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The Odessa herald. (Odessa, Del.) 1888-1892, March 02, 1889, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053062/1889-03-02/ed-1/seq-4/

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FOR FARSI AND GARDEN.

Scab In Sheep.
Scab is a very virulently contagious
disease, and the scab insects, like house
able to live in a dormant con
dition for a long time when deprived of
food. Two years is considered the limits
\ bug»,
of safety from tho contagion. Wherever
the sheep have lain
the mites
passed, some of
eggs may have dropped, and
may be picked up by other sheep.
Thorough whitewashing with hot lime
wnsh, with two per cent, of carbolic
acid, of every place where sheep may
have rubbed, nnd dipping the new flock
In the tobacco dip might prove a suf
ficient precaution .—New York Times.
Coat of Keeping a Horae.
The cost of keeping a horse by most
persons is mere guess work instead of
careful figures. Mr. J. H. Andre, with a
to enlightening the uninitiated,gave
recently in Mural Home the following es
timates: If one purchases a good horse
four years of age for $i50, it is a good
bargain. A top buggy will cost $125,
cutler $23, harness $20, robe $10, blank
ets $3, com!) and brush $2, whip $2,
which amounts figure $337. Now if we
tako all into consideration, these will
last, on an average, ten years. Perhaps
the wagon might last longer, but it would
need repair.ng in that time; on the whole,
ten years is a long average, as a horse
might bo worthless in five years.
If it costs $337 for ten years, it would
be at the rate of $33.70 per year, and
the interest on tho whole outlay at 6 per
cent, would be $20.22. Add to this
. at least four tons of hay, which has
averaged in the past ten years $12 per
ton, $48; one ton of straw for bedding,
$7 ; 90 bushels of oats at 35 cents per
bushel,$31.50; shoeing, $5,and it would
be a cheap job to care for a horse, wash
wagons, etc., for $1 per week, which
would bring the price to $52 per year, i
the sum total of $197.42 for the year at
moderate figures. And yet we find
thousands who keep a horse nnd have
real business for it, and do not keep
a cow, when the cost of keeping a horse
will keep two cows, and yet they do not
see how they can keep a cow.
be
put
and
What Vegetables
Grow.
Now is a good time to think over what
vegetables to sow and plant tho coming
yejir; and having decided, to get from
good, reliable secdslhon the seeds likely
to be required. If this is left to sowing
time, the chances
obtained from some grocery store, the
stock of which is put up for this partic
ular trade, nnd all that is not sold re
turned, nnd, in too many instances, re
vamped year after year. Such crops as
late potatoes, parsnips, carrots, turnips
and beets can readily be grown as among
the field crops, and be subject mainly to
the same treatment—that is, everything
about them can be so managed as to be
done with the horse-cultivator.
the seeds will be
the
Besides these crops, there should be a
spot of garden ground to grow the sum
mer vegetables, and such as will want a
trifle more care-in Um -way of hand#
weeding and so on. A spot for this
need not be very large. An acre of land
will be ample and may contain the
strawberry patch, and those of other
small fruits, except in very large estab
lishments. Such a garden should have
an asparagus and rhubarb patch also.
Early in the spring, have, first, radishes
* nnd lettuce and green onions, one of the
very earliest products and much liked by
workmen. Young beets are an early
vegetable and may be simply the thin
ning of the regular crop. This is true
also of other root crops. Peas and beans,
both French and Lima should not be
in
.
,
,
forgotten. Early nnd late cabbage, with
a few dozen of cauliflower,
changes in this line. Germans want to
add kohl rabi,
and when just right they
for^anybody.
Tomatoes, egg-plants nnd peppers will
require a hot-bed to bring forward. Only
a few plants
and, if not grown, can be purchased.
For celery, a pinch of seed sown in
April will give all the plants required.
A piece of land should be selected,
rather sandy if possiblo, for the melon
patch, a few hills of cucumbers and half
a-dozen of the squash family. These,
with a spot still more sacred by itself
for the pot-herbs to flavor tbe soups and
other dishes, would make a tolerably
good supply for an ordinary farm fam
ily .—Prairie Farmer.
good
turnip-rooted cabbage,
good eating
, however, required,
The Care of Fowls.
The raising of fowls is
mon by persons who are without farm
cniences or buildings that the hen
house in a necessity and its proper con
struction and adaptability to the wants of
the flock, and especially as an aid to egg
production, are matters deserving of
consideration. For amateurs or persons
keeping fowls in villages on small
plots the best results will be obtained
from limited numbers; say from a dozen
to 25 hens with one to two males. All
the liberty should be
that the premises
The central point is
house as a roosting, laying and hatching
place, with a small inclosed run attached
which belongs exclusively to them and
where they can always go when not in
the house, but out of this little yard
they should be allowed to run for short
periods whenever it is practicable. If
let out for only an hour just before roost
ing time, in the house yard or gnrden,
it will always be a benefit to them, and
a little watchfulness for a short time will
prevent them from doing mischief.
The dimensions of 8x10 feet will fur
com
allowed
will admit,
the hen
iple room for two dozen fowls if
nish
fitted up with properly arranged roosting
poles (of whieh a part should be low for
heavy fowls) and a sufficient supply of
nest boxes,
just high enough for getting around in
comfortably, and should face the south
and that front should be of glass down
to within eighteen inches of the floor.
Here the nest boxes should be placed,
out of the direct sunlight, and should be
as secluded as they can well be. Iu this
The building should be
way the fowls will not only have ample
light, but will get the warmth of the
sun through the glass the good effects of
which will appear in an increased num
ber of eggs at a time of the year when
they are the most valuable.
An earthern floor is the best, but if it
is necessary to keep out rats, make it of
concreto. With
on the inside and with thick walls, tho
temperature will be such as to induce
laying earlier and more liberally than in
a cold room subject to draughts through
crevices from the outside. A dust bath
A
hen-house plastered
is one of the hen's necessities, and if the
dust-box is in the house tho effect
everything is disagreeable.
For this
reason it should be iu a small covered
annex to the house, or else should be
under cover in a corner of the run, and
should be kept well supplied with dry
road dust or fine sifted ashes. If the
house is kept clean they will
keep themselves free from vermin, but if
lice infest the house it can be quickly
cleared of them by fumigating it with
llphur or burning the green leaves of
pine, spruce or any of the evergreens, so
to fill the room with a dense smoke
for an hour or so. Spraying it occasion
ally with kerosene will have the same ef
fect. Gravel, ground or broken shells
and bones, and miscellaneous food with
meat scraps, when inscctsrcannot be had,
should be furnished regularly, with a
constant supply of pure water .—New
York World.
a
a
at
not
Farm and Garden Notes.
See that all colonies are in hives that
are rain proof ; leaky hives cause much
of the loss in wintering bees.
Churn and cream should be at a temper
ature of fifty-six degress to fifty-eight de
grees in summer, sixty degrees in winter.
A regular system of rotation with live
stock on the farm may prove as judi
cious and commendable as crop rota
tion.
Four different kinds of food are es
sential to promote health and strength.
These are flesh, grain, vegetables and
fruit.
No farmer's family is too poor to keep
a pig, unless, indeed, it be so shiftless
and improvident as to keep instead one
or more dogs.
Tincture of assafœtida is said to keep
rabbito from attacking trees. It may
be mixed up with clay and water and, ap
plied with a brush.
An ingenious farmer and his boys can
put together a variety of simple tools
and conveniences for farm use in these
comparatively leisure days.
All fertilizers should be in os fine con
the
re
re
as
to
be
be
dition as possible, for upon tho degree of
fineness depends to a great extent the
solubility of the ingredients.
The peach or plum tree, when planted
the coming spring, should bo put in the.
poultry yard. It will be partially pro
tected from insects and will
gum
rapidly.
Some foods, liko wheat bran, cotton
seed meal, etc., return a value in manure
nearly equivalent to t.heir coat and are
a
a
hand#- often QJiinng the very best that, can be
selected for stock. ,
1
i
i
combs to become dark if allowed to re- I
. . * i • , .. , . , ,
mam on the hive long after being sealed. ;
this
land
the
other
have
also.
the
by
early
thin
true
be
Bees emit a glutinous fluid from theii
feet to enable them to adhere to a
smooth surface; this is what causes the
|
The disposition of swine is to pile up
in cold weather, and the warmer we can
. ., ,. .... ,, , , ,
keep it underneath them the less liable
they are to do this, and unless they can
be prevented from doing it to a great ex- |
, . . ;
tent, disease is much more liable to |
break out am ong them.
.
acrid poison to pigs when
T , r ° ..
It causes profuse uiar
Salt is
given in excsss.
rhea with blood ; after death the bowels
'
will be found inflamed and bloody and
„,1 „.uu „„.I
the stomach covered with red patches.
Drinking brine poured out of old meat
, , r ...... .
barrels will cause death in pigs m twen
tv-four hours
ty-iour nours.
with
to
will
good
eating
„ „ .
Norse Farming Vicissitudes. j
As the greater part of the coro „ocl
pasture land in Norway iasituated on the
., ... ..
hill and mountain Bides, it* cultivation
is necessarily arduous and expensive ; and
for every five years the farmers generally
count upon one bad year, sometimes two.
Either too much rain spoils the crops oi
early frost-nights destroy the corn and
11
l
oi
potatoes. But the people do not lose
heart; they try again. When they have
forests of fishery, they mako good theii
losses from these sources, or they carry
extensive sheep and cattle
farming by means of their great mountain
pastures than the farm otherwise could
support. The Norwegian peasants live
frugally,
their farms
on
but notwithstanding this,
generally mortgaged.
They cannot compete with the great
-producing countries, especially since
America has begun to supply the markets
of the worl d with its enormous production
of corn and pork. Many are now trying
to confiuc themselves to sheep and cattle
farming only, but the change inovlves
much expense, and the character of the
people does not dispose them to easily
relinquish the labor of tilling the soil;
it is the noblest— Harper's Magasine.
A Human Pincushion.
Louis J. Beck, a human pincushion,
recently gave an exhibition to a large
audience iu the office of a New York
paper, lie used two-inch needles,which
he passed through his ears, checks,
tongue, arms and legs. He then filled
his breast with the needles. He shoves
them into the very bone. The most re
markable thing about the performance
is that little, if any, blood appears after
the incisions. Beck is 23 years old and
born in Newark, N. J. He was for
merly a butcher. His father is one of
the largest wholesale butchers of New
ark. The pincushion was finely attired
in dark red costume and light leather
slippers. He says that reputable physi
cians who have examined him say that
he suffers from paralysis of the nerves.
He has lost several needles while giving
exhibitions, but they liave all worked
themselves out at different parts of his
body.
THE PARNELL INQUIRY.
A Lending Witness Against the
Home Kule Leader Confesses.
Admitting the London "Times"
Letters Were Forgeries.
After a searching examination of sixty
days, the Parnell inquiry in London has re
sulted in the most sensational developments.
The Parnell Commission, as it is called, was
instituted to examine into allegations of the
London Times that Mr. Parnell had written
sympathizing
r ana tho use »
the cause of Irish Home Rule,
published what purported to be letters of
Mr. Parnell favoring criminal action in be
half of Ireland's liberation from English
domination. The Irish Home Rule leader
asserted that these letters
letters :
murder
with criminal efforts—
of dynamite—to further
The Times
feqgeries and
demanded an investigation. A Special Com
mission was appointed to take testimony,and
the trial began over two months ago.
The most important witness upon whom
the 'limes relied was one Richard Pigott, who
had furnished the paper with the alleged Par
nell letters,§nd who swore before the Commis
sion that they were genuine Upon cross
examination, however, Pigott went to pieces
completely when confronted with a letter
which he bad written to Archbishop Walsb,
offering for pay to prove that the Parnell
letters were fraudulent. In further cross
examination Pigott involved himself in a
complete network of lies.
Times seemed knocked all to pieces. To put
a clincher upon the matter Pigott made a
forgeries, and
then disappeared. A London dispatch gives
these further particulars:
Richard Pigott, the principal Times wit
in the Parnall case, has made a startling
confession, He declares the Parnell letters,
published by the London Times, absolute
forgeries.
The announcement of this sensational de
velopment weis made at the morning session
of the Parnell Commission.
Sir Charles Russell, counsel for Parnell,
arose shortly after the opening of the court
nnd stated that
house of Henry Labouchere, editor of Lon
don Truth, Pigott signed a confession. This
confession stated in ■■■■■i
alleged Parnell letters printed by the Times,
which the Times based its charges
ainst the Irish members, were forgeries.
Mr. George Augustus Bala was also present
when the confession was made.
Pigott had, without invitation, called
Mr. Labouchere and offered to confess. Mr.
Labouchere declined to listen with
out witnesses, whereupon Mr. Bala
summoned, and Pigott confessed
that ho was the forger. He admitted
that he forged all the letters ascribed to
Messrs. E
Ho also 4
before tho Commission.
Tho statement of Sir Charles Russell was
•roborated by the witnesses
Having mads this extraordinary statement
to the court, Sir Charles Russell applied for a
warrant for the arrest ofPigott. The Presid
ing Justice said that within
rant would bo ready.
Mr. Shannon, a Dublin :
sisted the Times in constructing its cu~,
then called to the witness box. Mr. Shan
testifiod that
and tho case of the
conf—iloti I hat 1 ha letters
Saturday last at the
many words that the
Wgan, Parnell, DAvitt and O'Kelly,
admitted that he perjured himself
hour a
sol icitor, who as
Sunday night Pigott
him and gave him a written state
meut denying the statement he had made
Suturday to Mr. Labouchere that* he had
forged all
deck
the lottere. The first batoh Pigott
ed he believed to be genuine. The sec
ond batch, including two of the Parnell let
ters, was forged by himself and Casey. The
third batch, which includes those of Davitt
and O'Kelly, were similarly forged.
Pigott added, in his statement to Shannon,
that he now having stated tbe truth ami
confessed before the world, the Times
should deal leniently with him.
Sir Charles Russell, Mr. Parnell's counsel,
cross-examined Mr. Shannon, who stated in
answer to a question that he took
prevent Pigott from escaping, but that he
fully expected to see him appear in court.
very evident to all present that the
Times had met its Waterloo, and that the
in a state of complete collapse.
The following cablegram has been received
in Chicago from Michael Davitt by Alexan
der Sullivan :
"Pigott has bolted. It is tbe general be
lief here that the Times and the Government
have paid him to clear out"
steps to
of
i
F0ÜS NEW STATES.
of it« citizens the'
be clotho 1 with Statehood. She comes into
the Union, however, as two States, and with
Montana and Washington, whose admission
nlso permitted by Congress, the number
of American States will be increased to for
ty-two.
J| i the Houso the adoption of the bill was
greeted with applause, but in the Senate the
provisions of the bill gave rise
Tho Two Dakotas. Montana and
Washington Admitted.
{
After years of active endeavor
the part
debate.
The bill as agreed to In conference provides
for the admission of the States of North
^ , ...
Dakota, bouth Dakota, and Montana and
Washington. The attempt to induce the
JÄma1.Ä™ n f S miMes,. '
Tho Territory of Dakota is to be divide !
on the line of the seventh standard parallel
produced due we.»t to the western boundary
Territory. The delegates elected to the
Constitutional Convention north of this pur
"bol shall assemble at Bismarck and those
elected south of the pnralle at Sioux Falls.
The delegates to the Convention iu each of
States shall be elected
accept the name
ÎÎJ® a «. m « • »,
the Tuesday nftcr the first Monday in May
next and shall meet on July 4 and declare
that they adopt the Constitution of the
United States. They are authorized thereupon
to form constitutions and State governments.
If tho anxiety of the people in those Terri
tories is as great as it hus been represented
to 1,e ' thero is 1,0 r, ' us on why North and
Bouth Dakota> Montuna, and Washing
ton should not be States within nine
. months, and also be represented by Sen
j ators and Representatives in the first regular
standard parallel, which is to be the bound
ary lin-* between the two Dukotas, are to
have a chance to say whether there shall be a
greater difference thau is promised between
President Cleveland signed the bill for the
admission of the States of North Dakota,
South Dakota, Montana, and Washington at
11 o'clock on the morning after the document
roc laid before him, and immediately sent
word to Mr. Springer by letter. If the
States for whose entry into the Union pro
vision is mado by the bill comply with all its
remirements the four State* may be
l o meed as in qualified standing as members
oi the Union of States about tbe middle of Oc
tober, 188U.
During 1888 the distributive sales or
Armour & Co., Chicago, amounted to $58.
000,000. In that time they killed 1,140,000
hoü«, 501.200 cattle, nnd 104,540 sheep.
THE MARKETS.
NEW YORK.
. 3 7 ) <® 5 15
to good.. .25 00 Ca >45 00
Beeves..
Milch Cows,
Calves,common to prime....
Sheen.
Lambs..
Hogs—Live.
Dressed.
Flour-City Mill Extra..
Patents..
Wheat—No* 2 Red.
Rye—State..
Barley—No. 1..
Corn—Ungraded Mixed....
Oats—No. 1 White..
Mixed Western.......
Hay—No. I.
Straw—Long Rye..
Lard—City Meam. «
Butter— Eltsin Creamery....
Dairy, lair to good..
West. Im. Creamery 16 @ 23
Factory.
Cheese—State Factory
Skims—light
Wes
Eggs—State and Penn....
BUWALO.
Steers—Western .
Sheep—Modi
6 50 @ 9 00
5 60 @ 7 70
5 25 5 50
6 &
/
5 10 & 5 VS
@ 7 15
mi® y*
65 «î 50
81 (® t-5
40 @ 44 H
88
80 @ 90
80 & 00
— (8 3.(550
10 ®
a ;
. w a -,
. w a is«
'JH® 111
. io m ii«
14
.. 3 55
4 0)
Lambs—Fair to Goo 1. » 00 @0 50
Hogs—Good to hoice Yorks 5 2» @53«
Flour—Family. 5 00 @ 5 25
Wheat—No. 2 Northern
Corn—No. 8, Yellow...
Oats—No. 2, White....
Barley—State..
4 00
B 25
oiiii
[email protected] 30
a
68 70
I- lour—Spring Wheat pat's.. 0 i 0 @ 7 00
Yellow,
Corn—Ste
Oats—No. 2 White
1» ye—State.
WATKIITOWN (MASS.) CATTLE MARKET.
Beef— Dressed weight.
Sheep—Live weight.
Hogs—Northern.
riULADKLPllIA.
!■ lour—Penn, family.
Wheat—No. 2, Red, Feb...
Lorn—No. 2. Mixt» l, Feb...
Oats— Ungraded White.
Pot .t es —Early Ko* .
Butter—Creamery Extra...
Cheese—Part stilus.
. 46 J*
OR ^
63 0}
6*
1
•*<
IP.
•N
4 70 @
i HO
»'H® î»
4U*
•j t
85
38
an at
6 (3
8
THE NEWS ËHTOMGtZIA
Eastern and Middle States.
Governor Green, of New Jerrey, has
nominated Edwin O. Chapman a « Btate Su -
perintendent of Public Instruction, to take
the place from which Colonel Fuller was de
posed by the Legislature.
The Rhode Island House of Ropresentati
by a vote of three to thirty-one has passed
Ballot Reform bill, based
system.
The discovery of the register of tho burned
Park Central Hotel in Hartford, Conn., ilfs
pe's many painful uncertainties as to the loss
of life. A summary of the results of the dis
aster shows that tnere were forty-two per
il! the hotel, of whom twenty-two
injured and ten escaped
the Australian
dead, ten
harmed.
George Smith, seventy years old,
torn to atoms and much property - ~'wa$
damaged by a premature blast In New Vjgrk.
ugs of|Wesleyan University
Cona, were badly damaged .
the explœion of dynamite bombH by fresh
men who were celebrating Washington's
Birthday. Nelson C. Hubbard, a freshman
was dreadfully in iured.
William Bassett, builder, of Boston
and Everett, Maes., has gone into insolvency.
His liabilities
Two buildiu
Middletown,
, at
state l at $674,000.
A disastrous fire broke out in Warren,
Penn., and, owing:
weather, resulted ii
the town and the destruction of a block.
Mrs. James Westcott, the young wife
of a prominent citizen and lumber merchant
at Hazzard's, Penn., and a servant, Jennie
Walters, were burned to death.
to the severity of the
a loss of
$70,000 to
A building in Bristol, Conn., was wrecked
by an explosion of powder.
South and West.
A LABOREn named Joseph Brogan, at Up
, Wis., killed his wife and
children,
aged five and seven years restedvely, and
then committed suicide with a dull razor.
( While Harry Brown, John Williams,
a third
tho Kanawha,
crossing
. name unknown,
Rush Run, W. Va., tho
drowned.
overturned and all
LATE returns indicated the election df
Charles F. Booker. Democrat, and It. P.. C.
Wilson, Democrat, for the Fiftieth and Fiffcj
flrst Congresses respectively, to succeed the
late James N. Barnes, of Missouri.
Chinese coolies
being constantly
smuggled from British Columbia i
United States by way of coast steamers from
Port Townsend, Washington Territory.
Oscar Evans, a bark contractor, shot and
killed James Kirby, and mortally wounded
A. L. Hoke, near Romney, W. Va. About
a week ago Hoke horsewhipped E
The highest prioe ever paid for a horse in
America was given a few days since, when
the trotting stallion Bell Boy was Bold for
$51,000 at auction at Lexington, Ky.
The long deadlock in the West Virginia
Legislature has been broken by tho ro-elec
tion of James E. Kenna as United
Senator.
■ he
storm has raged all
Georgia. More than six and a half inches of
fell in Atlanta. It is the heav
within the recollection of people
A HEAVY
«'I
there.
Two children
eaten by wolves while
returning fromschoolin Minnesota.
Tunnel No. 17
Road,
in a property sense it is the greatest catas
trophe nny railroad ever suffered. The ofli
of the road placed tbe loss at from $401».
000 to $600,000. Coal seams we
which promised to burn for raon
tunnel is 120 feet long.
County Trkasuker James M. Love, of
Circleville, Ohio, has absconded end is a de
faulter in the
the Cincinnati Southern
Sunburnt, Tenu., is
fire,
of $26,000.
Governor Wilson and General Goff.ench
of whom claims to have been elected Gov
ernor of West Virginia, effected an under
standing to tbe effect that (he fermer should
Governor and the latter qualify
March 4. The case was then to
be taken to the Supreme Court for a decision.
Heavy snow storms and very cold
reported from the South aud
BUCh
weather
the West.
D. H. Smith, a colored_
shipping bands to Arkansas,
white men at Artesia, Miss.
who had been
lynched by
Washinjrton
Thk President has signed th$ Nicaragua
Canal bill.
The President and Mrs. Cleveland were
entertained at a
Mrs. Vilas.
Hon. Edward Phelps. United States
Minister to England, called at Die White
interview with the
dinner by tiecretar^r and
iluuse and had
deutà
rc House adopted the conference
_p Direct Tax bill by a vote of yeas à '«i.
nays bi It was then taken to the Hermit.),
signed, and five minutes afterward
the President.
The President has sent to Congress all
correspondence which has taken place be
tween this Government and Great Britain in
regard to the dismissal of Lord Kactyille
Westfts Minister of Great Britain tch
United States.
Secretary Bayard has received a cable
gram from Minister Hubbard, at Japan, an
nouncing that a treaty of amity, commerce
and navigation between the United States
and Japun had been signed by the represen
tatives of the Governments.
{ ,The President has vetoed the House bill
to quiet title of settlers
River lands in Iowa.
n?
■ h I
the Des Moines
Du. D. Will
Bliss, who attended
President Garfield during his illness, died u
few days ago at bis residence in Washing
ton.
President and Mrs. Cleveland gave their
last reception to the public. It
brilliant of the winter's series. Tbe White
Rous3 was handsomely decked with flowers.
The news of the signing by the President
of the bill making four new States
ceived in those Mates with satisfaction. A
telegram from Helena says that all Montana
is celebrating, and Dakota is really beside
herself with delight. From every hamttt
large enough to have a telegraph office
despatches expressive of a state of jubilation
bordering on insanity.
General Harribon has rented a pew in
the Presbyterian Church of the Covenant
Mr. Blaine will also worship there.
Dr. Francis Wharton, Solicitor of the
State Department, and a prominent author
of legal works, is (lead in his sixty-ninth
year.
Consul-General Waller, at London,
England, has pent his resignation to the
State Department, to take effect immedi
ately on the appointment of his sucoesser.
The President lias nominated J. Leo
Tucker, of Now York, to be Denuty Fifth
Auditor oY the Treasury, vice Alfred E.
Lewis, removed, and James C. Perry, of
N{)rth Carolina, to be an Assistant Surgeon
in the Marine Hospital service.
T\e Chinese Minister and suite have
arrived at Washington from Havana', Cuba.
Benton J. Hall, Commissioner of
Patents, has rendered a decision iu tho
matter of the petitions of Gray and
McDonough to reopen the Beil telephone
interferences. The Commissioner refuses to
reopen the interferences and reaffirms the
award of priority to Bell. ,
the most
Foreign.
liltPBROR Francis Joseph, of Austria,has
Bunjnioned the heir presumptive, Archduke
Fri.uj, to Pesth to introduce him to the lead
ing political
cracy.
The Cologne Gazette (Bismarck's organ),
nays that Germany will demand ot the
United States Government that it arrest uni
punish Klein, the American whom Germany
charges with having led the Mataafaites in
Samoa at the time of the repulse of the Ger
in December last.
MM. Freycinet and Melino have under
taken to form a Cabinet for .President Car
not of Franco.
and members of the nristo
H
The Duke of Newcastle has been married
in London to Miss Candy, a famous English
beauty.
A terrible famine prevails in the south
ern portion of Corea.
The Sultan of Morocco has ceded a piece
of the coast near the Algerian frontier to the
Germans, who will use it for a naval st&tion
JamesG Flood, the California million
aire, died at Hiedelberg, Germ any, o
Bright's disease. The remnins will l>e em
Ualmed and will rest till May in the church
yasd chape! there, when they will be trans
ferred to San Francisco.
Planter Modest a Ruiz, who was cap*
tu red by bandits in the Remedios district,
Cuba, has been releused
ransom of $30,000.
The British Parliament has reassembled
Tho Queen's opening speech asked lor in
crease! supplies for defensive purposes.
Fourteen streets, containing 1000 houses,
with temples, schools, and hospitals, in Shid
snoki, Juuan, were recently burned to the
ground. At Yoko«uki, fire gutted 500 house«
and burned three
tX-J
the payment of a
J*
to death. On the
bouses at Joctio and fifteen at
burned.
6*
Chtli has passed a law excluding Chinese
immigrants from the Republic. But all other
classes of immigrants find a warm welcome.
Gabriel Dumont, who was Riels lieu
tenant in the bloody hulf-breed rebellion,
has been pardoned by the Canadian Govern
ment, and is now on his way to his old stamp,
iug ground.
Prince Rupert, the eldest eon of Prince
Ludwig of Bavaria, the heir to the bavarian
throne, is insane.
IP.
•N
4U*
t
TRAGEDIES ON THE RAIL.
Hallway Casualties in Varions
Parts of the Country.
California Bandits Bob a Train and
Commit Murder.
inquest over the body
of Charles F. Gilbert, who was killed in the
train robbery near Pixley, CaL, the
other evening. He was a native of West
Virginia, aged twenty years, and was in
stantly killed. Testimony given by P. T. Fol
ger, engineer, and C. J. Alder, fireman,
snowed that when leaving Pixley
the engine
with shotguns and ordered the engineer
to pull out. They fired a shot when two
miles out and ordered tho engineer
to slow down. The eugineer and tlreman
taken back by the robbers to the
press car, nnd a bomb was thrown under the
The explosion nearly turned the car
. Tho measeuger came out when
The Coroner held
■ ■■ ■
Ml ■ ! -
dered
of tho robbers entered the car, while
tho other held the fireman,
iger under oover. Meanw
Gaberb

e Brake
side of

came up
Bentic
the other side to
cause of the delay. When they
proaching, one robber exclaimed: "Stop,"
and tirod. Gilbert received a heavy load of
killing him
thu
up
the
ap^
buckshot in the heart and head,
instantly.
The robbers then reached under the car
and fired
struck
abdomen and right
then inarched tho thr
engine and hacked
It was thought that t
■work of professionals,
murderous. Tho robbers secured
Armed parties
search of the robbers.
A di-'patch received from Bakersfield says
that the robbers had been overtaken by the
officers who went in pursuit, and that
the former was killed nnd one captured alivfc
the other man. Bentley
by several Bhot in the
The robbers
upon the
darkness.
not the
needlessly
only $40D.
scouring the country in
into tho
affair
Of
in
Tho Bodies Were Burned Up.
A serious accident occurred to a train from
Bangor to St John's, near Boyd's Mills, two
miles east of Kingman, Me. The following
killed:
John English Campbell.mail clerk; Henry
fireman; W. D. Mudgott, rail
Goodman,
way i>o8tal clerk.
it is reported that the bodies
in tho wreck. J. Angel, engineer,
ously injured,but
seriously injured.
The curs had Sewell heaters in them, but
they caught fire from the locomotive imme
diately after leaving the track. The mail,
baggage nnd parlor cars were burned, together
with the express mail matter nnd baggage.
A wrecking-train, with physicians on board,
went to the scene of the
Maine Central people
possible for tho injured po-ssengers.
Tho latest uccounts said the accident
caused by the drawing of tho rail spikes by
the frost. Une body had been recovered,
supposed to be that of Goodman. When tho
engine was derailed it plunged along the side
of the track for quite a distance, tearing up
tho Bleepers and cutting down telegraph
poles, tnoraby severing all means of tele
graphic communication.
burned
-seri
reported
1.1 »engere
of
disaster The
doing everything
of
de
Passenger Train Wrecked.
A north-bound passenger train
Northern Central Railroad
from the
the
thrown
track l/y a broken rail
Ralston, Penn. About fifteen pas
injured.
Conductor William Dale
to
cold
aud
of them
■engere
seriously.
supposed to I« fatally injured, but is better,
and his recovery was expected. The
rolled down an ombankinent, turning
twice in itsdesccnt. The passengers suffered
intensely from tho cold during the delay
caused by the accident.
Killed in a Collision.
Two freight trains collided on the Knox
ville and Ohio Railroad, half a mile north of
Knoxville, Tenu. One fireman was killed
and both engines wrecked. Several freight
demolished. The accident was
misunderstanding of oixicrs.
caused^ »y a
LATER NEWS,
Mrs. Frank Leslie, of New York city,
has sold her Illustrated Newspaper, both
English and German editions, to W. J. Ar
kell, proprietor of Judy«, for $400,000.
Curtis Crom Lien, as he was about ,to enter
ft* church*£oor at Carlisle, Perm., placed a
revolver close to his head, fired, and
killed instantly.
John J. Holmes, Mayor of Iowa City,
Iowa, has committed suicide by shooting
himself through the head. The act
mitted while ho
continued ill health.
temporarily insane from
A boiler in the
mill of Ingram &
Ragan, At Suminerton, 8. C., exploded.
John C. Ragan
and a colored
instantly killed. Ingram
fatally scalded.
The residence of Earnest Young, near
burned, and two
Battle Creek, Mich., *,
little children, a boy aged* five and a girl
aged six, perished.
Fire destroyed Kelly and Lyle's mill,
Leavenworth, Kan., together with 200,000
bushels of wheat; loss $100,000.
Cardinal Charles Sacconi, Bishop of
Ostia
one of the six suffragan bisnops of the
Roman Pontiff and Dean of the Sacre I
College.
Steinitz, of Germany, defeated Tschigo
rin, of Russia, in the sixteenth game of the
chess tournament at Havana, Cuba, and
declared winner of the match and cham
pion of the world.
John Lehman, a young German groom,
kicked to death in New York city by
Richard Yarwood, a riding master, who
cused him of getting him discharged from a
riding academy.
The reign of terror in York and adjoining
counties of Pennsylvania has become so great
account of numerous singular conflag.
rations that Governor Beaver has been called
upon by a committee of citizens for advice
and assistance. Thus far eighteen buildings
have been burned within tho past four
months.
J. C. Clarke, fifty years old, who was to
have been married to Miss Florence Smith
at New Orleans, committed suicide
day which
ding.
Five tons of powder
Schneider's granite quarry at Granitoville,
Mo., and the force threw down a hill of
granite fifty-two feet high.
The trial of Governor Larrabee, of Iowa t
for criminal libel resulted in a triumphant
acquittal.
The President issued the usual procla
mation convening the Senate to meet at the
Capitol for the inaugural ceremonies.
Vice-Admiral S. C. Rowan has been put
the retired lilt of the Navy, with full pay
of that grade.
The President appointed Brigadier-General
Orlando B. Wilcox (retired), Governor of tho
Soldiers' Home, at Washington, vice General
Hunt, deceased.
A dispatch from Pekin announces that
the Emperor of China has been married.
1 Velletri, in Italy, is dead. He
Mm
to have witnessed his wed
exploded in
DISEASE DEE TING DIAGNOSIS
Fifty Deaths from a Mysterious
Maimly in Kentucky
A dispatch from Marion, Ky., says: A
terrible disease made its appearance in
Webster County a few weeks ago. It raged
disastrously for a time and it
that it lmd
thought
spent its fury, as
ted for ten days.
The disease,
violent
repor
however, has reappeared in
form than
Nine new
Free Union. V
hi ■
the count
developed nqar
deaths occurred during
one day, and the other five patients
expected to live. Five additional
developed next day.
The malady iB confined to a strip of terri
tory bordering on a small stream called Crab
Orchard Creek. In one family of seven only
the father escaped. Up to this time but two
attacked had recovered from the
w, one of whom is totally blind and the
a cripple for life. There have already
nore than fifty deaths. At one esme
day there were four burials,
have not been able to make a
is of the disease. The majority
to the opinion thnt it is cerebro
other
hMB
tery o
Doc
diagnosi
inouned
spinal meningitis of the congestive malignant
type. The patient is taken with sharp pal
in the spine, which soon reach the brain nnd
foliowe<l by violent cramps nfkl
mis. from which death ensiv*s
rulsii
The Pestiferous Gragg Bird.
There is a little bird, common about
the fields and gardens, that la a worst
pest than tho sparrow, crow and black
bird combined. It is commonly called
tho grass bird. It is a dark brown or
dun color on the back, with a white
breast and belly. It eats clover and
grass seed, and those farmers who sow
these seeds on the ground without cover
ing them will look in vain for the young
plants. These small birds oome in tlocks
a hundred or hundreds,
and lighting on the fields are unnoticed,
while each one will pick up the seed
from a square yard of ground. It is
easily calculated how soon a hundred of
these birds will clear an aore of land of
seeds ; forty-eight visita will do it with
out leaving one need. No wonder there
poor cutches of seed, especially
timothy, sown in the fall, when these
pests have a whole winter to work in or
the ground in the spring. The
only safety from this loss is to
seed by tho harrow and put it safe in
the ground, where it ought to be put by
every good farmer. If these birds are
ded to teach farmers a good lesson,
that grass and clover seed should be
sown in tho most careful manner and not
scattered
j ur!act; of the ground, they will not have
.ived in rain .—New York Times.
and
body
the
the
in
Fol
two
the
car
of somoti
swarm
er the
of
of
tho snow or the bai e hurd
the
ap^
March April May
lost months In which to purify your bloocl, "Every spring 1er yesrs I have mad« it s
other season doe» the system so much
the std of s reliabl* medicine likn Hood's
winter ti:e
practice
take from tliras to fiva botMes of Hood's So
uns I know it purifies the blood and
Art tbe
for at
parilla,
thoroughly cleanses tbs ayatem of all Impurities.
That languid feeling, aometimea called 'spring
fever,' will
properly carod for by this
W. H Lawrence, Editor Agricultural Epltomist,
Indianapolis, Ind.
. During the long,
and impure, tbe b dy becomes
lost. Hood's
saparilla
blood becomes
weak and tired, the appetite
9 irsapari la in peculiarly adapted to purify
and enrich
to overcome that tired feeling. It Increases
system ihat has been
falling remedy."
a good appetite and
POPU
blot d,
'a Sarsaparilla purified my blood, gava
strength nnd ovarca
larity every year.
•T take
«X*.
the headache and dizaines»,
«ork again."—L utbbb
aaa spring
'a Sarsaparilla every
cat satisfactory results."—O Plans
. Brooklyn. N. Y
Church St.. Lowell, Mass.
I:, dge
Hood's Sarsaparilla
tA. Prepared only
$1 ; six
by a 1. HOOD A OO., Apothecaries, Lowell, Mw.
for $6. Prepared only i Sold by all drugs«»
druggist*. $\;
Sold by
by a I. HOOD A OO., Apothecaries. Lowell, Mu«.
by
up
I OO Poses One Dollar
OO Pose* One Dollar
\
SB
r
«
m
*
V
\
cna
the
I
|6,
w
f\vd'
»
ft
of
f.
V
$
Â
r;
Ar
a
A PROMINENT MERCHANT IN TROUBLE.
Old moneybags mopes in his office all day,
As snappish and
Tta. vshïïbü Vnow enough U> hoop out cl tvia
way,
Leri the merchant should grumble and
•wear.
Even Tabby, tho oat, is In fear of a cuff.
Or a kick, if sho ventures too
They $11 know tho master is apt to be rough.
And his freaks unexpected and queor.
What makes the old fellow so surly and grim.
And behave so confoundedly mean ?
There's certainty something tho matter
him—
Is it stomach, or liver,
a bear;
spleen?
guessed It—his liver Is sluggish and
wè'
His blood is disordered and foul.
It's enough to mako any
hopelessly mad,
And greet his best friend with a growl.
To correct a sluggish or disordered liver, and to cleanse and purify the
blood and thereby sweeten the temper, Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical Discovery
has no equal. It improves digestion, builds up the flesh, invigorates the
system, dispells melancholy, and makes life worth living.
IT IS GUARANTEED to benefit or cure, if taken in time and given a
N fair trial, in all diseases for which it is recom
&
near
two
girl
mended, or the money paid for It will be refunded.
Copyright, 1888, by World's Dispensary Medical Association, Proprietors.
CATARRH
IN THE HEAD,
of
the
I
matter of how long standing, is per
manently cured by OR. SAQE'8 CATARRH REMEDY. CO cents, by druggist*.
CHOICE TEXAS LANDS
Rare Chance for Settlers.
The Railroad System of Te
auto brin« within on
seaboard market» the 1
ring developed
the
HOUSTON &TSXAS CENT! RY.CO.
It has been determined to offer to settlers the
Renowned Agricult'l Lands
Located along tho lino of the Fort Worth Sc Denver
City R. It.,
ning with Wjlburger
200,000 ACRES
In farms of VA) ac.
located by the
b.i&'i?
tbe vari
Situated in U
as tho Souther
genial climate, fa
ward. These lands woro
iost, with
Ä.
gardens and
I the
d nnd healthy region known
i.din of Texas, they possess a
ruble to man nnd beast, where
:
torlt can tic
iod on tbe year round, and
jth regions of early and late
ed
fron
Population is fast pouring in, and local .
is already established, with schools, cliurehrs,
Tkiimh or Salk: One-fifth cash, baluiu-e in foil
yenrly payments, with lute ' '
For further information
of ileBtriietlv
Miz
three
S fonda n
adjaccntco
es, apply to
J. S. NAPIER, Vernon, Texas,
' show
(who is p
0.1
purchasers);
C« C* QIBBS, Land Ag't, Houston, Tax*
FOR TH EJBLOOD.
Kwift's 9pmfic hit* curt*} me of a mali«-
nantbrs iUititfouton my le>r, which caused
pain. It was railed Ersann by
^ urof whom tieuteilmo with
tididly < oufemi ilial I owe my
present good health tpH. S. S.. wM h in iny
entimatiou ib iu valuable a* a liloo l remedy.
MihrJdua DkWitt.
TOI N. 10th St, Kt. Louis. Mo.
Onr baby
lacked with
tho I
1
rt. I<
:

ila. which fori
failed
nil we K»ve Hwlft'« Hiwcifle,
*d hor entirely,»..,;
K.V. UELK.
'* Point, Text
fa
t.. 7.1,
trbfa h
ilv
hale and hearty.
Scrofula do •<
well
loped on my
mp» on her neck,
eine, »nd the result
prompt
nBMoan, Cleveland. Tenn.
TokKivinp history of Blood
!FT BPECiFI, CO* r **
Drawer 3, Atlanta. G*.
Rwift'n Sin
ful and th>
lu
3»! »*">*• .
Diseases and ml-
THE
«*fw „ who havo head Pi,o'.
sms
sms
PEERLESS DYES
W. L. DOUGLAS
$3 SHOE
Ar© the BEST.
Bold n r Dkpquist m.
A
FOR
GENTLEMEN.
r'-'
Best in the world. Examine hl«
JM.on IIaV i ' « ! \\ 7\> Yv i 'i t sKöfih '
#2.25 WORKINGMAN'S SHOE.
92.00 and SI.75 BOYS' SCHOOL SHOES,
made in Congress, Button and Lace.
Bom
\
a
W. L. DOUGLAS
S3 SHOE
FOR
LADIES.
Beat Material. Best Style. Best Fitting.
» *19P G ^ AS SHOES Without
ite W, L. DOUGLAS™BROCKTON? MlA8s!
CAUTION s
If any dealer
id by yoîr P d r &r,'
A -b * -Ï- * * * -Ï.
ns u/tt sHiSSi
ÄS 1
hi:
to hi«
TOWl I, -
BRAN
uillar to f vc,
hardly u he
qulto netting, not only fc
at beint; bo bn.lly taken
:
HEN
the o:
Orel I
Wind and Water
■s Pish Brand she
z
• ■•:.•) c
(ly like
id take
Ifyc
hr descriptive catalogue. A..'
,5dSlr
Tk# Sfaltmtni Hat Otar.
lh« null an (ha Arugglria «till oontinnes and
dally aooraa aï people call for a bottle
Kamp** Balsam for the Throat and Longs for
of Coughs, Colds, Asthma, Bronchitis
and Consomption. Kemp's B a l sa m , the stan
dard family remedy4s sold an a guarantee and
nerer falls to gire entire satisfaction. Price
Wo and $L Trial stae free.
Tns present orange crop of Florida Is esti
mated at 8,000,000 boxes.

Chronic Cough« and Colds,
And all diseases of the Throat and Lungs,
he cured by the
of Scott's Emulsion, as
contains the healing virtues of Cod Liver Oil
and Hypophosphites in their fullest f rm.
a beautiful creamy Emulsion, palatable
milk, eusily digested, and can bo taken by the
most delicate. Please read: "I consider Soott'a
Emulsion the remedy par-excellence in Tuber
d Strumous Afleotions,to say noth
ing of ordinary oold» and throat troubles."—
VV.R. 8. Connell, M.D., Manohester. O.

A Radical Care for Eplleptle Fits.
To the Editor —Please Inform your :
that I bave a positive remedy for the
named disease which I warrant to
worst
the
faith in its vir
wlll send fl ee a sample bottle and
valuable treatise to any sufferer who will give
his P O. and Express address. Resp'y,
II.O. ROOT. M. C.. 188 Pearl St.. New York.
i
SA Cent«
Will buy a Treatise on
Diseases Book of 100 pages, valuable
every owner of horses. Postage stamps taken.
Bent postpaid. New York Horse Book Co.,
184 Leonard Street, New York city.
Horse and His
and cheapest. Plso's
Remedy for Catarrh. By druggists. fiOo.
Boa
lil-'i'-l to
YOU NEED IT!
a Inure Diction»'y. but It Is so much work t<
1 tit for examination that lam ind.nod to ehlrl
I? out \vo d*, alt hi u-h dt-tilr ».b rf knowledir.'
, , HANDY DICTIONARY" 1* always
I .onk out words on the instimt, *o the
i* impreacod on my mind ."—Correspom
1 I
l. ■>!.;,I
Kn matioi
Webster's Illustrated
HANDY DICTIONARY
Thousand* of Words Defined.
Hundred« of Piet ii re«. Abbre
viation« Explained. Ordin
ary Foreign Phrnncs Tran«,
lat cd. Metric Syst«
Weight« and Men«nrc«.
7;.'J
of
rinb-d in »mall, clear type, on flne~r3i
>er; bound in handsome cloth. —
320—3?AGBS—320
Who that rends doenn't
ord* whose
for & inode
at hand
ry day come ac
ho dr
ot
whirl
a
II.
Ihu d
ary whlch^can bokoj.
lues tor.
•d/' d
>
ly volume, and therefore la n flTeate
tho Knelling nnd Pronunciation of
mon word» havo been changed during tho last :«
years^iieopleownintrthe old-fu«hionod Dii-tionarie*
Postpaid for 'ZSc.
HOOK PUBLISHING HOUSE.
1 4 Leonard Ht., N. Y. City.
A,
:
no. Hi
^it is at a trifling
LOOK AT THIS!
Cheapi-Ht aud lx «' Germ
American Oicilnnary at
the unprecedentedly low price
of 91 • 0'24 handsome page*,
bound In black cloth. Kngll*h
Hi
with Ge
i-rman words, with KnriiBh
l< nh
N
\>
so that if y oi
you want to tranulate
lisk word intoGr
i""k i
kn
it In
a
i
therpart. Postpaid, $1.
PUB. HOUSE, 134 Leonard
is
bln, y. <an
PRACTICAL HINTS j raKiB, containing boII,!
To Builders 1
;Ä fMgXTO 1 plaln M
.
K, ventilation, th«
) builder». Mailed
O cents ln |*o»tal *Umi» Add rest
NATIONAL SHEET METAL HOOFING
Twentieth
ll
Bn
i, !
ii' 1
ml«
roof and
.51« E
.. New York City
Ar© the BEST.
SflacisDil^
XheEhas-A-VügelerEo*
•BM.T0-HB
DIAMOND VERA-CURA
FOR DYSPEPSIA.
A POSITIVE CURE FOR INDIGESTION AND ALL
Stomach Troubles Alining Therefrom.
Your Drugglat or
Cura for you if not
tent bu mail op rr
get Vera
It will be
I;,-,, , I
r 0«
Uready in
iptof
bores $1.00)
Ipt Of'ir
Tie Charles A. Vogel rr Co., Baltimore, Md.
impfe
N Y N P-9
1 of three weeks I
lug from a severe oold
pain in temples. After
only six appliiat
Cream Balm I
rL Y'S7^B
m
-FOto
ay-feverBS
. Of Ely '*
relieved.
:
of my cold 1
Every tra
moved.—Henry C. Clark, Eeu
York Appra is
Th« moat
tain and safs
Pain REMEDY
o r Id
that Instantly
■tops the moat
• xernc i «ting
It tl
truly th« greet
CONqVERUR
OF PAIR H a«H
has done mart
pa
a
good than any
known remedy.
For SPRAINS, BRUISES, RAC KACIIB,
PAIN In the CHEST or SkDES. IIKAD
ACHE, TOOTHACHE, or any other EX
TERNAL PAIN, « lew »ppl lent Ions »et
like mugir, cnuiilng the PAIN
STANTLY »TOP..
For COaûOKSTIONS.ÎNFLAMRIATIONSy
SOllE TflltOAT, BRONCHITIS. COLDT
ir CHEST, RHEUMATISM, NEU
RALGIA, LUMBAGO, SCIATICA, PAWS
In the Sinn II
IS
In
tile Hack, etc
iitlnwetl and
«•««»«••y to effect »
i repeated
INTERNAL PAINS (In the Bowel«
omacli), CRAMPS, SPASMS, SOUR
STOMACH, NAUSEA, VO MIT IN G,
HEARTBURN, I) I A 11 R II CE A, COLIC,
»ATULENCY, FAINTING SPELLS.
RVICKLY
relieved Instnntly nnd
CURED by Inking Internally a« direct
ed. S dd by DruKgldi. Price, OOc.
ÛADW4Y0
II PILLSO
THE
For the care of nil disorder« of the
STOMACH, LIYJCR» BOWELS, KID
NEYS, BLADDER, NERVOUS DISEAS
ES, LOSS of APPETITE, HEADACHE,
CONSTIPATION, COSTIVENESS. INDI
GESTION, BILIOUSNESS, FEVER,
INFLAMMATION of the BOWELS,PILES
Internal
and nil derangeme
Viscera. Purely Vegetable,
no merenry, minerals, or DELE'
IOUS DRUGS.
PERFECT DIGESTION will be ac
of
«Ii
•e
> plinlied by taking RAD WAY'S
PILLS. By
DYSPEPSIA,
SICK HEADACHE, FOUL STOMACH,
BILIOUSNESS, will be »Tolded, and
the food that
contribute It«
nourishing properties for the support of
Sit« of the 4>o4jr. MOLD
ce »5c, per
the natural
BY ALL DRUGGISTS.
box, or, on receipt of py* j*
•eat by mall. smTui for C'...
. A. voller.
MAD WA Y & CO., 3» Warren St.,N. Y,
GRATEFUL-CUM»* L»H i iWG'.
BREAKFAST.
**By athorouKh krowledRe of tbe natural law«
<<f diK«'8tion and nutri
WBlCfa I 01
tion, and by
TIM of weU-B. . _ __ _
breakfast table» with a delicately flavoured bev
erage which may save ub many heavy doctors' bill«.
It in by the juàlciouu uec of such article* of diet that
a constitution may be gi »dually bubt up until atrong
enotnrh to rcBlxt every tendency lo dineaae. Hun
dred» of subtle ni»l»dte» »re floating around u* ready
to attack whetever there)» a we.ik point. We mnv
eecai>e many » fatal * haft by keeping our elvea well
for titled with pure blood and a properly nourished
frame.''— CNi-U N rviM Gazette.
Made »Imply witn bolliny water or m'lk. 8old
only in half pound tin*, by Grocers, labelled thua:
JAM EH EPPH^urt.^Homeenpatliic Cheraiat«.
cation of tlm line proper
M r. l-:pp. ha* provided
r
v you wish a
GOOD
REVOLVER
Grated "smith 0 It YVKSHON
b. The flneat »n
~ — ufactur.d
•e of nil expert*.
1
[pCTTssw
the
$S ' i i '.
e* 32.88 and 0-100. Sin
fety HammorleM *
al. d for II ii I - h ,
C.l !
and
Î le or double
Ml'K'-t in' dtl
rioii
hey
bin
Il y and a
nllenblc
D
whicS
i. The SMITH St
ipod upon the
J datea of pal
ery detail.
illll
æ
ften *
K
in I si
rare
emits
.1 pan
WESSON Re'
rel* with firm
!n
1
:
SKiSi
1 • I" A
Desor
»I |*OU
1er «•
criptfvo ôataloimë and' prices furnished upon
SMITH & WESSON,
will leceYvo^r
it and careful a
plica
IWMentlon this pap -r.
Springfield, Ma
Here It Is !
tn learn alt about «
Boar ? H«w to Pick Out a
tiens
Know Imperfec
> Guard agaii
? Detect Disease a
Effect a Curt when same Is
possible ?
the Teeth
11
7
age by
What to call the Different Parte
al? How
and other Va.uubl«
reading
HORSE HOOK
paid,
a Horee Properly
All tht
can be obtained by
100-PAGE ILLUSTRATED
eh we will forward, po«
elptof only U5 cent« In stamp«*
BOOK PUB. HOUSE.
134 Leonard St.. *■ New York City
its
6000 I AN
encash furnished]
iiocautV
OCÎOSIOADAY!
Jk Hn| AGENTS WANTED!
Holder» GIVE
duce them, E
from 1
feet. Hem
•»mi •
f |m
circulars rare.

N A WA V to intro
u „.cun« ror «smssa
lbi for65 cent». Address
WBffiiKKll Brewster Mfg. Co., Holly, Mich.
CONSUMPTION
lhavoa poMlUvr renu-dy for tho above (Useanei bvltaoM
Inoumnds of ctuxsi of tin 1 worst kind nnd of long nandtac
In ita •fflcarv thaf
with » valuable
has
FRi/Pi axle
rnA£cn GR c ASE
__ told Everywh e re,
Bin MC STUDY. Book-keeping,BuBlneBsForma,
M U RI E. Penmanship, Arithmetic, Short-hand, etc^
■ I thorn uglily taught by MA1I.. i ,i, ul n DM
Bryant*« Colleg e, 45 7 Muin Bt., Buffalo, N. Y
UJoSJa Dali* Great English Gout a id
llEcSir b rlllSi Rheumatic lle;ue;l/.
_Ora I Boa , «4» ronnd 14 Pill«.
SOLDIER^ SS»
McCormick & Bona, Washington, D.C. & Cincinnati, O.
BEST IJT^TIIEWORLD
lOc.
ffffinaWiSt b
IS YOUR FARM FOR SALE»
- . . - - wish
& to buy a farm ?
Broodwav, N. Y.
If so ul dress Coons a Weioht,
In-r r

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