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Holiday journal. (Wilmington, Del.) 1879-1879, November 26, 1879, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053077/1879-11-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1879.
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PICTURE FRAMES.
We tunk« «Im best Frame*.
Have the latest stylen.
And nell Ik« I licn|>«-at.
"Wähnt. 1 rames ns low a« 8 cts. each.
The cheapest Mottoe Frames in the
city.
All kinds o Fancy Pi-per and Scrap
Pictures for Chiistmus ornaments
_
has JUBfi* FFrRiVEl ^another NEiv in
—AT—
REEDS
SECOND STREET, ob. ORANGE.
All kinds of Picture Frames to order.
S. H. STAATS,
405 MARKET STREET,
Voten OF MISSUS'
FAHCY HOSIERY,
-IN
New and Beautiful Designs,
Also a full lino of
©liova», ©laves» ©laves»
—AND—
MERINO UNDERWEAR
FOR
Ladies, gents and misses.
Also an elegant stock of
'Fancy Buttons,
Black Silk Frinccs,
Coat Ornaments,
Corsets, Zephyrs,
Woolen Yarns,
Notions. & 0 .&C,
ri.
-J..
(by name)
Has The Old
Store,
No. 5 East Fourth St.
One Door Above H. F. Pickles.
Where 1 have pul in a com
plete Slock of Fine
Wobk Baskets
Work Basket*
Wobk Stands
Work Stands
Fancy Baskets
Fancy Baskets
Of all kinds just the thing fo r
Christmas Pressât
also a lartjc lot of
Toy s.
DOLLS BXPRESS WAGONS
DOLLS BXPRESS WAGONS
VEL08TPEDE8
VELO SI PEDES
TOY WAGONS FROM ßots to $450.
This 8tore is devote d to all kinds of
Holiday Goods.
«•There will also be fonnd at my *
other Store No. 403 King Street a
large assortment of Wood and Willow
Ware also Tin and Brash Goods.
Il SUOFMjîAFjR,
WORKING TWO WAYS.
;
WILLIS GltfllELK.
Ï FRETTY end is this of your
love dreams," said Miss Lydia
%. Lyel, severely. "Mairied only c
twelve- months, and loi \ find you dis
solving in tears like a modern Niobe
or an April snowdrift."
"It's very foolish of me, I dare suy,"
assented Mrs, Percy Essex, with spurk
ÜDg eyes and a suppressed quiver in
her voice. "But you must not chide
j me, Lydia, I
; Miss Lydia frowned tragically.
"I huvo no sympathy for people who
are eternally whimpering," said she.
Mrs Essex lmng her head, and toyed
nervously with the fringe of her scar
let wool breakfast shawl. She was a ;
rose-cheecked, dimpled little matron,
i with dark, pzure-gray eyes, a small,
heart-shaped month, and hair of a
dull chestnut brown, twisted in n sort
of a coronal about her head.
i M
d happy."
•'Oomo, now, leave oil orying," ad
ded Miss Lyel, who was a severe look
ing tpineter in a dress of mouse-co
lored serge with a string of Roman
j gold beads about her throat, and a
voice liko the rev rberations of dis
tant artillery, "and tell me the cause
of all this tearfulness. I'm a veritable
old mother confessor, 'you know."
But Violet Essex's head only drop
ped the lower, and a vivid coloring
suffused her cheeks.
,
,
j
" No more silly nonsense, now,"
burst in Miss Lydia again. "Hold up
what ails you,
your head und tell
and how it came about. I'll stake my
bead that Percy's at the bottom of the
whole affair,"
Percy 's wife assented by the iule
of silence.
"No doubt he's grown penurious, or—
or dictatorial, may-bo."
"Oh, no!"
"Or dissipated, or extravagant, or
even unkind."
"No."
• Perhaps he's jealous of you."
"Jealous of me—my Percy?" And
Mrs. Essex laughed in spite of her
self.
"Well, what ails you, then?" de
manded Mies Lydia, completely non
plussed.
"I scarcely know myself," admitted
Mrs. Essex, "except that I
unhappy, and that Peroy has changed
very greatly since
"It is the usual way with
dear." commented Miss Lydia, dolor
ously.
"To be sure, I don't expect him to
be a lover always;" pursued Mrs.
Essex. "But I oertainly do expect him
to treat me as well as he does other
women' and not ignore me entirely
when in their presence."
"The. same old, old story!" put in
Miss Lyel.
"I have borne his indifference all
vt-i-y
marriage."
» my
*
along," continued Mrs. Essex, "uutil
last uipht, when at Agatha Gainaboro's
soiree, his actiona were so pronounced
ns to be nolioeable. There I sat stowed !
corner liko a piece of old
furniture, while he flirted and danced
and promenaded with that hateful Su
Hanne Pritchard, in her ruby silk and
old cameos to set olï her dark, oriental
beauty, and hide her faded com
plexion and the crowsfeet under her
eyes. And oh, Lydia-! you don't know
how mortifying it was to ait there in
that odd corner, and listen to old Mrs
General MuGrail, who is as good as
any newspaper in town, tell a select
ootcrio of her friends how Percy and
Miss Pritchard had been betrothed
once upon a time, and would have
been husband and wife ere this tout
for a foolish lover's -quarrol that
estranged and seperated them."
"Decidedly humiliating," said Miss
Lydia, contracting her straight brows
"Just what I thought mvaelf," said
Mrs. Essex.
away
"And told him I hope."
"Oh, yes; bat only to have him say
Mrs. Generul MeGrail waö an old fool,
And that I was unreasonable and ex
pected too much."
"Unreasonable fiddlestioks!" said
Miss Lydia, shortly. "It's nothing
more nor less than brutality in him,
my dear, and You're a very great goose
to submit to his tr eatment, to say
nothing of crying about it."
"But what can I do?" asked Mrs.
Eesex, piteously.
"A great many things," said Miss
Lydia, epigram uiutic lly.
"I'm not the person to make trouble
between husband »ud wife," said Miss
Lyel, after a moment's hesitation;
"nut if I were in yuuc plaoe, I'd play i
my recreaut lord a game of 'tit lor ^
tat.' la other
1
•a, t'd do precisely
what he docs, and it Le didn't cry for
quarter within a Week's time, I've «
wrong estimate of his sex."
* T— I—don't quite understand you. "
said open-eyed VioleJ,
"Don't you?" said Miss Lydia,
"bear, dear! what a little stupid you
are, to be sure! 1 mean when Peroy
flirts do you flirt J when Percy dances
do you dance, and when Peroy promen
ades or does anything else question
able, do you likewise."
Mrs.Essex wiped her eves and stared
hard at Miss Lydia.
"But—it would be unwomanly."
"Only so far as it is unmanly in him.
My dear, there is a certain threadbare
old saying worth a thousand of your
new-fangled axioms: It's a poor rale
that won't work two ways,' I think it
suits the case admirably."
"I believe I will attempt it," said
Mrs. Essex.
And that, very night at the Bigelow
"German," when Mr. Essex and Miss
Pritchard were leaning against a
variegated marble column in one of
[TO UK CONTINUED OX «ITH
)
!
The Model
TAILOR STORE.
Wo claim, for this establish
ment nil that the name indi
cates, it. has for its foundatioi
XXTEXISJVCX
XXA 7ICR 7y AML n r
AJVX MIS XXI /.
We have built upon this
foundation commencing with
a few -samples until we have
a complete
MERCHANT TAILORIN'* i
ESTABLISHMENT.
Well stocked with all desi
rable goods.
i
^
FERB CARSON
MERCHANT TAILOR
No. 233 Market Street.
The Great Rush
that has been and still continiu-a at the
BOSTON
1 fflirç jjriu
«J T
HOUSE,

is indicative of several
tint facts. It
very essen -
ans that the people
know just where to obtain 'the best
bargains for the {cast Money. In
raaaus that this house by its fair
and honorable dealing has now the
r^nnnation of being the Leading
V tv thing House of Delaware.
They have on exhibition the
largest and moat varied line of
Overcoats & Ulsters
ever offered in this city.
greatest wonder and novelty in tho
Clothing lino is the
Heavy Russian Ulsters
they arc offering for $5.00—to suit
The
The custom department connect
ed with this house has made a
sweeping reduction in its prices.
The furnishing department con
tains everything in its lino, and
many boautifnl thing* suitable for
the Christmas Holidays.
fawton ©iic frire
Clothing House,
namut g?.
Y- E- HOLMES, 2W

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