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Holiday journal. (Wilmington, Del.) 1879-1879, December 17, 1879, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053077/1879-12-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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Uà^ ••..♦ . .■
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1879.-NQ. 4.
-• »
<-f.
"'■' 1
RE FRAMES.
'
W« make tht beat Vramci,
Have the latest Style*, f,
led «sell the Cheapest.
Walnut b rames as low as 8 cts. each.
The cheapest Mottoe Frames in the
aVwV » dity. »O, n&r>I
All kinds ot Fancy Paper snd Scrap
Piotoroe for Cbrietmu omatoenta
—NT—
, — 3r3- 33 33 3ZJ "S
SECOND STREET, «b. ORANGE.
.All kinds of Picture Frames to order.
Cohen,
JTflqrtlmnt g,nilor
AND
PlläftUlr ■ 6 ÏFTTSR,
Cor. 2d <f Marbel Sit.
Suits mtfde to order from $13 and upwards.
Pants *3 aud Upwards. Good nt guaranteed.
Cleaning. Soourfhg
d(
•Ordore
and Dyoing neatly
iceived by mail promptly attented to.
Cor. 2d aud Market streets.
Alio; BINE CLOTHING ON HANDu
one.
I 41
Manufacturer of all kinds of
XXU&XZV WORK,
The largest fthjck of^HAJD GOOD8 lu
ill APR JSWJSLIUf made to order at ths shor
' »test notice,
NO. 613 MARKET STREET.
SHOEMAKER
(BfHAMB)
Has Thb 0m>
riT
Wn&Utt A? Soa?
Store,
No. 5 Eâst Fourth St.
i;if|
i'>
Oue Door Above H. F. Pickles.
Where I /tyre 'pul in a cotn
plele Sloe# of Elfte
Work Bapkrts
Wok* Baskets
Work Stands
Wok* Stands
Fancy Babkdm
Fancy Baskets
Ok all kinds just the thino fob >*><•
Christmas Pressât
Lii; 1 .'I L: dai
also a large lot of
?■ ' Toys. > ■* VI
001.16 SXPRBSB WAOONS VKlOOWTO««
00118 KXPBES3 WAOONS YTOOOIPSDKS
TOÏ WAGONS FROM Bot» to «4.60
'JJhis Store is,devoted to »U kjode pl
Holiday Uoodb.
tffif-There will oieo be found at my
other Store No. 403 king Street a
large asaortmént of Wood and IViflow
Ware also Tin and Brush Goods.
J. II. SlfOEMA&EK,
THÉ HERMIT.
*»iiud brf
BY WM. B. ELSROAD.
T was on , a beautiful day 2n
spring, when the ai
ed with the odor of opened
blossoms, ft-at a merry party of young
grçls gathered in the dell of "the cas
cade." The oasoade was formed by a
stream that leaped over « preoipioe
with a fall of sixty feet, and then, rip
pling through the dell a distance of
half a mile, mingled its waters with
the Mississippi river.
À consultât joü waB held by the girls,
who had become somewhwt wearied
with romping and roaming over hills
and mid« flowers, about the next
soheme fpr amusement, and among the
suggestions was one to vis it the * 'her
mit of the cascade" which was agreed
to; 1 bo, with nervous apprehensions
and whispered remarks, they proceed
ed to make the, visit, i /. , ' ;j
Following a narrow footpath rising
obliquely tip the west bide of the dell,
they gained the mouth of the oave
ocoupied by the hermit. The eninwoe
was covered by what appeared to be
somè kind ot dried skin, And at a short
diatano*' eould nq|t be distinguished
' from the surrounding hillside. Susie
Bell, a dark-eyed hoUri, called to the
hermit, when one side of the cover
ing, was drawn aside, and a face ap
peared at the opening. The owner of
the faoe inquired what was wanted.
Susie replied that they wished to know
their future destinies. The hermit
said,—
"Do you know, young ladiss, that
some destinies are better not known?
Have you thought well on the sub
ject?"
They all answered in the affirmative,
and, after some chatting as to who
should go through the ordeal first,
Susie Bell went forward.
She left his presence with à trou
bled look, and was unusually quiet
the rest of the day.
Eva Manning came next, a meek
and lovely girl of fonrteen. The her
mit gazed on her with a look of
thoughtful inquiry, as if his thoughts
were in the dim past. At length he
said,—
"Your life has been unusually full
of anxiety for one so yopng; but soon
you will experience changes that wift
oonduat your thoughts in a different
channel. A bright and unexpected
futurs is instore for you, and compar é
nionship with one heretofore unknown
to yon." v n
buringhisremarks Eva was
soiously toying with a looket which
she wore on her neckband, becoming
unclasped* it disoiosed •'* faoe of
uncommon beaut^; khd, the hermit,*'
eyes res^j^'ou ifc.tie sprang CSgerlj,
forward, and, taking it from her,
stared with intense earnestness at the
if
pertfum
uucon
factored faoe, and in an agitated
voibe inquired,—
"Who—where did you get this?"
Eva said,—
"My mother gave it me; it is lier
picture."
"What is your mothers name?"
"Fanny Manning,"
"Is your father living?"
"He is not; he died three years ago
in Kansas city."
"Is your mother well?" the hermit
anxiously asked.
"She has been very delicate for two
years," answered the wondering girl.
» "Will you come here again in a day
or two?"
"If my mother can spare me I wil !•"
"What is your name?"
"Eva Manning,"
"Don't; fail to oome soon, if yob*
possible can. Good-by, Eva."
Much amazed the maiden withdrew.
Two or three other girls interviewed
the hermit, and theh all prepared for
their return'home, some with thoughts
confused and strange.
When left Alone, the hermit gaVë
way-WriUay ttenghu W«ft*pwi, tot -J
he had just gazed on the piothred faoe
oil the 6ntf woman he had ever loved
and whose marriage to another, while
he was travelling abroad for hit'
health, had 1 mada him a wanderer on
the faoe of the earth.
Three days . had passed, and the
hermit, whose namo was Gus Worth
ington, not reoeiving a visit from Eve
Manning, beoame restless and uneasy,
knowing that he was near the woman
who was «till dear to him, and he
oould not concentrate his thoughts on
his usual occupations. On the morn
ing of the fourth day Eva made her
appearanoe, but looking more care- 1
worn and sad than usual. She said she
eould not oome sooner, as her mother
was very ill from overwork.
"Are you kept very busy?" asked
the hermit, or Guy, we might say
now, : . j . 1
"Oh, yesl we have to work for our
living by sewing."
"By sewing! Are you so poor?"
"Yes, sir; sinoe papa died we have
had hard timep to gOt'Slong*.""!
"Will you ask your mother if she
would like to see ap old friend, and
be sure and let me Iptew to -morrow?"
•'T- wîir try and do as you wish. I
must go now."
"God bless you, Eva! Good-by."
On Eva's return from her visit tb
the hermit, Mrs. Manning ytfolined on
the sofa. The girl approached her
with noiseless footsteps, and inquired
how she felt.. i >v.y> m ;
"I am not feeling quite weljl, Eve
but I rfm not hneasy about myself. 1
am only tired." 1 V 1 ''— "
"Mamma, wotild-J9ou!lifee to see an
old friend?"
"Att old friend! Whet eld friend,
Ever 7t7 '- .
mtr ( COKTINÜKD ON 2ND FAOH.]
;j
s
-J- ****« ' fi qp 4» . «
1
(I !
The Model
TAILOR STORR
We claim for this establkh
mpnt all that the name indi
cates, it has for its foundation
EXTEXISJYCE
TXA2ICAZ. A7ÎIZ22 Y '
i.i
AJV3) MJÇ31I2:
We have built upon this
lbundation commencing with
few samples until we have
a complete
MERCHANT TAILORING
ESTABLISHMENT.
Well stocked with all desi
(
a
l caivj
i';
. l it
?
FERU CARSON
r.
*1
MERCHANT TAILOR
Ntt, Ü33 Market Street. N.

STILL CONTINUER AT THE
;oo2 v'3
BOSTOIT
:.x :.i ijfiïi .«Bi» ■ r/ßO
sl^ui^adi id
. ■!» '1
HOUSE. J iL : |,J
They have op eihi^itioa the
largetl and most varied line oif ' •
. . .XI !. . 1 I V«
Overcoats & Ulsters
I
The '
ever oßertä in this city.
V
\>Vv'» v kb *6!.w>\Va û .'4 Viôo*0
weil »dl in bios sbor.0 I! A
they are offering for £5. OO-r^tb su! t
all sizes, H A S - [j
ed with this house -has made a
fe H
veeping reduettm {h its n
^0*.© Iu : M»hi>waepcmn\zk
ms everythiug i;( ig imine. and
! -,
fifSw.o
m
Kuaiiiw
BOSTON ONE PRICE
d^'ngWsBse;"
&A 3 ;aMUKlTx«r.
'
I
v. E. HOLMES, I'mp

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