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The Sussex Countian and Laurel gazette. (Laurel, Del.) 189?-19??, October 24, 1896, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053065/1896-10-24/ed-1/seq-4/

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SEE
BDSESl
THAT THE
I
FAC-SIMILE
SIGNATURE
.^Vegetable Preparation for As
similating the Food andRegula
ling the Stomachs and Bowels of
-OF
«WHlMHIHImM
Promotes Digestion.CheerFu!
ness andItest.Contains neither
Opium.Morphine nor Mineral.
Not Narcotic.
IS ON THE
WRAPPER
oT OU DrSAMVELPtrCHER
]\uri/*tn Set!'
AU S',#!* ■
MwAmUoSJn
OF EYEEY
JïïïZimmttJmAo*
Hin* JW -
BOTTLE OP
A perfect Remedy forConslipa
tion, Sour Stomach.Diari hoca,
Worms .Convulsions .Feverish
ness and Loss OF SlEEP.
CASTORIA
Pac Simit^ Signature of
NEW YORK.
Oastoria ia put up In one-aise bottlea only. It
sold in balk. Don't allow anyone to aell
• on anything else on the plea or promise that it
ia "just as good" and "will answer every par
hf Bee that you get O-A-B-T-O-B-I-A.
Tho f»e
Atb tnonlks old.
35 Dost s -jjCents
:
It
EXACT COPY OF WRAPPER.
•v»ry
wnpper.
'
m
\3
r
The highest claim for other
tobaccos is "Just as i
I good as Durham." |
Kvery old smoker
knows there is none just
as good as
t
:
,s. Lw'. m
sr
- f ym
*»'
%
Blackwell's
BULL DURHA
Smoking tobacco
1
Ï
You ^vill find
each two ounce bog,
k pons inside each four ounce
^ bag of Blackwell's Durham.
m Buy a bag of tjiis cele
■ brated tobacco and read the j
■ coupon—which gives
W of valuable presents and how
FP to get them.
inaklfl
two
J*
« '■
I : .!
I
FIB • HVÜÜ 1 AMCU!
Is your Home, Furnit
6toc.\ and other property well insured
lots by Fi
, Graiu, Li
• Lightning, if you
of the Agents of the
ago
will apply
-KENT COUNTY
Mutual Insurance Co.,
you can obtain insurance at low rates.
Thu Coinpauy is mutual and yon will
only pay what the insurance costs,
any amount in excess of cost will he
returned in dividends, or at termination
of f oiicy.
VVM. DENNEY, Secreuiry,
J HIV w WOOTTF.N. AfffM
r.»m*
H. L. EVANS & CO
■5
BANKERS.
STOCK, GRAIN AND
GRAIN BROKERS
WILMINGTON, ML,
RDBRS for the pinch.-,
sale of wheat., con., i
()
*i*h, etc., execute
hd New York K
ï
1 1
ie l ou favorable tei
. Or.
in st. cksund h
• >u all tlie leading ixchauges.
!
Private telegraph «ires.
(.-.vestment Securities
Always on Hand.
FIDELITY MUTUAL LIFE ASSN,
OF PHILADELPHIA, PA.
(9i4 Walnut St.)
INSURANCE AT COST,
: c*r BATES, L'.W EXPENSE.
Senility, Equity,
i. 10.00 low« r at all ages than L«-gul Re
e Companies. Prompt settlements
«-.«•t. '
» f laims. 1
17 a Annual Repo t (Jan. 1- 1896.)
.$ 1,242,278 98
33.834 14
20,331) Oil
. 3.001,403 07
. 09,303,348 00
Ak ets,.
iu b.lin
I*
ï in ti
paid to «ixt
nu in hnce,
Keut ami i^us-i
led il
Dtfi ,
A C«
d Caroline Ci-i
oliire. H
)oiC'he-t
Hies, Md
W .Uul
S. I. Hoop.
Otfii'l Agt.,
ï el, Del.
A.I UK]
iul Agi.,
UH WiilmitSt. Phils.
I
Ls
TICK.
every man and woman in the United
nterested in tbe Opium and Whlaky
o have one of my books on theae din
B. M. iVoolley, Atlanta, Oa.,
lv
;•
be
PER ®XTR13>
...
t ?
DAY S COMMISSIOIV.
t honorable, steady employ
r round, at good wages, at
to travel? If so, sent?
o\ir wholesale prico-lisi
\V e furnish boat of bunk
DO you
r j r leia «lamps fo
Lit 1 En ,i panicularc.
:•
« *•
&
Hortifann
j j dusii/ess &S
703-J710 Chestnut Rt., Phllada., Pa. ^
*
UialrticOoii 111
' in-J.
i :
Book«k®epto0,
tic, ) Typo-*«riUna.
ship. I Correspondence,
rctal Law. I Practical Grammar, j
Kackias, CMrwu»to3, Ftotk Cvmpuuiu,
A
, P
'
C >!
<
/! T ""''
MAI
pAKKEira—
HAIR BALSAMI
Clean«» and Wall flee tho hale
1
Ex sä i
!
2 EF.
Ift^and ®1J0 at Pruggiuj
I WILL SOON BE BACK
'm only «'»ing
Jim Callaway
barber
and all
theboyn go there
but Jim In Mich
a hustler
il.r
n
1
m
wait long; I
bhv; If you «*
» ■»devo ur hrfir
M Hh
• d
//
fi
.
PRACTICAL BARBBR AND HAIRVdRBFSKR
»IÖ TI3££i 004 North Sixth St.
S Stdo entrance on Green St.
PH E LAD-: PH I A. CÜ RE. O Ü ASANTEEC.
î viiicTunE, dlood Poison,;*
3* r *GCNcnAL Dcdiuty, Lost Vigor.*
VTÛXCC02C3 AfîD ALL OTHER*
*CFFCCTG OF YOUTHFUL*
* FO LLY O GOT! i^EX ES*
3 At:a s;:r.u
);r v.\i
M\y I
ilh.
1
PARKER'S CINCER TONIC
t btlei Lu ng ^TroubloR^D*billed Istrearing •tomtrH «M
I-PARER'S
I HAIR BALSAM
î»,ÎSi££
PniMfrtt
I ' -
> ,. • j ï
HINDERCORN8 Tb.cmlri
Coruu. Stop« in fxtiu. Mike* walking ea«y. Ue.
NNYROYAL.PILLS
ij
sx
;"Âïr=K.
'««lief for
r t«ncl 4r.
........ ,/amt 1'aptr.
.UudlonHuur«,
A'hllnd*..
THMAGURA
FOR THIN PEOPLE
are you thin ?
Flesh made with Thinacurn Tablets by
a scientific peocess. They create perfect
assimilation of every f«
ting thp valuable part« and discirdinjt
the worthless. They make thin
l-lump and round «>
of food, ree
ho fleure.
They are the Standard E-'mcdy
for leanness, containing no n
absolutely liuiuileSs. Price, prep i*i, $1.-0
0 for $0 (lO I'sniphlet •'How to
' free. THE THJNACURA CO
»49 Broadway, N Y.
•n- 1
I.
Get Fat'
H,*p 1» 4«
iainbow Liniment
Banishes all Pain
UURKM Rht-uiiiallnm, Neuralgin, Lan
Hprulns, nruUeM,Chilbluinit > ( < rniii|» «V
Prie«, flic,
ib
bottle. Kample bottle, 10c.
by Dealers. Manufactured only by
H. «I. MACKETT A, CO.,
27 N. 2nd St.. Philadelphia.
^HACKETT'S
CONDITION
POWDERS
For Your Hors*», Cattle and Poultr;
Take no oilier, lfic. per Ib. paeka
WANTED-AN IDEAÄTÄ
t hiug to patent ? Protec t your ideas : they may
•>ring you wealth. Write JUIIN WEDDF.il
dUKN & CO., Patent Attorneys, Washington,
ü. C., for their $1,800 prize offer.
-- REVIVO
M {
RESTORES VITALITY.
»1C
Æ Made a
d|Well Man
of Me.
lit Day. YV
Day.
THE GREAT
30th Day.
PHBNOH riTIlVOJIDY
onnco* the above r,
Hill
wurf ally and «juickly. Cure* wlieu
Young men
mao will
KEVI
lost manhood, aud old
r youthful vigor by usiag
. It ouickly aud surety restores Nervo
Vitality. Impotency. Nightly Knilsslo
r, Failing Mnnory. Was
Diseases
-ludiscre..»,
ne for s'udy. business or marrlsge. It
by starting at the seat of disease, but
d blood builder, bring
D
vhic
atso
llTf
I
pink gi
pale cheeks and re
ring tbe fir_
aud Consumption. I
1 other. It
th. It wards off In
t on having REVIVO,
in vest pocket. By mall,
t for s»ff.#o, w_
tlve written guarantee to «ure o
the money. Circular free. Address
i ™ ™ C1,E co " 271 Watol1 meuo, ill
! Sold Id Laurel by 8. !.. Kenney.
be carried
Ul.
SOWING THK SEED.
Dl'. Tu Image Draws Some Lessons
From the Farm.
be Well
ited kihI
R..,,p I*
vent of
>00(1
ln his latest effort the popul
ington divine tells his hearers why it
urv that God should harrow
their .souls to prevent the precious
seed fro
Wash
being stol
hearts, 1 i s text
father is the husbandman."
out of their
John 15: 1: "My
This last summer, having gone in dif
ferent directions over between 5,COO and
iles of harvest fields, I
hardly open my Bible
ing the breath of
seeing the golden light of the
field.
ti.000
ithout smell
liny and
heat
hen I open my Bible
take my text, the scripture leaf rustles
liko the tassels of the corn.
We were nearly all of us born in the
country. We dropped^corn in the hill,
and Went on Saturday to the mill, tying
the grist in the Center of the sack
that the contents on either side the
horse balanced each other; and drove
the cattle, our bare feet wet with the
dew; and rode the horses with the
l)aller
and hunted the
the brook until we fell off,
for nests
till the feathered occupants went cack
ling away. We
born in the country, and all
have stayed-there had not some ad
turous lad on his vucation came back
with better clothes and softer hands,
ami set tho whole village on fire with
ambition for city life. So wo all
(erstund rustic allusions The Bible
is full of them, in Christ's
the Mount you could sue the full-blown
dies and the glossy back of the crow's
wing as it flies
nearly all of
lid
Mount Olivet,
d John, Paul, and Isaiah find
n country life a source of frequent
illustration, while Christ in the text
Likes the responsibility of calling God
a fa
David
\ declaring: "My Father is
tho husbandman."
Noah was the first farmer. We say
nothing about Cain, the tiller of the
a gardener
soil. Adam
a large
given all the
. calc, but
(icres of the earth. Elisha
aicu turist, not «cultivating a ten
lot, for we find him plowing with 12
Yoke of oxen. In Bible times the land
so plenty and the inhabitants
few that Noah
ag
right when he
gave to every inhabitant a certain por
tion of laud; that laud, if cultivated,
ever utter to be his
possession,
in Nebraska the United States
Just
government
ago gave pre-emption right to 160acres
who would settle there
payment of 810 years
to
and cultivate the soil.
All classes of people were expected
to cultivate ground except ministers of
religion. It
pposed that they
would have their time entirely
pied with their
though T
isters do plunge so deeply into world
llncss that they remind one of what
Thomas Frazer said in regard to a
in his day who preached very
well, but lived very ill: "When he
•s out of the pulpit, it is a pity he
should
profession, al
told that sometimes raiu
go into it, and when he
is in the pulpit, it is a pity he should
ever come out of it."
They were not small crops raised in
those ti
, for though the arts were
turned up very rioh
soil, und barley, and cotton, and flax,
and all kinds of graiu came up at the
call of the harvesters.
stalk of grain that had
Iwcen 800 and 400
rude, the pi
Pliny tells of
it be
. The rivers and
the brooks, through artificial channels,
were brought down to the roots of the
corn, and to this habit of turning a
river wherever it
ted Solo
when he says: "The king's
heart is iu the hands of the Lord,
and He turneth it
water
the rivers ol
turned, whithersoever He
T . . ) ".i - ' TT- .
Iu all ages there has been great
honor paid to agriculture. Seven
eights of the people In every country
disciples of the plow. A govern
ment is stroffg iu proportion as it is
supported by an active and industrious
yeomanry. So long ago as before the
fall of Carthage, Strabc wrote 28 books
agriculture; Hesiod wrote a poem
the same subject—"The Weeks and
Days." Cato was prouder of his work
on husbandry than of all his military
conquests. But I must not be tempted
into a discussion of agricultural
• (uests. Standing amid the harvests
and orchards and vineyards of the
Bible, and standing amid the harvests
and orchards and v.neyards of
'ry—larger harvests than have
ever before been gathered—l want to
run out the analogy between the pro
duction of crops and tlie growtli of
grace in the soul—all these sacred
writers making use of that analogy.
In the first place I remark, in grace
in tlie fields, there must be a plow«,
i'hat which theologians call convic
tion is only tlie plowshare turning up
tho sins that have been rooted anil
matted in the souL A farmer said to
iis indolent son; "There are a hundred
dollurs buried deep in that field." The
went to work and plowed the field
from fence to fence, and he plowed it
very deep, and then complained that
lie had not found tlie money; but wlieu
the crop had been gathered and sold
for a hundred dollars more than any
previous year, then the young
took the hint as to what his father
meant when he said there
i
i
-
;
h un
buried down in that field.
• Ired doll
Deep plowing for a crop. Deep plowing
for a soul. He who makes light of sin
Will never amount to anything in the
speaks of sin
ip tho world. If a man
though it
mistake, instead of the
in-*
accuracy
loathsome, abominab'e, consuming
and damning thing that God liâtes,
that
will never yield a harvest of
usefulness.
When I
boy I plowed a field
with a team of spirited horses. I
plowed it very quickly. Once in a
while I passed
without turning it, but I did not jerk
back tlie plow with its rattling device®.
some of the sod
I thought it made no difference. After
i while my father came along aud
-.aid, "Why, this will never do; that
.isn't plowed deep enough; there you
,'iave missed this and
have missed
(that. Aud he plowed it
•The difficulty with n great many peo
ple is that they are only scratched with
conviction when the subsoil plow of
.God's truth ought to be put in up to
the beam.
My wqrd is to all Sabbath school
teachers, to all parents,
tian workers—Plow deep! Plow deep!
personal experi
apt to take a lenient view
all Chris
And if in your
pnee you
of the sinful side of your nature, put
down into your soul the ten command
ments which reveal the holiness of
God, and that sharp npd glittering
coulter will turn up your soul to the
deepest depths. If a man preaches to
you thut y
order by reuson of sin. and that you
need only a little fixing up. he deceives.
You have suffered an appalling injury
by reason of sia. There are quick
drug
could
kill tlie body. And sin is like that
drug; so virulent, so pois«)
that one drop is enough to kill the soul.
ly a little out of
poisons and sloi^polsons, but tlie
gist could give you one drop that
, so fatal
Rev. John DeWitt, D.D.
of the Theological Skmi
N. J..
Jew Brunswick,
at Dr. Deane's
Ci: "I .HI »«ti.ficd ih
Dyspepsia Pi
right. They
ill
have n
Dr.
..
allege pro.
Deane's '
Dyspepsia
V Pills. J
. 1-llN
Imwym
Uy

the one great remedy f.-r
dyspepsia. Dr. Deane'*
Dyspepsia Pills are aciez
hat's why they have
If constipated, yciluW
•ni. ally
red, and
a sale. White
If bowel
loose. Send for a fr
|.V
DR. J. A. DEANE CO , Kingston, N. T.
OUT
tnifu ooin
§ A good drenching In a f
I cold rain is often the be- 1
£ ginning of consumption, i
4 Yet no one claims that ft
Ï the germs of this disease |
I exist In the rainwater.
* Then how was this
J brought about? The ex
| posure was followed by
£ a cold ; the vitality was
I lowered; the cough con- |
tinued for some weeks; >
I the throat and lungs be- I
't came congested; and *
* thus all the conditions *
t were favorable for the I
* consumption germs. *
it
;
aewi
'
'
Smifeion
& of Cod-liver Oil, with $
I Hypophosphltes, does not |
| directly attack these
*> germs and kill them
( But it does tone up the |
I whole system and re- |
stores the body to health ft
1 before serious harm is |
^ done. The germs of |
consumption thrive best *
when the system is J
4 weakened and the throat £
I and lungs congested. £
ft Do not delay until it is ft
* too late, but treat your *
I cough early. Cod-liver 5
jf oil and the hypophos- |
I phites, in the form of 5
Scott's Emulsion, are t
the vdry best remedies. Ï
«JUST AS GOOD" IS NOT
SCOTT'S EMULSION.
*
?
a
'
;
*
3. and 81.00 at all druggist s.
SCOTT A BOWNE,
N#w York.
!
Ï
AFTER UL 6 T££ 3 S Ml
) PS'
tj ö
329 N. I 5 THST.
BjIivow Vlas
Cc'tcwhlfl
« B?C0IALiS
II» la II,:- I tm
-il
lt
a
PHILADELPHIA'S t A
30 Ye.
Self Ab
en Or«
e Uml Doss "h*
is Fully F -
the HIiIl, ,
nD 11 ' 1
.1.
ni..,-, 1
• «à An
;v:
N. Ch
priub
Shntt
Kecnincd
I 11 eu I lb It
re«l.
UUh
"if v
•d.
kours—Daily'
11*. M. nud
'8. Sent
rree. OlHoo
» A. M. to
nud t*
to»
u
Deep plowing for a
ing for a soul. Broken heart
ligion. Broken soil
Why
p. D eppi.,v\
harvest,
it that David aud the jailer
for
B j EB awUC -tns o rWe iw -tw»
e publican and Paul u.a<.c »ucTi
ado about their sins? Had they lost
their senses? No. The plowshare
struck them. Conviction turned up a
great many things that were forgot ten.
•As a farmer plowing sometimes türm
up the skeleton of a
atomy of a monsty' 'ong ago buried,
th<
atomy of a monsty' 'ong ago buried,
tlie plowshare of
upjblie ghastly skeleton of sins long ago
.entombed. Geologists never brought
up from the depths of the mountain
.mightier ichthyosa
vietion turn*
megath
i mn.
Again, i remark, in grace as in thi
'field there must be a sowing. In th<
■autumnal weather you find the fannei
i rointr
about 23 inches, and at every stridu hi
puts ids hand into the sack of grain
and he sprinkles the seed
field. It looks silly to a
not know what he is doing. He is do
.ing a very important work. He is scat
.ering the winter grain, and though
the snow may eome, the next yeai
there will be a great crop. Now, that
is what we are doing when we.
preaching the gospel—we are scatter
/.ng the seed. It is the foolishness of
preaciiing, but it is the winter grain;
and though the snows of worldl inest
/may come down upon it, it will yield
after awhile glorious harvest. Let us
be sure
the field at a stride o.
the
who does
the right kind of seed.
■Sow mullen stalk and mullen stalk wili
come up. Sow Cnuada thistles and Can
ada thistles will come up. Sow wheat
pnd wheat will come up. Let
itinguish between truth and error. Let
know the difference between wheat
dis
and hellebore, oats and henbane.
- The largest denomination in this
Country is the denomination of Noth
ingarians. Their religion is a system
of negations. You say to
■•'What do you believe?"
(don't believe in infant baptism."
"What do you believe?" Well, I don't
'believe in the perseverance of tlie
paints " "Well, povv tell
do believe?" »»Well, I don't believe in
«the eternal punishment of the wicked."
; So their religion is a
tBelieve something and teach it;
resume the figure of my text, scatter
abroad tlie right kind of seed.
A minister the other day preached a
sermon calculated to set the denomi
of them.
"Well, I
what you
of ciphers.
11
nations of Christians quarreling. He
ing nettles. A minister the
other day advertised that -he would
preach a sermon
ty of transcendental and organized
forces to untranscendental
What
Weeds. 'i'll© Lord
t in
periori
l un»
organized forces,
/»owing?
he
Christ nineteen centuries ago
planted the divine seed of doctrine. It
sprang up. On one side of the stock
are all the free governments of tlie
earth and on top there shall be a flow
ering millennium after awhile. All from
the gospel seed of doctrine. Every
word that a parent, or Sunday-school
teacher, or city missionary, or other
Christian worker speaks for Christ,
comes up. Yea, it come® up with
pound interest—you saving
ving ten, the ten a hundred,
that
.the hundred a thousand, the thousand,
ten thousand, the ten thousand,
hundred thousand—on.
Foret er.
Again, I.rem&rk, in graeo as in tbe
farm there roust be a harrowing. I
ier now uot to a harrow that goes
the field in order to prepare the ground
for the seed, but a harrow which goes
after the seed is Bown, lest the
birds pick up the seed, sinking it
down into the earth so that it, can take
root. You know n harrow. It is made
of bars of
other, and the underside of each bar is
furnished with sharp teeth, and when
the horses are hitched to it, it g«>es
d leaping across the field,
driving tlie seed down into the
•th until it springs up in the
harvest. Bereavement,
sedition ere the
Bed
earing
per
■ i.l:
the gospel truth into
your heart. These
3-ou lienid »0 years ago, they have not
affected :
to
truths tiiat
nt il recently. Some
fiadl j
1 Is on
I, and the

ret in, and it has
ï (loti mean in tills
a century there
•hed, tut a great,
d do result, 'ih
lid panic to u harrow
t that hm
great trouble
truth was harrt
come up. What'
try in 1857?
thé gospel ï
deal of it prodi# u »»8ter.
Wall
■ï >'p
God harnessed a
of commercial i
went dowr
Wall street, dow
Third street,
up State w
avenue, and up
until the whole
u Third street, and
>wn Statu street,
i down 1*
!
a avenue,
to pieces
been before. What
? A great awaken
e ftO ),000 souls
Lord.
ns it had
followed the h:
ing in which thl
brought into the
No harrow,
! kingdo
> 1 1
op.
k, in grace as in the
I be u reaping. Many
of religion as tl
of economics or in
*xpect to reap in the
! Now is the time
p the joy of the
a tills morning, this
ght. If you have not
s you would like to
for whut you have,
•e. y
>seph,
?h
f»Ti m. there
Christians speak
•e a mattei
it
mrance. They
next world. Oh,
to reap. Gathni
Christian religh
afternoon, this n
much grace :
, thank Hot
and pray for mm
slaved than J
bled th
scourged than
amid the rattlin;
the gloom of i
the horror of
umphed in the
weakest
se trou
David,
_ Paul. Yet,
f of fetters, and amid
lunguons. and amid
shipwreck, they tri
grace of God. The
i tho house to-day
of spiritual joy all
u not go and reap it?
roanlng over your in
Wl.yrto yn ty ye»™. Now, give
your eman ci pa
l have it so hard; you
se. You wonder why
ble keeps revolving
»1, turning and turn
Vhand on the crunk.
8 is the grindst«
o sharpen your sickle.
Wake up! Take off
tacles, your blue spec
fit spectacles. Pull up
y bur mouth as far
To t he fields!
i
lias 600 acres
ripe.
You have been g
(trinities for thp.
round shottt^
yr*
tion. Y
might have it w»
litis great cold ta
through your soi
ing with a blac
All, that troub'
which you
To the fields!
your green spec
indes, your blac
the corners of
you pull them
Heap! Reap!
Agaiu, I
farming, there
I tell you bluutl
the farmer
ark, i
a time for threshing,
that is death. Just
vith a flail beats the
straw, so death teats
je body. Every sick
t of theft °* ^l 10 ** ,l l*' an( l tAie
hreshipg floor. What,
th to a good
■ it out of the straw?
f aged
f
wheat
the soul out of
iy
is a stroll
sick bed is the tl
has fallen
say you, ia dea
taking the whel :8terda y y°«
That is all. An f? rch playoff with his
asleep. Only y J^ alual y he received the
in the sunny pf 0 this world. He bade
grandchildren. *J' b y to his old friends.
to leu\ft urries tbe tidings, and
ins the kindred come,
the face
ndfather. Brush back
his brow; it will
in. But him away in
He will not
message
a pleasant good
The telegraph I
on swift rail tr
to look
wanting
of dear old gn!
the gray hairs 'M ie t°mb.
; never ache agal* 1 n Ufkt. Grandfather
the slumber of tl ? f anything. He will
Ing of the resurrec
s always the
or lTHs voice has already
Grand fa tf doxology..of Heaven.
rays did sing in church,
ly in thut? No. The
be afraid of tha{
never afraid
rise in the in
tion.
wirst to rise.
her
mingled in th
l(lrandfatheral.S hu . of the
Anything ghast,
•threshing of t
straw. That is
all.
folds a lamb In his
tie child filled all the
inusic, and her toys
p and down the stairs
hem. What if the hand
Lr-<fclocks out of the
£lt will w
L What if the voice
P iu the home is still?
lernul hosanna. Put
Ipe hand, a red
>pda wreath of orange
; the white flower
V red flower for the
/the orange blossoms
Lif! "'fir ctolfriiMfi
The Saviour I
bosom. The litl
house with her 1]
scattered all u J
just as she left t|
that plucked fo
meadow is still?
.eternal triumph,
'that made
lt will sing the
a white rose in
in tlie
it.
Two
the other hand, a
blossoms
the bl
for the victory, tS
Saviour's sacrifice
<■», nol The
• shut The
ghastly al», mà
went down fnff
wheat thresh©
tl
mt of the straw,
sleep," said a
"Deur Lord, gi
dying boy, the sob of one of my elders,
"dear Lord, givaftne sleep." And he
closed his eyessaud awolce in glory.
.Henry W. Longfellow,
of condolence
iting a letter
those those parents,
said: "Those liit words were beauti
fully poetic." f And Mr. Longfellow
knew what is poetic. "Dear Lord, gi
sleep."
of
its
in wrath
day;
the earth
In cruelty,
That tlie reaper
Aud
the (tower
way.
So it may be with us when
is all done. " 1 tear Lord, give me sleep. "
j thought to present
I have
I have spoken ol the plowing, of the
sowing, of the harrowing, of the reap
ing, of the threshing. I must
speak a moment of tlie garnering.
Wlmt is the garner*? Need I tell
you? Oh,
bo muny have gone out
circles—yea. fr
fr
your
have had your
that gurner for many a year.
» some of them -
ffuring, thej
your
family, that y
eyes
What a hard li
Gethsemanes of
sweat great drop's of blood. They took
the "
to their hot 1$; s and they cried:
it be possible, lot this cup pass from
With torfgues of burning agony
they cried: "O' Lord, deliver uiy soul!"
But they got |>
it. Garnered! Tjieir te
away; their battles all ended; tlieii
burdens lifted./ Garneredl The Lord
of the lu&rvesU
sheaves to perif
ueitîd! Some
had!
d they put it
of tr«. kubliug
"It
of
it. They ull got
dped
will not allow those
li in tlie equinox. Gar
remember, on the
put on tlie
ted the
farm, thut the i heaves
top of the rack which
wagon, and tlu se sheaves were piled
higher and hi| her, and after awhile
the horses start'd for the barn,
these sheaves s rayed to and fro in the
wind, and the c Id wagon creaked, and
tlie hors
a struggle, and pulled
p in loops
d
so hard the liar
of leather
the front whe<
door of the bar i it seemed
less came
heir backs, aud when
l struck the elevated
if the
load would gtt no further, until the
workmen gave« a great shout, and then
with one last tremendous strain, the
horses pulled u tlie load; then they
uuhurues sud, and forkful after
foraful of grairfi fell into the
O, my friend:
may be a pull,
pull; but thesi
go in. The L<
promised it.
coming to the
garner. Tlie t
soul sway to i
death, and tlie
the load, and i
floor of tlie ce
if It
struggle, until
the voices of o'
getting to Heaven
) hard pull, a very hard
sheaves are bound to
rd of tlie harvest lias
i the loud- at lust
of the heavenly
n aves of the Christian
ud fro in the wind of
old body creaks under
s the loud strikes tlie
lestial garner, it seems
.) further. It is ti e last
of angels and
r departed kindred and
voice of God shall send
ing into the eternal tri
l up and dc
: "liar
,«=
Moor
he vo!
the welcoming
the harvest roll
pli, while a
the sky
t home! hsr
the cry is hear«
vest hornet"
kite for the. presidency
lied as Mr. Bryan has
uot lost his temper and
I with liis effective talks
The slanderers are not
their object.— N. Y.
No candi
mall
;
been, hut he ha
goes right uhe
to the |vople.
•coimilishing
e another of those 1890
♦ts turns up. poor Maj.
that invented
-Kvery tii
free coinage let
McKinley utfiraç
ftoe
d ink.—ABlbuny Argus.
CAS 3?
Pf*t
The fie
limits
signature
—^ la on
wrapper.
CASITORIA
For Info
lits and Children.
stalls
signature
wrapper.
Is
of
the
has
tills
•a
1 !
o
*
' <(jrv*
I
;
$({
>'p
rv
L \1
u
!
'A
(
hi
8
V!
fa
:
-
Before
Retiring....
take Ayer's Pills, and you will
sleep better and wake in better
condition for the day's work.
Ayer's Cathartic Pills have
equal as a pleasant and effect
ual remedy for constipation,
biliousness, sick headache, and
all liver troubles.
no
They are
sugar-coated, and so perfectly
prepared, that they cure with
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in the use of so many of the
pills on the market. Ask
druggist for Ayer's Cathartic
Pills.
3 r our
When other pills won't
help you, Ayer's is
THE PILL THAT WILL

. L;
P
Fifty Years Ago.
This is the cradle in which there prevr
That thought of a philanthropic brain;
A remedy that would make life
For the multitudes that were racked
with pain.
'Twas sarsaparilla, as made, you know
By Ayer, some 50 years ago.
Is
of
her
Ayer's Sarsaparilla
cite
at
was in its infancy half a cen
tury ago. To-day it doth "be
stride the narrow world like a
colossus." What is the secret
of its power? Its cures 1 The
number of them ! The wonder
of them! Imitators have fol
lowed it from the beginning of
its success. They are still be
hind it. Wearing the only*
medal granted to sarsaparilla
in the World's Fair of 1893,
it points proudly to its record.
Others imitate thô remedy;
they can't imitate the record:
top
in
to
but
few
as
inent
5o Years of Cures.
REVOLUTIONARY MONUMENTS
r,l. to Hl.torlo M.IRoriM I'll
lod at Bprlnx0.l<l, N. J.
Orang-D. N. Oct. 30.—Thu old town
Two Kot
demonstration yesterday
monuments wer
•lien twe
to
as
in
died by the New
dety of the Sous of the
One
Jersey
American
monument iu the old Revolutionary
;nter of the
Revolution.
burying ground in tlie
village, and tlie other a huge bowlclei
the higest point of Hobart hill, ir
of Short Hills, where it it
the r
claimed the minute gun "Old Sow" w
flred. A
immense crowd gathered,
including tlie various chapters of the
Sons - of tlie American Revolution,
Daughters of the American Revolution,
Society of Colonial Wars, and members
of the New Jersey Historical
The crowd assembled first in the old
cemetery, where a granite monument,
eight feet high, hud bee
its face is tbe Inscription
ory of the Patriots Who Fell a<t Spring
After the cere*
•iety.
•ted. On
"To the Mein
*. 23, 1780."
field,J
monies of the unveiling of tho u
•nt the assembly the
the old Presbyterian church, erected in
the Hite of the old church
The
•d to
.ljour
1791,
burned by tlie British iu 1730.
church was handsomely decorated. A
large portrait of Gen. Washington,
wer the pul
sleets were
ded with flags, hung
pit, and old
stacked
•my
side of the pulpit,
•antion and singing
«il ln-r
After prayer,
of "The Star Spangled Banner," the
invited guests were drive
Hill,
"Old Sow" stood a huge bowlder weigh
ing three tons had bee
from Battle hill,
Hobart
Summit. On the site where
placed, lt
In
1777. On the
Washington camped i
side of tlie bowlder is a bronze tablet
hearing tlie inscription "1770,—Here,
revolution
ï of the Amerie
stood the signal beacon and by its side
the cannon known as the 'Old Sow,'
which in time of danger and invasion
summoned tlie patriotic Minute Men of
this vicinity to the defence of tlie
country and tlie repulse of the invader.
This monument is erected by the New
Jersey Society of the Sons of the
American Revolution and dedicated to
the memory of the patriots of New
Jersey—1890."
in the ti
POSTMASTERS TO BE REMOVED.
Tlie Dominion Go
»Ive 1
Midp.
Montreal, Oct. 20.—The Dominion
government has decreed that "every
citizen has the right of the free
the postoffices and of all departments;
the postottice must be kept exception
ally free from all political partisan
ship." This, it is learned, will be
lived up to, and within a few days the
dismissal of twenty Quebec postmas
ters for having shown offensive parti
sanship will be announced. I
It is stated, has action been take
eept upon clear proof. One postmas
ter was chairman of a committe«,
other allowed matter passing through
the mail to be opened and conservative
campaign sheets to be inserted, when
it was sealed up and again for
warded. One postmaster lbfused shel
liberal candidate during a
storm, and told him: "Y
of
tel
sleep
with the pigs;'' while another, noticing
a letter from the liberal candidate to
the liberal committeemen, retained it
for five days, finally delivering it
the day of election, unfortunately for
himself forgetting that the dating
stamp would cause his detection. These
are some»of the eases to which the axe
will be applied.
Dangero um Derelict Taimed at Sea.
Boston, Oct. 20.—Capt. Weiss of tha
British steamer Belgian Queen, fri
Antwerp, reports that on Oct. 10 the
steamer pussed a portion of tlie wreck
of a vessel standing well out of the
water, lt had apparent^' been a long
time in that condition. The wreck
is a dangerous obstruction in the line
of trans-Atlantic steamers.
OASTORIA.
^nile
ilmton
I
every
/ wrapper
cf
FLURRY IN WHEA 1
Excitement on the New York and
Chicago Exchanges Continues.
SIGNS OF A SPEEDY COLLAPSE
Tlie
ill
«1 by •
ip«»
»I»
Kug
laud—c
d
Are
Ne ï
^ ork, Oct. 20.-—The big jump
in wheat and the
consequent excite*
the exchange drew crowds
of interested spec ta tors to the visit
ors' gallery yesterday
again on
the outside public
<1 41iey are
band to-day. Apparently
are being tempted
the speculation in wheat but gen
conservallvo feeling is
ong the professionals. The
small •■scalping" trade
callv withdrt
int
ernlly
evident
have prneti
, tin* pace of flucLua
pid for them. The
i being t<
remarkable advance
terduy o
tit
ms started yes
advices from Englund of a
there in the
ts per bushel, and the bull move
us at once intensified
d vigor, developing cyclonic
'lus
to 10
,n.
force
tende
hich previous activities
were comparatively summer breezes.
During the first ho
great activity
nt dominated all the grain
:pt oaf*;), but
»deration. Prices started
with the hurdle leap of to 4>4 cents
per bushel advance over Saturday's
•guliti* closing prices. December
@83)$
1 excite
•kets (e
tr
pored with
at 8ü M @85 ft and
later "curb,"
the
•as checked back hésita
tingly to 85 %, the
inadc
did
. These change
ten minutes,
the trading quieted s
"•a;.
occurred
in less tl
Thereafter
î whut, but
•rvous and
sertaiu,
icasional spurt* of buying and
ding prices in upward flights
the whole closed
vith
selling,
or downwards* but
with
asier tendency.
Early in the
considerable realizing
selling, but the offerings were
freêly absorbed in
and
day th
a mysterious
e wanted and rapid bids and
quick upward slid
o resisting the
ay
sales followed
ing scale. There
•gent, and vigorous advance,
•se easily and
eut prie
ithout effort, dilfer
being paid at
; time. On the
business in wheat, while
nervous and active, was not of large
volume.
i aud the
•hole, the total
intensely
Kxclteinei
t ou tho Gillen
Chicago, Oct. 20.—The grain'market
Is still excited to-day over the
breaking jump made by wheat yester
day caused by advices from Liverpool
of a big ndv
her option
ice in wheat there. Dec
hich closed
Saturday
: 'n . opened yesterday at78H aô79V.
steadying at the latter figure,
vanoe of 3 M
cite
at
a.I
tento. The wildest tw
in t characterized the trading.
•eaetion to 79 I)e
went beyond tho
top figures at the opening, touching
high as 79*
in the first (Iftcei
business. Just before 10
•ket took u sudden drop downward
After
cemher wheat
»notary
irai times
rith
minutes of
.. the
to 7
after i() a.
. reacting later to 78%
Just
.. the price receded to 78%,
•ket
but ut thut point the
sharply upward again, and
few minutes advanced
ithîn a
full cent to
During the excite
Opening sonie trades w
as 79>tf, while sales at the s
tiler parts of the pit
figures, ranging all the way to 7t
At to a. in. thp price was 78« 4 ' Deec
ber, but at this point another
per bushel advance wa»
before the tickers
?nt at the
made as high
inent in
to
recorded. Al
could plae ? the
the brokers'
figures
rc a ^ c>e8 '. ^ Ie quota tion iiad
the tape i
I
, (
?nts a bushel added
ithin
sent of four
to the vulue of the cereal
a-single hour. Just before 11 o'clock
the market fell fi
as it hud risen, dropping a cent almost
in a straight line to 78&. Tho ruling
; rapidly
79*«.
ire
'
price at 11 a. m.
December. At l p. in., fifteen minutes
before the close, wheat was quoted at
77%. The decline continued during
the final quarter of an hour. Just be
fore the bell struck December
77%, and the last quotation for May
bid, IX higher than the close
Df Saturday. Coin and oats
affected by the wheat excitement.
oh HoHoi.il.llng War
8
London, Oct. 20.—The Times com
menting to-day upon the state of the
London market says that the rise in
the price of wheat in America caused
something resembling consternation,
and when the American opening cables
re received there w
is not usually seen except in time of
\ The paper adds that the advance
appears to be chiefly due to the sale of
Amerie
frightened the speculators a great deal.
scene such
•heat for India, which

(slmt Himself Through the II«
London, Conn., Oct. 20.—Alex
ander F. Maison, 00 years old, commit
ted suicide yesterday afternoon in P
bleton's undertaking rooms by shoot
ing himself through the heart. He had
resided at Quaintance cottage in Pe
quot colony in a fashionable section of
the city all summer,
his wife having been Miss Mary Ward.
They lived in easy circumstances, his
wife having Inherited mofiey and lie
had some
hisufflictic
Ne
married,
He w
s. The doctors declare
elaneliolia.
National Ft
rat Cc
igress.
Boston. Oct. 20.—At tlu*, request of
of North Carolina to name
the gove
two representatives, Acting-Governor
Wolcott has requested I'rof. Fred L.
Sargent of Harvard university and
Miss Dora Williams of the Boston Nor
delegates from
Massachusetts at a national floral
to be held in Asheville, N. 0.,
ul school to act
gress
October 21.
and 9.%.
Appointment f*»r «autel Mn*
Washington. Oot. 20.—Attorney Gen
kas appointed Daniel Mu
gone *of Ogdensburg, N. Y., formerly
collector of customs of New York,
special assistant United States district
attorney for tho northern district of
a
eral Harm«
Ï "i'l'
Ne
New Jersey Legislative No
PlanUcld, N. J., Oct. 20.—At the
democratic convention of Somerset
county, held at Somerville, George
Cramer of Brenehbitrg was nominated
for senator, and William P. Logan of
Bridgewater for assembly?"""
Treasury Goltl Deellnea.
Washington, Oct. 20.—The treasury
golil reserve at tho opening of busi
ness to-day had declined to »12 1,787,201.
Yesterday's withdrawals at New York
were »388,3 'A
it
Tuffs Pills
Cure All
Liver Ills.
To those living
in malarial districts Tutt's Tills
are indispensable, they keep the
system in perfect order and are
an absolute cjire
for sick headache, indigestion,
malaria, torpid liver, constipa
tion and all bilious diseases.
Tutt's Liver Pills
MODES! CLAIMS OF SlI.VÉftltEÔ.
C<
We have
dona directed
vugum claii
if slates and
1 1 ic
to the ext ï
Lt)
le by Hie repu bllea
I vdtea wherewith they
profess that they expect,
in the white house. The;
iformly
elect
peet,
land
Hoi
claii
have been
out
r that argument in connection;
of the question;
they de
rage
with them
the
ly wny to treat tl
to laugh at
the last two
theiDi.
Withli
three days,
of the free
however. I he
présentât!
oy have tried their hand
• buslne
diver de
at the si
. and they have
compiled
tnknhle modesty
list which, from its
Is
and conservatism^
must challenge the respect of the
publicans themselves. Here is the roll
of «
s with their electoral votes
which they pto
safe" for the Brv
be "absolu tely
and Sewnll ticket :
Alabama
.. 11
Arkansas
California
Colorado .
Florida ...
Georgia ...
Idaho.
Kansas ...
Kentucky
slana
Mississippi
Missouri ..
Montana .
a j
*
s
i 1
13
I
"
17
3
4 I
o ;
2 I
Nevada .
North Carolina.
North Dakota...
Oregon .
South Carolina.
South Dakota.
Tennessee .
Texas .
Utah .
Virginia .
Washington.
Wyoming .
3
II
" 12
j j
_ J
203
Total
_
203
Total ..
That is, without exception, the most
have hitherto
side;
"likely" list Hint
compiled
states thut a
the free silv
claimed in it
me of (hem, strongly bimetallic, and
here is not any re
of the
the'
to doubt but
will help the
its road to vlc
hat
•cry
leinoeratio ticket
ory.
Two things will be observed in the
ist that
; striking. The
thing
s that, contrary to all preceiients in
inch cases, a claim is not made /or the
full 224 votes which constitute n major-'
ty of the electoral college vote; and the
« of the big
>ther thing is that not
Jtatea of New York, G'nio, Illinois
Indiana is claimed, although the
mJttec lias good reason to believe that
all of the three last named will go for
Bryan.
The 20 states included in the above
(able
to be supplemented by the,
jther four states, of Delaware with
three,votes, Maryland with eight votes,
Minnesota with nine votes; anil the
previous 203 votes which thedepiocrntio'
committee pronounce to be "absolutely
wife" for Bryan, swelled by the 20 fur-'
(her votes of the four states just
named, which the committe pronounce
to be "reasonably certain" for the free
silver ticket, will give the 224 votes
necessary to elect, with five to spare.
But while the committee give out,
this list of states and electoral votes
as the list on which they expect to win,
they do not by long oddB convey an Ir->
lima tion, or
idea, that these are all the states that,
the democrats are likely to
contend trim the Bryan ticket bus a
thoroughly good lighting chahee in
:s. Indiana and Michigan, and a'
poorer chance in Ohio and Iowa. New
York,
la
squint toward the
•y. They
[Hi
ing to the detestable treach'
Hill, who cold-biood
•cessfully "queered" tBe
en tion, the
to have abandoned alto
cry of Sena
edly hut
democratic state
ifttre
get her. just
like Blackburn and Gorman have done.
But
green-eyed politicians
t York is not necessary
to deinocrntic success, its loss may be
•lnpluted with equunimitv; tlie
free silver ticket will win i
without its assistance.--N. O. Times
canter
I
( faii;jiïïnüph .SijlEiwMGiW
,
THE VITAL POINT.
by
for a Uovcrniui
Shall
cy 1
The Afnericau people will s
the polls and decide the issues thut
ire now dividing them. The most
spicuous of these bw
wfliich the
ing than about ull others, is the money
question. But inqxirtant
tion is, the
deeper moment to this
supreme issue liefore the republic is:
' Shall this nation be ruled by ita
pro
* about
, Ibe
rlting
d talk
ie
that ques
thcr of incalculably
public. The
money
On tlie
side we hove McKinley,
backed by the concentrated wealth of
the country. Kvery trust
clnss legislation in tbe interest of the
rich and influential confers the privi
lege of taxing the masses for private
cry syndicate that has made,
3lies to make, millions by raiding
treasury of the United .State«;
pitul that seca
hich
profit ;
lu>
the
every combination of
itself in the contraction of the
who has
gain
every rich
tk"> think that the government
for the benefit of hlm
should be
self and others like him—every one
>f t hose elements is striving for the
ce; a of the republi
■ i)innl:i.t<'<l wealth of the country is
candidate. The
Good Health X
by the Quart Y
ry bottle you take of Johnston's Sarsaparilla
i better health, and every bottle contains a
It makes better blood—purer blood. For
thirty years this famous remedy has been creating
and maintaining good health.
Eve
means
quart.
*
builds up the
S stem,tonee
e nerve®,
and strength
ens the raus
cle s
Johnston's
Sarsaparilla
A
»
I
ore
promptly and effectually than any other remedy
known. The pallor of the cheek disappears, energy
takes the place of languor, and the rich color of
health flows to the cheeks. Unequaled for all dis
orders of the stomach and liver, and for all weaken
ing complaints of men, women, and children.
per fall quart bottle.
Sold everywhere.
WILLIAMS, DAVIS. BROOKS & CO., Detroit. Hich.
e $i.
HV^M! Liveretten Cure Sick Headache and Blliousneas. ȀC.
Bold by 8 L Kenney, Laù el, Di 1
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By the wonderful new? patented system, the BOOK-KEEPING TEXT-BOOK IS
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Illustrated catalogues Issued In the world mailed FREE. Write for It. Graduates
aided to positions. SELF-SUPPORT quickly given through mir SHORT Courses.
H. g. OOLDEY. Principal of GoMey Wilmington Commercial and Shorthand
College, Wilmington. Dei.
The past
ladles)
ib«'
the NEW ROCHESTER LAMP
THE STANDARD OF THE WORLD
is good THE ROCHESTER
itaiionfi, lack the peculiar
uine. Look for the NEW ROCHESTER stamp.
Other lamps msy b« " Hke " or "
but like all In
Ik las
Aï*' No Smoke, No Smell, No Broken JChimneys.
ivable design and finish, for all lighting
, to compete with any.
WHY BE CONTENT WITH ANY BUT THE BEST ?
Made in every co
or heating purposes, and at prices
I1ANQUET . ThleNo.310II.IIF.ATF.lt.
LAMP, height30 inches, oom- t height 2SW inches| will heat e
Iilete with Silk Shade of any t room 10x18. Neat and attract
lor desired ; base and head
tsssss
older) flnished In
recisipt o?" prtoa, RUT
, ?8o.
08-Page Art Catalogue t
42 Park Place and
37 Barclay Street.
receipt of prloo, |4.
$3.80.
The Rochester Lamp Co.
New York City

\ Cram pa
\ Colio,
\ Cold »,
DIARRHOtA, DYSENTERY,
and all SO WEI, COMPLAINTS.
A Sure, Safe, Quick Cure for UM*e
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Croup, \ X
CoughaA 3 l
Tooth- \
«•»•.V î :
FainKiUer
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r»ed Internally mad Externally. % \
Two Size*, 25c. and Me. bottle«.
O AMK). ■ «> $
working by every means, fair and foul,
for the election of McKinley.
On the other side
Is
have Bryan,
and
whose only strength Is his ca.
IlJ thopiI f. ILis appeal 1 a straight to the
people
stands, fle asks
the principles for which he
quarter from the
He defies selfish wealth and
:
trusts.
Hm I tenges It to exert to the utmost it*
to corrupt, to coerce and to
11
a j fu«e tlie issue by controlling the voice
* of the press. He begs for no man'»
s vote who does not think it beet for the
country to give it to him. He urges
t he people to study the questions at iB
ond then vote as their knowledge
di«rects. His is a brave, a frank, a rü/
nly and a truly American
1
"
3 tionul, a
appeal.
Bryan speaks for the> weJfairje of th«
4 I industrious many; McKinley for the
; welfare of the opulent few.
I Is there a thoughtful man in the
whole United States who does nol
that the greatest danger which
3
k
j is threatening this republic is th«
J Bteadily growing power of conactence
; Iw*» money? Does not every thought
feel that unless the grip ol
government ahall t*
e must ultimately have tf
oligarchy ir.
wealth upon
loosened
republic in traîne and
fact ?
Citizens equally honest differ sincere
the currency question. Silvef
think the single gold Standard a
potent cause of
gold
increase rather than lesson that dis
tress. But honest Americans should
Ihj agreed in believing that a presiden
tial election carried by the trusts and
syndicates, under the leadership of
Mark Hanna, would be immeasurably
more disastrous and dishonoring to the
United States than the retention or In
troduction of any monetary system.
Kvery oitizen before he goes to
tlui bo/lot box will, if he be intelligent
and patriotic, ask himself the vital
question:
"Shall I vote for government by men,
for government by money?"— N. Y.
Journal.
iy
industrial distress;
fhink that bimetallism would
-——-Mr.' Hanna begaji his career as the.
manager of a political trust by saddling
McKinley with his syndicate ; he fol
lowed this by saddling the republican
national convention with McKinley, and
crowned his work by saddling the
publican party with a crushing load of
millionai
defiance of public decency and popular
sun timen t into which the syndicate boss
has led the republican party has
been equaled in the history of politics,
republleans realize their blunder
. They would give much to be rid
of tlieir mortgaged candidate and his
political r eceivers.—fet. Loui s Republic.
——The Binghamton Republican
act of 1873 to prove that tho
currency has a
"gold backing." The silvef dollar has
been standing up since 1873. Prior to
1873 it stood up, too, but between these
two periods it had
currency. What held up the silver dol
la r from 1792 to 1893 ?—Bingthamton '
finance committee«. The
.
The
quotes
silver dollar in
standing In tfho
New York, Oct. 20.—The board ôî
managers of the Joint Traffic associa-
tion has instituted a boycott against
the Toledo, St. Louis *fe Kansas City
railway, commonly called the "Clover
to all lines in the association not to
issue tickets
the Clover Leaf, and also not to accept
tickets issued
the Clover Leaf. The boycott covers
only passenger business at present. It
is alleged that positive evidence of cut
ting of passenger rates by tlie Clover
Leaf has been obtained.
check baggage
baggage checked by
New TurkUh Minister at
Washington, Oct. 20.—The
kish minister, Mustapha Tahsin Bey
•ived in Washington yesterday after
. Mavroyenl Bey, his predecessor,
who has been here since March, 1887,
leave for ,
Tur
is exceedingly anxious
home at the earliest opportunity and
he has arranged to present his succes
to Secretary Olney to-day before
the cabinet meeting. If possible the
formal presentation to the president
will be made to-morrow.
Metl.oilUt Amerlou) Uuiver«Uy.
Oot. 20,—The pro
•elses at the lay
corner stone of the
Washington,
gramme of the
ing of the
Hall of History, the first building
of the American university (Methodist)
in this city to-morrow afternoon has
been completed. Owing to a previous
engagement to attend the sesqui
tennial celebration of Princeton, Presi
' dent Cleveland will ndt be present

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