p
U»'.
h&tÿ iïsokfisS Mouse.
• CLAYTON, SMYRNA STATION,
lit.yr I'joL'NTY, D1ÎLAWAP.1 1
THr. .•IMHC'IIITJEU
Dllll
iÜäMr<
pplisdwlth
th
r
Ti
ll

Wil
Tin* iwople il
BM1 in Kent < •
' P'l
uhi. i h
'f"
■ l by
.til»
ao.l i'Iid;
m.
MOST
KAlLirWU
MANUFACTORY,
m
i
Pill v
HK LNDEUSIUNE
-i
!> •»»!
fry
nd >r
.
rial
for Oei
n y
lux Y.I
Hi

n.
TURK,
HAT -iUCKS.
L'MtiUßLLA ST
'.AM
rh,
IRON FURNl
kind
AW I '
roinc IN GEN
I 11
VL.'
13UÎL
> 1 ';:
tb.i
jy
■ siv<
l atri
:
P 1
«•ly
li/
Wl:
the
D D
:
IV
il
t.
!£<'&* Bi'f'l'.
DSORIBER HAVINGH
■i ,
' y \
n.-i
Yimit
Hli
•i
.«t a
rfac
y hi
1)0
city
><L
'(«11
Ü
« I «So
oul Llw; p
'
h"
nul
;y
i.
s.
Jc
r.i
VlVUtt
B*'i
141 Mi-ir : t.L
l
rfii
!
I»lie ibn
h>
■ny
Jy..S
:it
1
zi»;
'■!'
atylt
«d.
.•paired
id
Uy.Mten.Ldu», Don't
'Aki:
V r
-iy
''ploy
bsssTutte—A
Itbir.
TotswoB'Inl
ith and Eighth,
between Sc
7 lb Market Sire*
WILMINGTON.
ITND.. LISXGN.
HAVING 'J
iy fi. F. h mit It,
'A
■<l 1
Dill
ti
i
tit 1
. CIU1
oJ will
irwht
sh
If« tli«*lr li

if
io klubeit tylo
. inoettlnir-uab
«J
tili«
•I
•ivrnth. Dr tbo ]
No
BOLUS.
LIVBfiV PTABLii.
. DJiUStGKl'lD \? Ul.LI)
thcpuhUtfthH
liy
.
©44
ml
M
-,
ill'
ART
Hi© public
furnishing
» tu b
l-ic. 1 1
lion
CBIVKI) AN
FOIl
JVftT
SAX
«*1.
If
Mi
Cap
:
il'i Caj b jit
H. H «AÎ
BOjBUdWCt FIft.
tippl-C
a. Mill
TUB
'
T
-i'
o. Full part Ic«»Invfe
-1IAM fi l iiARK.
l »liftin'!, B'itt! fillecMiary.
CE FOR THE
.1 ; , , thfi PILf..' Is
&FEKI
t vSPECIAL
!i virtue
.
Ll t
! '
Citv of
r,f
fi
iiptaoit
Mi
Fi
tic
-h
17
.'Ä
*Dniggi»t.
York
li.ply Iron
Cabinet Hi:«kins', CSIaaiiiS
l'ainiiiiä,
above Orange,
if DEL.
JOSEPH H. KUAMMBR
West Sixth Sere'
WILM1NG'
ihl«
like
id
cli
,,'k
r r
:.VTir
Toil
>t|i
». iiv
.»«lo «nit tb
Jmlg« 1 r y.*ui
ti KAMA! Ell
i>
,1c
1—try
(ada-lyj
Uttl lCAl. CAUt
ATTTKN TIONj
:
kill
UNION CA.
Del.
•be
•d n
ui
Sji tugled
ue.diiy und Batarday al 10 o'clock.
ry
Aie-i&A
IMHL
D
D
p
JU
a
J
1
=.~ :■■ ir-jr^r i.r^ pfcSgt:
.'"trasri-rir, ugätjalitt, É'-EL^jTBæasrrsrz.'
at
•^T
UU L
rTBLISH«» KVJîIlï SATl'RDtT, HY JA9IE8 MOdTOOMBEY, KO. »04 El * ft KB T »THEBT, BKTWKBSi FOURTH A K II FIFTH 4TKEKT8, WILMINGTON, DKLAWAKK.
SATURDAY, MARCH 22 , 1862 .
No. 47.
vor,, hi.
82.00 PER ANNUM.
JPrivat<' ialf of steal A Pee- !
MOiial Property,
THE SULWCHiUKIl WILL SELL [
I'rivnte pule, 11*0 un tiro stock »I Sum* Thi.
Psiiri w, Set fi
: l■. iii
'"""aiI'i'i.
'
j
i
I
Iiifsil
•st, between
n .Market 8ti
tVUmlnKfoii, D
**»« :
I fi
This U
led b> U
I";
wishing
III!
»M by
lU ibiS I.UM.K
H. IV
'wM Hr K. C «)-UANlil
i2
A Snilff Two M»rv
Hit 1CK. liU lCLLlNU FOK
j
MALE,
at.Hl hi No. 61» C
hi? Wild low
- nt
To
«y. For
« .'.Ht.
Heal IMatft .Agentj',
(ioueeriiiii, Ac.
AVIKG FOR MANY YEARS HE
on«i | j;o , I
Anctlono'-r. in
v-JCcutOuiinty
OFFICE IK THE
Aiic
11
Hti j
r.„,. !
j
north« ..f N»
tfy a-; Iteal K
t.v.
i.i
l>'i
ti
■ny
hnvuj
,1.- •
'Kit LI
ILDING
;kj
l.
4ii
'I
nl'IHty »
ill
;
: vi at 4
A'il'NT
X
fxorbOLVwill
ij- undivided
*<Y
'Vli
b» 1
»,
lpt1
•Htfpv- ■ of.
Ft
rj
il
1>. T. ItlCKAKliS. ^
B.—lk
rie* of y
>n\1f
OHS or nil Ilia.
Nvw Month. Cniintv. 11?..in«
.gny,ed In LOANING MU' KY
fu
will flu.] Ill
tiitu «wpnrtnu
*. T. IIIOKARIK
YaliisiDlF Real Estat<> ;r
M*» , iYHtc Sale.
i "'in »cii
i.-'k.l
rilii und« I
i.l :
i
It
I
i Je ya
n.
)<]■
1
H
; I
p«-ny
DANIEL WARD
a If aj.plic
r'A-tf
11
' j TIB INliEKSI
NHL WOULD IN*
public K«mera)ly th«..
cupN by Patrick Douui
lEE't. where lie ini -
hi
l
tiv
FO
)T uF SHU
•c RLACKBMITHING Bl'81N) :iS
■li an HOUSE SHOE- VO,
TUOIITI.NO tVOKK, kKIP
ty.
in all Ita
MACHINE WORK, WH
loua l>
■, I
WOKK, 4c.
EDWARD FARM).
.UKlIy paiJ u, Hon..*
pnJorsnHwfactloi'. in-*
i J at! vror
I8a i'«l wave
THE H'BSORIUER 11
thin .lay
•g«—**ij
ilia n a lam
Of 11. (1. llHll
is friends n ^
ut
Hv solicits Uie
In
liy.
C. A. RODNEY.
1
3o
I
A Card.
H aving di-p^ejot
No. -'01 Market Si ret
fiifpli
tin imbllc an entirely worthy of thei
»I Hardware, 4c
A. Rodney, I take i*
i .
u
. O. BAN NINO
titrten «ROccry sitOJrêT !
NO. 4M» MARKET STREET,
HU.* '
4 AMES BROGAN, takos tbl» nuKlind u, u.h u
Ity lijHi li - i i
•'bovo place. ««• >'•
- .
hu cRUo
i'll n Ore
o.
I»»
J'
iJ
Ui.iMioml Srfwerj,
and ilotel,
Sis 225 King St, bet, 2d & S ',
nUlINOTU.V, Bit.
JOWKPli aTPECI4H.lt,
<>U to inform tho oltla .«•
and the surroimai' «
O'.'-* <•.
th«
«y
the
and «l«.Ji
notait
y
l>«\»;u..vd cnnnul 1*4
.tue 11
ItlK
ntry.imJ th«« prE
; I •
l.y any
"
tliO
In procuring Lü* r
••«y
:
0
ih
N.
kordh
i
I'lii.n
■t
"1 up Jnliy
ll
Lf N Oll 1
:
In
rout sale mi ri;ht
I> BK1C1Û
A LARGE 3-STOH
lihlitnc. «uitHl.lo for u ?
M'oollen or
I
Pm
F*«
llr
l
Jli
Mo

i
'
«y

:
Tlx* I-uililiujri
wlshljj«
in* h I •
ii
.
;;

kind ot l>
IW tu J A
■t WILLI-UI
IIK«. <1*1
"E
Sc
ST IIOUU
nniaiiT. uth st.
Mark
lüair SlreitMGij; and wiiavin-;
SftBOOi!,
In fitateemm Building. 5lh St.
J^O A CH AND KING TAKE T II1 .«
Ht/tliéyu>
IOi
Marke-.
(DR
i y un th
til
ko* nt tl
:
j udAhi
tb*lr finir «1
ctUl and ruuli
1*1.
h
iu Ui« I .
'■"'.■I :!
Ui. loiliiwt
!
»Hi
kt
»
W!?l. A, BAClli:,
BOOT A.WI» «11012 TRKKS
No. 101 West Sùüond Street,
WILMINGTON, BEL.
!
!
U.t
CRT Lauts «uiuiu
HATS! HATS! CAPS!!
CAFT. HOt.ACE R. 1LAV,
Uuviug taken ti^e Store
NO. 307 MÀ.UKBT syitEET,
WILMINGTON DE
j
ARM
fifii'n»
-
Sr 1 n At
ibPro ho will kc
iF FIN K SILK
f HOYS' FANCY HATS AND CAPS. Tl.o above
und will bo sold
•n purclioaud for coil
roi". «>11 u 'I ©su
. All lV>odt> Hol'I
ÎSSW

chat they
MILLINERY ! MILLINERY!
\YiLsuNar--K Ins
'ORNEK tlGUl'll AND MARKET STREET!*
8. CARTER
» tb© Liidie*
Vi iï»ho
• i'
ui'l
it bovo building, wlilt h In
of SPRING HONNETH,of tl
, wliit'h «.
.*d
11
Ml
fey Hi
© pric«H. Pleat©
ention
also. Children'«
bf thoBo wlehing
hint »call.
D.—Bleaching
• 1
Preaaiug promptly »Itended to.
S. CARTER.
J. M. M'CALL,
•4a °
Wöhb'N Building, Market
-ILL Wilmington, Del.
d Vest!
MERCHANT TAILOR,
below Third.
preely for
rdnr In tlie
oh' furniah«
, Helocted
nki-h u]i .1
C lull)«, OlMlin
lyte. Also,
ad
YOUNG LADIES' INSTITUTE.
l'ITUAiED upon a beautiful
thi.' Western part of tbe city of Wllulnjj
re». Tb© lx.unq 1 *
ly tm
lid« embrace
mgboutand
■ B'j
lugtfly rentUated.
Two pn
d tuition iu Engll.h pur
b
t
payitlil© «|uarturly
I I
«160
!
M
MONDAY in 8«p
No
DAY PUPILS PER QUARTER.
Junior Department, Engliitb,
Mlildio " .....
Senior '* »...
tb
8
10 00
non, iiddrrfiS
ev. THOM Ah M. OANN, A. M.,
Princlpid.
Catulo
i«Ug3 -4 __ __
i ViiSi SU SÏÏSHStàSTLé Mutö
upLie<l at ibe lowwt rat«#
UK ST A CO.. Drngcl«U .
•t St., Wlluilugtcm, D#1
GrvceiHimd others i»u
5 . Ult I NO H
ii.9]
I IJsr toc«iv«Ki » now invoice u
i »J aud Glow pointing,*«t
i Hprir
!
[
[For the Delaware Inquirer.]
The Monitor and MemmftOi
i
THOMAS BARKY
When the rebel commander bad sunk the
Cumberland, .
j And the gallant.frigate Cuugress, was burq
i ing by bis band,
I Said he, we'll sink all Yankee ships that keep
us in blockade,
the Mm- is good for anything that ever
Yank**«» made ;
So get a little Higher—
Mak?- ready, boys, and lire, j
And play,them the umo-coil'd Virginia
ucver
:
Ft
Hol pilot, at the lookout 1 just caal your'eyes
»irouud,
Kre weiiluk the MinneaotH, .that
aprouod.
j The pilot U.ok'd with quislUg ©>.*, t
! hv laugh'd,
j There
is fast
loudly
e « a Yankee cheese-box a-tioutiog
» a raft ;
Let hew get a little nlgher-,
We'U sink her the first fire,
e'll piny them the tune called Virginia
Ft
never tire.
And soon tlié gal laid Monitor
the Mac,
o do
up
inlroductiou with a devil of a
And gave
wbdek;
•ibo made the mounter «tugger, the captaiu
alarmed
a Yankee cheese-box with boite of
tbiitidtii' hrinofl';
To
Let her come a little nigher,
And we'll rest*
ur fire,
And plav them the tuno called Virginia never
lire.
But Worden, ofthe Monitor, wag not the least
afraid,
Aud heavy
giuin paid ;
He bang'd her fore, be bang'd her aft, ut
broke her iron akin;
He pelted her beiweeu the ribs and let tl
daylight In; .
the compliments ha to Vir
:
Says the rebel iu his 1rs
Ho 1 pilot, you're a liar,
For tbe devil's
the cheese-box, «ui Vir
giuia must retire.
! never
In all uiy travels
the
craft
3o dreadful hs this cheese box a-floating on a
raft,
For every shot sbe gives tbe Mac her iron fab
sbakes;
I verily believe her gun9
carth-annkoe :
Let us no longer fry her.
We cannot stand her fire,
We'll have to piny the new tune, Virginia 4lll
retire.
loaded wjtb
-
Here'S health to gallant Worden, and all bis
dauntless
That fought against the Merrlmac
age true;
May the cation give a just reward, nor let
then? nut abaft,
Wbo iougiii the Yaukee cheese-box a-floatiug
id piovM
tbeir
on a raft,
Au*i «.he nation will udrni
The patriotic lire
t made them ehaug" tbe luu*
will r«*tiiv
Virginia
Ttii
'
i
!
!
WHILE IT IS DAYTIME LEI CS WORK
Every mortal'litis liis tulBsiou .
!n tbiif world uf active Strife/
VVb)'M>*r tn'H high position,
Or a lowly walk of fff«.
!
5
Ueit.is.whf
Every duty, day by day,
.■Shows thé luintT and spiilt willing
1
l'o periorw its ouwsrd way.
Life's a btirk upon the ocean,
Tossed and rocked hy every gnie :
Now scuds on with speedy motion,
Now with rout and tattered sail.
Life's a bright amd nuuuy morning,
With some light refreshing Bhowe r ».
Follorwedby dark,'cloudy warding
Ofthe sWirtn that' o'
lowers.
Life's.tho chord ofwilver/biadipg
Mun in contact with hi- kind ;
Death is b.it that bond unwinding,
getting free the earth-bound mind.
! Life's the pitch èt at the fOtHuhin
! Whehcé ühmörtal rills descend ;
'Tis the' fragile wheel surmoiifitlng
«Jisféfn' Where pure wilterl bTcnd.
j Life's the day lor deed and action ;
Death's the -sent,, -the time of night i
ti®.who worKs wfth autirtlaotion,
Works while yet the hour is light
Forward, then I the day is waning ;
Westward sinks the setting sun ;
Onward ! on ! ! without complaining.
it rimy be done.
Work ! while j
■»
SMAKS^ÈABK.
whore kings are laid down In
What
the eartb,
'Neath castle
pyramid pile 1 *
Or fpr tombs of rude warriors cathedral-be
palace,
girtb,
While Stratford-on-Avou belongB to our isle!
whore saints In tbeir shrines are
What,
embalm'd 1
That o'er land and o'
oceau weak pilgrims
beguile,
Or "here wise
becalm'd
While Stratford-c
fa] umber
ql old may
-Avon belongs too
where nb^tea in marble or bre^f,
;'ulpinr'd to fascinateFlattoryVsuiile;
There's a bust that a thousand of suth can
surpass,
For Stratford-ôu-Àv
isle
*
What
! ■
isle!
belongs to
00
t'd
What bare'? If the mooarchs of SuTope l
clay,
Should tho bands of the fashioning potter
besoil ' 1 ' 1 ' '*
Th«' usbes of Sbakspeare are sacred for aye,
AndStratford-on-Avoa belougt to " *
[For the Delaware Inquirer.]
^ÜVEnSTTTJIRIffiS
OP
SIGNOR BIVOROLA,
OK
BY JAMKS MONTGOSiUBX,
Author of The Coutint — 7%« (Quaker Spy—The
Enchantreet—The Witch of Brandywine —
The Myeterioue Stranger—The Firet Vic
tim of The Ovid Fever—The Bn
Ihueiaet»—The Politician, jr.
CHAPTER Yl.
Rivorolu was standing quietly in the mid
with bis
ihud towards him. Zapponi
, aiM rushed towards
folded when
die of of the *
the ruffians
saw the aim u
hie friend to save/ him from their attack.—
stood, bis
Proud and defiant, the young
hand clasped firmly a dagger that slightly pro
truded from its scabbard in the inside of hi«
pocket: An Instant more and the bright
dagger gleamed in the gas-light, and the firm
and compressed lips of ftivorola told too
plainly his determiuatiou. The sharp click of
revolvers announced the desperate determina
tion ofthe assassins, Zapponi stood between
his frieud and the approaching enemy with
the intention of shielding him from the attack,
even if it required the sacrifice of his Ufa. One
and the man of science would
moment
have fallen a victim to these desperate
However fate decreed different, for before
opportunity offered to shoot him, a well di
rected blow from a chain, in the hands ol a
stranger, felled the foremost of these miscreo
ants to the fiooi- The stranger doalt blows
fast and'hoavy upon the heads of the intruders,
who fell like dead
in every direction.—
Before the terror-stricken gentlemen preheat
oould interfere, the attacking party was van
guisbed. Rivorola was as much surprised, ut
this happy termination of the affair as auy
else. But before he could recover from this
surpris« the stranger quietly took him by the
and conducted him into
adjoining
Reader, yon may imagine tbe surprise of
Rivorola when he saw before him bis friend
and gtiidc, Guiciolli. At first, he scarcely
seemed to realise tbo fact that he
onre
with his friend, and that to his timely
arrival he might attribpte the saving of his
life. Tbe enraptured mau fell upon the neck
of his deliverer and gave
in a best of ejaculations that
Italian .can imitate. (Question uppu question
WftS prupuwu A.-4 -r? IwiJrs-MW.
auswered. He stood motionless aud fa
though be would r«ad
to bis feelings
but
zed at bis protege
the most secret thoughts of tbe young
without inquiring the cause of the present
trouble. Rivorola
had happened, and without further molesta
tion they departed together for tbeir Hotel
where they found Beatrice awaiting tbeir arri
val. The young lady chided Rivorola for keep
ing late hoars, aud the party departed for
tbeir respective rooms.
told bis frieud all that
CHAPTER VII.
In is iu one of the private parlors of the
Hotel of
Bud
friends that ouce wore
Rivorola and Gulccllll seated together. They
ha«l fully disrnsied tbe proceedings of the
night before and tbeir attention
cd towards matters of more lmporunce. Gn|
clolli had visited the Sunny 8onth, and bad |
seen and heard mauy things of importance.—
His burines had all been transacted—whether
uowturn
satisfactory or not—and he had returned to
Visit tbàt region
. The deep ache mes
ofthe secessionists were beginning to réalise
their fruits in the destruction ot the property
of men who clang fiercely to the Union, on<t
willing to sacrifica everything for their
country. Men had been driven from their
homes, their property confiscated, and a reigu
of terror prevailed that had no parallel in the
history of the world. Oaiclolli was explainiag
all this to his pupil na they sat together.—
Guiciolli proceeded : ^
"Tbe day is fast approaching when the great
-ebe'lilon will transpire; when this beautiful
country will be^ devajjed and iu verdant fields
be rod with the bloo«i[ of sanguinary strife—
When thé hand of red war will blight every
thing, and couvert ïtic peaceful cities into for
tifications, und chill tbe blood of thé people
with-the sound of terrible can Hon. It Will be
almost a war of extermination and nothing
strength dï thé ndrihew?
end to 'UJ ' It WUl la
but the aupeii«
fiords will 'put
cret.su lb«* piiKltc detif, and burthen the people
with taxés most oppressive. But the day will
certainly come when this war Will l*e consid
ered a.blestftng rather thku a wiftte'. 1
•Mow can so«.h horrible Lluod-shed ever
prove h l)l«:ouing to bumnuily ? 1 csrnhot con
ceive.
"Thefe i« hut one way to show this. Tbo
heavy national Hobt will be dt vidfid t'A email
among the 1 people; paltlcblarly aineng
thé lahbriog classes. This WH «frèatb k» in
terest in the general goveru'&efit'diae nôthiug
can break* A klbd bf ^ofid 'W ceihWit «very
section oftfie «jobb fry togétber.' if Will then
hu thé in terest of ihé massés to Support lostead
of breaking'up the èdvè'rtitriénM Ev'éry
will have something at Stake 1n tboCöötiüuance
'of the Union. It «will benefit tôgétbë# every
section of the Cohfiti-^, and bind together the
whole consteilc tlon of stars With a bond'stron
ger than any that bas över heretofisY« existed.
Nations' abroad wiH reSpfcct tfife goVerbment
more than they e'vfer did before, ffithply because
they will see the pöwef bbfillid th« ^OVorötoeu t
that Badks and àhp{>ortlf ft: It wifi b* fine of
ih« strongest and moBt durable govennnents
extant."
Before the coüVSrßftttöo wetitaUy farther
Beatrice entefed'and took a seat With ber
frënds. Öer face iéeméd ftdlhöd,'ätäd' her «yes
looked as though skfe Âtfd'bëèfi Weiring. At
tfie'sight of h'is slster.'Gütctmii lettthé
and Rivotöla and fils fklt friend'#ifrtl aion«.
Ever ai d à'nou 1 â sIgfi Woxtld bufàt'ftjHli from
the breast bf tbe^ofiii^'lady. ' RiVdfoIa
that Homethirig Was wortldk «he miml
of Béatri'cb, for her dsukl-gayetyiiifd- subsided
into a profound grIW. ; RiVoroU Was-not long
in inquiring'the oaiuie Wliar sorrow. An Uen
SAW
of the topic under discussion may be gleamed
from the following conversation. Beatrice wu)
talking; Bbe said:
'•I grieve
Doomed by wicked
of happy homes will be made desolate. Tu
father will slay bis
armed agaiuit brother; many a mother will
the fats of her fallen child. Oiiie.i
the fate of my poor country,
revolution, hundred*
and brother will be
weep
will be destroyed, and old ft„e will be brought
with sorrow to the grave. Thonsauds of in
nocent people will be made homeless and a
general desolation will pervade the. whole
land.
" Wft* have you ÿucii gloomy forebodings
of thFffcte of the country and Its people ?"
" Myirother, you know, has just returned
from thé South, and he says that nothing
can avert the conflict. The worst, must
oome."
" But, Beatrice," interposed RIvorola,''we
need not see or even hear of this terrible re
volution, We can return .to our sunny Italy
and enjoy the comforts and happiness of a
sweet »nd quiet home. A wide ocean will
be between us and the horrors of this war.
Everything will bo comfort around us, aud
in each other's scei&y will bo happy togeth
" Rlvorolla, you know not what you say.
This is my country—it is my home. Hern
among its beautiful hills, that raise their
craggy peaks along fhc Potomac, I have
apent my childish days. They have asso
ciation« and fond remembrances in my bo
som, that neither time nor distance —
eradicate. And When I think ot the # torriblo
▼oleano which ia seathing beneath my coun
trymen'a filet,cannot help trembling and
having sad forebodings for my country's
fate."
' 'But why need a lady continue in a country
fraught with such terrible disasters, and over
whoso hood «o much trouble is pending ?"
"A lady can be a patriot and love her
home and her friends, and sorrow over her
country's trouble, as well as a gentleman.
She has fully as much at stake as a gentle
man, and the head of a family has."
That Is all very true, but it Is rot ex
pected that she is to take any active part in
these troubles. It is to bo supposed that she
has other duties of a higher and nobler char
acter to perform; that her j>rovince is to pre
side over the household affairs, and tÄ be tbo
bright aud shining star of the family circle."
"That is all very true. But you do not
suppose that a woman should forsake her
friends in the hour of trial and danger V"
" Not at all ; I did not take that view of
tae cas«."
** Beo*jjw ;X tUpk I know woman well
owoug: -^*3» vaui she will stand by her
friends aid relatives, under any and all cir
cumstances, and that she will sacrifice eve
rything for their comfort and good. Thou
sands of goodand loyal men will be wound
ed in this conflict; these men will need the
comforts and assistance of woman. I must
stay to do whatever lays in my power for
them. You cm return to your home, in the
garden-spot of the world, and enjoy the hap
piness that place and circumstances will
round you with, but I must remain here and
assist my friends in the great trial which is
about to come upon them."
Rlvorola's lustrous eyes flashed as the sar
casm of the young lady struck deep in his
heart. No dagger could have cut keeuer
or Grounded deeper than tho words of Bea
trice. A deep flush passed
the young man as he arose from his seat |pd
paced the floor. As soon as he could eon
strain his amotion, he said :
''Deafest girl, your love of country, and
frieuds, excite «y nd mi ration and make
feel oeiwiWty how- Auutb wmdk 1 have «!oue
yon in making the suggestions 1 have,
will say
priceless jewel os my Beatrice is, while eithe
duty to her country, demaud he
tho fa«o of
But i
ter leave such u
ihiug, 1 will
danger,
presence here, your fate shall be my fate und
whatever destiny befalls you shall be my des
tiny."
"Yo« flatter
things
may
and doubtless may say
the ardour of your enthusiasm that
you bitter tsars in the future."
"1 fear nothing of tbe kind ; 1 am confident
that jfear counsel will always load my stepB
La lire right path, and point me ouward through
the gifdy makes oHtfe. I long to be by y
side fey I know yu^ will make a fit companion
for onl whose whole soul 1« a>**pp«««t .up m
your e«etioj.''
Beatrice blushed crimson at tbn words tbo
yoongiman spoke, but she affected to pay
ootwafd attention to his conduct.
Rivérola advanced to tbe side of Beatrice
and l«*öoß hi* band upon her shoulder lo«»k
e«f steBitfastljr. ia. h i UMjtf *,
deepesV cebbshes ol her heart
b«aatifulgirl blushed deeply
orb« «of the young
upoa her, but she met that gaze with u stead
fadt look that spoke plainly to the young
fully appreciated.
it be wouid read
The
the
ih«
intensely
gaiing
unArstanding that he
Tin* the samt» sentiment that prevailed in his
bus hu found a recipient iu tue heart ol the
y(*£g lady by bis side. T at 6ilent gaze spoke
voltnies to the mind of the youug
reid, in the clear and lustrous eyes in which
hegAzed, a tale
oodd articulate. The iauguugo of the human
eji is such that it can be read in all languages
tbit speaks eloquently to the heart, und pleads
eloquence
a Cicero. The cj
be the wiudows ot the soul
. ill!
truthlul than words
wth a tongue possessed of
thus that ot a Tullej,
ha'o been said
wlereby one mind looks into dnothers, and
n*/er was the saying more truthfully verified
this occasion. That siieut gaze
thui
mean a mutual
ioterpreted by both parties
reeognitiouof e&oh other's sentimeuts. Ouce
^or« 3o*t*d by. the side of each other tbe re- i
itraiai that had heretofore existed had passed |
away. The spell
understanding bad taken place. They
free to talk as they had never Bpokeu before. I
Their miads had become a unit and the young !
Italian with an ardour that indicated tho pud- 1
Sion of his own sunny climate. Mutual pledges !
were made that each should be to tbe other |
what nothing but love could accomplish. ,
broken aud a mutual |
, und
Their conversations were freer than
they spoke of matters and things that but se!- 1
dooi If «ver
yet they wen conversing fclguor Zapponi
red their heads before. While
tered. Beatrice withdrew as the Italian
red and left the companions, of the night
before, to themselves. Zapponi proceeded, in
a jocular vein, to rally his friend on the pro
ceedings of the night before. He said :
"Tndeeil, I had almost dispaired of receiv
ing aid in the unequal contest that was about
to be waged, though I had determined to make
good one of these rapscallious before I yielded
to their numbers. I have a good and often
tried stilletto that 1 had intended
purpose but the timely arrival of Guiccioli
disappointed me."
"Indeed, it was a fortunate disappointment
know what might have
friend'd timely arrival
and well armed blows prevented it. 1 never
such a thing again, f would nut
human being upon my
couscience for the wealth of India. But the
auch circum
fgralJofuH. I.di
happened imd
Kit
have the blood of
event has passed and 1 hope
stance will
occur again.
At this period of the couversatiou Guiccioli
•red the appnrtmentnnd all reference to the
squabble ofthe night before ceased. With Gnic
eioli c
introduced an Signor
Don Petro of Mexico. Zapponi separated from
the other gentlemen and the parties conversed
together in pure Onatilliou. The conversation
almost exclusively by Guiccioli
and Don Pedro, Rivorola seeming to tak«
lute
h curried
wliatev
In fact his mind
gués of States, and the cold calculating cupid
ity of almost every
with. After considerable
transpiring,
far away from the iutri
he came in contact
'creation Don
Pedro bndo his friends good dny nnd left.
" This is a very singular
haß a great passion for gambling. I would
not have introduced him to you, but I could
not get away from him. Chance happening
to throw him in my way, he clung to mo
like a leech. His business was to get an in
troduction to a «Jistinguished Senator from
Delaware, who he fancies has plenty of mo
ney, and not enough sense to prevent him
from gambling it away."
"Is it possible that a high officer in the
government would so far forget his position,
and the character of the men he represents,
to sit down at a gambling table with a
more adventurer, and play a game of chance
for money ?"
"That is a common practice In this
tropolis, and I feel that the Senator would
play with Don Pedro's servant, if he thought
indeed. He
he could win.'
" Poor human nature, how debased 1" ex
claimed Rivorola.
"You must remember, Signor, that it is
fashionable to gamble in Washington. The
high and the lpw dg it, Thel most exalt#*
officers under the governmentTneet at niglds
in the gambling houses and play with the
meanest man In the country. The high bofn
and the low born, all associate together
these occasions. This is a democratic coun
try, and every one appreciates the liberty he
enjoy s. To night I will take you to the
place I have selected to introduce his excel
lency, the Senator, to the Mexican gambler,
will see some of the sights of the
'
ana
gaming table."
Rivorola objected at first to this arrange
ment, doubtless having in his mind tin*
events of the night before. But Guiccio |
assured him that everything would pass oL
well, he at leugth consented to go.
In our next chapter we shall show up a
gambling house in the great metropolis, with
some of its attendant evils and licentious
practices. There will be members of the
Cabinet, Senators and servants; Represent*,
tives and Politicians; all mingling together
like a band of profligate brothers, willing to
associate together, but at the same time hav
ing no objection to stealing each other's
pocket books.
TO BE CONTINUED.
Study a Child's Capacities.
naturally dull; and yet strive
do well; notice the effort and do not censuie
tbe dullness. A teacher might as well scold
a child,, for being -nearsighted, as for being
naturally dull. Some children have a great
the reverse. Some
If some
verbal memory, others
minds derelope early, others late. Some have
great powers of acquiring, others of originat
ing. Some may appear stupid, beo&use tho
true spring of character lias never been touch
ed. Tbe dunce of the school, muy taro. o»»'
wondcr
in the end, the living, progra^' <1 '
working genius ** "•« ln order to exer '
the best spiritual influences, we must under
stand the spirit upon which
that influence. For with tbe human mind we
must work with nature and Hot against i». —
Like iho leaf of iha nettle^ if touched
it stings like a wasp, if the other, it Is solter
than satin. It
wish to
would do justice to the
st find its peculiar charnc
individual
teristics, and adapt ourselves
this point with a
friend who is tho principal in
uftr schools, aud
convert
be it
of
instruction I
wh
remarks," «nid
a little
Last
look back with delight—"y
; let
tell y
quite
bo, *'
incident, which bears upon this point,
summer, 1 had y girl who was exceedingly
behind in all her studios. Sho
tho foot
but little
of the division and seemed to
about her books. It
happened that
relaxation, I let them at all times during
ite in 6inging.
noticed that
school bout
■eet voice—
her, Jane, you havo a good voice
may lead the singing." She brigbt
d from that "time her mind
this girl had a remarkably clear,
and I said
and you
,ened up,
attended
active. Her lessons
gained a high rank. Oua
I was going home, 1 overtook her with
ed
to, aud she
«« _ v
pens it,you'.do much belter
" I know what sho told
gaid her companion.
1 " And what
!
|
, She felt she
day
a school companion. "Well, Jaue."
getting along very well, how hap
tbau at the be
i.l I.
ginning of the quarter?"
"I do not know why it is," she replied.
the other day,"
that?" I asked.
encouraged."
"Why, she said she
Yes, here
encourage«!
dull in everything. She had
ilearned a self-respect, aud thus she
have it—she
1 c
aged.
Home twelve or thirteen years ago, there
Wus in Franklin school, au excessive!} dull
boy. One day the teacher wishing
to look
word, took up the lad's dictionary, and
opening It found the blnnk leaves covered
with drawings. He vailed the boy to him.
" Did yon draw these ?" said the teacher.
" r " 8 sir ." «M 'he boy, With a dowuca t
out a
1001
" 1 do 'kink It Is well for boys
in their booke," said the teacher, ''and I would
rub these
done. Did you
" No, sir," said the boy, bis eye sparkling.
" Well, I think you have a talent for this
thing. I should like you to draw
thing when at j
it to
draw
if I wore you ; but they
well
take lessons ?"
leisure at borne and bring
how well you
In the meanrimo
yoar lc«s(>ns.''
The boy felt he was understood.
He began
to love his teacher. He became animated and
He to«k delight In grati
fying his teacher by his faithfulness
studies ; while the teacher took
tunity
sires. The boy beca.ne
loud of his books.
bis
every oppor
cncourag- him in bis natural di
of the first scholars,
and gained the medal before he left school.
After this ho became
engrave», laid up
money enough to go to Europe, studied the
works of old mastem, sent homo productions
from his own pencil, which found a place ia
some ofthebest collections of paintings, and
of tbe most promising artists of hi*
in the country. After the boy gained
the medal, he sent the teacher a beautiful pic
ture
a token of respect,
this day, he feel« that the teacher, by the Jo.
dicious encouragement he gave to the natural,
turn ol his tniud, has had a great moral
.spiritual effect
j I doubt n«
id
his char
r ,—Gotpel Me*
»enger .
[For the Detawiu-e Inquirer.,
Letter from Philadelphia.
Philadelphia. March 18. 1862.
Mb. Editor :—
Üur Irläh fellovv-cilUens celr
brated yesterday in a becoming manner, though',
there
military
usual eclat to their proceedings on the an
niversary of ibe birth-day of their patriot
saint. Along the lines of ihe Army of tin
I'otomac, howev
as ad
give the
doubt not tbo galli
sous of Erin did houor ia their Uearls to their
patron saint aud this their adopted city. Ther *
morning
High Mass
iu all tbeir chaichcB, an»l
St. Patrick's, where Haydn' i
i No. 3, was given by* a splendid choir
with full orchestral accotnpauiisueni, drums
included.
Grand Ma
Iu the afternoi
the Hibernian
•iety held their aunuul
officers, tbe choice
Major-General Patlei
iieting, and elect»*!
President falling
Aftei ward they Bit t
' l """ i*>Abeie*«,«nuot dinueroT meoeeU*;«.«!*:,
two hundred invited gne9ta, amou ■;
-*re Gov. Curtin, Col. Croaman, an l
of huuianiiy, the renowned
Julia Drew, who oulivensd the rompany with
his overflowing humor, in tho evening tbo
Rev. Dr. Morlarty «ielivered
Academy of Music, which
ill«'
whom
that comical pi
address
Crowded by
tbe
enormous audience.
A singular meeting was held last algbt,
tbo Big Bethel (colore«i) church, down Loin
ijard St., the object being the furtherance of
«be welfnru of the genua contraband,
ported in the morniup papers
life of
negroes
As r<
cannot for
find out how the interests of th*
to be furthered by the meetiuf,
<he principal part ot the performance having
boon the recitation, by Profess»)r Greene (n.)
of several cantos of bis "great original poem
Slaveryand the Rebellion.' From the extract.*
have
•hut
this modern epic
Byron's Child? Hamid.
The tax bill ia exercising
citizens and
the newspaper press iu a wonderful manner.
Everybody wants to be taxed that tho expensed
of tbe goverumcni may be fiel, but there an
thousands of couflicting views as to how it is
bo «tone. We want tbe money that Wu
pay to go directly into the coffers of the govern •
wen(i and not into the pockets of an army of
tax gatherer*, assessors, etc. In England the j
expenses of collecting her enormous tax j
of the whole, j
yatemise our machinery to ap
proximate to this,nobody can grumble; but with
the disposition of «ur people to servo the
try to tbeir own profit, «ye fear that a fourth of
perhaps a half of our money will go to fatten
olrny of la*y rascals who ore aiwajg^w»*"
such opportunities.
— » Kra«'U «■
Saturday night,
be
I
amounts to but four per
and if
oncert at tbe Academy,
a snccess, notwith
standing the inclemency of the weather. But
the enormous space ot the building was
bear to advantage and as for the OparatU
performance of Bently it doc» not call for ex» |
tended commout
A beautiful exhibition «ff India aud ibo
great 8epoy Rebellion is now open at tb«*
Assembly Building.
Of matters literary
have to report first ]
copyright novel of j
"The Earl's Heirs, a tale of Domestic life," by
the Authoress of East Lynne. The publishers
well known Philadelphia firm of T. B.
Peterson it Brothers, und the book in a
the publication of the
well printed pamphlet nt fifty cents. Until
recently Mrs. Ellen Wood was only known to
a select few who had perused her newspaper
stories, The Red Court Farm, Six Grey Pow
ders, etc., bnt in East Lynne aud The Eurl's
Daughters she proves herself capable of a
power aud mastery in fiction not excelled by
the authors of Jaue Eyre and John Halifax.-—
Even Adam Bede is not a better story than
East Lynne. In The Earl's Heirs we have a
plot combining originality, ingenuity, and pro
bability, while the incidents are told with
dramatic power, and the descriptions pictured
with vigor and force. The tragedy, usually
lett to the last chapter in a novel, comes in
tbo beginning, aud the iuterost is sustained |
throughout. Though nota "sensatiou'' book |
it will doubtless create a sensation.
j
Messrs. Tieknor à Fields publish, in one of
. . . , .
. volumes which are the
glory of their press aud th* delight of all
readers, tbe Dow «lory which has juat bus |
completed in th# Atlantic Monthly from the
that wrote Life in the Iron Mills- The !
those beautiful lt>
"
name by which it w« known in tbe Atlantic
Appears second
now know
To-Day."
the tittle page, and it ia
"Margaret Howltt, » Story of
Wo took oCcassion to 1 notice ft from
during its sefitti ; puhHca/ion, and
a further «xauri&aUon hat souvlaoed
that i
TERMS.
The DELA WAKE I5QUIRKR, 1* published
«»er/ S*turd»/, At Two Dollar« a yes«-, payable
advance ; if not paid for till the end of the
year Two Do Her« end Fifty cent* will Invaria
bly be charged. No subocriptioa will be
celved for less than el* month?, and no paper
diHoonui'ti^duutji «Il arre*v'* , t' eSÄr *' P 11 ^, unie
at tin- option of the pttbiishet.
Advertisement«
ré Wil
exctwdtug a e*{t
be Inserted three time« for one dollar. Twenty
fivecentsforevery subsequent insertion. Longer
proportion.
In the
ÄgT" Twelve lines or lees constitute a square.
Ràîr Single insertion 50 cents perjiffuare.
fitijrWaota of 4 lines
single insertion 25 cts
of the most powerfully? written talee
notice. It is »
of the
it is
come under
that has
story of sorrow and suffering So
manufacturing cities of the west, 'not overdrawn
aad yet highly dramatic and exciting. Tb*
author is a lady of Western Virginia, and her
worth all the other products of
boastful stat* put together. With
that
this lady, and Harriet Prescott, and Rose Terry,
the Atlantic is certainly a fortunate and favor
ed periodical.
The January uumber of the "Edinburgh.
Review" (American reprint of L. Scott & Co.,
New York - ,) has just been published, ably su«
taining the roputation of this Jupltor among
the British periodicals. The prinolpal article«
the Life and writings of William Pater -
, tbe founder of the Bank of England ;
Sewell's Ordeal of Free Labor in the Wee»
articles not very eomplimen
BelHgerents and Neutrals,
an
Indies; and
tary to ourselves,
and the Military Defence of the Colonies. But
papers will not carry the weight
with them which they would once have done,
at--the Edinburgh is not as dogmatic
it used to be—a decided change for the better.
" Blackwood| Magzine" (for February) also
if a John Bullish at tide ou
the Defence of Canada. We feel bound to
notice these defeots in these leading foreign
periodicals out of justices to those who shall
he induced to read them upon
«a
a its slrp ut
persuasion,
article in the great Black
But after this
wood the whole number is geuial, kindly,
oioquent and delightful. Bulwer's Cartoniaua
opens a series of ensays that promises Uf
graceful contributions yet from his
The stories Wassail, and Salem C'aapel,
Physicians. J»pd
Quacks is well worth perusal. Three dollars,
dollar« when taken with the
Ul
1><
beautiful. Aa article
par aunum,
Reviews, is "Blackwoods" price.
The March Number of the "Historical Maga
r.iae" (C. B. Richard«, Bible Rouse, New
York,) contains Josiah Barlett's Correspon
dence During She Revelation, Gordon's History, #
of theMassochusett's pecliraUonof Indspend
ence proceods of Societies nod Notesand Queries
the early history of this country.
This lino periodical is the only one of the kind
bltsbed, and deserves a large circulatipu.
Messrs, bbsidoo A Co., publish Marti«
snou. It has Darby's
I»«
Chuzzlwit, of which
fcpfendid illustration.
[For the Dolawar • Inquirer.J
THE VOICE OF SPRING.
BY THOMAS DAUBY.
Me thinks f hear the voice of Spring—
How merily the blue birds sing ^
rhHtr mating chimes ;
They speak of comrades on the wing
F rom other climes.
Tbe trees, the welcome tidings tell.
That Spring is coming to thé dell.
And thus they talk;
Tbe maple bads begin to swell
Aioug the walk.
The tropic winds so soft nnd bland,
Come sighing from the sunny land
With gentle gush,
And maidens' cheeks to health are fan'd
With rosy blush.
The South winds round the hillocks creep,
To «uke the flowers from tbeir sleep
(n silent nooks,
Aud water cresses slyly peep
Above tho brooks.
1 io smiling sun shines on tfis vale*
And warms the soft wings of the gale
i hat move tbe bowors,
A;ul toftiy broad above the dale,
Where sleep the flowers.
Soon will tbe Spring bnrat forth lo song,
Aud all the merry feathered throng,
Atune tbeir longues,
And swell the graceful stream along
With vocal longs.
! const thou ho mute, and hear
Those graieful songs of happy oheer
lu uature raise,
And tby cold heart alone appear
Devoid of praise.
Awake tby h«rp with graftalni ««—
Ob,
mfrtbv'v .
To him who sends the Spring along
To bless tbe earth.
Gooil Furniture at Auctior
Will bflsolJ
up« of tb«atil>scrib«)r, No.S'2 French »tr«M
e door b«|ow Third «treet, on THtTRSDAV
March 13.1S63, hJs entire atoçk of Uoome>- ,
Furniture, consieting in partof
ut «ofa, cane ««y»t chair», marble
Public gale at Bbe *ate
ton table», Inrg» inabogany rocklug chair,
parlor carpet aud Venetian blind», n early —
uew anJ very little u«q<k hat rack, warble
top w«eh «t.inJ», flue walnut drewilng ba
reaux. walnut bed«teadi, chamber, entry
extern« on
of other
and «talr carpet, china dinner »et, e
dining table, rufiigerator, store«, and a variety
~.r«. Ih. obrto,
haring mov«*t
wvi. rr
of th© city.
at 10 o'clock, A. M.
GEORGE T. CLARK.
V. C. G 1 LPM,
g. W. CORNER MARKET AND TENTH STREETS,
WILMINGTON, DEL,
Wines, Liquors and Groceries
flMIK Titxlor*lgn©J would r*«p«ctfolly odlattatfMtokt»
! «lock *f WINES AND LIQUORS.
»««•©<! by him for obtaining all Win©« and Liquor» iu tu«ir
purity, with a long «xi^rieuca In tha biMlnjm, aflhrd«
euranao for the charaetur and quality of hi* WU»««, An.
Among hl« «tock may b© found
COGNAC BRANDY. PALE DO* HOLLAND GIN,
JAMAICA SPIRITS. SCOTCH WHISKEY.
Clioloe Old Wh laker, in wood and bottle«.
LISBON . SWEET MALAGA, CIUMPAO^E. PORT
MADEIRA, CLARET. TENERIhFK,SHERRY.
Wines, very choice uuloM, In wood and toutes. .
Extra tine Mnnongahela Wlilakey, 2 or S year» old, the
flaror cannot bo eanNMNMl. ^-Tavern keeper, nppltod
on tbe mont rfMfflMHf term«. Familie« »applied with tha
clionpeat Wine« amt Liquor«, for ouUnary purpoM*.
TO THE AFFLICTED.—Invalid» _
and Liquor« of varioun kind«, for medicinal pnrPfe**
?uM on obtaining them ot *o flogt wUt£ from
UII.I'IN 8 W corner^ Mar ket and Tenth straete.
alwayt on hand and for «ale Wy V.C. GILPIN, B. W. corner
^'teas^winks!'ORRERIES AND i °_ f 1 ''jr® d
it« Hotel» country trade and consumera »nppilen
^holw!!!ear»«lrotan. by thec»k. demijoUn.dozen or pack
îu • ■« rTo
ni>
is*.at V C.OILPI 8, • ■ >nh
AMS I HAMS 11
a«, of th# r#ry
H
WHOLE OR CUT
l,©iii quality, fqr
' ADOLPHCS HAYK8,
. Wilmington, D#l
pn.
f '
Ç
Tat n»H «tr
I r©reived and for Ml# at th# ckM
HEAP HATS.
°w*,is

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