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The sun. (Wilmington, Del.) 1897-19??, December 19, 1898, Image 4

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ACTiCAL POLITiCS.

statecraft is
NOLONGER LOON
ED UPON AS A
MTSTEIPr BUT
A6 A BUSINESS.
*-Ow£l.L.
DIVISION
—ADDITION 1
1
I
I
1
, -hi?. of Dr. Hiram Burton, of
the Fifth Senatorial district of Sussex
county, protesting against State Senator
elect Franklin C. Maull taking his seat
in the State Senate is still being discussed
pro and con by a large number of per
80 Jj, 8 ;. ,
The concensus of opinion, as expressed
by tending politicians, is that Dr. Bur
ton s action is plainly illegal and that he
forfeited all claims to the seat when he
withdrew his contest against Mr. Maull
before the Superior Court, during the
tabulation of the vote.
It is asserted that a few Republicans
will stand by Mr. Maull, although he is
a Democrat, and that he will be allowed
to take the seat to which he was legally
elected by the action of Dr. Burton.
1 lie United states Senatorship is again
attracting more than the usual attention,
and whilst very little is said one way or
the other, quiet and effective work ap
pears to be the order of the day,
The coming of Willard Saulsbury into
the "ranks" was the sensation of the
week and neither Regular Republicans
nor the Democrats, who had everything
arranged for the return of Hon. George
Gray, Gold Democrat, to the United
States Senate, have as yet recovered from
the miniature earthquake that Mr. Sauls
bnry created in their midst.
How and in what manner they can
still obey the mandates of the Adminis
tration is the question exercising the
minds of the Regular Republicans, but
as they have not seen their way clear, it
is hard to state what method will be em
ployed in untangling the web which Mr.
Saulsbury made.
„„ ... ,,, „
Republican Glasses must reiterate
that it is unfortunate for the Republi
cans of Delaware and therefore for the
State that a United States Senator is to
be elected this winter. If there were no
senatorial contest the Legislature about
to assemble at Dover would fulfill the
highest expectation of the people in re
spect to those great questions of stat
th . e ne r w coMtitu
upon the late Legislature,
toiminJ' Til„r,- y wa ? u " equal 'ode
t , .' e e '6®' | on of a Senator, with
the acrimony which it will probably in
ject into the Legislature will necessarily
interfere with legislation. It will pre-1
vent, it may be feared, the making of j
that record which would otherwise en
sure Republican domination for many
years to come. This contest in 1895 gave
the State to the Democrats in 1896. A I
similaroutcome or one approaching t hat ;
even to a moderate degree, may give
this btate back to the Democrats in 1900,
and vet the offices to be filletFin the
state and in the three counties in 1900
arc, selfishly speaking, of infinite more
value to the party than a half dozen
senatorships. To the State itself the
continuance of Republican supremacy,
now endangered by the coming contest
over the senatorship is of infinitely
greater value than any senatorial repre
sentative can possibly be at Washington,
Delaware needs new laws. It needs a
decent non-partisan administration of
public affairs. It needs an absolute wip
ing out of the Democratic tricksters who
are still in office. All this is imperilled
by the senatorship. Hence it is true
that the election of a United States
Senator at this time is a misfortune to
the Republicans of Delaware and to the
state itself.— Republican Glams, Sunday
Slar - '
There is considerable curiosity among
certain politicians to find out how J. Ed
ward Addicks will stand when it comes
to the final contest. It has been asserted
by the Regulars that the Union Republi
can party is a party of Addicks' follow
ers and that if he were out of the way the
party would disappear from sight. On
the other hand, it is held by the Union
Republicans that they are the onlyRepub
lican party in the State, that they are
genuine Republican party because the
largest, and that Addicks ia but a mem
ber of the party the same as other
men, and has no more rights and priv
ileges.
If this is true, and there is no reason
to believe that every Union Republican
is simply a blind follower of Addicks,
then Addicks is more sure of carrying
the whole Union Republican delegation
than are some of the other candidates in
the State. If the Union Republicans
were simply elected as Republicans and
not pledged to support Addicks
tor, then there is plent
some other Union Republican to work
his claims for Senator. If the Union Re
publicans go for Addicks to a man then
it is likely that the Regulars will not fall
into line, and there will be a deadlock as
surely as the Legislature meets.
Of course there is still talk of a confer
ence in which the claims of the various
candidates can be discussed and an at
tempt made to reach some arrangement
by which a Senator can be elected, but
it is doubtful if this will result in any
good. Conferences did not result in any
good when the Regulars had the
jority in the General Assembly of the
Republican members and the Union Re
publicans had the minority, and the
plan is not likely to accomplish much,
now that the conditions are reversed.
Then the Regulars placed the Union Re
publican minority in the position
ing prevented the election of a United
States Senator, and unless the Regular
minority watches itself there is likely to
be an effort made to put it in the same
position this time. The Regulars must
face that condition or else surrender to
the Union Republicans, for there is
nothing else for them to do.— Wilmington
Correspondent Philadelphia Inquirer,
the
'll a
,
The new constitution of this State is 1
for Sena
of chance for
of hav
of again in evidence in matters political.
New and mysterious portents are being
continually discovered in its provisions.
seat What can, and what cannot be done
under its provisions are still unknown
per- quantities in political equations. So far,
however, as its influences have been de
veloped and determined, it has proved
be a Democratic "boom-c-rang." Made
he by a body fraudently organised in the;
he interest of the Democratic party, and
thrown from that party's citadel with
the brazen confidence, begotten of a long;
career of successful political fraud, it has
carried back, and fell upon its makers
is with destructive force. I
t was expected
to defeat the Union Republican party.
The opponents of that party, Democratic
and otherwise, confidently asserted that.
The fact is, its operation defeated the
Democratic combine. It ia conceded
that it practically assured a pure ballot
or and an houest election, and it is unde
niable that in securing a pure ballot and
an honest election, it also secured the
defeat of the Democratic party,
There can be but one reasonable infer
ence from this co-relation of facts; and
that is, that the Democratic party, de
spite its assured horror over alleged
frauds and wholesale bribery in our elec
tions, had been profiting by these very
things. The result of the election proved
further, that the allegations of fraud and
bribery by the Union Republicans, and
that they won, and could only win vic
tories by fraud and bribery, were untrue,
These are the reasonably conclusionsto
be drawn from the result of the recent
election. They must not be overlooked
or forgotten by voters who desire to cast
a pure ballot and have that ballot hon
estly counted. It is possible that the
Democratic party—the organized man
ageinent of it—will not be so desirous of
a pure ballot and an honest election at
the next bout of the ballots. Then if
this surmise should prove prophetic the
facts here cited will be worth having
been remembered. It is amusing now to
remember how very zealous they were,
How positively sure they were that the
anti-bribery provisions of the registra
tion law would prevent Republicans
fromregistering; how the anti-briberv
provisions of the election law would pre
vent Union Republicans from buying
votes; how these double ended anti-brib
erv provisions were to eliminate the col
j ored Republican vote and assume a
Democratic majority at the election - and
then, more amusing than all else' the
immediate effort of Democratic '
I paper writers to prove that an over
; whelming per cent, of the Republican
votes was cast by colored voters
Surely the gods have decided to de
strov the Democratic party—tliev have
made it mad.
There seems, however, to be more of
these sugar-coated Democratic political
nostrums concealed somewhere in the
new constitution. In indication of this
a curious story came to Union Renubli
can Glasses during the last week. Sher
iff Shaw, of Kent county, who has al
ready served two terms, consecutively in
that office and thereby earned a singular
distinction among Delaware sheriffs is
authority for saving that Democratic Jaw
yers tell him that lie may be continued
in that olfice for a third term. Several
lawyers, including the Hon. John B
Pennington have told him that bo is not
(will not) be compelled to vacate his
ofiic-e. Sheriff Shaw was of course inter
ested in this story. He was not dcsir
?" 8 or anxious to keep Sheriff-elect
Wharton out of the office to which lie
had been elected; but if he, Shaw, was
still sheriff under the law lie vanted to
know it. He consulted several lawyers,
but they could not find any warrant for
the Democratic statement. Mr. Shaw
came to Wilmington and consulted law
Eifcelectt Urn various^oumfes td
that rife' 'ffenrme ra t i c ^r^aT'afalfe!:
What it meant he could not tell. But
just as lie had given it up another promi
nent Democratic lawyer meeting him on
the street, repeated the suggestion that
he, Shaw, would not be compelled to
vacate the sheriff's olfice if he did not
want to do so. The mysterv appeared
to be deepening. It has been suggest
ed that the riddle is a constitutional
one.
news
It is a fact that the new constitution !
makes no specific or special regulation 1
for the election of Sheriffs to succeed the
present incumbents of that office.
of article III, says: "* * * !
tlie terms of office of Sheriffs and Coron-!
era shall be two years. These officers I
shall be chosen by the qualified electors 1
of the respective counties at general
Governor 1U1 ^ ^ C0llim ' S8 ' 0nei ' by the
S wL,r.T,V"
I
(Section 26) of the same article, directing
where the Sheriffs shall "keep their of
fices,'' is tlie only reference to that office
there is in the constitution proper. The j
schedule appended to the constitution,
Section 7, provides for the extension of
tlie term of sucli officers as have been
elected or appointed to State or county
officers "made elective" by tlie amended [
constitution, and whose terms expire be
fore tlie first Tuesday in January, 1899,*!
to that date. This apparently applies to
the Sheriffs of tlie various counties,
whose terms of office under the old law
expired upon tlie election of their suc
cessors. It is claimed, however, that the
Sheriff's office was not "made elective"
by the new constitution. It has always
been an elective office. The term "made
elective" it is claimed applied to Court
House officers—Prothonataries, Clerks of
'he Peace, Register of Wills, Recorders,
Registers in Chancery and Clerks of the
Section
Orphan'* Court, and to State Imnrgr,
State Auditor and Inaannoe Oommis
aionera, which were appointive offlcea
e™fA b ^ m t blr U0Vern0r ' ° r brt ' ,# ^
question ia were the offices
Sheriff- "made elective" by the amended
constitution? Upon the negative or
flrmative answer to this question bangs
the iate of the Sheriffs-eleot in New
Castle, Kent and Sussex counties.—
Union Republican Giantess, Sunday Star.
The
Who said they were subsidiaed?
W. Lindsay McFarlane for clerk of the
Senate.
How is that riding school looming up
Mr. Cy.
The Great-I-Am, will soon step down
and out.
And Willard's bomb almost drove them
into exile.
The Sun's Senatorial contest is becom
ing interesting.
W. Scott Vernon, of Wilmington, (or
clerk of the House.
Your political gossip is required by
The Sun, so send it in.
First Citizen Hilles? When the Atlan
° cea " over -
, e Wmdlords are now whooping er
1 U P * or ' ,lle nex ' campaign,
What is this dinner that certain poli
fichus are talking about? Ask me.
far, Coroner-elect Vandever intends to con
de- duct the duties of his office himself.
to it won't be Beniamin \ield«- »ml
that's no idle nhanZna of the hrein
the; 1 8 no Id e phantasma of the brain,
. ...
a i lnanlc candidates jump into the field,
long; William Michael thinks that a|
has ! m ent will soon be here. Correct,
!
Look out for fun when the council
oint
ike.
Try women on the Board of Educa
tion. They should be represented in that
body.
The mills of the Gods grind slowly,
but they grind exceedingly fine, eh
Court?
Oh, Citizen Willie came to town,
Riding in a kerridge;
And some friends turned him down
Because he had no porridge,
ni nr , ,
• lU J 1( ;. nnce owne . d a boom
i, ° r 1 10 } nltcd States "Wenit,"
u «' as "" t , t0 an tarl y do " m .
" ecaU3e ie wasl1 ' in *'
The Bayard Legion will nominate offi
cers for the ensuing year at their meet
ing tonight.
A singular fatality appears to follow
the Conaway family after they are elect
ed to office.
Li Hung Chang Bach is again forging
further in the rear. Did you ever
him "skm the cat."
As the days roll by Deputy Coroner
James T. Chandler is becoming as affable
as ice will make him.
It is given out on good authority that
Stephen I). Slaughter will be the next
Speaker of the Senate.
Who would have thunk a year ago
that Sir Anthony Hig and others would
be called such hard names?
He said he only delivered half the
goods and then Charles S. Horn stood no
Bhow of getting a "posish."
Dr. Kvan G. Shortlidge is up to his
neck in the fight for Police Commis
sioner. He'll get it where the bottle got
the cork.
see
The Street and Sewer Department has
now opened a skating pond in the vicin
ity of Eleventh and Walnut streets. Its
cheap too, as no admission is charged.
/\l in r^l rr-iiur«r-r*
OUR t)USI N K 5 S
V
wien We Started business ^
a modest wa Y at our present loca
i j t. a 1
woulcl have to enlarge our Store
^ tv . .
room * Every year our business
i • ,
llas increased until
has outgrown our store thanks to
our many patrons. Four years
tion we had no idea that
we
we are com
pelled to make our store as large
!
1 again,' which when Completed
.
will he the largest and most
!
Complete Tailoring
I °
1 ttient in this city. Previous to
J
alterations we will make up our
™ '' and "Gidiciilouslylow
I " **"«■> >—* ~4
j
„„ „ , .
moll -> as nowhere is it possible
establish
money.
Great bargains await you.
you are wise you will not miss
this great opportunity to
If
save
to get the values we are offering
for cash.
W. H. Lockyer,
Custom Tailor,
808 MARKET ST
MONDAY, DEC]
SlKriaflnna A . w.i
«WiaOI)l ON n«Ip M>
V*PtllllB«Dt| it> THE
^ SUfl Will b« I*CIO fON 26
of MDts Until oithoN hffiVO
af- °«* n B*«UP«a «na OPa«N
id OUt,
New
HELP WANED—MALES,
WANTED-A druf clerk Apply to J.P. Will
iams, Ninth and Madison street.
the
up
(or
by
er
»ml
WANTED—A young man who understands
hardware and |«lnts; a hustler. No. 220 Wett
Second street.
WANTED—Immediately a solicitor-collector;
one who Is a hustler. Salary. IM.ooper month
and eommtodooi. Apply [loom 1(>, McVey Bulld
„. Wilmington, Del. Office open 8 to 9 a. m.;
2 to I p. m. ^
In*.
SITUATION WANTED-MALES.
'RRJ* 1 for » competent engineer.
Atotoss. J. BURBANK, No. 523 West Eighth
street, city.
* position, either
A ttrst-cfffifis, competent
!2Si neer ^.pnt-clMs references from last
employers. Will go anywhere. Have run C'r
U«l Greene, Eagle, Ball, Erie, Wood andloco
^alNEER m 8u™Offlc? Arem " Addms
tf
HELP WANTED—FEMALES.
WANTEIX—Thoroughly
for boarding house; good
104 East Seventh street.
WANTED—Girl for general housework. Must
bt*good plain cook. Reference required. 803
Jackson street.
competent white cook
wages. Apply at No.
eh
IIftl( grown white girl to assist
with children- Apply at grocery store, 825 West
Front street.
WANTED—A good white girl for general hnuse
W0 J APPly »t Bakery, southeast corner Sixth
and Walnut streets.
WANTED—GUI for general housework. Apply
from 6 to 8 at
_1102 JACKSON STREET.
SITUAflON WANTED-FEMALES
WANTED—A Swedish girl wants place — ..
cook; acquainted with the language; good ex
perience and reference. Inquire at No. 1218
Ileald itreet, city.
Y oung lady of experience and in
tegrity desires position in a business iirra
Address L. M.. SUN OFFICE.
B0ARDIN6 AND L0D6IN6
WANTED—Boarders for two second-story rooms
heat and bath. No. S East Sixth itreet. Dela
ware Bank Building.
WANTED—Room and table boarders. No. 714
French street.
WANTED—Refined gentlemen boarders to
occupy two elegant front rooms at No. 507 West
Fifth street.
SINGLE or communicating rooms with boaH
No. 905 Tatnall street. „ ...
WANTED—rv*L*rf*»nts for furnished and unfur
nished rop*»- N). 902 West street.
MISCELLANEOUS.
WANTED^-Torent; mrty wishes to rent stable,
with room for three horses and three or four
J. L. OCHELTREE,
Room 405, Equitable Building.
carriages. Apply,
J.
add factory line easily good
for $100 monthly corns, Free samples.
RUBBER CO.;
18 Cliff rit., New York.
SALESMAN
§ END 10 CENTS IN STAMPS OR COIN FOR
latest novelty. Entirely new. Immense
Agents wanted.
BOX 92,
Wilmington, Del.
WANTED—Energetic agents, either lex. Char
acter must bear strictest investigation. Addreei
SUN office.
FOR SALE—Priues low, terms easy, houses i ..
west side from |1,5u0 to $5,000. Apply to A. L.
Johnson N. E. cor. Eighth and Shipley streets.
D.
FOR SALE—Three fine Buffalo robes. Frank
S. Dure Co.. 411 Market street.
FOR SALE—Unredeemed pledges of diamonds,
watches, rings and musical instruments at E.
Levy's Confidential Loan Office, Seventh and
Market streets.
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FOR SALE-Canary Birds. PHILIP A. MINK
No. 902 West Sixth street.
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FOR SALE—St. Bernard Pups.
No. 410 Tatnall
street.

W A XTTF n agents wanted
EdiHonY'NO TAxAjn AGENTSd' 6 This'Smk
contains thirty decisions of the highest courts in
the land, all proving that agents, peddlers, can
yassers, fakirs, auctioneers and others are exempt
iSBfi P^^offthspecial town taxes and
sells to every lawyei
and city official as weli as to agents, drummers
^"dotofrginterested. Over50,000 copies of the
old editions have been sold each year. The
Eight Edition will be issued December 1 , 1898.
Send twenty-five cents now for a complete copy
of the book and ter ms to agents. Tho Sun . No 5
Randolph Building, Philadelphia
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THK CENTRAL HOTEL
m
Sixth and French Streets.
Dost Pleasant Place in Town
^ ■yateni of electric calls has been placed
every convenience
P® tron9 - Special attention is paid
tne dining department. Bar attached.
ISAAC C. PYLE.
W
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V-BW WONDERLAND THEATRK,
„ „ "• lj Dockstader, Manager.
Performances daily, afternoon 2
o'clock, evening 8 o'clock. Adinis.
slon, to, 20 , 30 cents. Devoted to
Drama and Vaudeville.
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EASIEST PLAN
to earn a bicycle is to sell COO of my "10 (%
Nights in a Bar Room," at 10 cents V
a piece. Itetail price 25 cents. A 2-cent
stamp brings particulars. 12 cents
of the book and full particulars.
BICYCLE BOX. 27. Lltitz, Pa.
m
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a copy
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HOME MADE GAS.
To Stay Two Days More.
8ueh in the method cf heating done by the
Champion Oil Burner Company. This Cleveland
linn is meeting with great succewi and is in a fair
way to revolutionize the methods of heating all
kinds of stoves and furnaces in this vicinity, by
the use of kerosene oil, which their burners con
vert into a natural gas, for cooking or heating
purposes. This new process is supeiior to any
thing we have ever seen, and the cost of these
burners is within the reach of all. especially to
those who wish to order now and receive the
benefit of the wholesale prices. The represen
tatives of this company, by!pedal request, have
j»ff«rons.iEhffi &
saawa? 1 ,h * ,r bura -
ageot.
m
m
J
c*
» competent
will
Ooun
ao,
10a. a. is
of recelr
i.iosp-.m.;
from all a
under the,
is nurnoee
who an lubject to
„ ._-—lUx law. Wj wlU
TiSSSL?^ <*»>•' days Imlna
i ol DeceBDsr nreceive inch returns,
-1"* fftBM I those it the Court
law la strict"
the
Hous*.
i matter ol mak
comply.
Inf such nturns, and all
J. D. M'COY, First
No. to nut Filth Street.
WILLIAM BANNA,
trlct,
914 King Street.
NEIL KENNEDY, Third Din,
No. (07 W
J.H. HOFFECKER, Fourth Ditofct,
No. MO Madison Street.
Second Street*
WILLIAM BAYLEY, Filth District,
No. 1021 Kim Struct.
Wilmington, Del., Dec. A1898.
MORRIS & C0„
ELECTRICIANS.
h
I
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We install complete electric
light plants.
No. ii East 8th St.
mONE 816
Dewey Ho^se
jos. H. Mahoney,
C^Saloon
Klund and Pine Sts.
Keeps constantly on hand a fine line of
Whiskies, Cigars Ac. Saturday Dec. 24,
1898 he will give his patrons a chance t
get a Fine Turkey, also a Mandolin dn
Monday 26th he will server ^"and Lunch
and Egg Nog free.
an
-J.'OTBll WESTERN
Fourth and Orange St.
The finest of wet goods and cigars al
ways on hand.
EDWARD KRAUSE, Propr.
Permanent Boarders.
J. M. Mather.
C. E. Pierson.
Jl?? U/iImii>$too lijsuraijei? /)§eijey
ESTABLISHED 1867.
J. M. Mather & Co.,
Fire, Accident, Plate Glass and Cyclone Insurance.'
D. & A. Phone 426.
Delmarvia Phone 622.
No. 913 Market St.
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I yoUr prints

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a^d

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your Business
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Successful business men who have
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Goods to Sell •.
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have found it profitable to enclose a well
printed slip advertising some specialty in
every letter mailed from their offices.
Why don't you try this plan ?
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We Print S
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the slips well and design them for
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you.
The Cost Is* Little #)
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1001 East Sixth Street,
J WILMINQT0H,
•J
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bCLdWARE. ?
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NOTHING IN IT
t.
il
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\
but there will be soon, for nearly every
one knows a bargain when be sees one.
We have frames for your picture* and
pictures for your frames. From our var
ied stock you cannot fail to find what
you want.
Harry Yerger,
419 Shipley Streets
WILMINGTON, DEL.
FOIl SALE
A BARGAIN.
Grocery Business, Horse, Wagon,
good established trade. Good oppor*
tunityfor young man to start in busi
ness. Good reasons for selling
Address
"Wi
GROCERY,
SUN OFFICE.
J. L. DASH I ELL,
Violinist and Teacher,
Studio, 7oa West Fifth Street,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
First Violin in Philadelphia Symphony
Orchestra.
r I
SEEING IS BELIEVIN6
BAR6AINS IN REAL ESTATE
S. W. Cor. 8th and Li*~"* - > Store and
oz^East 7th street, dwelling.
507 West 5th Street, dwelling.
824 West 2nd Street, dwelling and stable
518EaBt 7th Street, dwelling.
605 East 3rd Street, dwelling.
2409 Lancaster ave, dwelling.
234 230, 238 Harrison Street, dwellings.
And many others.
Daniel W. Taylor,
400 EQUITABLE BUILDING
Real Estate,
Loans and Fire Insurance.

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