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The sun. (Wilmington, Del.) 1897-19??, December 05, 1897, Image 2

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' SALVATION NURSES.
A NEW BRANCH OF THE ARMY'S
CHARITABLE WORK.
A Plan to Furnish Trained Nurse. Free
to |*f»or People Who Meed Them—Sim
ilar Schemes Projected by. Charitable
Women In Washington and Baltimore.
Ever since the advent of the trained
. .
nurse that high priced Wy of the
well to do invalid has shed her benefi
cent influence iu the sickrooms of tho
rich. Now, however, a movement is on
foot iu several cities to extend her sci
entific aid to the sick poor. It is a proj
ect which must appeal strongly to the
charitably inclined, for if the wealthy
invalid, surrounded by all the ordinary
comforts of a luxurious home uud able
to command constant if unskilled attend
ance, needs iu addition a trained nurse
how much greater is the need for such
sen-ice by the invalid who iu addition
his burden of ill health must bear
to
this direction is that which is being
taken in New York by the Salvation
Army. This organization has brought
from Loudon Mrs. Caroline Frost, who
has been for years nursing iu the slums
of that city. Mrs. Frost will uot only
continue her work in New York, hut
will establish there a nursing branch of
that of poverty?
One of the most important steps iu
Army work. Two women who wero her
colaborers iu Loudon will assist her,
and in time it is expected to have a
corps of at least 50 trained nurses who
will he able to meet nearly all the de
mands for such services as they can give.
These women will work entirely among
the sick poor, and their work will he
dune for people who cannot afford to
for such services, however much
hf-cn startl'd in W i^himdou hv some HO
be n stall r, y - '
rnurSaSnlt^Xpimlo;
ed nui.-t an.I a gradu.itoot a ho. pUai or
pay
they may be needed.
Mrs. Frost will train American girls
for this work and will stay until the
corps is thoroughly organized. Wlieu
the nursing branch is iu operation, it
will he a valuable adjunct to the slum
workers of the Army. It will then he
possible for one of these workers when
she finds a case of sickness and destitu
tion demanding immediate and constant
attendance to summon a trained nurse
by merely sending notice to headquar
ters.
A somewhat similar movement lias
training
broader, for their purpose is to help not
merely those people who are dependent
bring within t he
h.iiity, but to
upon
reach of
he gn at middle class the skill
lh
A# '
>i4i: A*
- ;
ri
i
s,",
<■■■&&
\
'■4
' r ;■■■■
i'ii
p
■ t ¥//!?■>
i L.
7
just be
,n.en
tin ir l■ ae]
you
f
soeiety, i nch mi iii'.er
1.
go to tho aid
which jib dg( H iiei 11 t
of persons who may c all upon lu r iu
•veil although
it is understood that the family of the
case of proper sickimss,
cjt afford to pay the usual
patient ci
rates. They will bo content to accept
only moderate lees and will charge on
ly for such time as their services aro
actually needed.
Their plan ban been enthusiastically
indorsed Lv Hut leading lumianitariaus
The null,urili.-s of the
sider
.
f that (itv.
Central Union mission of Wash ington,
who have been for some time c
ing the adoption of just such a plan as
these practical and nol le minded young
women have put into practice, have
asked for a eonfirenea with tl," officers
a view to co-opera
similar plan has been
of the society wit
thin in the movement.
In Raltiniori
a
sueiation of
School For
adopted. The aluiiinic r
Johns Hopkins Training
Nurses lias agreed to s,ml to families
or to persons in boarding houses trained
nurses who shall lie paid at a moderate
v.'i:!i the understand
rate bv tin* ho
gular
•nt. -Lull I.r ,.;l,i-r than
• Hi
I* nurse will ho
ltttcs.
able t<
h \ * ral patients during
attenc
ii
tin- o.
th* ):,• li
11 .1:1 * 1 them
a* c< in
nds bus been
.f tin
post'd
! rails d
md tho
i
l.i/in
* lllllil
regular
ital
-1 i y Inal
no more
n
'social
i»f eight 1. s
sick i noli,-;.
■ •if 11 i st hi*'ii \v
IIIIV
* .-■ <if :J 0 ami *10 will l e ad
ze of in.-tin* 1 i* n will
.]• fi .arse of hygii no. Tlie
,:ii lull*' a so;
.rail nts I'm-Hi lie t veal'alter gradua*
wed to chill
I r their services, and
li'.ti will ho tilin'
tint
a w
Rio to $15 a, week, ao
l.ft.T-wurd from
lording to their duties.
Annutth CllAWFOItD.
Read Tut; Si n.
WASHINGTON LETTER.
Sapid Growth of tho Capital - Played
bright
[Special Correspondence.)
"It is difficult to convince the young
er generation how this city has grown
in the past 30 or 85 years,''remarked a
well known citizen to a reporter, "and
particularly how that portion in the
hwc|t 8ectiolli west „f Fourteenth
the ordinary farms of the country they
wero farms, nevertheless, and some of
them were large enough for all pur
p 0ses . They were not garden farms ex
c ] D6 j ve i y , though the majority of them
now the corner
and north of M streets, lias developed
into a residence from a farm section.
While the farms were not as large us
were devoted to growing market truck.
I will never forget the Miller farm, the
house of which stood about where is
of Sixteenth aud P
streets. Mr. Miller not only raised a
great quantity of garden truck, but lie
Fail two large grass farms connected
w ith his place, on which lie raised large
of hay. Thirty-five years ago I
big enough hoy to play baseball
crops
was a
and was a member of the Eagle base
ball uine, which played fine ball for
those times.
was a member of our nine, aud we were
exceedingly uux i ou8 that he should play
One of Mr. Miller's sons
Played Ball on the White House Lot.
When spoken to about it, tho Miller
boy said that his father would uot let
him play until the hay, which had been
cut on the farm, had been raked up aud
stacked. The club wanted the services
of their short stop, and wanted them bad,
and the only way to get him was for
the entire uine, aided hv at least nine
others, who were members of the club,
though not on the principal mue-tor
nearly all baseball clubs tboso days had
two or throe nines—to go up there and
gather and stack up the hay. It took 18
good sized hoys, with the help of two
farm hands, the entire moniing and uu
'dock in the afternoon to
lost the game, which was played, as
nearly all games then were, on the
White lot. 1 mention this to show that
there was a very large crop of hay to be
gathered. While up in that neighbor
^ 1 t " 1 ' 1
boys all0Ut „ m . ...p^iences in liaymak
ing. As they looked around and saw
the rows of lino brick houses they could
with us.
til nearly 51
do the work. Wo got our short stop, hut
"
not
-'•s.
on tho
old re
Carroll Wright, and the Censr.
"Carroll \). Wright's views
subject (if tho next ansussh
ceive the att! n'
mail wh
•in <if congr.:
.-ays a
fully strniii d the een
"Ile is cue < f ilo• most
pH stion.
SUM
i> country to direct
competi ut lie n
tho vast and
•Iiicii
I wmk
.-uiuplic
iif eciiMis ctatistics
has
tlm collect i
grown to he, lint lie ticciares that noth
ing wi.iihl tenqit iiiiii -.ii limb r.it'i.o it
on the plan ] n ■;
at" hill, v l,ii
' he pre.. lit sen
1"'''V"
it h
r 11 ti less for the serv
• huoti
rat regard to tin
Lnt Mr. Wright is
ice th v in d
a hunting pol
v little
-. while lii
on .y
it ians ur
rl: Dice til
a re is vc
at his ljroto.-t will h;r.
any
only rational
f.T tl.o
but eau tor
if stall.-fies
• pi jtulaticn
■am nt
-a }..
the p riodii al pul 1 mat i n
ial count o. t!
and a <c i- n
mnees
if ii l.i w i unit, ri'eit 810
It ( lillllttrleit
lie ili.-ri.M i v
Filter Li rtifiiidu imd a).
hunk nut". 'J in- .-liver certifi
is a iihutiigrniiliic pii.'luetieii print
pic-esof jiiqii r pu- ted together.
made to color the
f tlie note, which is a shailo
brown iiislcad , f gri.cn. The seal is col
ored a bright pink. The notu is badly
printed, and tho lathe work is blurred
The national hank note
No attempt has bei
'f
ba* k
and indistinct. ^
is on tlie l-irst Natiunal ut Joplin, Mo.,
series of 1882. It is,also printed on two
piuas of paper, utid the silk fiber in
tin; genuine is imitated by pen and ink
marks.
Defect In the Army Pay System.
An instance of the gUortroimugs of
tlie present method of the pay system in
the army, which is given us an argu
nt for the trial of the "payment in
)' isun" system, is shown iu a
• in Texas now under iuvestiga
m
recent oe
earretic
ti*ill.
by
Major iitiliis, the paymaster sta
tioned at i-'an Antonio, si ,,t tho money
• e:.press to paly the troops at Fort
Hrnv.Ti, Ter. Tho package arrived, and
: ofiieir detailed an
till
1'inn an
t bring it to the fori*.
i,tan
Tl,;s
v< l'MicaJ i< n \ as
t (1 iiil't IU
cl wlien it cam ■ t
pavu
t be mol
ho-'pital ...
• Ivcd from m
1 iiKji
i i ry
•vliicli in
1;x the ca
ial in
i' 1!
i'" 1
l
t*i
i ;: -. , n, 1
ii' : " f ••;■:■ v
r;
n
rounds
Tell
i l.e fired.
in'
r 1 in
ini.in,;:.; a mi!;;-.' ial h pus
Th* v. i'i'l was blowing directly
in the fat i - of the lilt It, and i
i'yui falling. Every lime tlie breech
. op, .nod th' sun A- from
f powder I.il* w (hi' 1 ctly in
the fail s uf tin nu n who were at work,
highly grati
)ii d with tin- a s.t uf tlie new rapid lire
; (| V e inch gun made at tlie Watervliet
With 8 J,GOO pounds pressure
f 2,1,uu feet was obtained,
leighiug 53 iiouiids.
C.illl. Bt'IIOFlELD.
r;
I;» pounds
Geueral lTa r ,li r v,';
tils. i.al.
I u velocity
. tlie projectile
e- for all.
in. So:
STORIES OF JUDGE GARY.
tnUreetin* Ancc<l ot M^Abont the Funoae ;
Judge Joseph E. Garyt who presides
at the second Luetgert trial, is one of
the best known judges iu Chicago. lie
on tho bench for 28 years and
bag b,. cu
won a national reputation as the judge
who sentenced the Ilaymarket anarch
ists.
Judge Gary is about 75 years old
now, but is still as full of life aud vig
a
1
t, -
fpj ' // s
a
yJI
im
MJ
1 /
)
judge Joseph e. oaky.
or as ho wait a decade ago. Each day he
walks to aud from his courtroom. He
r j ses ear ] y every morning and, with his
favorite dog trotting along by his side,
s out to (]o bia own marketing.
Ma aro tb( , ane cdotes which illus
, t j udge Gary's skill at repartee aud
"tkness^if wit when on the bench,
Hfi haB ahvays bad au especial dislike
for , nen wbo try t0 shirk jury service
on flimsy excuses. Once a little German
tried to by making the plea that
ba cou]d U()t Kpeak good English.
««Yo U 'll uot have to speak at all,"
,, illdn „ 1
' "Veil, shudge, I don't t'ink I makes
a , 8 h uro r anyvay," persisted the
fn i„ smaI1
"why not'"
"Velb" with a gesture in which he
iudicated , bl . attorneys, "I don't uu
d er8 fc 00 d noddings vat dose fellers say. "
"Neither does any ouo else. Sit
( ] own ," thundered the judge.
A voung lawyer iu«t admitted to the
J, vs mi!.' appointed by Judge Gary
t0 d( . ft . lld a priscm.-r. It was the young
lawyer's first case, and he was anxious
, j. Q nul j {(3 ^ ou( j lowing, hut in spite of
all l.is efforts the man was convicted
im,] sentenced to 18 months m prison*
Meeting the i
marked:
Ige later, the lawyer re
"That was pretty hard on me, judge—
you know, and my man
got
mo:*.
a
g, " it turin d tin* ju
"Thaim
ight
sh'.rilv.
iieut put
ir.-t
V( ,
anil me,!.; rly.
111 priv Judge-(n
III' is all afi'i etii rat
ala s great priiln in his
ughters. who are ih eply im. rested iu
nritable work.
GEORGE S. BATCHELLER.
,l)i i rf the In
II. Cors A bread
ill Co
iTimtio
Georg; 8'la naan LatehcHer, who has
been appoint"! as the A
em
ber of the illt< rnat iejiaJ court at Cairo,
I
abroad tor man
if his time
ar. He was uivi-n
.-u•• "'-=1
has spent n:osi
it
s same po:
This
long time.
involving fen iam rs or for< ign m
i m
ttTesl.-i. He ;,i:
d us miuisti r to
come the fori iitn
]iromim-iit Ann ri.
ptinies, living for a liumhi r of yi avs in
eomeslr :
New 5 uric state.
pllcrvilie, Saratoga eouuty, aud his pros
it American residence is at Saratoga,
Portugal and resigned that. otUce. to bc
uttormv for sevi ral
Iif.' insurance coin
a:
Paris while holding this position.
Mr. 1 atc h' lh r is <il years old and
in iif the i blest families in
Hu was hern in liatcli
i
m
i
fPK i
r ,•/
m/d
% Vv
AS# /;
/ w
4
. ' / ■'
/ .
n.Vif IIEI.LEK.
fil. MU' DMA
b< r wh'isi ' avchitec
• lias had tho
unique tiiat
|.1:i:. • put-nil d. J]u\vn
. pt'.i uiited
at
of law
i.r* red t he
rs and
lent e* b.ili 1. He
ree* nl. and his staiid
H'lm-iv.ed
in,",
-11-: w hi* h I.- did u
rirgani
be • late milit i: , fr the war.
•tiec d
active in
id' lerms
ig t' .1 :.«*
as member of tin- Lev;
I V" ii it'll t.
limit to
d ut the intel'
u 1
it
'. |;l'i mi;
nali i.:;l tribunal ,-f KgJlit in 1875, mill
ini- 8 lie wt.- i-lecli-,1 pr-fideAtof tiiat
tin* lieiieh and r,-tun.ttil to
Thru, years later lie Was appointed by
J'i-i siiienl Uarri.-on as ih t assistant see
letary of the treasury, in t was dissatis
lied with this place and ,viis given the
l'ortnguose mission,
ill • |Ss(i Ie-..ig "d iiis seat
Saratoga,
Tho latest in souvenir spoons is the
Nansen, commomorutiv* of Dr. Nansen
and his farthest north e.- pudition.
Namen Souvenir qiooiiK.
linv Tin: Si n.
BARNEGATS BIG LIGHT.
Monster Lens to Be Placed In
**,«» n rp as Tower
BEACONS ON OUR SHORES,
Uncle Sam's Lighthouse Service Is of the
Best, aud He Has a Large Fleet of |
Lightships— Lonely Lives of the Light
Keepers.
It costs us something like $8,000,000
to light the vestibules to our maritime
portals and otherwise provide for the
safety of the traffic which comes to us
over tho ocean highways. That is quite
an item iu our national housekeeping
exponses, but every ouo familiar with
tho service must admit that it is money
well spent. Especially along about this
time of year is Ibis truth recognized.
Without the hundreds of lighthouses
which are stretched along the coast like
a string of fiery beads nono of our ports
could bo safely entered after sundown,
and our coasts would be avoided.
The care of our lighthouse system is
intrusted to a board of officials whose
organization is known as the United
States lighthouse establishment. Rear
Admiral John Cl. Walker is chairman
of the board, and liis office is in Wash
ington, but the real headquarters of the
lighthouse service are on .Staten Island,
The lighthouse establishment is com
posed of enterprising, progressive men
whoso aim is to make tho servico as
complete and nearly perfect a. possible,
but they are handicapped by congresses
which grudgingly grant increased ap
propnations.
Up to within a dozen years these ap
propnations were absolutely niggardly,
but of late they have become more rea
souable, and radical improvements have
been made. Within the last year, in
fact, some notable additions have been
made to the equipment and still more
important ones are planned.
Other governments, it seems, have
been no more liberal, for when the
monster new light which is now being
prepared for Rarnegnt tower is placed
position Uncle bam will have done
fully as much in the way of protection
for mariners as any other nation on the
globe, it not a little more. Just at
]>reseut tho great light which the l'rench
have installed at. 1 'inistcrois the stroll
gest and largest beacon extant, hut the
is to be ils equal.
Jiarm eat li.'l
31. Lepaute. the inventor of t lo• light.,
00,000
•lainis i'T it no 1 * ~th
t this is
I,., w,r. Howl
a li;
eand
ai>preciated win
Iu to v
id
nu
realizi d it I.ngh
i - of only ;'t
tl..- isle «,i Wij
Di.O can*
die pow r. In order to run tin
11 • w ijur
,V;
Tv*
;
i„
V
r-V
-
J
1: '
t..-x
JL
;•
%
\
I' INI' I'EUE UOIIT.
negat light team and electric power
must he gene rated, for the heart of the
light, is to l" 1 a (1,000 candle power arc
light. This will be iut* nsilied by a great
lens built up of rims of prismatic glass,
with a bullseye in the center 18 inches
in diameter.
This monste r light is to be installed
in tho new towrr w hich has boon built
beside the old one. Wero the earth flat
it could bo seen at a distance of 100
... , . , „ ,
nnles; but, taking the curvature of tho
globe into consideration, it is expected
that sailors can make it out while still
over a 10 miles away. The Rarnegnt sta
tion is a most, important one, being lo
rated oil the most easterly point of tho
dangerous low lying Jersey coast. Ships
coining up from thu south generally
striko the coast somewhere in this
neighborhood and then feel their way
along up toward Mainly Hook. It is most
important tlm» tin y should be able to
at theearlii st pos
sible moim iit, i .-jiccially when them i
danger <,1' In in ' driven
luciitu Hani'ig.Tl li;:l
In tho n:
• r of light-thips we lead
the woiId.
• • than -10 * if l hesc i
. '
lung our c: ,;.'t where
stationed at ]
v!i* re the
am
Jlt'C*'
lmildii
g of 1 i "
I:*iiisi s is inqiracticab
rim island liglit.-hipi aiiil the Diamond
lt-bij
a,or of his ;.j i
< *:M *• ILit i.'J li . ]'*'!' Vi LI'S th, ' livhtlmuKO
: .b< ,.l 1
dr* id( d
IIS'
bi.il l a
liglith*-use oil
, i
Di.:.., ::■ I hhr.ul, 1 ut at last, alp r
nior •
u eO,()(.)<) had 1 < ■ n spent, and sev
lal li\
in
JJiainniiil
waft
atieoq * was
for lie 1 lir/iH.
lie
boie-ij In
f a found a 1
to
-linking a
inn
-S' .n,
that win*
ITU', ii il ii\\ ;iy I lie
hut when
l aiiduiii <1.
equipped with a i-team engine, ilietl'io
any other
■bored iiff l)ia
i lie Fire Lkind lightship i
one Of
the line of ee";
the eutranee to New York lairln T. it is
improvemeiits.
mend shoal is a sister ship,
made ill Lath, Me., and c
apiece.
-Is v.'hi-ii mill'll
kimpl
.lights, a steam whistle and
llotli were
st $50,000
r J hat ;
Tlio Now Fotith shoal lightship,
which is anchored 2(1 miles off Nantuck
et, is farther noni shore than any other
lightship in tho world. It is the first
American outpost and guards a shoal
vvltieh in times past was u veritable
I
The Sunday Si n I cent.
STtimeYh^th^Now South shoal light
ship becu wrenched from her mooring*
by tho lnry of a winter's gale, but she
has always survived and after brief pe
riods of wandering resumed her lone
some vigil.
There are under the control of the
lighthouse establishment no fewer than
1.475 lighthouses and lighted beacons
in American waters. Many of the men
who (rim tho lights and keep them
burning at these various stations are al
most as wholly isolated from the rest
of mankind us if they lived on the
A few of the lighthouses are se
situated that communication with the
mainland is confined to the monthly or
even less frequent, visits of tho supply
boat.
moon.
q U( , l)f tbe most desolate posts is that
0 f the keepers of the light on tboFaral
M£r
m
//
m
'M
1k
'U
m
i:
ii
'
\jM ft/
'm
\
m
£
. .
^
ocean .. miles fr mj ^
y c | ljldrt , u tbat „ ot
tnno nun the San Francisco school hoard
Jong £* e « a "
subl sh.d ' t ' ah tb .
<ht, so that the kuptrsure nit anog
or hermits. _
,.MiX's'located on
those of the keepers of lights 1
the Florida m-ts.
lighthouse, especially during the
'' inter mouth*, I™*
'" '," lj . ^, ro cao ™a
< > U * •■ • ' -,i ' f .. . ..
up m a mu m tmw i, \\iu \i m i u «
P^e or ri s'K asi mg as ; «
table to st( p upon. .\Jtn n-li nly a
from ^
not hear from the outside uo.1,1 om o a
1!l1 ' -1 ' 1 . . «• ..
, r * !V'V**- 1,1 j,, u t - /•. \
^' ^ ( ^ < n . t* d mi'the
years t lit
INSIDE A BIO LENS.
Life in the Minot s
toi
.
For four
daligwous hi;
.Ntnicture sti.'M
I ih'' shock of storm, Init
. IS
wild April gale it
finally
nmng :
lh. urn—light, keepers uud
ept int •
u at oner on a nn re
ial towi r of stone, but so dilti
Making that during
tiit! first year only .'Hi hours' work rnuld
Thret- y« ars were required to
! stone, and it was
in j 1 "re tie■ i r wit was eomph it d,
cult was the un
l," 11-4M
lay l
Lut it viand.- n il;
in
A in.tin Imhth'tv ••
iiicii v."
* .■
nly alii r gn at olasts
that <n
h ha
f, in
iltio
is
J.ako I!in n. It i.' 11 mil*-s from land,
and its hamdalions were laid <
a sub
n
JIMTg
winter it is expos <1 t
the almost ine
f-orec of gr« at ice th h whi'di a*.
driven against it by wind and
The light is
burning .after lake
igatioji close.
by this time
so tiiat
ii des< rf( 1 for th
it has b
winter.
iS'ot all coast lights are
town's. 'Most et
•ated in
se on tip• Pacific
h>\V, sqiialtV
coast, in fact, are ] l:i« . d j
j
bouses, 1 ut this is 1
•;ius»* t be height of
the bluffs or headlands < n whic h tliev
■••re placed is sutlicieiit. On the At lain ie
coast,
Most of the in are built of stone. Haven't
you ever v. • ndircdbc w Uncle 8am nian
•iged to lac ]i the ia so inunaculately
white? 1 did i util < nc day I found out
towers are required.
that it was
ay to common
whitewash, inleitigi inly and frequently
applietl. If yen \i; i.t to do any artistic
whitewashing, you cannot do better
lball t()il , lV , Uncle Fain's formula. Here
\ t \
due
"Ti
ten pans of freshly slaked
it is:
lime add. cue part of thu best hydraulic
\ v. i 11 with salt water and
\
]
(• incut.
apply ,,uite thin." This will give to
brick i.r si
wall a mat as white as
driven miov and one that will not easily
wash * r ru!» oil'.
( inly a few ol* tlie lighthouses ttr,
furnished with eiietrie light plants,
Tii" rc,-t use kerosene—i in ti
ary kero
• an illmi.iiiant. Unde
1 ill v s
it of the > I;
laid ( il cuinpany and
10 cents a uallun for it. Jt is dis
tntnsSH 'fuel -i.pply statii us l.v the
lb > t of lil;;' i: i'.nd v. Lilt ■ t< an
»wn
us lightb.'-iiM- tend*
.
I TH
alsoi i.«
1. cu.il and
(
■ : t .V
lit—
W
i
r?
x|
i
.
Till
fill!..' I I.I.NS
IF Tin; NKW llAIINKCAT
dsn transfer the eir
eulaling liliraiii - in wliieli tin* i-nlated
liglttWis rs take mi tmn-h satisfaction,
I.IOIIT,
Ih. k . pc-', as well as ether
»' ''' ssiti, a. The;,
"al"*'
^ mure iaitlilill public
h.i,i"I- \ mu I .use same in; nkeepers
1111,1 >''■ " ' ,T l;' " 1 ly I 1111 ' 1 lllll, ' ss It '*«
the ill" savers. J lie highest salary paid
Is $1,000 a year, anil the average is $000.
I.T they are the most contented class of
Officeholders on the nation's pay roll,
and il is tarn that one of them resigns.
I'erliaps, alter all, solitude lias its
elinnns. Cykub Sylvkster.
Advertise in The Sun.
'i'here are no
WOMAN AND FASHION.
■tylaa In Fur Trimmwl Costumes- Not.
•ltiu In Neckwear-What Woman
Are Doing Hera and There.
Costumes of cloth or velvet trimmed
with fur aud adorned with jet or silk
applique aro among tho fashionable toi
lets for winter wear. Violet and plum
tints or dark green are admirable with
v
m
\A
1
W\
H
Russian styles
bodice cut otf sharply to the waist and
worn with a belt. Frequently this belt
j
A eostulne worthy of description is
in gr( ,,, !!11:a „ tho
opening to show a vest of palest gray
surah, and the wide rovers of ck.th,
turned back on (ither side, aro overlaid
A
t'
'i,
! i
A Ft It TrilSIMKI) COSTUME,
blue fox or chinchilla fur or with sable.
If the skirt is short and really escapes
tho ground, a fur border is delightful,
hut it must ho laid entirely on tho skirt
aud not allowed to project at all. If the
costume is trimmed entirely with fur
it can easily he supplemented by a ca)n
or wrap for very cold days and is most
useful for fashionable afternoon, resorts,
such as rinks, matinees and bazaars.
Ouo of the latest bodices favored by
Paris modistes mirl which will no doubt
bccomo popular hero when the rage for
lias abated is the coat
jont boilin'
steel passementerie ;r:l
y t and
wit
bordered with gray fox. The sleevt s nr•
tight lilting and l ave two fur trimmol
ollur sets onlv at
,
the back and is lined with fur, ami t:
neck is completed by ono of the 1< ;;g
scarfs which are worn twice round ti ••
t on from tho back. 'J !•»
f gn i n velvet is her*: ' i
tnreaihir hut
vitli gray for anti trimmed with hinck
pinnies.
Fur Neckwear.
Numbered with novelties aro ml
placed horizoi
el of v . tii Tim result is tii.it
tadimt formed by tl e most di 1 1'?
a til" kill In ill Cl! •
llv
■- ">i
i t: 4 t i
( . (; } (1M | j u , r |
Herald devoted eonsid' r*
o of tbo
The Xew3
, illustrating s
newest ne( kv. « ar. An ermine stole illus*
A
: • \ • e /.,7
m&y
t
m
:'Y
'ii ■
V
k
f
\ :
I
( ! l
\ r.l
m
M
iiMS
i;
bit
itiiiif
NOVELTIES IN FEU.
tnited has a high medicis collar. Tho
ends aro flat, narrow and rather long,
and mi each aro six ermine tails,
thu back of the neck is a bow of whim
The
At
satin, eciulined in n slt'ass I tickle.
tur is linrd with whko hh tin.
A m ck trimming of palilo is ornament*
cd in front with black satin hows, hi
tho center in
tails. A hiiii.ll .sable scarf shown isc i
if one animal, w liu
row are four y l "
pcsul of the
thu natural head.
V r Vat V/omen Aro reins:.
Utah thcro aw
Jii Coh r;
auo
n in the legislature.
T In re is no In It it informed won 'J
fairs in America than JM*s.
well (Jonvi rso.
oil Indian a
U.uTit t M:
Tiie tfmiil' .-Mi ih* Martel, bettor km 11
iiy lier nu,ii ee iilnnie, (lyp, i 8 the granil
niece of the gnat Mirabcau.
The
Dieula
erumeut
Mine.
' has been licensed by th0.£' v '
lo wear masculine attire.
eh
arelneolcgist
I'lC
I'll,
i-tui'.y ei dciuiertiu soicnce by
women in Gemumy includes the
Hudy of the vegetable garden and how
to cultivate it.
Mrs. Robert Louis Stevenson is said to
ho ouo of tlioso fortunato women who
know tho art of appearing young, no
matter what the calendar may tell.
_
I
The Romans used lemons to kecittbe
destructive little moth from thcir'gar
; incuts, while iu the time of Pliny lem
oils wero regarded as an excellent poi
Uses For Lemons.
sou.
Read TiiuSrx.

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