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Delaware tribune, and the Delaware state journal. (Wilmington, Del.) 1877-18??, October 18, 1877, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053082/1877-10-18/ed-1/seq-2/

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tend
and
fore,
a
THK dklawarb tribune, u pub.
.L by THE every evening pub
LIBBING COMPANY, at Fifth and Mark«
Thursday morning. It containt
reading matter than any other
the Peninsula. Terme,
a vn COM
TBE EVERY EVENING AND COM
MMBOIAL is Issued every ttfternoon, saoept
Sunday. It i* the oldest Daily Paper in
WUminaton and the State of Delaware,
Twms to any Post-Office in New Castle
county' 16.00 per annum; 8160 for y
ä
outside of New Castle county, 86.25 per year,
•1.60 for three month»; 66 oents per month
Single copie » tioo oents. Ths Publishers
prepay postage.
,
THE "COMMERCIAL PRESS JOB
OFFICE w unply prodded with printing
material of the latest stylet, and its work i»
FhUaMlMa 0ßCe " anAa,
w *
slrestt, every
far more
paper published
One Dollar and Ten Cents a year ia odeonot,
postage prepaid by the Publishers.
WILMINGTON, DEL.
OCTOIIF.B 1», W77.
THURSDAY,
-TSphic
°
**
ished
Wllmlnfften's Trade With the Fen
Inealn.
The fourteen counties constituting the
peninsula lying between the Chesapeake
side, aud tho Delaware
and bay and the Atlantio ocean
other, contained at tho time of taking the
oensus of 1870 a population of two hun.
dred and ninety-eight thousand and thirty
j pur people, divided as follows :
DXLAWABE.
New Castle.
Kent.
Sussex.
Maryland.
Cecil.
Kent,.
Queen Anne's.
Caroline.
Talbot.
Dorohester.
Bc.uierset.
Wicomico.
Worcester'...
Virginia.
Aooomac.
Northampton.
bay,
the
graph,
made
artist
tu re
.63,515
.23,804
.31,6%—125,015
dark
.25,874
.17.102
.16,171
.. 12,101
.16,137
.10,458
..18,190
..15,802
...16,419—157,254
is
And
.12,567
. 3,108— 15,765
.298,034
Total
This is a population much larger than
that of Florida. Nebraska,Nevada, Oregon.
Rhode Island, and but about twenty
thousand less than the population of New
thirty-two thousand less
Hampshire,
than that of Vermont. Though by
absurd j/olitical division made in England
a century ago, tho territory
under the jurisdiction of three
more thi
comes
Htate governments, it is to all intents aud
purposes a single State, composed of con
tiguous counties, inhabited by a lioino
geuious poople with similar pursuits and
interest«:, shut oIT from all others by well
defined natural boundaries, and knit to
of rail
to
gethcr by a most complete sy
For the purposes of business, the
ry bo considered as
considered it is not a poor
s tbo true valuation of tho
way«,
territory
aud
the last ce
real estate aud personal property
peninsula was
Delaware.
State,
3. By
tho
follows :
997,180,888
7
tend
Eastern Shore of Yirgiuiu,
.»•j;
.$178,081
ry favorably with
States of
Total.
This will compare
the value of properly i
many
ud population than
much greater are a
tho peninsula. It is greater than the true
al property iu all
having less
wept
value of real and pc
the btatcfl
population lhau tlio peninsula,
Itkodo Inland, nud in addition to th-so
3. The total value of
Alab
Arka
•20V
pi Minnesota j
«209,197,845 ;
«208,146,989
d p raonal property 1
55.841 : i
,014 ;
ssippi
Carolina,
sas $188
hi
i : in Mis
Wsst
Virginia,
and i
«190,651,491. Thus it will be stun that
insula is iu wealth not far behind
o iu the habit of
I*
of the States v
ipoiiant and com
parantively Yvculthy ones. In its products
also it i« equal
mated lotel annual v
ducts in 1870 Vi;
considering as large,
ul States. The esti
ue of its farm pro
follows :
1 b 8,171,66
Delaware, .
10,911,4
Maryland (Has;
SI
14
1,671
Virginia Easte
Shore)
54,056
be
of
ho
gricultural
Colorado's
This largely sarpanos tbo
product of many larger .States,
products are worth but
millions, Florida'« less than nine millions,
Nebraska's tho same, Oregon's but a little
'cn millions, and Rhode Island's
los» than four millions, while the value of
Connecticut's agricultural products is not
six millions greater lh
third
jurs, aud Kansas
. en millions and
New Hampshire less thau tw
lint it is not in agriculture alone that
tho peninsula will favorably compare with
many of tin
the lists 'as
and will hol J it« ovr
--•«. 1L c.iu afford to enter
facturiug community,
t agwnst many larger
iter popuU
ual valuo of manufactured
19 follows :
i. In
tcrritoricH aud gre
1870 tlio
product« wai
Delaware....
Maryland (1
Virginia
.. 16,791.882
1
1(51
!1,633,
,;v estimate,
This,we ai
for tho valu
ifftc
lediaie
of the jiroducts
nd ite ii
lured in Wilmington
vicinity in 1873 wa
but accepting the c
have an amount of manufacturing, which
s ov< r twenty millions,
suu figures
root,
leaves nearly all the Southern Status away
behind us in the product of their manu
Mlunfcpia but about two
Yaukee
rs and agriculture
fi.shcricH,aud proba
'hoit> fisheriOH product of
d annual product from
this peninsula of $42,502,282 according to
the census of 187»», and tbo total product
lias doubtless largely increased «ince thon,
Sitting at the bead of so rich, popu
lous aud productive a territory' as this, a
territory, the laud of which is growing
richer from year to year, and with varied
KiuftU industries scattered all over it, "Wil
ght to persistently seek its
trtuk. and if it becamo ablo to secure that
trade,alone,it won't! be twice tbo commer
cial city that it is. From year to year the
trade of Wilmington merchants down the j
peninsula extends, but there is not half .
the persistent effort there should be to
Btill further 'extend it and to increase it
whore it ha« gone already. No agency
that cau knit the peninsula more closely |
together should be
factures,
millions ahead of us, while
Vermont does not jjroduco quite u ihird
tlinn we do. Add to these
product« «?f manufac
$7,350 from IîcJ»wai
bly half of lh
Maryland, worth $95, 27.» and $10,8U<
from mining and quurry ing in Dej^F
i
I
glocted, for oll such I
tend to nv^e Wilmington ita metropolis
and burV_ " v *"
ponde r on the solMI facta
fore, them and think whether there is not
a held for further effort at their very door*.
J
John
J.
very
.. . the
The new art of poikilofraphy, which we m#de
mentioned some days ago as the disoovery
Ij0ndon flrm c f nhotograpew, has from
* p . . t
been examined by eeveral ber
English artiste, who declare that it is cloge€
likely to exercise a oonsHerable influence '
in a j^ont extraordinary and gratifying der
degree to redu0 e the cost of.really fine and
Vjdu#dde copies of the works of great than
ia K - id *w duplicates of rare of
masters. It:m suia um aupuww« of
lkud delicately executed paintings have been
made fidelity to the original
connoisseur is under the necessity of
nmking K oloM examination to dirtinguUU
the copy .from the genuine picture, xne
exact nature of the process by which tbo
pictures are made in'at present a secret,but
1 'th*t the first stage
is understood that the nm wag I
a simp ® P I
-TSphic negative of the crigina y
° intim» from which are developed by I
** • i _-r.ii-.p1v mechanical fin
manipulations entirely mechanic«', nn
ished duplicates marrelously exalt in tnc
imitations of the color and tho tone of the
The London Daily Tele
obtain our infor
have laid be
A Hew Art.
it
art ie
the
the
the
hun.
the
original work.
graph, from which
mation, says that in the pictures already
made by this process the variety of tex
and surface whioh the hand of the
artist has transferred from nature to tho
the half-tints, deepening into
tu re
canvas,
dark shadows, and evon the softest aud
produced with u
faintest outlines
truthfulness which has never been pre
other inode of
viously obtained by any
copying. The definition of poiklograpby
is the art of depicting in diverse polors.
... , . . . , , i
Washington journal ln Iho
f that city, and last Friday \
FttftitiuH O(Metals.
These disgraceful iwsnnlU by public
getting entirely too common,
officials
And the offenders should be made exam
would effecl
pies of in Buch a manner
ually deter other pugilistically disposed
*0*3 from indulging in such
public
shameful performances, ifo ni
a United States official, has the right,
however much ho may feel aggrieved, to
and seek to redrets
fancied, by
not
ignore tho law
wrongs,
personal violence toward those, at whose
imagines he has, received
In thie country there is
conduct
real
hands he has,
injury,
oxcuso for such
(hat
dispatches from Balti
yeeterday, and Postmaster Tyler,
who so far forgot his duiy us 4 citizen
to deliberately violate the law by assault
who bad provoked him, should
ported i
ing a
be punished by l prompt dismissal from
office, aud all office-holders guilty of riw
!s should be served in
like
ilar oltei
manner.
no were treated to
tho United
Not many weeks ago
the spectaclo of the Solicitor
States Treasury engaging in fisticuffs with
I
editor of
another equally disgraceful affair took
place ut the Capital betweon Judge Wright,
of ludiaun.und
Dolauo, tbo former being tho aggressor.
Its enough to have Judges aud Solicitors
of tho Treasury mixed up iu such disrepu
table scrapes, but when it ccmes to post
masters also, it is really too bad,and some
thing ought tc b.o done to check tho evil.
-Secretary of tho Intel ior
Prcsldci
plain
The Prcsldci
Tho President's messago is printed clee
documcut to
where in full, and is not
call foi extended comment,
d brief
It h
statement of tho reasons 1
is could well bo
calling the extra ecssi
id it wisely urges that prompt
army of
of
made,
provision bo made for paying
tho si
authorized by law without
si der what changes, if any,
gonization
The
stopping to
shall bo made ii
its
other
strength,
ce^sary to bo provided for
equal business-like
numerical
deficiencies
mentioned with
conciseness.
Tho recommendation
participation of the United States i
International Exhibition at Taris and the
ri«ou Congress, P*e well
deration und tho fir«t of
îernlug the
the
Inter." ationui
worthy of
them demauds prompt action,if any is to
be taken. The whole message is f
of the way in which a mail should
ho has to say in tho smallest possible
lei
all
ber ot words.
The Town Couucil of Ayr, Scotland j
rather noyol plan of
has introduced
npetition. Having decided to erect a
town ball it announced that
pre
warded to each
mium of M'J 5 would bo
architect whoso design for tho building
should be
•jected, while tho accepted
design will bo paid foriu tbo usual way. If
awarding prizes worein
uch ft «ysten
VOgne in this country, there
• m'micipolities that could afford to
build even a dog kennel, much less a town
hall. It would bo
not many
Of
good thing though
would-be architects.
for s
of
no Aoe for tho week end
article discussing tho financial
aspect of affairs iu Greece tho London
lit remarks that if any of the
Ia
foreign creditors of that country still
tertuiu the expeuiuiou of dividends, tho
recent report of Mr. Windham, British
Secretary of Legation at Athens, will go
far to dispel it. The report refereed to,
of which the Economist give
says tho deficit
double what was
ab.stiaot,
this year is
pated, and that tho
finançai plight of the country is about as
bad as it is possible for it to be.
of Are good looking men so scarce down i
Georgetown that tho Indies look with fav
prisoners, if they have_the good
fortune to bo handsome? There used to
to be «luitô a number of not only good look
iug, but handsome, men there, llavo they
all moved away or got married?
a The Georgetown people do not appear
to ho very enthusiastic supporters of Mr.
Martin'« claims to tho Democratic Con
"Wil- gressioual nomination according to tho
its letter from a correspondent, printed elsc
that
the
the j
half .
to
it
| \
CURRENT LI TKRATURE.
's L
Litte
in;; October 13th, contains the b< ginning
i of a serial by tho author of that eh
I «tory "Patty." bosides tbe usual amount
d valuable
tmng
of other interesting
w volume began with October. Pub
I fished by Littell A Gay, Boston.
jour BOOMS.
•Ter,
"under
became
opponent«.
Robert
and father
Washington
been
A
J B LliaitaosM e V», »... j
The twelfth volume of the "Memoirs of
John Quinoy Adame," receatly issued by
J. B. Lipphasett à Oo., completes that
very extensive and valuable work—one of
the moat important contributions
m#de to Ae printed hbtoiy of the
republic. This volume (mens with extracts Rational
from ths Diary of April, 1848, when the ftboilt
venerable statesman waa sitting as a mem- p Ur po«e
ber of the Twenty-eighth Congress, and Oregon
cloge€ witti his death. February 23d, 1848. CO utidenee
' Neariy half the pages are devoted to a negotiator.
Ärt jwäää
der ,, d ea8y Q f consultation. up, and
when Mr. Adams died he had more uj
than half oompleted his 81st year, a spun
of life not exceeding, it is true,the average rtba tract,
of the earlier statesmen in our history, but the
^ ageH c f those more the
^«nUy departed. His father died at 91, raucb
Jefferson at 88, Madison at 8. r >, Monroe at dliyg 0
Adwn8 did| to the momeut of seixuro by timeg
b and of death, and scarcely any of war .
them had tilled so wide a range of place«, believed
He had aooompanied his father to trance, j^ber
I wll en the latter went to that country as mtt n;
I Minister, in 1778, and almost from that y 0tt j
y me forward was constantly iu the public Anil
by I service. Private secretary, in his loth f rom
fin- year, to Francis Dana, oar tiret accredited gU g 6 l
5^ ^ to Bus«., th?
tnc ^ BppoiotM j by Washinglou, ln 17»t, for j nR
the Minister to Holland, and in 1797, by ms a
father, Minister to Prussia, lu lot)-, ho
was elected to the Massachusetts Legisla
ture, and the next your to the Luited
States Senate. In 18u9, Madison sent him
envoy to RuaeiA, and Czar Alexander
reoeived him. Than he acted
behalf of the United Stetes, with Henry
Olay, Albert GallaSu, James A. Buynrd,
Jonathan Russell, as negotiator of the
Ghent treaty, by which tho war of 1812
was closed, and following that he became
Minister to Great Britain. From 1817 to
1825 he was Secretary of State iu .he
Cabinet of Monroe, and from 1825 to 1828
President of the United States. Then,
instead of subsiding into the quietude of
elected to Congress, aud
ain, without interval, re
seized in his seat,and
died in tbe very chambers of the Capitol
fit close to uis eminent career.
The entries in tbe diary in this
are of interest scarcely inferior to tuose
which havo preceded, and they include
many very vigorous remark« and criti
cisms. It was during the period which
they cover that tho annexation cf Texas,
thut scheme to counterbalance in behalf
of slavery, the rapid growth of the free
States, was consummated, aud against
this, at every step, Mr. Adams contended.
When, iu June, 1811, it temporarily failed
in the Senate, ho recorded it as "a deliver
, I trust, by tbo special interposition
of Almighty God, of my country, aud of
human liberty, from a conspiracy compar
able to that of Lucius Sergius OatUina."
The annexation of Texas, bo declared,
would be the first step to the couqucst of
all Mexico—a possibility that wo may
especially consider.
During this period, also, tho dispute
with Great Britain over the Oregon
boundary, received discussion in Con
gress, beginning with the extreme demand
for the lino of "fifty-four, forty," and
onding with the compromise on the forty
ninth parallel. Mr. Adams, upon this
question, sustained vigorously the right of
the United States to tho disputed territory,
earnestly B p-* , ' a "" hr ' half o! ^ After
speech upon the subject, January 2d,
184«, there is this outry iu the diary :
i "Iu coming down stairs from
Iho „ Mr . ,l 0 l m w. Houston,
Friday \ m .. m i>©Y of tho Htnto of Deiawavi
troduced himself to
he concurred entirely with t
which I lias just delivered."
Of tho administration of tho public
service in those days, wo get
by a careful rending of tbp diary. Noth
ing is «aid, it is true, of the disgraceful
bribery of Senators nnd Representatives
to noth
ed to par
ted Slates
h
wVxiFSïUîâ!
tex
the
tho
into
When
All
With
But I
Peso«
greater
value,
esteemed
ceive
hrough
Market
now
aud
u
pre
of
obscurity, he
again and agi
elected, until n
The
In
public
exam
effecl
in
post
district
soason
lmd
the
ciul
where
purses.
men
of a
of
each
stores
with
fogs,
the
and
It
1
Mi-.
such
right,
to
redrets
by
not
whose
fall
(hat
Balti
Tyler,
assault
should
from
riw
like
th<
to
United
with
I and
a m
tho
a Whig
, had in
, mill told ir.« thut
took
Wright,
aggressor.
Solicitors
disrepu
post
some
evil.
r.utimeutH
ior
light
by Texas scrip, (bought at nt
iug before annexation, und 1
when, by that measure, the 1
ponsible for its full payment,)
other interesting
became
but there
curious revelations,
tho clai
which for two years had lie#
the Treasury Department, but without
plain «UCC6H3, the auditing and accounting offi
?fusing to allow it.
believed it just, but though he hail more
visited tho Treasury to present
.1
t
of the estate of William Otis.
I
clee
to
Red uj
Mr. Ad.
1
well bo
prompt
army of
than
this view, had accomplished nothing. Bui
finally a representative of tho estate had
employed a beuator. Air. Merrick, of
Man land, and this gentleman bad gone to
the President, (Tyler,) in the last hours
of hi« administration, and had procured
from him, after two personal visits i
day, a written order to the Treasury offi
cers to allow tbo claim, upon which, that
lnd through
dy for pay
without
if any,
other
for
of
is
re
day, it had bue>
and the
well
fir«t of
tvl.
all tue offices, and
nient. For this the 8 ;u.
received a fee of $500, and there bemg
odd $112.19 in the claim, ho " expressed a
lively desire" for it, also: Buch was the
Senatorial fashion of that time, it appear«.
dal« came to
the
the
!
is to
- House, too, Hftd nc
tlie surface. 0& U J - McNulty, the
Clerk, iu January, 1845, waafounutC
drav.u large :.:ipi s from tho Treasury, and
used them in outside operations. The
account of his contingent fund was
$75,000 short, of which a part, it
presumed, could be
neither of these cases, perhaps, w
scandalous as tbe frauds and speculations
the appropriation« for Indian
purposes, including the shameful Scminola
War in Florida. It was notorious that
tho appropriation bill passed iu February,
1815, contained largo items for tho owner«
of fugitive sIuvch, who had
the " overglades," tho ile
nully for " important
tho Commanding General!
this w
Mr. Adams records:—
"-aggravated by fraudulent
charges for the pretended increase of the
slaves, while fugitive«, aud hundreds of
thousands of dolT
due to tho Indians, to pay for fictitious
m and their pretended iu
In
lei
all
I
But
ed.
Scotland j
plan of
roil.;, (tl. - il !
erect a
a
pre
each
building
away to
being nomi
•udered
accepted
way. If
worein
But
tho worst of the cauo ; it
afford to
a town
many
though
deducted from
runaway sure
crease. "
In November, 1841,
ventiou" was held at Bulti
Adams attended, and
dent. There
tlio first
Delaw
Adams returned to Washington, "and
thinking it fair to leave Judge Hall to
preside, 4 took lejjve of tlio Convention |
before adjourning st i o'clod,; upon which
they passed a vote of thanks."
Thu departure of Louis McLane for
Liverpool, in July, 1815, to u&junio tho
dtilio« of Minister to Great Britain,
some sharp observations in tbe diurv.
Mr. Adams thought that Mr. McLane, in
the Presidential contest in tlio House of
Representatives, iu 1825, had not acted in
Jitter wa« then the rep
ue Id in his
hands, alone, the vote of a State,
cy to the vote of
V irginla.
Captain Allen McLane,
for his hold sol
dicriug in the Revolution, hud been a
Federalist "of the l;otti ni Liclal," :.:ul
Washington had appointed him first marshal
of litilaware, and afterward Collector of
Customs, at Wilmingtou, the lutter posi
tion remaining in his hand« all through
the administration of John Adams, Jeffer
, Madison, and Monroe, up to the very
time of this Presidential contest in the
House in 1825. By a change in the luw,
however, procured by Crawford, tbe Sec
I rotary of the Treasury, who w_s hinisel
oue of the Presidential competitors, thi
terms of appointment, instead of being
week end- indefinite ÀÔ before, had been xuftdo to run
but four years, euu ÎJ A gentle
Mr. A«'
financial
London
of the
"Lord's Day Con
. Mr.
made the 1
Vico Presidents,
g Willard Hall, of
still
tho
British
will go
to,
•d b
e. After two days' sessions, Mr.
ab.stiaot,
year is
that tho
about as
down i
fav
good
used to
look
llavo they
appear
of Mr.
Con
to tho
elsc
good faith.
resentative of Dei
« quid in valuo and pule
New York
father,
distinguished
Uis
:
ginning
amount
am« believed, dc-sin d
u ot reappointment. L
for Cm
tmng
•If K
1, it
therefore, voted Del 1
being
their ballots for him.
Pub
I
of the four States
Mr. Adams, liow
•Ter, became j eaidant, but he again
Alton McLane Collector, a r ter
oined the Jackson m y,
Buren,*' und
lirais jo
"under tbe win
became
opponent«.
Robert Owen, the Rmark enthusiast,
and father of Robert Dale Owen, visited
Washington ; in the spring of 1846. Ho
been lecturiiig and oiroulating his
the "The Now Moral World and
Rational System of Socioty," and was now
ftboilt to depart for England, with the
p Ur po«e of promoting a settlement of tho
Oregon boundary dispute, having no small
CO utidenee in bin own ability as n volunteer
negotiator. In the course of conversa
sää-äsä
up, and tbo diary say s :
uj told him.
to wur and peace, considered in the
rtba tract, I agreed with him, and with all
the benevolent and humane throughout
the world I held it in utter abhorrence, as
raucb M tho Roman mothers in the
dliyg 0 f Horace and of Augustus Ciusar;
timeg aud O0Cfts i O ns of dire necessity for
war . andt philosophically speaking, 1
believed that war was not a corrupter, but
j^ber a purifier, of the moral character of
mtt n; that peace was the period of corrup
y 0tt j 0 tho human rat,n "
Anil Mr. Adams then quoted a passage
f rom "Paradise Lost," where the Arch
gU g 6 l Michael, having foretold tof Adam
th? fortune. ' 0 , U is f.llon posterity, »of
for j nR „n the horrors o( war, then turned
a picture of their condition i
thereupon Adaui says :
to
of
h
ITS
gs of V
of tlie President's most earnest
Tho
day
the
W.
ton,
.that with
to
laid
tho
an
.
"I Md hope
coned.
d win
When vtolfi
All would have theu gone well, peace
have crowned.
With length of liap.iy dsye the race
But I wss fsr deceived, for now 1 »oe
Peso« to corrupt, no less ihsa war to
Space will not permit us to purs
greater leugth a review of tho 'diary. Iu
value, as a contribution to our history, is,
have already said, very great,
library of any pretension enn
esteemed complete without it. Wo re
ceive the volume from the publishers
hrough Charles Thomas & Co., 421
Market street.
i
of
d
be
At
to
ing
the
action
MI DDLETOW.
The Rapid Grown» of the Town
In Promlucnce—Ita Fair—Governor
(loch ran.
bit
Gorraipondtincfl of ETery Evening and C.-.mmorcm .
Middletown, Oct. 15.—No town i
Delaware
in proinincuco Middletown lms bad in the
post five years. With a rich agricultural
district the town is made to flourish wlieu This
manufacture« are few. Tho summer
soason closes with few regret« to those who and
lmd a fruit or grain crop, for tho results of mado
the sale of those crop« have been hem fi
ciul to nearly every farmer. Here, us u > - warGi
where on tho peuuisula, there are> iuîl
purses. Realizing this fact our busiues p r
men havo commenced their
with good hopes No
of a successful season. As a guarantee
of their confidence in tho stuto of trade,
each firm bos laid in an unusually luigo
ery description. days
it is noticed that a
first-class harness store, two clothing of
stores and other business stands have been
opened lately and are centrally local d. p
with all these,however, three largo build- for
fogs, imitable fox factories, are uuoooupitd. the
At one time our principal carriage manu
factory was known to take the lead in ^
building first-class carriages ; but though
putatiou rt-muinsuuimpnired toib
present clump carriages, of inferior con
fctniction, havo forced the firm to reduce I.
the number built.
There is every reason to believe that we
«hall have a city in a few years. Mid .U
ol d for it* found i U yu, 21,
and is canvassed more by Philadelphia, )V.
New York, Baltimore, and Wilmiugton Dr.
"drumraers," than any town south of it.
It is now made the headquarters for u'l
neuch news, nnd all peach and railroad
1 n who iind hottl nccommoilltio is ns :
ch of an attraction ns nujtbinc olso. 1
Tbo talk of tnukiug tbo fair ut l over of
i-reutor intcrost than onr own, natural;.
produces sjieoulalion. With n foundaUon ;
successfully built, tbo l'eut.«»!» A,trient.
it nnd PomoloKicnl A.sociution will un- '
it, st, but continuo to improv ;
their exhibitions, under tl.o patronage , .
uu uf Goyernur Cochran, Ron. E.i
buulsbuiy and B. T. Big
Mi-. ."auRbury
boost of tlio rapid growth
fall
pply of goods uf
in new enterpri
th< i
.1
t
though B.
nom« from Kent county. 1
littio written of Governor !
that few outsiders know uf him.
I said to a strango gentleman from Mary-;
laud not long since: "TilCTÛ gois Gov
time desig
ent) i
' Bret !
i
i.
AlthouRh sow !
lui., d ill-f. oltn > :
defeated aid their
1
XI
ernor Coehr.
unting the Governor. The
replied:
'' at tho
f w hut Stat
despite the modesty of domw
permits strangers to
and office,
higher cut
'Govev
r which I Ih
ignorant
Cochroi
<
held i
than he did when elected,
of his appointments havo
toward« him by tho
friends, his sober and imps
is nut doubted by those who
have been told that he
r'ould not appoint any
who was addict i to
this
re coghizus the odvauceuici.
n..ranee cause with interest.
al jud;,mei.
a
to
i
•centl
fli
!
drink. 'Whether
lira hut h :
no», I
NEW VASTER,
I it (errs Una: OiMoitverle
«ol lloiutu
:ricic«l
— Ne
j
Castle Oct. 15. During th !
' ' ' rbiJii Jiav. ^
•d to tlio
livingladanv
of the loutlstat-;.
u when the paper wn-. 1
being th- 1
io
it<
I*iuly
A Tomifc
Flillmlelpliln.
N
repairs to Immanuel Church,
just been completed,it beci
remove the puipir, wne
beneath it a collection
«fcc., among which was a paper
a brief history of tbo church,
placed there in 1850 at the time tlio pulpi
erected. Thu contculs of tin* pope
highly interesting, givi
valuable information
cliurcb, of which few
knowledge. Only
who
!Le Tuud
to
Tiny were
living, that
written, i
Hon. George B. Rodney, of this 0
that time tho church lmd fifty.li
municonts, tin* Sunday school
teachers and eighty-live scholars,
parish library four hundred v
The repairs then made to tlio church were
designed by John Notman, Esq., architect,
jxecuteil by James M. Di\
carpenter, of Wilmington. There v.
also found copies Of tho Delaware, ffy
At
|
th •
«Ul .LS.
and almanac«, and from tho reading Ot fcho
paper mentioned they were expected to
remain there a much longer time. A 11
addition was made to it by tho Rev. .Mr |
Spencer aud it was re placeu.
A one-story frame building lias l-oen
erected on Vino street between Delaware
nnd Harmony, designed as a school-room
:ed by Miss Lizzie Gun,. ,ill
and her private school. This will L ut
great assistant» to Miss G. and enable her
to havo a permanent place for the nc. -m
mudation of her pupils. She is, witliout
doubt, an excellent teacher of small
childrcu. aud parents inn y entrust their
littio ones to her charge with the full
assurance that they will reccivo faithful
amt cartful ioatnictiou.
A young lady of this city, «hilo in
Philadelphia a few days ago, stepped i„to
u store to make somo light purchase, after
paying for which, she put tier pocket
book in the outside pocket of he r d, «
Upon reaching tho street she felt tor the
pocket-book to put it iu a safer j :, e but
j
i
1
d is to bo
it
sn't "tli.ir.'
Rat lu r
place to carry valu:
pockets
«, thO:.,
by In
•rreü
«pondent writes tint the !
town was enlivened Monday night by a j
serenade to Mr. Johu Pilling und bride, i
who had just returned from their wedding j
tour. A largo number of p upl«! were on
hand and tbo music whs discoursed by tho
Citizen« Cornet Band. The sercuaders
were treated to au elegant repost. 1
N
k
GRAND LODGE L 0.0. F.
The
ITS SESSIONS 1RSTMRDA1 AFTER
NOON AND LAST EVENING.
of the
forth
in the
He
Navy
realize
tend
affairs.
grown
lions
hove
has
priations
needs
lieve
special
that
Navy
tion
there
cretion,
not,
but
in
not
tions
Tho Ba
Hi
ta fcj the
■I Mbs
Grand ■awter-A^Jeei
DU.
The GrandLodge of the State. I. O. O. F.,
Fellows' Hell yester
day afternoon at 1.J50, end prooeeded with
the transaction of business. The Grand
Master appointed J. J. McMullen, Isaac
W. Ilallam, John T. Jakee, D. W. Brere
ton, and James H. Appleby a Committee
Dues aud Benefits, with instructions to
report at tb o uext session.
An amendment to the constitution, re
ducing the rate of percentage from ten
introduced and
reassembled at
to «.-ight per cent.
under the rule.
laid
Printine was author
copies of
The Oommittee
ized to have printed five hun
tho constitution of the Grand Lodge.
A memoir of tho decease of members of
Gharity Ix>dgu, and of the Grand Lodge,
read by J. J. Boyoe, P. G., and
ordered to be spread upon the journal
replies of the Grand Master to the
Master of Ontario were approved,
the law and
Tbe
Grand
an being in accordance with
usage« of the Order.
of
orrioxus.
elected officers for
ELECTION
The following
tho ensuing year :
. John J. Gallagher, M. W. Grand Master,
Hope, No. 21.
Thomas J. Stevenson, R. W. D. G.
Master, Philodeinic, No. 7.
Edgar Pierce, R. W. G.fWardcn,
Fairfax, No. 8.
Isaac W. Flallcm, R. W. G. Secretary,
Hope, No. 21.
R. H. Ewbanka, R. W. G. Treasurer,
Eden, No. 34.
Vi. 0. Carnegie, R. W. G. Grand
Marshal, National, No. 32.
E. 11. Spencer, It. Vi. G. Rep. to G.
L. U. 8., Delaware, No. 1.
David Downs, Janitor, Jefferson, No. 2.
An amendment nbolishiug tho offleo of
Recording Secretary iu subordinate lodges
...... defeated, and the Grand Lodge then
took a recess until 7.30.
secure
means
the
i
It
be
all
would
when
d
fixing
rosp
4
At the above hour the Lodge reassem- in
an additional number of members ! ests
admitted. The percentages paid in j is
on funeral assessments were direoted I
to be refunded to tho several lodges mak- I
ing such over-payment. The decision of |
the Grand Master in the appeal from the I law,
action of Hope Lodge, directing that a sure
fanerai benefit be paid, was approved,
EVENINO SESSION.
bit d ami
the
This was a very important
The officers «looted wei
and tho following app
of mado i, y the W. M. G. Master :
fi- George Hughes, Grand Guardian, Dela
> - warGi No. 1.
iuîl j. r Martin, Grand Conductor, Chosen
p r i endH> No. 85.
Joseph D. Patton, Grand Herald, Hope,
No 2 1,
Rev. G. L. Moore, Grand Chaplain,
Brandywine, No. 18.
\ motion was adopted defining thirty
days os a month for lodge purposes,
a Proposed legislation changing the mode
of representation was acted upon adversely,
been ^ rising vote of thanks was tendered to
d. p r q Cooper, retiring Grand Master, I
for ^flicieucy aud promptness in performing .
the duties of tbo office.
At y 30 the Grand Lodge adjourned j
in ^ uc ^ .
' BTlvn . vn nmrvrTTEFs I
„ bt.kdino oomtrnnia.
con- The Grand Master of the Grand Lodge, c
I. O. O. F., of this State, has, since its
adjournment, appointed the following
we standing committees for tho ensuing year:
.U- State of the Order-Joshua Mans No.
yu, 21, chairman; E. O. Mooro, No. 4; Johu ;
)V. Boon, No. 21; John L. Pierson, No. 1; j
Dr. E. W. Cooper, No. -Û*
it. Legislative Committee— E. F. James, . t
u'l No. 34, chairman; Charles Patman, Jr., |
No. 9; I. K. bhortman, No. 6; R. H.
ns : McDnuol, No. ïl; J E. Nicholson No. 14.
1 Omuütutun» and I^ws-Wilham II.
of Eoulk No. 20, «hnirmnni J. M. \Vh.tford,
No. 31; Jnuica r. lluytH, No. 10; D.
; Wilson. No. 18;Dr. fJ ; T, Ma.wcil, No. S.
Corrcpondonoo-Edwin Hurab No. 4,
un- ' cbnirmnn; B. C. Barker, No. 3, Dr. J. U.
; Chandler, No. 37; E. It. Jester, No. 3S,
, . Henry K. Bennett, No...
E.i Committee
!
duly installed for
not
for
,
ointments
;
Appeals
B. Hyland, No. 26, chairman; 8. R. Law.
1 son, No. 2; James H. Appleby, No. 23; C.
! Spoorl, No. 29; G. W. Williams, No. 12.
him. Committee on Printing L W. Hallam,
Mary-; No. 21, chairm^^. Thomas E- Young,
Gov- ^o. 84; Arthur Lewis, No. 8; Mar^t
desig- Chambers, N°* m* 0. Golorn, No. 11. !
ent) i bpeeial Committee on Dues and Benefits !
Bret ! —J. J- McMullen, No. 21, chairman ;
W. Hallam, No. 21 ; D. W Br era ton;
i No. 15; John T. Jakes, No. 20; James
i. IT. Appleby, No. 23. i
Committee— W. II. Cloward, I
sow ! No. 84, chairman; J. P. O'Daniel, No.
oltn > : 2t : B. F. Bartram, No. 26 ; Daniel Farra,
their No. 8 ; Elba P. Crossan, No. 22.
Unit Committee—William H. Everatt,
tjo. ", otndrmnn; Jacob But*, No. kit;
O. Huxtou, No. 31 ; L. 1'. Adair, No.
1 ; John P. Taylor, No. 34.
Committco on Accounts—P. 0. Daily,
No. 31. chairman; Löwin T. Grubb, No.
A It. MnuaMp. No. 17; M 8. Bnrlowt
•3d.
William
which I Ih
Fi
i
fli
h :
*. 19 : J. JL ^citing,
THE rENINS ULAR PRESS.
Cilltoriul ( tuumruli K'pon C'urreut
Topics by tlie Dt ltmnre anil Fntlcrn
Miure XetvsjMiruir».
The .\'em and Advertiser says that the
recent disastrous shipwrecks at tbe Dela
ware Breakwater will go far toward
vinci . g ship owners aud masters Jthat their
liv s'and property ure much safer at
than when lying in such a harbor. It
thinks that with a good ship, any prudent
captain who has «ufficient warning to give
him time to make u good offing, would
prefer the open sea to such a trap a« the
Breakwater has proved to be, und it sug
B* 8 * 8 ttiat our Senators and Représenta
lives iu Congress might remler the country
8om0 service if they could find time to
study this matter, and uige such changes
as would tend to make tho Breakwater a
real harbor, and not a sham
Tho Middleto
ex-Gove
Una,
Transorfpit alludes to
Chamberlain, of South Caro
of tho carpet bag
,s "the last
er," and is of tlie opinion that he
.t the capital of the Pal
far differ
lotto Stale i
building from
?apic4 in that
which he
he
i''"j« _ , . .
The Newark Ledger does ntwonder toat
the jury in the Bliss case at Philadelphia,
| ^ilcd to agree, after listening to # the
crazy charge of the crazy Judge Briggs.
A'' or genüeiuanly and dignified language
m discussing tbe merits of a political
opponent, tlio Denton Union tak
prizo. Referring to Stale Senator Fields
announcement thut he will visit and speak
in every village and town 1
county, it says: "This cheap talk is not
worth much. Almost any man so largely
uuppliod as Senator Fields with the bel
lows apparatus can blow most lustily. We
have seen a mole bovine sometimes pretty
good at the bellowing business,
Tho UlieBtertown 3 ranter,ft u outhor
il J' ,or »>*« statement that tlie temparanco
refomiere of Kent county propose to test
tbl ' " 6 "»° of 11,6 P e0 P ,e , ln re «" d I® 0 "
u P tiou al lbe homing election, by having
'he words "for local option and ' against
local option" printed at the bottom of all
tlckol» used on that occasion. The Tran
script approves the idea, and says it will
afford tbe citizens a fair and reasonable
j me do of expressing their sentiment*, and
i also give to the members of tho State Leg
1 l «biture a safe foundation c p which to baso
the
Carol im
! their actions,
j Tlio Cecil Whig says that it was
i munism that carried Ohio fortheDemo
j ernts. It consoles itself, however, with
the reflection that the victory will be short
live tl, for the reason, as itututes it, that "a
nun; taste of Democratic rule always turns
1 the country's stomach.''
THE NAVX DEPARTIS * .
The Amenât of the Del
A
cltsri Ira the llepnrluient m Hi -
ported bjr the beerelnry.
Washington, Oct. 1«.— Tbo Secretary
of the Navy has prepared u report setting
forth the amount of the existing deficiency
in the Navy Department, which will be
transmitted to-day with the Message.
He says his brief connection with the
Navy Department has enabled him to
realize some of the difficulties that at
tend the administration of its financial
affairs. They have in some measure
grown out of the diversion of a
lions from special objects to w
hove been applied by law. This probably
has grown out of tbo fact that tbo appro
priations frequently are less than the
needs of the service, but be does not be
lieve it to justify tlicui in doing thiB for
special purposes, for tbo reasou. he says,
that it would enable the Secretary qf the
Navy to substitute his
tion for tbo requirements of law ; and ai
there would be no legal limit to this dis
cretion, the deficiencies would exist
not, according to bis pleasure. "I
unwilling to assume this responsibility,
but prefer to administer tho department,
long as it shall remain under my charge,
in strict obedience to tbe will of Congress.
"Deeming it best ut tbo commencement
•ice to adopt fin s course, I have
not allowed any portion of tbe appropria
tions for tbo present fiscal year to be
expended before the year c< >inuieuccd.
"My primary object ir this
of administration by
ual -expenditures of
bo more easily and
m
ppropria
hich they
on
tho
inn
sort
a
The
of
the
of
was
ÜOT
n official discre
of my
to
secure a system
means of which the
the department tm
accurately ascertained., and causes of
deficiency, when it ».hall occur, can be
certainly and ^latisfactorily known.
iomy could
It was believed that 'oettc-r
be assured by this -metl od, inasmuch as
all bureaus and brunches of the department
would bo held 4 .o stricter accountability
when it is understood that money appro
priated for 'jug object shall not bo
expended for another, aud that when :
proves ins officient the object _ shall be
ubandont d until further appropriations by
difficulty in
a
it
Congre^. There will be
fixing upon the department the measure
rosp onsibilitv contemplated by law.
4 -It is the right and duty of Congress
direct such results to bo accomplished
in its opinion public necessities and intcr
! ests may require. It is not tbo right
j is it the duty of tbe department to " e ®h
I accomplish results not contemplated
I directed by Congre««,
of | "The department >
I law, aud exists only at the will aud plea
a sure |of the law-making power. It is
responsible for not doing what tlio law
bo done, but it is not responsible
accomplish what law docs
of
to
to
or
to
I tions of tho present fiscal year, and there
. fore be usIih for the deficiency so that tbe
accounts of tho last fiscal year may be
j properly closed." .
. The report then shows that tho dcficicn
I cios ruu blluk a krgo period of
Uoara, nnd proceeds to explain . _
c i eU cic«. It show« that tho department,
its l)y Averting appropriations, has for u
ser i e8 of years buenenabled to pay a larger
8um t } I lu t b 0 appropriations for tbo
No. r> and tbl u explains at length how it
; don«. iutd goes back to show Its p
1; j tied operations.
The report concludes: "Tho nppropria
. t i OU8 u f these sum« by Congress will, it is
Jr., | believed, enable tho department to avail
H.
14.
II.
D.
S.
4,
U.
3S,
a creature of the
! directs
for failing
not direct.
"Where, therefore, just relations be
tweeu Congress and tho department exist
there will be no difficulty in fixing the
measure of responsibility upon tho former
for making or omitting to make appropri
ation«, and upon tho latter for expending
omitting to expend as the law
mit und«.
"Having adopted this rule, ho found it
«•vsary to omit the pay of the navy for
tho lost quarter of the last fiscal year. A
the appropriations for that purpos
insufficient, it was impossible to make pay
, meats without drawiug

the approprio
tbo defi
; itself more satisfactorily of the advantages
arising from a more prompt settlement of
accounts of paymaster* iu making up it«
annua' estimates of expenditures, and
tnereb'y enable Congress to nücerte.iu with
greater accuracy tlio Bums
ccssary for the support of the
believed also that it will
eco.nonjy iu thé expenditure
y. It is
greater
I
Cases—^Tiro Trial »**
liurrinr-j.
Corrwpopiienco of rvery Kv.nins
Georgetown, Del., Oct. 11.—As lias
been tbo case for tho last year or two the
judges of our Supreme Court anil Court
n f Oyer nnd Terminer arrived by the
afternoon train. At least three hundred
i pcoplo summoned to bu hero by
I 10 o'clock a. m., awaito^ (heir
arrival, but not all of them
patiently. Very deep and earnest mutter
inps, coupled with the question an to liow
ike morû was tu be racùüol, wero heard
more frequeutly ttrnn tlicy wore six
months nyo. "Why hundreds of people,
many starting before day, and CüâiinL! 1
twenty-five mites to be on tittle—for many I .
were oblinr.l ; 0 walk—shcnld fco kept I
wnitbg for three men to .Imply lmiplio..
ble, and 1> (»using the talk the* nconver
.loi would bo wholesome, and it, is plain
before were si many of this
of' thinking because pcoplo arc apt to
talk as they think, Thus far mo have
had a full court, a« is usual during tho
jcupied by tlio business of
ObOKOh'TO I
JirelfftN Who Iterp Pcoplo XVnlllug—
n—Trlvlnl
Tlie Foil Term
f <
a
that
the
ti
State
There havo boon several very unimpor
sault and battery—scarcely
enlioning—so trivial, in fact, that
should havo been in court.
that of State
they nev
Yesterday the first cas
vs. John Gurtz, negro,
with intent to kill t\
indicted for assault
egro woniun, by
Tho c
d tbo defendant found guilty and
i' imprisonment,
shooting with
tried,
sentenced to tivo ye
$1,000 li
To-day the triu
pillory.
.1 of th
Lewes will commence,
fine-looking and hands
tloniPM. They are believed to bo guilty,
but tlio chances are that they will not be
identified. The jrrand jury ha« not been
so active iu fiuihug bills as formerly.
Thomas Z. Burke
iudictediutwo
to kill. Bail i
liquor me
to bo licei
d
tho safe burglars at
They
ely-dressed geu
of MiUsboro',
for assault with i
3 given. The
about iu full force, hoping
..ed, and it is believed there will
applications granted than for
merly, notwithstanding tho long list of
names .j remonstrances—chiefly those of
lit
$1,000
Until advised by tbo Eve
Commercial, tho oldei
never hoard of the
labor reform movement down the Slate.
Evenlno
voter in the
ew political
>ty
icMHpeikke City.
Robbe i
Blk'on Will«, el buturrtay.
On Thursday night the Htoro of William
Masonic building, Cbesa
entered by burgh
.and about $360 in
J. Barwick, in
peake City, wa
safe blown ope
taken. An eutn
store by means of tools taken from a
neighboring blacksmith shop. The safe,
which was to all appearances perfectly '
pregnable, was blown open by means of
powder or other powerful explosive,whioh
was introduced through a hole drilled
through the upper part of the door. Tho
door of the safe
entirely from its hinges.
, tho
money
•as effected to the
«buttered and blown
toallor Drowned
Tlio dead body of
floating
Wednesday afternoon,
tl»o harbor
by tbo captain of tho Babal Jr
schooner that was sunk on the 4 th in staut,
being that of John Miller, a Norwegian
by birth, nnd one of tbe
vessel. The btiuy was in
Cf decomposition and
ognized
, the
of tho
advanced
immedi
ately buried. À coroner's jury rendered a
verdict i
state c
icordanco with the facts.
Silk jewelry, made bright with hand
painting, is shown in novel designs.
SUSSEX COUNTY GOSSIP.
The*
A FLY I NO VISIT TO OEURURTOWN
IN COÜHTTIM E.
Court,
tiou,
namely,
raphy
the
of his
of a
proofs
Albert
hardly
faithful
Tbo
tho
three
their
for
prepared,
•arts
colors
fir«t
of
press,
yellow
yellow
.
a
a
iimuuer
rod
yellow,
picture
colon
•r
tamed
present
new
deport
Mm ich
•raaraal arad PolUirnl Notee-TU*
Herein! Trlsl of tbe IifWM Hnr
The ladlM of «eorielows
patbetle — The *«»■» Foetal
A What la The««bt of H—
m j
tha Darasaerate Think of Col.
tonal Aspirai Ions
Martin's Cong
—Will They Go lor a New Castle
Man in Preference*
rrMpmimnin r.»«*» Kv—-- _
Oeobostowk, Oct. 1«.— I dropped down
on tho rood people of CleorjV'town just, id
tho tall end of court. Erery body is hillt
inn of the trial of the Lowe, burglar«, a
sort of small edition of the somewhat
famous bank robbery affair in Now Casllo
some years ago. _
The supposed criminals
fellows, well dressed, and
gaining unlimited sympathy among the
young ladies of tho town. The dear
creatures visited them frequently at the
prison with words of comfort,and cheer of
a more substantial character, good footl.
The charge of Judgo Comegys, i
what captiously criticized for the mildness
of its wording, but that it was » fair and
proper one is a prevailing opinion among
the members of the Bar.
There seems to havo been little doubt
of the guilt of the prisoners, but tho case
was oue of those where a moral certainty
could not be reduced to legal proof,
verdict of acquittal was greeted with
raptuous applause by the large number of
ladies present, which tho court was com
ÜOT
handi
ceeded i
i
colors.
dubbed
The
polled to check.
The sympathy found a climax upon Inc
day for the departure of tho boy«, aud at
the depot a fair delegation waved them
"I should have hated
of the prettiest girls iu
, "if they had not
~~ handsome."
in
a hearty adieu,
that jury,''said
Georgetown to
acquitted them.They wc
The trial aud its incidents divido the
gos«ip of the town with tho recent postal
change, the displacement of Mr. Lynch
and the appointment of Mr. Maull.
Ouiuiou is divided, aud expressions are
various. Thochaugewas brqughtnbo.it about
through tbe influence of whut is generally wor
known as the «Bti-nnR^mg of theKopuV
licnn party. , Two hi .'Ä "Vt?? ° '»
apainKt Mr. Put
of office, « brou pht arai' «1 '-*
management which we « brought agaiusl j
him and sustained. The charges wer«, viUe
not of a criminal character, and
suspects tho honesty of tho late post
master, but tho faot« so strongly proved
carelessness aud neglect that if lor no other
reason be could have hardly expected re
appointment.
People talk
of Mr. Mardi than of
placement of Mr.
pretty generally felt, independent of
judicious ap
pointment could have been made. Mr.
Maull is rather slow ; bin plnco of
busiiies« where tho post office will now be
located is not convenient, and, although
he is a good Republican nnd lmd the sup
port of Mr. Layton and his friends, who
inode tbe appointment, I am inclined to
u class, regret
live, energetic postmaster
it
is
law
of
to
to
or
tbe
be
of
_
u
it
is
avail
the
to
be
the
law
it
for
A
pay
about the appointment
the dis
Lynch.
It
Bryn
party, thut n

think that the people,
tliat a
not given them.
The transit from tho gossip of tho
postmaster to general county politics
is natural. Ono finds tremendous diffi
culty in mastering Sussex c
To solve a political probier
that the results equal nothing is not
encouraging. Political philosopher« butt
up against their own wisdom oftencr iu
Sussex county than any where else on the
globe. Everybody supposed that Ned
Martin represented Sussex county Con
gressional aspirations, that tho people
down here
biH friends, and in tho fullness of this c
victiou.thc question "You want Mailin
course?" Addressed to a most prominent
member of tho party seemed naturally to
suggest the answer yes. The reply was
direct, emphatic,not to be mistaken, "No,
"H,
;ty politics.
d discove
defi
to
>.!
of
it«
and
with
An« 1 , guch w
tho unfuiling verdict
want Martin,"
of the most luminous light«
of Democracy iu tho county,
opposed to him mo«t decidedly; find Le
se ho represents
and second because ho knows
I doubt if ho would find Les way to Wash
ington without his father."
This opinion scorns general, and if
cau judgo of tho feeling in this part
of the county by what its most promim ut
politicians say, there is litUo Lope of his
obtaining tho support of hm own county
in tho Convention. A gentleman who i
to Mr. 0. C. Stockle
that ho does
"We do
"Wo
is
but himself,
little that
lias
the
Court
the
by r _ ... ...
(heir ,. r \ yausoy, it is stated,
them °î
^ f. ùt ' v . ; rua ^ *»».lf responsible
liow .J ho opinion that it is impossible for
heard M"run to B . ; t ll, u uommuUo fc v, t nt
six "P 10 u njilî. U'n sa io-nie l'roni
. 1 , 11 vo lo-dny.
1 P olltlcmus k>-oo cau uu relied upon
many I . ' v ' ' «sk fur nothing
kept I " "-»ontmn. "Wo will go for »n»
,- 5w V!"'. 1 " colu : ly "fS U " > dcl '* ll ' ou
fro '" Ul '* 1 " u "'J r - wlU l«e«nt,
plain Mother prominent Democrat to
this Boro would ho very nooopUU ...
to
have
tho
y iu politics «ny»
Martin and that
support _
a most docidcd opposition to thut gonllo
existn among other prominent gcntlc
■ill support
ance. 1
H
said
"Mr.
.. . __ .. ,I think
that Mr. Martin would j 10 t carry the
county if ho were homiuuteU, Jacob
Mooro would beat him any time."
I suggested. Mr.
several for Gove
Causey's
, but the impression
seemeu to be that lio did not ut this time
seek the nomination e
Btocklcy does not appear
tions either. Everybody seemed to think
that Mr. Hall would bo nominated for
Governor. But while these feeliur*
influences not yet
_ may sufton them,
think it a stretch of the facts to
that Mr. Martin would fail to oan
county if nominated.
to
the
id ^Mr. C. C.
that
court.
State
assault
hi
he
the
gilt
by
and
to bear which
: i
When tin* fight
approaches nearer it may bo that poli,
ticians may view these things iu a different
light and the opposition to Mr. Martin,
whioh appears to bo of a
character, bu a «rout He.-.', inmliàeit At the
time, with S
Castla unit
guilty,
be
been
at
geu
al
very pc
divided and New
possible, upon Mr.
ss would
Mr. Hall of
If Martin
mt
Lore, his chance
l»i bo Y
The
hoping
will
for
of
of
the nouiiuuliou, anil that bias
not be anything iu fnv
Kent, for Governer is patent,
is defeated I should not be surprised if
Chancellor Saulsbury does
at tho nomination ot Mr. C. 0. btoi;kley
for Governor. He is the most,
nnd popular
lit
terfe
ailable
for that place in Sussex.
the
political
THE CO UNT! COLLECTORS.
A Deport of Their tlflielnl Rtaudluir
by* he"
mnly Trensnrer.
New Castle, Del., Oct. 11.—At the late
meeting of tha Levy Court tho County
Treasurer mado the following statement
showing tho standing of the various
collector« for the years 1876 and 1877 :
William
Cbesa
a
safe,
'
of
drilled
Tho
tho
money
the
M COLLBCTOUfl you I87Ö.
$'1,087.
*,661.
Pencader Hundred..
Red L
Kt. Georitea hundieû _
Appoquinibiiuk hundred
Appoquiuimtuk huu
Kindred.
9.71
•I.
Tolal
COLLECT
*i i .lia.
11S77.
.•',000
i. ot'»'.'.",
J. Lt. Dttrneuter, wlluiiuatou
in .lordwu, OhriatUna . .
J.B Croaaiu. Mill Orcek...
F. Urittlth, W. C. Creek...,
D. McCoy, New ü»»t!e
S. yieuileetn. B-rcader.
J ATT Cl O.
A. «. < Ub
Itt
,00
blown
14.1»
Jol
l
•i 052
1,0
g le, Red Lion
st - G«org
l-olen lerguson. Appoqui
A. Hayden, Jr., Blnekbir«
J. N Orubh, Urandywlne bundled .•
A. GlVeu, WlluttiigrtOU.
J. L, Carpenter. Wlimlu.
John Jordan, Uhrittlana
J R. üroaain. Mi
^•.O)
staut,
ognized
the
iii
... i,
J4U.71
52
tho
advanced
immedi
a
ptou
F. Ot Hath. Whit» (HayCreek
D. McCoy, New Oaatle.
euln, Peuoailer.
. Eagle. Red Lion.
li
s;
S. Cl

A. it Cftborne, St. lleoigea.
Colen Ferguson, Apt>o«|ulnlmluk
A. Hayden, Jr., Blackbird........
hand
3,'
L bi
ruoTOOMAPmita colon:
Maid to Hove
The* Proble
Halved by «Her
Arllul.
Josepli Albert, p
Court, has finally su
tiou, which has thus far baffled him,
namely, by a new prooeadiag in photog
raphy to render the natural colon '
the picture by a photographie steam press
of his ovn construction, without the aid
of a pencil. I have seen some of tho
proofs of such oolored photographs by tliu
Albert press. An expert painter could
hardly givo tho colon of the object
faithful iu living reality and with a distinct
the nicest shades.
Tbo secret of tbe invention consists in
tho analysis of the white light ii
three colon—yellow, blue and red,
their recovery of the three oolovs
for tho press. On a plate, ohemicalhy
prepared, so as to roceive but tb<> yellow
•arts of the light, and the ton of the
colors of the object to be refleeted, t'i.i
fir«t photograph is taken when a negative
of that ptete is at
press, whose cylinder
yellow paint. None but the tones of tho
yellow colora are now men in the impres
. After that the object is photograph
a plate made to reflect but the bluu
undor the press reflects
a blue" impression the cylinder being
with blue paint. In tli<j
iimuuer ho receives but the tone« of I ho
rod colon by means of a third pi ito.
Printing the individual picture« of u
yellow, blue and red
picture is produced true to nature, tbo
colon intermixing by having been printo .
•r each other. The idea, long o r tor .
tamed and prosecuted by AHk . a .
photograph colors, may no • r '
considered as not feasible. T
present to foretell wlmfc
new inv< ntion will prod
deport un ate of art.
Mm ich
to tho
inven
tho
d :
dy
i
ace put under the
is dubbed ovi
with
ed
colors.
This plate
dubbed
each other,
bo
bard
T he W. & ' ^ ^ R#palrfl .
The repairs ( .. . , f wn
mington & Southern raihmed rendered
ueccssary ' *v5 ,1 ™toroad, rendered
about ly e n ' completed ^^great^h H of
wor k wa " as -
and 0 ^ 0rwis ; .Um^ed in
° '» places. New trestlo work ha» be
Put np nt some points. Th« tooomolivo
'-* fln,ft R c d l>y the accident at Waynesburg
j unct ?on, ia stUl at the shops £ Coatei
viUe '
of
of
be
to
At is
revolution the
in tho many
nt
Nine thonsaud pupils demand admise:
to the public sohools of Kansas City.
ItewAHD.'—We 'will pay a reward of <
lioumuid Collar» tor uny oertlttestepublished
11' K Dr. Bull'» Ooush syrup not
ne.— J. C. Meyer 4- Co,. Baltimore,
re*K
.1
ber 1, 1876.
Bryn
Elect ro-voitnir and Alnirnrtlc
P*» Bell« and IlnmU forSelfC'ut
•tor» tbe Ner
PH
«d Debilität..
h
.
%Sf«i^ 0, ftldney
Impotenor, Ml MltruMH, Kt«
w ni". I Hunt '«r 4»d pAiaphl
HhYAN^AÇPLlANoi' <
im
Oe'jBuy!
1*
f.blMjw
A llcnldi Inflncnce.
1« Nervous and Debilitated.
Krst
not
iu
the
to
was
"H,
uoc« M r„iwti
:. ait yan'.s
»-VOLTAIO A
NKTiO aPPLIANUKK.
He
»«J J
Kle-j.
U.l G'l'RlOmr IS NATURE'S rowr
.1.
8c
Dysp^ptl». W
itpib
*ly
»• Spit... «SO..UI
tha Kidiuiys, -
»Ur.
ir
n
>.!
X
petl
riiuiple«
' D1UCSN.
DR. BRYAN,
j.nl-.ljv,
117 K.nst Fifteenth ■
j.nl-.ljv,
117 K.nst Fifteenth ■
A Froe Cure.
V-pti»
I
Ihm», c
ad
ly si
1
We
' tii«
thi
rful it
the
■i,
'ir.

FIRST DOSFi
OH A BOSTOH POLIOS OF /ICEB.
Boston, Ne
tlie spring of 1S6T
ir which had »
|Hio best nied)
v. 15,1871.
IT. R. Stey
D ear Sir
fluivn with fir,
hopricss run.
In attondnneo
but it left me
id almost
our
al advice being
ir
Uifl
orribly
Uns I.
II
1 hips,
ach n'y
»iuo, nacii nm
itod with KiiliK '
di'^iu a ecemoil
i
tel y
yL
plaint, anil no
in'this
jndltior, I was persuaded to try
by a fr lead whom It
anted
\
Ul
d
though
t tho Ii rat done through my
out 1 began
:
tl
Vtiolo HV
, u ?Jly growing hotter fro
».id I followed
until It com yde tel^
t
'1th the Fixuv:
siuca which
my nntlos
i been »hie to pit
officer, enjoyi »u
<b>ubt obout I
a poli.
d
lioaltl
•1 liier«
.. ho er«»
viduoy Comp) all»' alia
LAP A Ÿ ETTE^o^of cal® ,roadway.
lino of Vr.
milur ili
I
All Diseases of the Blood.
If Veoeti.ve will relie
pftln, * -l
P'
rlfy and
ch diaoüHcs, rosloi
hefllth after trvb if> «11111
..BiiffcVl , B fcry
if you u eu »till
I« this ■ .eiUciiti
perfe

iat
modi
lus! vo proi
ured? W1
in
it •

1
fill 11 id. It can trulv
teilt: AT DLOOl) I»UI IIFIEU. 't
o of olsenso origin»!»« In Iho blood
lieino tl
■Vl'imi
i ■
.1
v .1 directly up
»«tJb ha» any Just
on It,
nd 1 .
PI
uL".
»■»lit* n.
Sevonty-one Years, of Ago.
E
Id Aits hfield, a 4u a. 25.1870.
Mn. Stevens : Dear Sir— L n m »eveiity-oi
•oars of at?o ; have Buffered ins ny year» with
Cldney Complaint, weakness in my hack
is induced by frio ud»
id 1 think it tho best
fur weakness of the kidneys
î
d
:
\
1
i
ul
plaint,
J
ul
mm! bo much relief
It strengthens anil iu
1
tint
v
hole
• Many.«'V
telle
it t
tlio com pi dints for whichIt ïs rêconimendciL
JOS1AH H. SUERADVN.
Yu
truly,
Would Give a Dollar for a Dose,
Boston, May 30,
badly afflicted with
' I
II. R. Stevens, Eb«|.:
Kl<lnoy Complaint for ten year»; have Buffered
rent pain in my back. Lips and »i«le. with
rent dltUculty in passing urine, which was
1 very small quantities, frequently
niiumied with blood ar,\ excruciating
I have faithfully Yried most of tlio
tnonded for my
D< :,r
r—1 hn
pain, i
popular re
Ile»
plaint; I li
»••mo of tli«
skilful phyBic
mow need my ease incurable,
«lit ion when 1 was mlNiscil by
Veoetinr,
»II tlie lint
ians in Host »
II of wl
P
i
y»i
(I I c
i »
tii
l effects f
«lose I took
l
til
kei
itl
king iu al), I »Uou',«i
d
think, aboi
It I« I ml
ix lKlttl
1 a valuable
«•te«l
•lieino, ond If I
HtemM In
i in the
lor a «lose, If 1 coul«l ho)
ltoBi>ectfull^j,
I
•OUid nil o a dollar
et it without.
f
Gif >
Ml Third St., Sout' a Boston.
Life a Burden,
Bo^
i, Nov. 2,1873.
II. R. Stevi
E»q.:
car Si
1 a poor, emaciated »affe,«.,
has restored me to perfect
a \
health.
i
a terrible sufferer fro
for y
ba
times reuderii
Bid
b
me. 1
i
(«•
than when I co
<1
U
i i
m
k
that
also
nor from Kidney Complaint, cau
iating pain through tlie small of t
•etime. This, too. Vr
now n perfect pi
licaltli. und 1 will add, happiness—all cause
from the use of a few bottles of Veoe~inr.
Respectfully,
back
52
»early nil of
f
1 a
.
II. G. HUGHES,
1 Union place, Boston, Mass.
s;
Vr.OETlNE is composed of Roots, Bari's am
It 1» very pi
Herbs.
« lti
ViGETINE IS SOLO DY ALL DRUGGISTS.
bi

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