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Delaware straight-out truth teller. ([Wilmington, Del.]) 1872-18??, October 01, 1872, Image 4

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£ CONTINUED FROM FIR9T PAOE. ]
boost to tho little soreliead faction.—
But while he tells u a Democrats that
Sic does not feel himself in the least in
debted to us for his nomination, he
rejoiocs that we have given up Demo
cracy us doad and gone. Qencoforth,
lie sayi, the Democratic party must
stand even with the doctrines he
always maintained. His
"Gentlemen, your platform,'which is
•Iscmine, assures me that Democracy
Jtnot henceforth to stand for
^^Republicanism for another,"
That is Mr. Greeley's understanding
ftlie present situation, viz:—that he is
*no less thoroughly and earnestly a
Republican than hé ever was," and that
The Democratic party has come to him,
and so thoroughly embraced bis princi
ples that henceforth there can be
ference between the fiery Radicalism of
Horao# Greeley and the Democratic
party. And if the Baltimore Conven
tion were the Democratic party, he is
clearly right in such a startling conclu
sion. That Convention unconditional
ly renounced Democracy, and without
an expressed or implied reservation em
braced Greeleyism. Every Democratic
Tote for Greeley is, therefore, a vote to
surrender Democracy, and to affirm the
justice of the Enforcement Act, the Ku
Klux bill, the Bayonet Election Law,
and all the rest of those horrid measures
which are largely the work of Greeley,
and from which he does not recede one
step. But for Greeley, Sumnor, Trum
bull. and the other leaders of the sore
head "Liberal Republican " faction,
which the Baltimore Convention joined
such acts would never have been pass
ed. A decree of heaven banishing
Greeley, Bumner, and the whole sore
head faction from the earth, would give
almost instant peace and rest to our
country. But instead of praying for
Such a merciful measure of relief, there
are some deluded Democrats who pro
pose to put these old disturbers ot the
public peace into all the chief scats of
power : The proposition is monstrous,
and all « ho vote for it may expect to
use the residue of their life as a space
for repentance.
ANYTHING TÖ BEAT GREELEY.
The cry of 4 'anything to beat Grant"
Is not, therefore, based in intelligence,
from any Democratic stand point ; but
that other demand of anything to
prevent Greeley' from beating
AND DESTROYING THE DEMOCRATIC
party, is now the watchword ot every
Democrat. With all that Grant has the
disposition or the power to do, his alee
tion would be a leBS calamity to the
Democratic party and to the whole
country than the election of Greeley,
for that would go a great ways towards
the confirmation of the -basa surrender
of Democratic principles, and would
aceni to leave
ha
c is :
a democratic votb for GREELEY is
„ . ._ _ okant.
But it is said that, by opposing Grec
shall elect Graut. Well, a auf
ficlent answer to this would be that, by
opposing Grant they elect Greeley, for
every Democrat has a right to choose
between these two "Radical" nomi
nees. We will not, however, choose
either; and It Grant is elected, the
whole responsibility, whatever it may j
!s with the Baltimore Coavou -1
tion, which refused the people either a
Democratic nominee or a Democratic |
to vote for. It w
thing
dif
party in thiB country
devoted to the Jeffersonian doctrlue of
free government. The Baltimore Con
vention, in nominating Greeley and ac
cepting his platform, has indorsed the
Enforcement Act, the Ku-Klux Law,
the Bayonet Election Law add all the
reet of those terrible measure« which
Democrat' believes in, and which no
Democrat can accept without dilhonor,
or without voting for the absotute de
struction 6t the ■Deolobratlc parly by
merging it in the very worst slough
Radicalism, One of lhe most distin
guished and honored Democrats in
United States has said that the "duty to
oppose Mr.Greeley actively is neverthe
less imperative, for without such oppo
sition, it will seam to an observant
■world that political principles, left des
titute of either champions or followers,
have perished from the land 1 "
EVERY DEMOCRATIC VOTE
CAST FOR GREELEY IS A VOTE
TO WIPE OUT THE IMPRESS OF
DEMOCRATIC PRINCIPLES FROM
AMERICAN POLITICS, AND TO
CONFIE VI EVERY ONE OF THOSE
DANGEROUS AND FATAL DOC
TRINES WHICH I'HE DEMOCRAT
IC PARTY HAS STEADILY OP
POSED FOR MORE THAN TWO
THIRDS OF A CENTURY.
To say that the Baltimore Conven
tion committed this act of felo-de se, as
a juggling trick, meant only to cheat
the public, and to commit a fraud upon
those whose principles they professed
to adopt, is too monstrous a proposition
to be approved by unybody but a scoun
drel. If the Baltimore Convention was
not honest in taking Greeley and his
platform, it deserves the execration of
every honorable man, and if it was
honest, it deser
opposition of every true Democrat.
ot
the
the hatred and the
A YOTK
Ur*
be,
pian
1
„ . ,
meat» difficult to make a Democratic
nomination, which would have entlm
staatically united the Democratic party,
and which would, at the same time,
havo drawn away from Grant more
" Republican " vote, than it U possible
for Greeley's name to do ; and as it
must now be apparent to all, that Gree
ley stands no chance of an election, the
tftftly possible hope of defeating Grant
is by the whole Domoeratic party aban
doning the lost fortunes of Greeley and
uniting on O'Conor. While It is utter-,
ly impossible to unite the Democratic
party on Greeley, there eertamly can be
nothing in the way ot uniting it on
O'Conor. All Democrats can rally
ander this great and honored name,
with their eyes proudly fixed upon the
the glorious banner of their o*n prin
ciples. It is safe to say, that if all tho
people of the United States who would
rather
O'Conor President than
eltherof the other nominees, would vote
for him, he wouid be triumphantly
olected. Henco, every person of ordi
nary sense must see that tho only hope
of defeating Grant lies in the instaiila
neous and universal rally of opposition :
to him under the banner of O'Conor
and Adams.
nVoNftn in »
N A candidate.
But it is replied that C'Conor is not
in the field. This assertion is nothing
but the shallow device of the enemy;
for it is apparent to the eyes of all that
he already has, or will have, an eleetty
al ticket In every State where there is
the least chance to deteat Grant by unit-1
ng all the elements of opposition to ;
him.. O'Conor re in the field, as is I
proved by the fact that already an elec
toral ticket bearing his name proudly i
soars in nearly every State. And he is.
in the flold as a candidate for the Presi
deucy, not by his own seeking or ac
ceptance, but precisely as the fitst two
Presidents, Washington and John
Adams, were made candidates, by popu
lar nomination, and not by the aclion
of conventions. Jefferson's candidacy
was nearly of the same character, as
was that also ot Madison and Monroe.
None of these candidates ran as the
nominees of any officia! party orgauiza
lion. And the first time that Jackson
ran for tho Presidency he was the nom- .
inee of no Convention, but was made
such by the general coueeut of the
people O'Conor was nominated for the
Presidency by the people in nearly every
b ate before the meeting of the Louis-1
ville Convention, and even before the
assembling of the Baltimore Conven
lion. But he regards the whole Con
vention system as the source of nearly
all the corruptmns which have crept
inte politic« in our country, and which
. i. to be reformed, or swept
wholly away Public opinion, uure
strained by-the vice of conventions,
rarely ever makes a mistake by norni
Bating incompetent or bad men for high
official trusts Therefore, in refusing
to reduce himsell to the level of sell
seeking Convention nominees, Mr.
O Conor has sustained his exalted posi
° u f".! 88 . a - ? an , , tran8 '
S h '$ Ue8t T,V r
u L , mt ? Ul f Dt &ï r ■J Êt S a f u>
Sînîï Aa dc e ~
«ITS'
nm? n ^rt,? e fSî* î nd pttt , n "
" of . lhe P arl y
they fully acquiesce in Mr. O Conor s
this subject, and heartily join
people in every btate in pre
cahdidate for the Presidency
.. . . wants U*® office,
but who, if voluntarily elected by the
people, will not retuse to serve them,
Wbeu, therefore, the enemy, for selfish
purposes, proclaims that Mr. O'Couor
is not a candidate, we point to his ban
already flying iu nearly every
iroudly wave witb
on or dissent from
convention, he
., , T î ot mak ®, a "y
objection to the use ot his name by the
I>cople. Like Washington, he neither
seeks the office, nor purpose's to disre
gurd the wishes ol the people if they
<-41 »1 f i «
It lb one of the most hopeful signs of
these times that the use of so great
and spotless a name for the Presi- h
deucy instantly commands the re*
spec, of all classes, l-.ven those
venul polit it nuis who are personally iu
tcrested in the success ol other cundi
dates, how with respect at the majesty
ot O'Cpnor's name, And the second
• ticket, Johu Quincy
Adams, attracts the confidence ami ad
miration of all honest men. It is a long
time siucc a man ol his distinguished I
ability and high character has been
placed on a ticket for Vice President by
any party. To eminent abilities anil
an acknowledged purity of character,
the adds the characteristics of true he
roism, for lie 1ms twice led the forlorn
hope of Democracy iu that black State
of Massachusetts as candidate for Gov
ernor, when it was evident that he
could find no other reward than the
consciousness of having served his
country by holding up the almost sur
rendered banner of Democracy and
Truth.
In these hruve ads, he has reminded
us of an incident in tiio life of iiis great
ancestress, Mn. Adams, the wife of the
second President of the United States,
which is recorded in Loring's History,
j She was a heroine of the Revolution,
whose life was full of devotion to
liberty, as is well expressed in her own
| words in a letter to a friend :
ought ut
views
with the
eentifig a
who neither seeks
ners
State, where' the;
out either perau
him. While he would not consent to
lie the nominee of
bus not made, and
wifi
name
, ouu CAUSE, I TRUST, IS THE
CAUSE OK TRUTH AND JUS
TICK, AND WILL FINALLY
! PREVAIL, THOUGH THE COM
j UINEI) FORCE OF EARTH AND
I riELL SHALL RISE AGAINST IT
| (l U r nominee for Vico President
j may, with force and justice, repeat
these startliug words' of his great
grandmother, in the canvass he is now
[ making against venalty, anarchy aud
despotism. in our country. Indeed,
O' Conor and Adams Is a watchword
which attracts the longing eye of patri
otisnt, and fires the heart of every lion
est man with fresh hopes for
country.
C. Chauncry Burr, 1
.Tames Lyons,
T. M. Monroe,
W. II. Wuems,
Wm. M. F'-.rry,
!
Committee.
«BEELBY »NAPS his finoebs
at the democracy.
Tho Hartford Times (Democratic.) of
June 26th, publishes tho following
tract from a pr vatc letter written by
: Greeley to a gentleman ot Connecticut,
Tho Times says-. " Though it was nev
er intended for publication, the gcntle
,nan ,0 whom it was addressed has
deemed it of sufficient interest and im
portance to justify its publication":—
New York, June 11,1872.
* * * I have no possible claim to
Democratic support, and uever made
any. Tha Democrats will, of course,
be govorned by a consiperation of their
own interest. It is nowise proper or
; probable that they should bo Influenced
I i u making their decision by any con
^deration personal to myself and if they
i could be 1 do not desire it. Hence I
havo said nothing to any Democrat un
leas he first addressed me. and even
then, I have gone no further than to
say that, if I should be elected, I would
treat all those who supported me alike,
not asking whether they had been in
the past Republicans or Democrats,
* * * Yours, '
Horace Greeley
Tills is a perfect gem of good reading
for those Democrats of the easiest sort
of political virtue, who have run crazy
after Greeley, even while he snubs them
. by plainly telling them that he neither
solicits their support nor concedes that
they are capable of going for him from
any other than a perfectly selfish and
un worthy motive. There is nothing
earth that Greeley despises so much as
ft Democrat. Ho lias denounced them
H o long as "drunkards," "thieves,"
"brothel-keepers," -'traitors," "liars "
"knaves" "swindlers" and "sneaks "
that he cannot, even in hiB present po
sitiou. help turning up his nose at them
whenever and however they appear. ~
lie despises their personal respect, and
plainly tells them so. He actually
thinks that they are such dogs that they
will he more likely to vote for him if
he continues to kick at them, as he has
done for the last twenty five years. Let
every Democrat read over the above ex
tract from his letter five or six times, to
get unmistakably at all its beauties —
™ clause, which declares that lie
w111 a11 alike who vote for him, is
especially Interesting* us showing that,
wv ® n V no i ninftl0d lhe Democratic
P art W and ftvon ,f elected by it, he
huowb that the "Liberal Republicans"
are a Unyth. There is nothing of them.
If he\is elected at all, it must be to the
Democratic party that he will owe his
elevation. But he declares iu advance
that hé shall feel under no obligation to
Democrats as a parly. He would al
most resign his hopes for a seat iu the
kingdom of heaven to make sure oi
wiping out of existence the Democratic
party. But the devil has
to gratify that ambitiou.
The Mouth and Horaco Greeley.
Did we believe, could we be mode to
believe, that Horace Greeley, if elected
President of the United States, would
U sc his influence to truly benefit the
crushed South, we would throw body
ft „d sou ] i, ll0 the work of placing him
[„ the chair now occupied by General
Grant; but we do not believe it.—
Horace Greeley would be utterly pow
e rless to aid that long-suffering people
h n the least. He would he obliged to
keep up the infernal Ku-Klux laws, the
the military force, the Civil Rights bill,
the political nigger machinery with its
huge taxation—all
I
I I
the power
Grant's carpet
baggers keen it up at this moment,
Iioruee Greeley tells the people to-day
that he lias not changed his political i
ideas to the extent of a hair's breadth.
The Ku-Ivlux laws he would make
stronger, the equality of the nigger he
would make more appareut, the Civil
Rights bill he stands shoulder to shoul
der with Mr. Sumner in enforcing, the
rights of the States he declares are
subordinate to the pow
of the Federal Government : all, and
more, thus anti-Democratic, ho declares
to day ; then where is the "reform" for
the South, the safety even of the nation
impracticable a fanatic ? How
Democrats support him? IIow
:an the South trust him?
and wishes
Momeby'M Letter.
Col. Moseby, in his letter, which was
recently printed in the Day Book truly
says:—
' Will lhe partisans of Greeley point
to one act that was odious to us that he
lias not justified and approved? Nay,
more. The tyranical acts of Congres
sional legislation were an expression of
a Northern sentiment of hostijity to the
South for which Horace Greeley, more
than any other man, is responsible.
Gen. Grant has been the instrument of
executing many laws obnoxious to us,
which were enacted under the pressure
of a public opinion created by Greeley,
which no man could resist."
With the above facts staring him in
the face, how a decent Democrat can
indorse Greeley is more than wo can
understand.
WHAT THE PRESS SAYS.
[From tho MlUdleburg (S. Y.) Gazette.]
" Not any man
Whose head is right
Will wear just
A hat that's white."
[From the Morgontown (W. Va.) Consti
tution.]
Defeat is certain if you should yield
to the degrading overtures of the
Greeley conspirators; and along with
defeat goes your own lasting disgrace.
Stand firm, and if defeat must come let
it come at least with honor.
[From the Dallas (Texas) Herald.]
The Greeley Democrats are mostly to
be found about the towns and cities
among the merchants, and bankers,
and lawyers, and politicians, but go to
the country, where people breathe
pure air and are exempt from outside
influences, and you will find that they
opposed to Greeley,
[From the Savannah Daily News,]
The Savannah Daily News, an able
and staunch Democratic paper, won't
choose between 4 'two evils," for it now
14 We could not have suppo
Greeley consistently upon a be
cratic platform—lufcv mueh less can we
support him upon the Cincinnati reso
lutions. The adoption of these resolu
tions by the Democratic Convention is
an indignity to the Southern people.
[From tha Warsaw (Ky.] Weekly News.]
A majority of the Democratic part
want a Democratic candidate. It
only the political wire workers, policy
seekers, etc., who favor Greeley's nomi
nation. The Greeley Radicals pretend
they want to beat Grant. Why can't
they do it with an honest Democrat?
Why do they choose a life-long enemy
to the South, and the Democracy—the
very people of whom they now ask
votes ?
[From the Greensboro (Ga.) Herald.]
Can our contemporary cite
stance where Mr. Greeley has recanted
a solitary word of his slanderous abuse
upon an oppressed people? So far as
we have seen, he has not. Neither has
he modified his political views.
********
All the outrageous and tyrannical
laws with which the South has been op
pressed since 1865 received the hearty
and zealous support of Mr. Greeley
and in perfect accord with his opinion
of self-government under the Constitu
tion.
? [From tho Washington, (Ga,) Gazette.]
44 As for us, we are no more in favor
of Horace Greeley than we were when
(nominated at Cincinnati. We have
/pressed our opinion'freely ana candidly
/heretofore through the columns of the
Gazette, and have taken our stand
Wainst this anticipated movement some
time ago. We see no occasion to
BTC
says
Mr.
in
rlillin-i
opinion or
the position already taken,
not blindly follow the guidance of any
convention or set of men, contrary to
our own views of what is right, in the
face of our own convictions and against
tho interests of the party to which
belong, against the country, and to the
the destruction of constitutional
ernmeut. Mo't things in the future
uncertain, and it is impossible for uny
one to say what he will do, yet there
is one thing certain, and one thing
which we can say tee will not do,
and that is
Greeley. The
5 look
to move from
We can
gov
ie will not vote for
re-election of Graut
ccrtuiu, and fear that
upon
the Democracy is dead."
Hichiffnn's True Democracy.
MiLFOUl), Sept. 8 , 1872 -
Wc have about two hundred and
thirty De mac
hundred und seventy live have already
signed u pledge that they will not vote
for said Greeley, nor uid by their votes
any man or set of men to a Suite, coun
tv, or .municipal office who aided or
had any hand in the transfer of the
IX-moemtie party to its life-long enemy
aiul tradueer.
At Work.—A majority of the States
have already held, or have issued calls
for State c<
ors for O'Com
."entions to nominate elcct
aucl Adams, but not
being in the newspaper business and
exchange list to clip
give tho following
ample of what we could fill a page of
paper with. :—
"A County Convention of Straight
out Democrats of Montgomery county,
Pennsy Ivunia. was held Tuesday, 17th
inst. William Beau, oj Norritun town
ship, in the chair. 1
Whitplain, and Rowland
Lower Merlon- were anno
n<* having
from,
ionry Dull, of
-,--and Evans, of
Lower Merit», were appointed secre
taries. A good township representa
tion was present. Muss mcetiugs
being held and addresses delivered by
able Democrats. A full electoral ticket
will be ready for publication next
week."
Goon !—Wc printed 1,500 copies of
the Courier extra last issue, and still
are unable to fill the orders that
come in by the score. Tho Democrats
of Western Wisconsin and Northern
Iowa, are fairly wild with enthusiasm
for Charles O'Conor.
There is not a true Democrat in the
Northwest but will cast his vote for
O'Connor and Adams.— Pratrta du
Chien (TF»s.) Courier ,
GEO. W. JACKSON,
City Bill Poster
AND
DISTRIBUTOR,
No. 6 WEST FIFTH STREET,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
CHARLES POSTER,
WHOLESALE AND ,R1!TAIL
DRUGGIST,
Cor. of Front and West 8ts. f
WILMINGTON, DEL.
Manufacturer of Foster s Colebralad
Tonic Bitters, Blood Purifier, Rose Worm
Lozen*eM, Pile au<l Barn Halva. Also,
• ;y° l ' 1 , n F BJrtnwta. Extracts, Essen
ses, oodl^y's Cordial, Bateman's Drops,
assMag- au ° rde "
QUINBY & KENT,
Dealers in all kinds of
Building Lumber,
HARD WOODS, Ac.,
FRONT AND MADISON STS.,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
JOHN R. HOLT,
DEALER IN
Wall Papers
AND
WINDOW SHADES,
Third and Market Street,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
soU'cui 5 T °" r patronage la roapeotfully
E. S. R. BUTLER,
Dsgly and Weekly Papers
Hooks and Stationery, Pocket Books,
JSatchels and {fancy Artic^*»
MO. 420 MARKET STK^ËÏr
WILMINGTON, DEL. »
Ë. C. Stotsenhurg & Son,
, Iron. Brass,
AND
Bell Founders,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
SAMUEL BARR & SON'S
Coal Yard,
No. 801 WKsT FRONT STREET.
Locust Mountain
«1 other Schuylkill
and Indiieh (Joui. Also, Oak, Pine and
Hickory Wood.
GAWTHROl' & BRO.,
P'LUMBERS,
Gas and Steam Fitters,
No. 415 MARKET STREET,
Wilmington, Del.
JAMES COISnSTER,
Manufacturer and Dealer in
Saddles, Harness,
Whips, Trunks, Valise«, eto,
No- 237 Market Street, one
door below Third,
Wilmington, Del.
49-Tlm largest stoek of Buffalo Robes,
State* B1 »"keta, Lap Itugs, &c., in the
ADAMS & BROTHER,
GREAT
VARIETY STORE,
506 Market Street, 506
WILMINGTON, DEL.

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