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Delaware tribune, and the Delaware state journal. (Wilmington, Del.) 1877-18??, June 14, 1877, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053082/1877-06-14/ed-1/seq-2/

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WMS« OOMPAWr, «I jfftü Ml V «rfc
«*«*■ «m n «r «t «ora». .im»«
and
* e NeMmr ttnd Ten Oente a pear 1m odeontr,
poAepeprepa « »V «te PabMekere.
f'JM XVERT EVENING AND COM
MKHCIAL it tieued eaery afternoon, tatotpt
to
of
due
»rndog. n it Ms cMsat DmUp Paper in
" T éi»inir*m and As Mats of Delaware.
fVfWM, le map PaakCßee 1m Ne w Casfl*
t $110 for g
psrmoaA; to poet-eßoee
mmmta, (tN par
mnmttiß ; M
«»**
r «toy*
^ iUMH MÉPW I
TtJiC r 'ÔOMMXÊGIAjL PEERS" IQß
- urfW* te »OH. Med v&TprMi*,
.neMale/Oe Usm «ftte», Md de werk le
«< lo »alcf .ItBldl, tle.^fcee, eet «'
higher rate».
The PatMekere
m*c*. ■ v, tt>
the
rq
ha
i HiiaaiAT, ip«i >a, mm.
a«rvis«ta( th« MvHjr af tks
Gaomh
—- „ - tknMgh
•Im «mita. Am agtata « tfc. Btn»'.
Em.Cc^f M« tab» Utawfc. fc Mew York
tira TieMn «f Uris kw lad ha waa
tek.« iMfon i , BtateUord at N.w
Y«k on a will of Asfeai oorpue and his
release demanded on the ground that
I« pass such a law. Tha Judge
to tha affect
rtmdered a dcaiaiaa
that Qoupwa had a right to exclude
Ira tk. adta MM whioh It Mlmd it
prtjuéMéal topubëa aasaUty to carry and
that if IM—rifim J lot to ria s immoral in
tfaair t rait a s e iia it had a right to prohibit
tha carrying of drenkrs and advertise
ments nnsinwlf them through tha
Tha argumant of thora who hail this
4-üirioa with M ta tac « — ta tliat but tar it
the poet-oAoe da p a rtm s ut would be 00 m
pülbKhto oorry obaeene literature or any
other uaiawfttl thing that might be pre
sented to R s ea l ed and directed.
Tho law against carrying immoral
unlawful things through tne ma* be
unobjectionable but we do object decidedly
to the methods fay which it ia administered.
N itlior tha part ado s department nor any
«ffleer themof ought to be permitted to
b*^ak thj seal of, or otherwise open, any
package entrusted to the Basils for trons
misrioa for any reason, nor under
pretext It is hatter that all sorts of
thiags
be carried than
innooent should be
mais to suffer
«ins of the guilty, and all correspondence
be Hubjeoted to the prying inspection of
any offljer who might Suspect any pack,
age of containing unlawful matter. Of
«ourse, raeh inspection would be the
•asiate way of detecting any violation of
the law, but it ia not the only way. If
the Government wishes to protect itself
from being imposed an, it is
matter for it to ascertain what mail
comes fro
that
Of the
difficult
persons suspected of being
engaged ia unlawful businesses, and it
put what marks it pleases
and folow them to thair destination and
summon thoirreoairersas witnesses betete
its courts or prosecuting office«, Taut it has
bo right to break the seal
▼•topi before It Is delivered to the person
to whom it ia directed.* It is an intolerable
thing) and not to be borne, that any class
shall have
mails
■Boh letters
cut the
of
government officials
the right to overhaul the
and open ray lottere they suspect of
Those who
taiuing improper matter,
remember Gotland Butler's .boasts
floor of Congress concerning the dis
coveries he made while rooting among the
private papers of firms whose effects
seized by the New York Custom Röuse
author.Teg, will not need to be told the
evils of permitting the official inspection
of private correspondence. The objection
then is not so muoi. to the law itself
the means taken for its enforcement.
do doubt the 'propriety of the
Î iw itself. The power assumed is a dan
gerou « one. If the national fgovernment
esunae that a lottery which is per
fectly lawful under the laws of Kentucky
un'awfnl to It, though it has
tho
to
Yet
juris
diction ia such matters, and that it will
therefore refuse to carry anything relating
to U through the mails, it can decide
that anything else to
majority of
object is
which a
Congress ehooses to
not At to
carry
through the mailt, aad the old custom of
excluding the abolition newspapers from
tho mails was entirely justifiable
long
a majority of the members of Con
gress bohevod that such papers were dan
g to u to publio order and subversive of
rights of property in
, which,
in that day professed
to behave in. It is a dangerous thine to
tamper with and the government had
bari .r curry what comes to it and leave to
the local authorities where offences
commuted the detection and punishment
erf thoso who
Goagrossi
the mails for improper
if this be
there ought to
that the law should be
But
purposes.
Admitted,
fram'd a
be
to
warrant
give
color of authority to
any offi ;er of the government to open a
sealed Utter until it reaohes the dead letter
offlee after every effort to get it to the pev
whoa it belongs, with its seal
, has been made. The American
people will not stand
the
broke
inquisitorial pry
tug into their private correspondence
iu liter what the aause
Tt sc
remarkable that James Russell
Lmv« !l should be willing to accept tho
mission to Spain, especially after it is
thrown up for a higher class mission by
Kasson. The idea of Lowell being
oud choie« to Kasson for any
amusing. Kasson may bo
but he does not
ia tha some gallery with Lowell, in the
0 / the world. It is gratifying how
to havo Lowell
Court of Spain where a Cushing has
<i*d a Sickels. It may be worth
.'on Spaniards think well
a very fair Congressm
ever to know that
»51«
j won.Ur if Luey Hamilton Hooper
not •»xaggerato a little in her descrip
;i giv»n elsewhere of the conduct of
d .*s
an young women studying art i
P*rU. If she does not then
An
think that
wu h i 1 better havo fewer women artiste,as
do without artistic cult
better
IhiUi without modesty in women.
Mr. J. G. Saxe, who is 61 years old. is !
.... .
said bis rectyery is j
still ill, and it i
doubtful.
Two Aaurieu ex-Fretidanta, Fittnon
and Van Buren, visited
twenty
[of
honor and..n
and
t
.NfchiA, Wie
character iff which the present English
government regards General Grant. To
some extent this I diffmauus
to the great military fame
of Geoeaal Osant, but tt SUB u at beratirefr
due to that, for hi ÎS»fc 7 clrcU. In
is tht
ia due
tt> . m
artäwj"
* f«w jmt# tta. ■ M fco», tho
.
Grant is not ao much a paraogal tribute to
the man. sait lato 4ha - o*
oooaaion of his
the
ha waa ao r e n s n tty the ^ M , ahtt>| „
**» «toe b tann 4ha «wapllon
+*** hhn «AI ihflfi tmoriri Um
pnvtoM etL- rtumm tkhta MtattWeds
UA |>taMta ttaffty. .iri»i«l fcwud
AasaHon àmêmg tha pêat imam ty y ears
They do not especially «4*4?* R.W
Item of govenungnl» p s sh tps» UMH tto»
they did then, bul they da V w psol Rr«nd
the wcrkTs great nattCBia, and thiaia all wa
have the right to ty^tot from them or any
other self-reepecting people.
This foot, which cannot but he a
pleasing one to im, ia largriydue «4 fin?
(mwtli in wmIUi and a -,, Mt ft ta
tar mon dm to ttw # ctSI tat
whtah our pMpU, diridW U»| kdfcUe
it
in
the courage, strength and military ability
of two nations. Tha North alone
mode by that event to appear os a gnat
state in the eyea of E uro pe» tort the
it
rennited nation, with Kortk and H»uth
once more, ai one people, uniting in theft
common interest« and detaake Uu tremen
dous power which ike, developed in the
tac«h »nth each other, make a spectacle
that impresees the European imagination,
fact everywhere, nations
acooant of theft
The wer bfougkt us «
long train of crile, it is true, and some of
them Were so great that the, threatened
the very existence of our system of gov
ernment, but it brought
tage» and among them one, not by any
means to be despised or undervalued,is Iho
valuation of
be
to
of
since there, as i
chiefly respeoted
strength in war.
many advmn
be
of
Of
of
If
military strength Which
it gave not merely to Eufttpe hut te
selve«.
lion have taught us also not to be quick to
create occasion for using that strength in
the costly game of modern Warfare.
itete* lctisons of debt and taxa
A Mere War at Wbitb.
Wayne MaeVeagh answers Butler quite
as sharply as Butler answered him, and
yet does not for a moment beoome the
blackguard that Butler's letter proved the
latter to be. MacVeagh's letter contains,
too, a phrase that will stick. "The leper
"of our politics" i
strong, while Uke sting of the letter in its
tail h; such as to make
But after all it
only a wind storm. Both
has
appropriate
it i
a leper winoe.
has proven
hurled words at each other and stopped at
that. Butler has railed like Hto tfiarse
blackguard that be Is, and MeVeagh has
struck equally severe blows with polished
sarcasm and innuendo, and both havo
intimated against each other what neither
has attempted to prove.
This sort of thing b aamring to nfaft
people and disgusting to «Orte-, but A Ir
lacking in force and effbetiven
Butler beüeVeS MacVeagh and his con
teefefe bribed Louisiana legislators to desert
from Packard to Nicholls let him give the
dis
the
the
tho
If
which he bases his belief and
prove ite truth. If MacYeagh know«
Butler to be a thief who mirtp^tetirialeA
private property while military command
ant at New Orleans let him prove it rad
help the decent class of MansacHusetU
Republicans escape the hated leadership
of *
to
who has climbed to power by
corrupt intrigue, rad is sustained there by
unthi nki ng rabble. Fact«,
not words, should be the weapons in tile
suppose ends With
MacVeagh's letter published elsewhere.
the
of
which
a
to
Aastralli
An article in
CeaMerattoa,
the New York Time*
recently called attention to the effort«
bring made by
people
a united government of the
several provinces of the country. Though
do not know that, any wall organised
effort has yet been made toward this end,
yet the result would
of
that
a part
of Australia to
of the
form
of
to
to
almost inevitable
in the nature of things,
provinces have made great progress
respecte
The several
ull
the last
20
30 years, and
her nearly 3,000,000 people—almost as
the American colonies at the
collectively
many
time of the Revolutionary war. The
progress of these colonies in many of the
arts and industries of life is only paralleled
by that of
country, as
clusively shown to all who took the
to
a
trouble to inspect the Australian Courts
at the Centennial Exhibition. The
advantages of confederation do not
require statement in this country. The
most serious hindrance to a union in
Australia appears to lie in the foot of the
opposing theories of trade that
and
held
id
. Victoria,which contains
half the people aud
wealth of Australia, has a protective tariff,
while the other colonies allow free trade.
Should this
than half the
tho
is
by
any
bo
not
the
has
well
question be satisfactorily
settled, union will only be a question of
time. Complcto freedom from England
will naturally follow in due course.
Is Admiral Porter bidding for a_
mission in the Turkish Nary? If the
Turks believe iu his torpedo nets,_
tioned olsewhere, they will doubtless be
glad to bave him. It is the liveliest sort
of fishiug we havo
mentioned.
A Mtnifiilnr tainlclde.
In St. Louis,
tall, well dressed
broker's shop, selected
asked the proprietor to load it. On re
ceiving it back, from the pawnbroker, who
supposed the man wished to purchase it,
he suddenly shot himself iu the head, and
died in about an hour. The m*«i was a
stranger in . St. Louis; aud there was
thiug on his person to identify him.
Monday evening, a
eut into a pawn
11 revolver, and
of
i
that
B*we Ball
Newark.
is ! , ° u Saturdft y afternoon, at Newark, the
. Actives defeated tho College nine,
is j grounds of the former, by the score of 15
tin
CI
7ME.
first number of
Mm litre, whethrt
I NMar^ 01 ^
Ä tnOt
j the
b principles of finance
n of industry, it is
ny j o rt tynk r otte»
Poems and
authors will be
pubUtahed. In abort, as the prospectus
informa us, the quarterly, wfileh is df
hrgea|ao^MBd handsomely printed, Is
▼ÀhüshTfor the
moat radical
RfeTha
and the
announced
tion. Lits
much snatf
^■original^B
translations from
prose articles.
and^Sud
•carriage
thought
of the
of oar time. The
gwnml
iwigai
which
; fritter,
5Är iôiin"tWki!*o! k> B!
Bàmuel Johnson, John W,
Edmund 0. Htsdmtan lorMtaadeV
iadudea the
mum B»
Of J
fits Reclus Wiài
J
Hpoonsr , JMebhsn FsoH «fififilcwa. G
Bsstot «iMa «4fa^ fepreeentahvee of freed
I« though! and optokm. The present
Mmbw, for May, contains aittoka of
mportanoc on
quite a variety at subjects,
of considerable length
w "* iwU0 ■
ofaaariaa
are
««»« 1 - p.
Ftohdhon. an interesting consideration
of ' The Influ e n ce of Physical Conditions
in the Ge ne s i s of fipemea" by Joel A.
Allen, and "Our Financiers, their Ignpr
anoe, Usurpation« end iVauds" by
l«ndto «priOûeï. ''Practical Socialism
in Gefto&ny, bÿ C. Vi. Ernst,is an interçst
ipring àn aooOuht of the
elplAwfgtWr sbckl systems,
r records Um socialism of
a
TS. tartWr
Geftfiony «
a hopeful enterprisa, but
r its partisan movement« as
A. Wasson contribute« a
vary interesting and important
article on "Theodore Parker 0 « 4 Religious
Betometv" are poems by B. Vi.
BOM and IL C. Stedman. Current literal
lure receives a. good deal of spaoe, and
"Chipe toom My Btudiö," by Sidney H.
Morte ita 4n entertaining discussion of
topics, some timely and some of.prime
interest at all times. Tho Revùw is
edited and published by Benjamin R.
Tucker, New Be«lford. Mass.
A somewhat sensational novel i
beneath the dignity of the Reviews par
«•wtttitofc..aa wo tnty style the English,
eVoept for a passing notice, but the high
toned and respectable Edinburgh in its last
number devotes quite a space to the latest
appearance of "Gregor Samarow,"
ex-Becrctory of the King of Hanover in
"Cross and Sword," a brilliant^ but not
entirely reliable study of such plots, secret
llpeieties disguises ana counterplots, as were
rife in Ualv in the days of, MhZrifii àncl
to^eyentojn iPrrifcto ihien culminated at
looks u
futile.
«
of
lally
to
in
Franco is the "sword" Italy tho
"cross." A rather thin thread of romance
among ordinary people is entwined with
the doings of the
could be taken out without lunch effect
The inost remarkable feature
is that it romances with dis
tinguished people yet living.
In Italy it introduces the reader to the
darkest of conclaves, enlivened to
mence with by the murder of a spy, held
in the recesses of the Baths of Garacnlla,
under the auspices of Mazrini to Riot a
Guy Fawkes treat fo? the benefit of the
council about to consider the Immaculate
Conception.
Franco forms a
which, however,
ing to the ex-Empress and her
take the book up to amuse
81ie,by these accounts, was the
in the Franco-Prussian, her w
called it»
illustrious, but this
Jft5T&
•e sprightly chapter,
hardly be entertaiu
if they
iillo hour,
spring
ns she
at
Ir
Tfia Rmpetfft was struck down i
H\elo-dramatic manner by w h?. y t
Ne la ton and Conneau, he declared to be
"tue beginning of the end." In this criti
cal moment, Olliver called in, all else con
fided to the Empress, while he wrestles
with death. wifely and impressive
enough by his bedside stilj finds côurc'à
tom. And döes..p(R fot-be'àr à little private
exultation m the power which she does
nbt tacruple to use, thus preparing rather a
complication for the invalid when he is
able to look about him again. There is,
however, nothing for it but to go ou.
Whatever their particular accuracy iu
detail, the spirit of the events following is
conveyed with a life and power which
mark roeffaOenbiy.tHete glbbtu And Import,
especially the fretfeAt from Metz, when
broken In health and utterly crushed in
spirits, the Emperor met with suddenness
hardship and reproach
Longueville he proceeded in a third-class
carriage and there tho fainting Prince
Im penal received thankfully from the
station-master a stole roll and
of which the Emperor also partook.
Arrived at Sedan, restless nnd mar#?, he
rideg out to the army Ôn the day of battle,
and meets first the wounded MacMahon
—then the retreating troops. The
day his last hope was crushed when, i
interview with his captor, ho learned that
the artillery of Prince Frederick Carl, to
which he ascribed his defeat,
Metz.
of
If
all sides. From
by
by
besieging
"The Dramas of Alfred Tennyson"
the whole favorably reviewed, "Queen
than "Harold. " Sympathy
extended to the
"Life and Letters of Charles Kingsley,"
whose literary work, however,
hasty to be enduring
day, so influential as bis earnest, many
sided character.
The review of Wallace's "Russia" rather
devotes itself to pointing out the
deficiencies
Mary," more
and discrimination
to
perhaps in bis
of that
very well received . book,
ite omissions i
generally
Among
ite want of anything in
regard to the army, commerce, finances ol*
the imperial administration. Failing
therefore to be comprehensive it is still on
excellent exposition of the State of the
peasantry and the course of country life.
"The House of Fortescue" brings up tho
charming aud romantic chronicles, such
os England abounds m. In connection
old Devonshire family which, since
the days of the Norman conquerors, has
never failed to send a man to do his duty
at any crisis in a foremost position.
" Brigandage in Sicily," reveals an
almost hopeless state of affairs, the out
laws,
were anything known of law, being so
hand-in-glove with the authorities as
to have virtual sway. ' Punishment,
indeed, is hardly even feigned, and
the hereditary feuds with such encourage
ment are terrible. Eastern matters
illustrated by the opiuions and dispatches
of the Duke of Wellington and Chevalier
de Gentz in the earlier part of tho century,
which display acumen and foresight suffi
cient to giv^ them value
when applied to events which fill tho
papers of to-day. .
as
with
in
those who would be outlaws
of
well us interest
A Runaway Horse.
From tbe ClhMter N«wa.
be
On Saturday night a horso, attached to
a wagon owned by George Cunliffe, of
Chester township, took fright
of a number of drums
by s
the music
«1 a fife, played
Concord
Upland lane. The animal r
the wagon badly, threw out the oe
a gentle
around tho country a disti
four miles before he
gentleman aud ludy
injured.
ad,
off, broke
pants,
and bis wife, and raced
of about
s stopped. The
Thrown Foo.arrlw..
W®«t Ob«u«r Republican.
Mr. Frank Evans, of Phcenixville, was
thrown from his carriage in Philadelphia
Saturday last, and seriously injured,
as driving with a companion, when
his horse became frightened, and starting
off suddenly,threw both of the men to tho
ground. Mr. Evans fell upon his head,
fracturing the skull, it wus thought. HL; j
injuries were such as to preveut his
removal to his home, j
re
it,
a
a
He w
15
3
OOKB.
3*srK££1Sïï£"* w
oval ttf English life, |gri
$ti»> «tories ouriourfjr
r. ..Ifc faoF there are three
»to Jpb, to abow, apptran
mm do not alwaya prodwaa
Tito principal story, tho
in which gives the
, is tliat of a mature
Utter
"IS
This is hi
through it jH|ne
twisted togi
s, one
SK
chief character
book its
ma# who act
.to
va fitell n
htt world
yeartof tr
wi&oHthe o _ „
only to fall madly in love with a beautiful
face. The girl ia immature and abeolutety
selfish. She marries him reluctantly an d
ES&axti'aRas3f*
to
her, but
whom
evaryfiho eise except heraetf
brother. Her beauty R sVentasUy
by ta accideat which occurs just In
tu stave her from cam promising her repu*
tatiQu, and which in tavp résulta hi killing
her vanity fuAçi«utfy to allow some littia
gwtitHde to grow up In her.
The vHoer story ia that of a lovely and
rich widow who married her oousin on his
death-bed to gratify him, while her heart
half broken by unrequited love for a
faithless triflsr and who finally falls in km
with a man youn
futiug ccofes. f £he 1 « 4 vefÿ real end lov
able «ornrui, however, and will appear to
ro^st traders the heroine of the booc. Th
third Btory is Uint of a giddy young girl
who marnes in a business way a matter-of
fact old fellow, whom she rather likea^ud
makes a very good and a faithful wife.
The novel is a well wfitteh one ancEthe
characters qui lb graphically portrayed,
while there is an e$cel legt mortal in it as to
the temper and Spirit, the selfishness and
shallowness that may lie behinck a face
beautiful os that or a pictured angel.
The authorpss should drop any attempt
tbo future to drag
Americans into her stories,
attempts but little, but that little is of the
sort that
Ktti*
. tot
after ra
America
Sfie
is
angered our people hut
only excites ta sbiile of minted
amusement and contempt. On a steam
ship she intrbducc* Miss Maud Maria
Hutchinn, who has been traveling in
Europe, and whose father the authoress
says 1 'is one of tho class his countrymen
call 'petroleum' _or
young lady gets off
such utterances as the following : "Guess
your friend's got a touch of tho dismals."
"I noticed he wasn't much up
meals." "Guess your Jiökin fun at me."
•'«Test so." "Well y
anyhow!" Thus it
love
'shoddy.'" Thi
to
his
dew astound
on, the character
being doubtless transferred boldly from
the stage of some small English theatre to
the pages of tho book. This little evidence
of the writer's provincial ignorance will not,
however, hurt the book in American eyea,
as it is reasonable to presnn^e She knows
enough of English society to enable her
to writo of it
sho does of
icons. The book
esting
all novel writers must pursue, and hence
will repay perusal. It is for sale here by
Bougbman-, Thomas & Co., 421 Market
street, through whom we receive it from
the publishers.
ARIADNE. Tin
Pbilitdelphia, J.
Louise do la Kamee, known to the world
as "Ouida" lives in her beautiful villa at
Florence unit takes delight lu Oft, in
horses and in dogs, for one of tke Italtcr of
which sho has erected n fine marble tomb.
Here she writes the nofelfl Which appear
to delight thousands of readers and which,
it is said, their author is pleased to know
offend the English taste and temper
" ,TW *'% though reared iu England and
writing in English, sho despi
professes to despise English criticism of
art aud literature.
HeMflhe has just Wtitleh another book
with ui« title given alx>ve and it is os
likely ns its predecesssor to offend whafc
ïiiost pure and wholesome in Eng
Americnn taste. The story is told
old Roman cobbler, himself
1 it, nnd is largely filled up with
1 . '"d opinion, the man being
regnftted with the Roman atmosphefe
ftri; tana lia ring positive opinions,
often running counter to those of the
critics, and for which he gives
reason than that he believes in
causo he does.
Through
understandingly itan
the shoddy class of Amer
ns a whole is an inter
, Homowhat out the beaten track
a
« Prfttm. By Ouida
Uppl
t A
a
is
is
in
to
of
Utah
by
art criticls
Df
them be
convenient a mouthpiece of
laking "Ouida" manages easily
to got off a largo amount of opinion about
firt, especially sculpture» and also to tell a
story of illicit lovo which runs nearly par
allel With a cUfeairi of Arindue which Iho
cobbler lms,drowsing amid'the marbles of
the Cichiir's Gallery, just before be meets
the heroine. The story thus told must bo
rather dragging for those novel readers
who read simply for the story, and who
would consider the digressions made to
enable Ouida to discuss through the
mouth of tho cobbler questions of
with sculptors she has created to agree
with het*-.
Wo do not propose tolling tho story in
brief here. Buifice it to say that every true
and honorablo love comes to grief and
and that tho mere pursuit of. a cloyed aud
sated libertine ei-etiles iù the mind of_
hei-dine that lovo which becomes the law
of her being, which crowds out all other
feeling
the
notion, crushing out honor
ific ambition, silencing the voices of duty,
affection and gratitude
gladly
and causing
her to rush
eless lover's unhallowed embrace and to
love him with all the same intensity after
ho has cast her off, and only Blame herself
because she did not know how to please
him better, and to prefer in neglect tlie
memory that be had loved her to any
solation which lovo or ambition could offer.
This is tho
"Onidu" delight to glorify and which
it is to be hoped exists only in their own
warped imaginations, and the imagina
tions of the women who believingly read
their works. Wo say women, for
doubt if the veriest rake alive,among n_,
can delude himself iuto tho belief that
this love which is represented as so ,
that it lifts its possessor aboVe the moral
law and the
to
sort of love writers
lik
in
ol*
on
an
so
as
aigus of society aud makes
herself; which is so
great that it casts out the fear
of the world's reproaches, society'
tempt anil a parent's sorrow and Bhamo; is
other than hin, the wages of which is
death to ull that is pure iu womau or noble
. In telling her story Ouida has
done well to mako her characters half
believers iu the old gods, for this
love of tho Greeks, animal passion glorified
and nmd for possession, and not at all the
intellectual ami spiritual fellowship
aud affection which constitutes by far
the greater part of tliat which iu
modern times and Christian communities
is called love. Taking this into account
fit confess the story of Ariadne to
be consistent and well proportioned,and to
those who will read from it tlie lesson that
that which it glorifies is heathen passion,
not Christian love, it may appear a book
with a better purpose than ite author
ght. It is for sale by Bougkman,
Thomas A Co., No. 421 Market street,
through whom wo receive it from the
publishers.
her a 1 .
the
to
of
A Rroken-I.einred Horso Naval.
! argued tliat it is unnecessary
to kill broken legged horses, and a case in
point is stated: Twelve weeks ago, the
nigh hind leg w
Williams' valuable
Iti
broken of Mr.
i, in Utica, by a
ther*horse. The fracture
kick from
was half way between tho fetlock and the
gambrel joints, aud was complete. A
veterinary surge
leg. A canvas sling
lh ° limn! a in ilia such a wajthal
she could occasionally rest ui
injured limbs. The fractured
then set, bound with hickory and leather
splints, with a heavy leather boot outside
of all. The mare did well, aud never
missed a meal. After throe weeks a
plaster of Paris baudugo was substituted,
and iu seven weeks "Nellie" was walking
j aiound the stable. Thera was no sign of
the fracture, and it is thought tha! tah«
j will koep her 2.40 gait,
undertook to set the
arranged, and
limb was
AiuriM ATmmvm omumcm.
«#
ttttoi
,At a m
of
Osla
oa
wnfrg . WyMtotyT.tW. IU»d.n»r
offered hia Mugnation, end It wee aoeepted!
In order to aaoertein Mr. Heldemu'a
s'
Of :
8 «
If
in
tn»t the nffeir whioh led to hie reeignetion
»»mSmESaZ
in
to
resigh in
maintained. . inj
divWdnä And .MM
great deal of
There inaÿ ha i«^|n^«
unison with the pasta
to hin», but at the
the discipline being imposed '
member in question, and in this
ways he felt that'
gendered, m which
Jesus Christ, could not
take part Difierenoêa i
t
a
in
t
upon.
qM»tt
b»«B
«I
■i«iHy
in re
el M 4
gard to cases of.
oonvictirinà, and,
produce factions, vyl Chaf,
hanuonise them without blU
mh-hem
thasWaii
» prodÿ 0 « lor^Md tau
to lead a party, he con
cluded to withdraw and k
nise themselves. He did
his mission Is to
many, cad not
not w
tobe a
partisan,bat the pastor of a united chtarcH,
and, nahe saw than Wkaan oppöhnnitr
to make division, he did not with to be
be responsible for it.
His resignation was not requested
expected, sind Was an overwhelming i
prise to the church. It was tho result of
a sudden conviction Of hit own. The
meeting last night waa not a toll one, but
he has
membership of Ÿ50, who, upon the
proportion of his remaining as
wOUM bave tbtefl «tafln it. He,
his friends
or
know
e of any, out of the
simple
pastor
howe ver, ttflt only to
to vote fo? the acceptance of his resigna
tion, but insisted that they should so vote,
and left them no «tentative.
ration had sut
»rted him in
the ease of dlsripNne. and the reverend
gentleman speaks ih toe wannest manner
of the hearty and enthusiastic support
given him in all matters by his
tion, . and referred to the
recently adopted by OVer taofl of the mem
bers, expressing thei? confidence in him.
He states very emphatically that his at
titude on the temperance question has
nothing whatever to do with his redana
tion,
The con
grega
ihition
mm
the church supports
ed last
Ä A resOAutRnp would nova been
approving his oouree in regard to
the tempe ran oe question.
He will remaui with the church for
some weeks yet, or until* they con make
other arran
movements
tenia, and as to his future
says he ia entirely in the
hands of Christ, and awaiting ordere.
Members of the congregation state that
his resignation was a complete surprise to
them and that it was induoed by compli
cations within the ohurch, and has no
nection whatever with the temperance
question.
ÊtJOkEN BEATM,
An OM and Bwpwl«4 CIUmb or
mimlaruia r.aa« Dud la and aa
Nn«d«y Muraiaff.
early hour, Mr.
Bunda
William
citizen of Wi
y morning
Long, an a
at
ted
aged and much
incton, died very suddenly
No. 619 Lombard street,
, with which he had
tear
of senile
been »ufferiafi for setertl y
The sudden decease of Mr. Long was
not entirely unexpected by his family, and
somewhat of a surprise,
the evening previous he appeared in better
health and spirits than he had for
months past. He retired to his bed
Saturday
night, undressed himself and went to bed
0 « usual; find ttfl thought fit his being
entertained. His
son, Mr. .William R. Long, who keeps a
oonfectionery store at 311 East Eigbth
street, was going away on the 1 o'clock
train and about 10 minutes before 1 went
up to his father's room to bid him good
bye. He found him lying on the bed
apparently, in a calm sleep, but when he
endeavored to arouse him he discovered
that he was dead. His body Was still
warm,, and he evidently died without a
struggle.
The family physician, Dr. Bnitcher, was
notified, he examined tho body and
said that death was produced by sonile
mortificatiou, for which disease Mr. Long
had been under his charge for a long time.
A burial certificate was granted and no in
quest will therefore be necessary.
Deceased was 7A years of age and was
employed in the .qq raise department of the
Ü. S. mint at Philadelphia for otefr 4o
years. He left the mint about 2 years ago,
on account of the affliction which has
resulted in his death, and moved to this
ra.
yet it
chamber about 9 o'clock
ill
%
Was a member of the American
Mechanics, having joined the drdet
shortly after ita organisation, and was at
his death and for 60 years previous a
member of the Methodist ohurch.
leave« a wife and two grown up children
and daughter, both of whom
married and reside in this city.
He
A BOLD MOBBEM1.
A tortlaiy Near teatawlrtf by
*«4k< «I Men.
Ina lia i Mwaklt «04 Cocanwratu at MrMfty.
Iia«t night foul* masked 1
entrance into the houee of
nock, two miles from Landenberg, Chester
the lbck out of the door.
Mr. and Mr*. Pennock
len forced
Levi W.
Fen
county, by
They then
and a carpenter who was in the house, in
the second story, and locked Mr. Pen
nock's two sons in a
story. Placing a pistol at Mr. Pennock's
head, they forced him to tell where his
money was, whioh they procured and then
«le parted. They only obtained about $100.
They had drive« to within half a mile of
the house in two
brace and bit,
entrance,
iu the third
wagons. They left the
used in procuring an
the premises.
ivy Falla»
Mr. H. A. Blood, of Fitchburg, Mom.,
filed a petition in bankruptcy yesterday.
His liabilities are $1,528,310, and his total
assets $1,310,G00. Among his principal
creditors are the Fitchburg Savings Bank,
for $2G3,000; New Bedford Institution for
Havings, $120,000; Continental Mills, of
Lewiston, $100,000; Merchauto' National
Bank of New Bedford, $1)0,000; Wachusett
National Bank of Fitchburg, $88,007;
Walter Heywood, of Fitchburg, $87,000;
S. H. Howe, of Boston, $85,000; Harrison
Bliss, of Worcester, $82,000; and the
Boston National Bank, $00,000. Simul
taneously with the news of his failure come
that of H. H. Howe, formerly of the drv
goods jobbing bouse of Howe, Pieroe A
Co, of Boston, whose liabilities
reported at $100,000. Mr. Blood was
formerly General Manager of the Boston,
Clinton A Fitchbuig Railroad, and
President and Vice-President of various
other roads. He procured the build
ing of tho various railroads, and their
cousoliilatiou aud that of others with the
Fitchburg road, putting all his means into
the enterprise, until the load became too
heavy to carry. Howe was Blood's confidant
and assistant, aud thus became dragged
iuto bankruptcy with lita friend.
»■w lM rt by b*t N«fbra
Nobtbampto», Mam., June 11.—Later
Ä oe from the aoene of the murder
tfield states that Jared Wheeler,
colored, about 26 yean of age, living near,
murdered hia aunt, Harriet Wheeler yes
terday. There was «aid to have Men
some «pile between the parti« which
might have been the oauae of the murdar
ia
s g o r s
kk
xeUrslon |||)eia«M
»r Result ,
1 Oom*t iUrfef Friday. 3j
uai nxeuituosi, at the openiug
tejMeartiti* frö» this eitvi
m j . . —' OPch, leek plaoe yesterday*
Bfftoial train of three
left at (» o'clock, a. n
were added
'WeatlrfFiofi
t
* partially filled,
., and two
it Harriugtou. The dull
esl detained many persons
wfiuho if the
ho
ly morning
made to
had been fair. The__
Lewes, by U.40 o'clock, from which place
numerous hacks conveyed tKö* '
i«ta to the Beach, in less than nx hour.
The Whole ride doYn
a very pleasant
e thefe had been
in
PoMviurwt-luftl -*ffH>U«R W4J the dust
àûd aâoled the air: and at RfehAftoth, from
up'clpck. until 2f whoa .«% k-ww«r agiaid
began, the weather was exquisitely pleas
ant. À fine ' sea-breeze tamo in, ladCb
wifh UfO tonic odor of 4ba peas, ml there
wis a splendid sud for bathiug, of whioh
a party of gsntlcn
oourafeoqs young lady took early advan
tage. Xh*y reported the water cool, but
nol. too cpld tor a parson of vigorous
vitality.
For dinner, the party divided, tiie larger
number going to, the Bright Hu use, which
ha? been Open since the 1st if|st., and had
mad^bountiful preparations for guests.
Hie neW less«'os, Messrs. Mora and Whit
iye thé establishment in goodqrder,
I undoubtedly deserve a liberal pat
lbtfage. Almost à dozen boarders, who
intend remaining some time, aro already
In the hohse. Tnoy tard, tiré pelieve, mosuy
Cram'New York. At tliö Öiirf Mouse, Mr.
Wifflant' H. BiHany Is now ready for
guests, and the house Will Remain open
eontinuonslv for the season.
In Hie aftern
"by
nc
oon, a yijriety of business
relating to Beach properly, tho camp,
meeting, Ac., was transacted. Shortly
after 2 crclock, a public sale of lots belong
ing to various parties was held at the
Surf House, and a dozen or so were
offered bv tho auctioneer. Mono were
sold, the bids bei fig much under whyt the
dWnets regarded w theif value. The
privileges Of selling horse feed, lihit keep
ing bread stand nt tho camp meeting
wert then offered. Tho latter brought
« 6 K. During this offering, Rev. Mr.
Quigg stated that the prospects
the oamp meeting would he tho largest
ever held nt this place, judging by the
inquiries for tents and other indications.
The camp will open
find continue till the 21 st.
mittee In chrtrgo of the
it also held a
sub-committee to
School Convention
the 2ild and 24th of July, «luring tho
■.ting. The snb
that
the 10th of July
Tho c
goments for
ceting, anil appointed a
rrauge for tlie Sunday
which is to be held on
tinuancc of the comp
committee consists of Rev. J. B. Quigg,
Itev. W. E. England, Vi. Rioords, Rev.
E. StubW.
The Board of Directors of the Relioboth
Association also held a
Lam bom
the property,instead of W. II. Billany,who
was recently elected to tho pluco, but had
dot entered
adopted, marking out a
policy of finance. Tho Association i
much embarrassed by want of means to
pay small debts, orders drawn nearly a
year ngo standing unpaid,with no funds iu
the treasury to meet them, though there
is a larg
$1,4<)0—due the Association for lots, taxes,
Ad. It Wits now ordered that tho secretary
proceed to collect tiitbo dries, Ond bo
allowed 10 p
also resolved
•ting. ÄL D.
elected Superintendent of
tho duties. A resolution w
ore vigorous
of
—probably fr
$ 1,200 to
sr cent, on them. It was
tliat deeds should bo made
but ft t Wts sold but not paid for, anil
that theso deeds fihould bo ten
dered tho purchasers, when if lbs
amounts remaining uùC were not paid I
within GO days, tho lots should be soid.
Ample legislation • was obtained at the
recent session of the Legislature to enable
the Association to enfoKe iis legal claim . 3
in these respects.
The showers had abated by tho time tho
hacks started to return to Lewes, but
the way up, another sprinkle wti
tored. At Lewes, the railroad authorities
kindly ran the train, after most of tho
passengers had entered, down to tho pier,
affording u Hett Of tho waters »round the
Breakwater, where a number of vessel?
lying at anchor. At G o'clock,sharp,
the train left, and made good time on tho
way up, reaching Wilmington at !).4().
The prospect of a large patronage of
Bobo both, this season, is regarded as
encouraging. Mr. BiHany says tho Surf
House baa bad
probable guest«, aud that house ?*>s
the Bright House, is likely to be
filled, during the height of the s
leant. The cottages will be
doubt, thöugh the owners of a few of the
have leased to othe
Jethro J. McCullough has lensed Ms
cottage to Mr. Thomas S. Foole ; Mr. Job
H. Jackson his to Mr. James Bradford 5
and Itev. J. B. Quigg has scoured tho
cottage of Rev. Joseph Mason. One
cottage, that of Mr. ( 'ameron, of Bridge
ville, is in process of erection, and nearly
finished. There irt the usual "talk" of
extending the railroad from Lewes td the
Beach, but this cannot
course, in timo for the present season.
Other railroad conversation is directed to
the proposed road from Lewes, by Milton
aud Frederica, direct to Dover,
is urged, would materirtlly shorten tho
time between Wilmington and tho Beach.
H
„ j
&
s inquiries from
II
, at
icupied,
for tho Reason. Mr.
bo done, of
This, it
THE WONBEUS OF TELEQE.-LPIIY.
A Method of Transit»IttiiiK a
New« pa per Pace
Once.
VraattasN«« York Worl l.
Washington, Juno 0.—A patent lias
juBt been granted to LoringPickering,
of the editors and proprietors of Urn Firm
ing Bulletin and Morning (Mil of Kan
Francisco, for a method of rapid telcgraph
of fac similes of stereotyped plates,
claimed that by this pitocesn an entire
page of a newspaper can be transmitted
by telegraph iu from 15 to 30 minutes,
delivering the copy directly from the
instrument in such form that it «'an be
handed immediately to the printers. In
other words, the copy will be a substantial
reproduction of the original, except that it
may be given in a larger sized letter if ro
desired. The stereotype pinto requires
preparation for the purpose of telegraphic
transmission other than the tilling of all
its depressions or spaces betwoen tho
faces of the letters with a nonconducting
substance which may bo quickly applied,
tlie faces of the type being left clear by
moans of an equally simple process. Tho
plate thus prepared is placed upon a
cylinder arranged to revolve rapidly, 10 as
to present each successive letter to
attached to a traveling frame. As tho
cylinder bearing the plate revolves, the
frame grad'.t dJy advances by the operation
3 W ; aud thus each and every line
is successively presented to tho fingers or
magnetic points ulreody mentioned.
Necessarily the circuit ia
points are passing over the
surface ; but as often us tl
presents itself to said lingers tlio ci
closed, and the
points
make the record there in the s
as the original, dolincated iu r
fine lines, either upon chemically-prepared
ordinary paper fixed upon u c
ponding cylinder at stud receiving station
»"g
Itis
A
fingers
of
h.
tl.e
mutai type
llflg
-«1
at the
ing station
Amo letter
1**'
oi
Tlie E.eujrili
At Bremen and Loudon tho longest «lay
has sixteen hours.
At Stockholm, in Sweden,' the longest
day has eighteen aud-a-half hours.
At Hanumrg, Geriuany, and Dantzig,
Prussia, the longest day w
hours and the shortest seven hours.
At Petersburg, ia Russia, and Tobolsk,
Siberia, the longest day has nineteen
1 lours and the shortest five hours.
At Tornea, in Finland, tho lôugeKl day
lias twenty-one and a half hours, aud tiro
shortest five hours.
At Wardnuys, Norway, tho «lays last
from Mimt 21 to July 21, without iui vrup
tion, anil Al Spitzbergen the longest «.by is
three and a half months.
[r^e
P.40U TO BUTLER.
kßk* Heven LeMei
«ng to TensR Men.
IfioVeagh furnished the
ieply to Gen. Butler to
trt,
n
i . Way«
t
the
miLJi^ruu, ■>tauO fl.—Gen. B. F.
Butler, Washington, D. 0.: I fear you
have overworked your inventivo faculties,
for your long and labored letter of to-day
shows signs of failing power, and will go
far to destroy that reputation for effective
scurrility which you havo so sedulously
fostered. The issue between you and me
king, and is so plain
cannot obscure it by any amount
1 '
of y
that y
ist'
gnr.
published ooncarn^g mo some sheer in
noods, without a panicle of foundation
of them. Thereupon I promptly
put you on the national pillory with a
very legible statement of your off cubes
upon your forehead.
As y
for
auy
have endured your punishment
entire week, and
fess that overy statement made by you
mtrue, I have no objection to y
getting down, but yOu must not suppose
thatl placed you tliero in resentment only.
My chief purpose was to exhibit you as a
warning to younger men, by showing them
that in spite of great ability and energy
■you had become the leper of our politics
"by reason of the general conviction that
you habitually disregard tho eighth and
ninth commandments. That purpose has
been fully answered by the comments of
the country ' upon your character, and I
have no further interest in the matter. I
■will not «veil take the trouble to deny any
falsehood ÿou may thfnk it to your
, for thorn
will not believe anything
, and those who know
, will not believe any tiling
virtually
for
advantage to invent about
who know
you say against
you, of c
you ssy against rhj body.
,n
Waykb MacVeaoii.
NEW CA3TLB.
Probate—Ten* irernnco
Movement WterteU—Iron Fnrnaeee
Work lug.
Oomapondanoa of Rvwy Kraul«« «ad Oummajci >1.
New Castle, June 12.—Register
has admitted to probate the wifi of George
Dougherty, Sr., late of Brandywine hun
dred, deceased, and granted letters testa
mentary
Admitted
Biggs
the same unto Georg
Dougherty, Jr., the executor named 1 ;
ihe will.
Ä' temperance mpVetaent
nted hero last evouing by
mombers of the moral suasion club of
city. A mooting
front of tho Court House, and
inaugur,
of tho
held i
tho
delivered by Me
Molutire, Fox, Riggs and Quinn, aud
wore listened lo with marked attention.
small, but after
The meeting at first
the speaking commenced it gradually in
' till the whole street was
jrowded. During tlie speaking the pledge
.vas offered f w signers, an«l by the time
7 6 had
tho meeting
closed
signed. The addresses of Messrs.
Molutire, Quinn and Riggs especially,
they being well-known to
citizens,
had .a decided effect upon the people, ns
was manifested by the remarks which
could bo heard iu passing around among
the peoplo.
Thu Delaware Ir
Company yesterday
commenced running four furnaces instead
of two, which they have been running for
some time past. This doesn't look much
like the shutting down which it was
reported would take place
the loth.
• about
THE PACIFIC TIDAL WA » EB.
Lfiter Intelligence of the Damage
Done Iw U*e Decent Earthquakes
and Ti«lal Waves.
Panama, June 11.—By the flrntdi of
tho steamer Oroya from Cnllns.ou the 28th
ult., ,0 o havo fuller details of the disasters
suffered on the cows*, from earthquakes and
tidal
Iquiquc, Pontaile, Lobos,
Pica, (jhaimvnqua, Hi
Uorigu, Mejillones de Bolivia, Autofogaeta
and (Jhauasal are n«>arly all destroyed.
About GOO lives only were lost. The
destruction of property is estimated at
& 2 «>, 000 , 000 . confined mostly to the coast,
although tho town 8 f Taraprter. 28 leagues
«I the villages of Pica,' Matilla,
id Oanchones, far iu tlie intefidr,
less ruined.
The shipping of guano from the south
ern deposits will be indefinitely suspended
as all the facilities in the way of launches,
chides, wharves, water condensers, and
buihiings of nil kinds, havo been swept
ÄMnmati. at
a total loift.
ned.
Captain CarfieM w».» saved, though one of
his children was killed* iù .tain anus. The
■cd on spar» and pirtuk*,
Arne..,
PabeHoti de
illos, Tocopillta,
res. Tho
towns of
inland,
•ay
Tho English ship
HuavilloH, Captain Curffeld i
The captain's wife, three children,
d steward
e d
KILLED BY A POLICEMAN.
A Nan Deuten Ile foi
Thé 9 *o1I«cuiimi
D efe
New Yotik, June 11—Frrtuler Williams,
who was severely beaten by police officer
Doyle, at his own door, early yesterday
morning, died this morning. The police
say that Williams and his wife were light
ing when officer Doyle interfered and was
attacked by the fighting couple, and in
self-dofenso the officer drew his club.
Williams Raid bofose ho died that the
officer struck him without cjiuse.
doctors say that
peritonitis c.i
Intestines.
and held to
Ills Own Door—
IMcmIn
Self
The
Williams died of
e«|uent of rupture of the
Fhe officer has been arrested
-ait the coroner's inquest.
THE OALLOWS.
f Fled'tier at IMilla<lcl
|>lila—11<> Dies Calmly.
, Juno 11.—Geogo W.
s to-day executed for the mur
W. Hanley in November,
'
Fletcher i
der of Ji
Flctehi r ]
After hanging 17
I*
imites life
d ÜM body was
Tl
e RrlllMh Grain Trade.
iew of the British grain trade the
■k again tells of complaints of the
backwardness of tho season ; and though
the acreage is larger than in 187G, the
yield will depend entirely upon tlie future
weather. The stocks of wheat iu the
hands of farmers
A
unusually low, they
having generally yielded to the temptation
of Belling ut the recently prevailing high
. Holders of the little amount re
j«mining unsold, feeling confident that the
scarcity will bring quotations up agaiu,
are refusing to sell at the decline ; c
sequently business lias bueu almost at
Maik Lane ite cour
listless aud
is were fully 10 shillings
below tho highest points
reached lately. The war, continuing with
out apparently any decisive action
either side, the influence of politics seems
to have ceased to be felt iu trade. The
having b
heavy and rapid. An article that
weeks ago brought readily 32 shillings p
quarter is now slow of sale at :
shillings. There was an improved inquiry
for floating curgo wheat at the close.
l>
spoken of
decline in e
is noted
few
to 2 G
«11»» Robbers.
Witt
Fr
On last Wednesday night, during the
terrifio thunder storm, the station at
Bnuulywiuc Summit on the Philadelphia
A Baltimore Control railroad, was entered
i. the entrance being effected by
shutter. They also entered
tlie resilience of Mr. Thomas J. Pierce,
tho station agent, who lives just opposite
to tlm station buihling. From
pluco n cloak waa taken aud
by thie
0
prying
tlie torn
empty
n Mr.
]>uir of boote
carried off.
runk was broke
Fr
«Pra
ente ii
occur q
htrango lo suy, tho thieves
caught.
Those
V
Irn Colo, a locomotive fireman, vu
stabbed to death by Calvin . Stewart, iu
Dover, N. J., on Monday. There waa
provocation for the deed, but Stewart
drunk at the time. He is in jail

waa
Farelra's Continental Balsam.
THK cura;
J'IAHKHŒA 1NT1DOTP.
»hr
HÜ«
Hr), am
t)i« r CbroBi^I)iar
8 fe
it
t
wlk
ULil ri a— aStU T
taut
I prie« b« Mt
"ii*
, VpnamaeptMm Cared •
SH?» Æl";W-i„"ïi.-h.iarb
W'isri £Hsg*& ä
(4(1 UMU>Ù4
vEkTisS
■tCar« at 1 w.
K?.a
H*»
ly tvs tad its wondnrful
) hk * >a
• ao»«« In
«■ap e# mala It
Actuated by t hi«
mmàËL.
St wSä r
h
rfs. 1 -"
Monm?îl
:»rv.
HrrnnVi UlécBre-WeltSle aari MagW^tlc A|>*
pllauee^ Well» and Bfcnd» to? 9*lf i-'are.
• tl** y»fT«u« e»4 PWiihWBrl, imp»r 1
strength to nie inning org«niam, en
Äfezf âMX\Ziï.
Pi
ic»M,
. viui
.,.».iSSÄ
. K.» V,rt ; jrtlU r«
tte
Ir
fnt
M
A Health lslMM.
e Korvoui und Debil
IK ütreagtotM*
troatlog t>lMä«e wltltMt oieitois».
Rektorin* tt
,n SS
Maotta to«he
DR. BÎIYAW'.
MAG
HM* Of Btudr •«<! ro
«^VWM&Ma. S lc ?««►
.KCTRIOITY IS If AT URIC'S rataiK
■fcin
A Ho
J . t . r, SV J „Ä3rKi. , ,£!
UIU
**»a
rally.
C«Jv
»
b
h*
Ä.
I phy.lt,!
typliai lwri .
ADDRESS,
on. BRtlv.
janlS-lyw
II
Flflftenth atTMi,
A Free Cur«.
oh It I«. ««
Fo
iwtir
'fei'hKft! «S
ti
by
a »»iu«»!« ■t.ftoiflu 1 « t
syw-Birrsss-s.BSi
■ly,
OOdMfUl Iftffifto
I., to *ny P«ma t-nvloMir-n
Ï. W. 4 o. Bu.9k Ult '
ply.
, N
feMS Braw
The Following;
MOUE OP THK If ANT
liURAT
ARIC
muoLi
■iffiffMSi
U
IhTIEV ING
I
XIU;
pÆUfflXÜî
1 limmo*« raajr
tta
1 Mlff.il
«ly«
I« nil« ht
id
KK
ii«« Dr. WUIUi
rfnlljr u.«tl ? tv
cur» «rad«a I
I
<bs
1
A
1
dys
««"I
iUioted U BVMlf.
d
Ur b
J. N. PRIOR.
ISth aud Utaurry
t. Nov. at.
»ml
'X
fol"
1
»in
»Y.
Ä;
m
!.'• miili
tht
<ly«
Df
rfi'd
«f et i ;
iy
»
Mftdi
r, A««ta
'tsoisiyw
laUul»hia.
VmETINB
The ti-reat
Family Medicine
HEALTE-RESTOBEB.
General Debility.
(11 o denote deficiency of
(.»utltiiciit» of the blood
ir ]>roix>rtlon f while
. Debility 1« offre
ident to ft variety of
re apt to be swollen.
dilation is irruuular, but al
1 'nlpltation of tlie lieart is
otloa
tumult
t Ions arc lauguidly
length isdimfulsh
5 or slight exercise.
rest, tw
in-tail i
:
nth
88
y part lull
11
1
feeb
"4o
Violent
oft on ih
t 1
•Half
:i.i
i
T
1 1
de
Tho bmuliiu*
(juiet who
011 painfully sgiuted
1 running, usceudlp^
h
iu«j
b« h
3<l. Vertigo,
. Violoutaiklob
{(! pains in ihchead.slde,breast,
of the bodv, aru also frequent
tiens
in females the
ays either suspended or
ed. Tho bile ts scanty,
Uh unhealthy evacuations
dyspeptic state uf the
symptoms.
Stil
tho «linos*«. The
»ro nlim
' ' fily P
fo
very 1
and
!>aii\
mb,
mol y c
MARVELLOUS EFFECT.
II. R.
i
I Lave uBod Vegetinb, and feel it
a duty
1 <
vlcdim tlie moat bciteût it lisa
d<
of tlie your 18621 was
sd by overwork,
I mss very wsak
any remedies,
vw.niflnyoftboii),
yVRorrixE. Ue
iuy Improved
aud courage,
it every day, gaiulng more
ns completely restored to
of this Jlemrdu, In case of
indeed marvellous.
"Elizabeth a. foley,
Webster street, Charlestown, Mass.
In tlie spring
encmldeblm
d nine!
:lo«l 11
•tltfri
ri,
itb
civil
1 w
1 to
f«i
1 1 bad
tb
Iltlo
1
çlb
lie
rai
tl tut
SWOLLEN LIMBS.
>N, N. H., Jon. 29,1870.
Mr. Stkv
D ear SI
tbo eltoct
-1
0 to inform you of
'urllier" upon my
I commenced taking it, • ye»r
lundi ilüMHtated. My limb«
that it was Impossible Cor we to
ringe, and
0 this no
III.
WI
• n
olio
fr
rjnMdttftil
nuoed, 1c
IP
ly
î)£TiÇ
ill In
!SÏ
!
11 to improve. Mr
ft rent? ih returned.
b
od and
«P
!«•
tl
unto wit b my
P'
nted.
d I feel I
to Veoetjxb.
Y<
''." ir :
Ml
H. TILDEN.
A PERFECT CURE.
Chaulsstown, Juno 11,1861.
•rtifv that Ve
» e when my attoadinc
ed my cane coaaiuup
-t survive many day*. .
M its. Ï.KD8TON, 35 Cook rtréel.
slated by Mrs. Lcdston tare ponoo
by me, aud they aro true. ,
A. 1>. HAYNES.
Mr. H. R. 8 tk
Dear Sir—Tbisi
G
»hygician bad 11
Id
1? l k fUC
IPould not. be Without
YEGETINE
FOB TI£N TIMES ITS COST.
•n
tie groat b.
of VFI IET
) received from the
» in« to give my.tes
ove it to b* not only
ig t he health, Irak a
:uliar to Ui« «|iring
1 . 1 b
fg
ith
ill
i>
P'
and
ild 1
or ten times It« éoat.
TILDEN,
w ilii
EDWI
Aßöi
'm Lifo Assurance Cam
Attorn«
ui Genera
uildlng, Boston, Mi
Vegetine is sold by all Druggists.

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