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The Odessa leader. (Odessa, Del.) 1892-18??, September 21, 1892, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053126/1892-09-21/ed-1/seq-2/

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The OhEssa Lehöer
A LOCAL REPUBLICAN NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHED EVERY WED
NESDAY AFTERNOON AT
ODESSA, DELAWARE.
TERMS, ONE DOLLAR A YEAR IN ADVHNCE
Editor
W. A. Bonn
REPUBLICAN TICKET.
FOR PRESIDENT OF UNITED 8TATBB.
BENJAMIN HARRISON,
Of Indiunn.
FOR VICE PRESIDENT,
WHJTELAW REID,
Oi New York.
Blew Castle County Ticket.
FOR SHERIFF,
PEIRCE GOULD.
FOR CORONER,
GEO. W. JACKSON.
RECEIVER OF TAXES AND COUNTY
TREASURER.
JOSEPH E. MARTIN.
COMPTROLLER,
HENRY C. CONRAD.
ODESSA, SEPTEMBER 21, 1892.
A CHANGE OF NAHE.
We place before you to-day for your
approval or condemnation the Odessa
Leader.
For almost four years the Odessa
Herald was a weekly visitor to your
homes and your fireside, but the
Odessa Herald has now given way to
the Odessa Leader. Under the
new management of things it was
considered advisable to give the paper
a new name that it might not conflict
with any other paper of similar name
in the county and for this reason we
have substituted the name of the
Leader for that of the Herald; and
start a new series with this number.
The Herald's friends are asked to
continue their patronage as heretofore.
We trust our readers will appre
ciate the improvements we have made
in the general appearance and style of
the paper.
Coming among you a stranger, we
have had to depend solely on our
friends for what you will find in our
local columns, and trust that our
readers will not be too hasty in form
adverse opinion of our merits.
The Leader's mission, as
that of its predecessor, will be to ad.
vatice the interests of Odessa and her
citizens by every honorable means,
and to promulgate the principles of
the Republican party.
We desire it to be understood, how
ever, tlmt so far as local politics are
concerned, the Leader shall hold
ing
a candidate's worth above partizan*
ship.
in desi re to say in conclusion that
!I|Ma L-j ;
OR. : I flit J';h uliin -üj'J.Ü-'i

^ÄWfUpP*''
fl-class work.
links to those who so kindly
[in various ways, we reniai^
Tour humble servant,
The Editor.
P. S.—Our subscription book awaits
your name._
Cleveland must train down consul,
erably before he can mount that Hill
that blocks his onward march to
Washington.
Protection is ever the watchword t>f
the American citizen who desires to
see the continuous growth and pros
perity of our country.
Our Democratic friends may draw
nil the consolation they can from the
decreased majorities in Maine and
Vermont, but they won't have a word
to say when Delaware wheels into
the Republican line this fall.
Sam Joseph's song of "Four Years
More for Grover," which was inspired
at the Chicago convention, is never
more heard of. This will likewise be
the fate of Grover'himself after that
Republican cyclone strikes him in
November.
We candidly believe that if a man
was to come along and offer first-class
seats in Paradise in exchange for ad
vertising space, some papers would
bite at the proposition. We arc more
thoroughly convinced of this from
seeing a large advertisement going the
rouuds of our contemporaries, of the
Mieut of which wc have some
Blcdgc.
1]
Haruihon and Reid.
This is the banner under which
we've enlisted.
Our candidate® have stood the
storms of many political battles and
have conic out of them triumphant
and unscathed, and one-time pclitical
foes are uniting with their friends and
rallyiug around their standard.
"The Shibboleth of Tariff Reform,"
us Cleveland is designated by some of
his admirers, cannot turn the tide of
overwhelming defeat into whose mad
rushing waters the Democratic hosts
are even now plunging.
Their attempts to carry the
States of the Northwest with money
«ubscribed
by pronounced Free
the East, will bear uo
The mighty West, this even
L\r of empire, has spoken in the
Traders i
fruit.
past, and will roll up such a majority
of States for the Republican tieket as
will open the eyes of the East.
Business Men in Politico.
Four years ago the National Re
publicpn Committee intuitively real
ized the tremendous weight of the
business clem eut as a factor in the
campaign, ns well as the fact that the
sympathy of this element was natur
ally with the Republican party.
They therefore resolved to make this
sympathy active instead of merely
passive—to secure the benefit of its
organized influence instead .of resting
content with its fortuitous and spo
radic support. With this purpose in
view the advisory committee of the
National Republican Committee was
composed solely of men selected for
their high business and personal char
acter, and their influence and promi
uehce in their respective localities.
_ „ , , , ,.
In pursuance of this plan a body of
\ j
men was brought together composed
, , ° . . .
of the very flower of the business
, , ..... ...
men of the principal cities ot the
. . ... . .
country, and our present efficient
, .
Postmaster General was chosen as its *
, . , , ,
chairman, lhe work undertaken and .
_ , . . is
performed by this committee unques
\ .. J . , . . .,
tiouably contributed largely to the
, ..
splendid triumph of the Republican
1 , . . . ,
party at that time, and it was work
....... . . , ,,
of a solely legitimate and honorable !
. r». , » .
character. lue gentlemen ot that.
committee were never classed ns "prac
tical politicians," and they had no
personal interest'in the campaign be
yond the intelligent and sincere con
viction that the material welfare of
the busiuess interests of the country
were involved in the repudiation of
the economic theories of the Demo
cratie leaders ami the establishment
of the tariff policy represented and
advocated by the Republican party.
It is an irrefragable fact that for de
ceucy, honesty, and purity, the cam
paign of four years ago was conspicu
ous for its improvement upon those
that for many years had preceded it
In the present campaign the prospects
for a repetition of that Republican
triumph of four years ago arc very
flattering, and the business men as a
factor to that success have become a
fixture in the Republican party. To
this clement we must also look for the
salvation of our State from the hands
of the Democrats who have so long
sat in her council chambers and en
acted laws that have brought the blush
of shame to the cheeks of every horn
est citizen, be he Republican or Dem
ocrat, black or white.
to
we
to
of
we
our
our
our
ad.
her
of
Organize.
Organize.
The Republicans of Delaware will
greatly lessen their chances of carry
ing ' the State ~ in November next,
unless they wake up. Untiring ac
tivity, constant watchfulness, intelli
gent reading and plenty of it, are the
essentials to success iu this campaign.
Our leaders in both Nation and
State are wording ^ like beaver^ to
drift Delaware from its Democratic
moorings, but we cannot expect Jlo ac
complish this unless every Republican
takes a hand.
One of the most effective ways to
reach this desired end is to
Oraganize.
Organize at once.
Organize a club in every neighbor
hood in the Slate.
This
joint
the
at
the
of
down
sible.
to
tled
the
the
Make the club the weekly resort of
meet to
your people, where they ca
jgether, consult, learn and keep them
selves posted.
Make it pleasant that all will wan
to come to the meetings.
to
Hunt up the young men and in
dues them to join and attend regu- l
larlv.
Keep plenty of good political read
ing matter in the club room.
Prevail upon every member and
eighbor to take and read his
is
It
is
every
local paper.
But above all organize.
The Democratic organs are not yet
able to resign themselv
that defeat stares them in the face tliis
full. They fail to grasp the idea that
the deep-thinking and intelligent peo
ple of this great country are averse to
changing the present protective sys
tem for
the Democratic papers eve
us to state that in Indiana this fall
votes can be purchased ranging in
price from a drink of whisky to a
hundred dollars. This charge is not
very complimentary to the av
Democratic voter, since it can hardly
be Republican votes that can thus he
urchased.
to the fact
Sonic of
: sham reform.
rage
Our Democratic friends arc some
what di.-consorted over the great de
mand for tariff literature, and hardly
know how to act about it, while the
Republicans arc more titan pleased to
sec the people take such an interest in
the great question at issue. They are
well supplied with this kind of read
ing matter, and the arguments they
have in reference to what the McKin
ley bill has accomplished are unan
swerable. This pi
ed ucatiunal cam pa ign,
forever shut out the chances of Free
Trade getting a foothold in America.
of
I and
to lie a,
vllicll
,V!
j The Philadelphia Record has taken
r j up tlu* fight of the Reading combine
ized
rrayed
Its latest move will have n
itself against
irgi
j labor.
great effect oq the political situation,
insomuch as the laboring classes will i,
j not support a party whose National
I ta one u r tlie j.t..prieta.rs of |
sheet, and that sheet tlie J
! mouthpiece of the Free Trade clc- ]
j Chair
as a "rat"
ment. Every workingman who loves
that freedom vouchsafed him by our
glorious flag, will repudiate such se
tion on the part of the Democratic
leaders,
. .. . . 4 ...
1 he city papers are all right it you
. . , ' . , ,
want them, but it is the local paper
. , .
that advertises your town, vour busi
. , , * ,
ness, your schools, your churches, your
' . . .. ...
numerous societies, sympathizes with
...
you in vour affliction and rejoiees with
* * . , ....
you m vour prosperity. In short, it
. ..
is your local paper that mentions the
*
thousand and one things in which vou
.
are interested during the year, and
which you do not find m the city pa
.... , , . . \ .
pers. Did you ever look at m this
!
light?
°
Truly in reading the great daily
papers one can never be sure of nny
thing. The news vocation is being
discredited and degraded, public mor
als are vitiated, and brutal wounds
are inflicted upon gentle and loving
of hearts, which, in its own honor, out of
good feelings, a self-respecting paper
ought to feel itself ever ready and
bound to respect.
-
^ ^ ms become of Ruby McKee
ant ^ Ruby Ruth? I hey must evi
( ^ eu ^Y have been taking part in the
Maine and Vermont campaigns, which
it- probably accounts for the small vote
cast * n ^ iese ^ lates -
a
a
To
the
en
The Third party advocates uro mak
ing things warm for the Democrats in
the South. In a recent issue of the
official organ of that party in South
Carolina, editor Dunning, says: "Men
have either got to come out of the
Democratic party or fight us.
'Force bill* humbug is their excuse,
and as to that I have to say—If the
Southern Democrats keep up the
frauds in the black countries that they
perpetrated in Alabama, public senti
ment will put a force bill on them."
Tit
the
in
are
the
and
as
of
The Odessa Republicans are known
all over the State of Delaware, and
their services do not go unrewarded,as
was evidenced in the appointment of
Collector of tho Port Townsend.
In pursuance of a proclamation
issued by Governor Reynolds, October
21 is to bo a legal holiday in com
memoration of Columbus.
old as he feels
A man may he as
but not always as big.
cause
Delaware's Boundary.
Delaware is to have the "flat iron."
The
stand
of
This is a piece of good news,
joint commission of the States of Penn
sylvania and Delawa
have decided
the boundary question which has been
eyes
now^
diers
The
its
old
at issue for many years and given to
the Diamond State the little tongue
of land containing 700 acres, running
down fropi Pennsylvania between
Delaware and Maryland,
sible. Pennsylvania can afford to be
generous to her little neighbor inas
much as the strip was of little account
to her, lying as it does outside of its
symmetrical lines and seeming to be
almost the "little end of nothing whit
tled to a point." It is well also for
the occupants of it, who will now
know in which State they live, and
the tax collector will he aille to get a
little tax out of tho fellows down
5
his is
the
a
cian
there who have heretofore been able
to escape him by dodging fr<
State to another when be was after
one
them. That commission deserves the
unanimous thanks of three States in
l lllv ing settled this question without
com mon weal ths— i n
involving thre
eluding Maryland—in a bloody inter
-Oxford Pres
State war -
it
is
A Pretty Surprise.
A beautifully illustrated and charm
ingly bound edition of Longfellow's
"Evangeline," the most popular long
poem ever published by an American
author, and one of the most famous
poems in the language, just published,
is a pretty surprise for book lovers.
It is in large type, numerous and ex
cellent illustrations, very fine and
heavy paper, gilt edges, remarkably
handsome cloth binding, with gilt
title and ornaments. No illustrated
edition has ever before been pub
lished at less cost than 81.50, and that
is about what you might "g
price i)f this to he, hut it isn't—it sells
for only 10 coats, plus C cents for
postage, if by mail. This covers only
about the actual cost of manufacture
by the 100,000, the publisher's object
being, not profit, but to show the book
loving millions what he can do. llis
publications arc not sold by dealers,
but only direct; catalogue, over 100
pages, a literary curiosity in its way,
is sent for a 2-cent stamp. Every
home in the land ought to have a
copy of this Evangeline, so charm
ingly bountiful, as a poem, as a col
lection of artistic illustrations, and as
a product of the book-making art.
Address John 1». Alden, Publisher,
L, New York.
a
he
of
ss" the
to
in
are
.-> 7 Ito.*
laiclcpciidciil Voters».
We are told that more independent
voters are needed to purify politics,
and it is doubtless true. The demand
of party is to close the eyes, drown
conscience, and swallow what
ever seems expedient to advance party
interests. Wc are told that the party
that adopts Sunday School methods is
to be defeated. This, too, is
doubtless true, because i»f the scarcity
of independent voters. If every hon
est Christian gentleman ivould system
atically and quietly refuse to vote for
the unlit candidate, the candidate who
a,
ized
sure
n
will i, u known to l»c a political tricks
^ would Vm-Iiui ''afTwlîl) tei^'ùnd '
of | " c lV' v'.t'V" ui.d'"».ViUoul influenceThe
tlie J political atmosphere would soon he :
clc- ] clearer and purer.— Farm and Home, j
THE GRAND ARMY ENCAMPMENT.
a
of
of
if
\
A
Graphio Description of the Illuminations—
Mi's. Harrison's Condition— -A Memo
rial Arch to the G. A. R.
Washington, Sept. 20. —The illum
ination in the streets of Washington
during the time that the members of
the Grand Army are in the city are
unique, and excel anything ever seen
in this part of the country. There
are a large number of what arc called
universal signs on which arc the
names of the great battles and of the
generals who lead tho Union hosts to
victory. These are grouped about
the various corps badges, the battles
and names of generals being associated
as nearly as possible with the corps
with which they-were identified. Of
course, these names and badges are
produced by the electric lights, thous
ands of incandescent lamps being em
ployed in doing so. A design that is
of special interest is erected at the
head of Fifteenth street at the en
.
l
a
It iaa huge
®
trance'to the White lot.
fac simile of the G. A. R. ba'dge,
eighteen feet high. This badge is
made up of incandescent lumps, of the
various colors that go to make up the
badge, and when tho lights are turned
the emblem produces a gorgeous
and magnificent Grand Army medal.
The great display of the wonders of
electricity are shown in the White
House grounds in front of the Presi
dent's house. Here innumerable
lights are bidden in the shrubbery, all
of them changeable in their character
and disappearing and reappearing in
the most bewildering manner. Tho
trees and shrubbery are fairly mag
netized with electricity and the effects
arc novel, and in many respects start
ling. The illumination of the capitol
building is something out of the ordi
nary, and is accomplished by a vast
number of electric search lights. These
powerful lights, stationed^on the top
of the high buildings, are thrown
upon the dome of the Capitol, and
upon
cause that wonderful structure to
of marble
stand out like a piece
statuary against the dark background
of the sky. Taken altogether the
illumination of Washington on thîf
occasion surpasses anything yet al-«
tempted, and is a revelation to the
thousands of spectators. All politic:?!
eyes are turning toward Washington
now^ The gathering of the, old sol
diers interests thousands of people.
The Grand Army' button has made
its appearance upon the streets, the
old soldiers have brushed up thefr
uniforms and war reminiscences to
meet their old friends. Mr. Cleve
land's cars will probably burn whej*
the Grand Army boys get together.
The Grand Army is supposed to be
a non-political organization, but it
could scarcely be expected that in a
presidential year so many old soldiers
would get together without the politi
cian getting in his work
There is reason to believe that the old
soldiers will be reminded a good many
times before they get away from
Washington of Mr. Cleveland's veto
record, and if Bourko Cock ran and
Gen. Sickles are not quoted several
times to the effect, that Cleveland can
not get the vote of the old soldiers,
then there is more forgetfulness on
the Republican side than could rea
sonably be expected.
them.
While there is nothing in the late
. t T i . . .. .
rq,orts from Lorn, Lake to .n.I.catc
that Mrs. Harrison is making any
substanlial progress towards recovery,
it is encouraging to learn that her
symptoms are more favorable, and it
is needless to say that the hope of her
restoration to be'ulth is universal. The
, , , /• 1 -, . ....
whole country feels an .Merest m tins
matter, partaking more or less of a
personal character, for the reason that
all our citizens, without regard to pol
itics or party bias, tael an immediate
i , \ \ t ,
and loyal interest in whatever effects
the welfare of the President or of the'
he will
renatin at hi, wife', be,Li, le to long
as the emergency readers Ins presence
necessary. The veterans of the Grand
Array are exceedingly anxious to see
the President and to pass before him
in review Imt tlinir niiviotv te.- MV
1 loue "' but , ! k11 ll ",f ct y <01 M,e
Harrison outweighs all other consul
orations. It is. however, rumored
that Mrs. Harrison is anxious to be
President's household, even
they may be
Whether the P«
though
to both.
>idcnt will he able
strangers
to visit the Capital during the en
campment wreck depends, of course,
upon Mrs. Harrison's condition. Earn
est jfnd enthusiastic as lie is in
gard to the great reunion, and reluct
ant as he might otherwise feel to nb
isclf on this oct
re
sent hi i
in Wa.-biugton, and insists that she
well enough to he moved. Her phy-i
' The proposition is being discussed
!" ,,,on g !l fe ' v ei,i7 -™' i alul Gri " ,tl
: Army men to agit ate tho idea of the
j erection iu this city of a memorial
ill comply with her request
sicians w
if she continues to improve.
arch to the Grand Army of tho Re
public. It is suggested that it is now
a good time to discuss the question of
providing a last tribute in stone and
bronze to the achievements of the men
who compose tho army, and whose
ranks are rapidly thinning. It is said
that the idea often advanced hereto
fore of crectiug n memorial will event
ually crystallize into result, and that
this encampment offers the most aus
picious occasion for tho beginning
of it.
in
in
â
in
no
.
of the Manic election will do us good,
if the majority does not get too large. !
\ n * ... . . ,
A small majority in Maine is whatgJgg
we want to work our folks and wake
Senator Pettigrew was in Washing
ton for a short time this week. Speak
ing of the political outlook to your
correspondent, ho said: "Our folks
(the Republicans) are greatly en
couraged. We think wo are going to
carry New York. The betting is in
favor of Havrisou. I think the result
i
i
I
__ . _
Not (»cncraUy Known ;
That there seems to have been "a
tempest ill n tea pot" over in Scott's
Hundred
That John W. Jolis will be the
j«.xt County Commissioner from the
TWili .li.irîfo
l ii it uiBirict.
That Captain Walker is an old
veteran in political warfare and has
a record that few have attained.
- That a fair count and a free ballot
"ill number Delaware among the Ro
o. . r . xr f q
])u t.iciin States after November 8. tt
^Tluit Dave Hutchison is one of the
workers around Townsend and will
make somebody hustle before they de*
Innl Itimfnv fl.n T mnelnfnv,,
feat him foi the Legislature. !
That everything's fair in war, and
thin often times we must ^orifice piin
ciples tor sentiment. But then its,
gooil politics, and don t you forget it,
either. j
, P , . , tTT , tv,, n /. » *
Iliat Lnclo Billy ( ochraiis an*
them up with."
R.
That Will Davis says lie i
out of
politics, but that if Cleveland is dec
ted, lie'll
; well, we don't like to
say.
That Collector of the Port Town
send is one of the best booked gentle
men on politics in the State of Delà
That tho Delaware Ledger un
kindly insinuates that the Wilmington
Daily News will be no more after the
election.
either. j st.Ul
, P , . , tTT , tv,, n /. » * which
Iliat Lnclo Billy ( ochraiis an* Q^oko
nou nee meut of being an independent counters
candidate for Assessor in this district
completely took the starch out of his , n* the
Democratic colleagues. _
Timt William A. Scott will not be ùiu
tlie County Commissioner from (lie Cnro
Fiftl, District, unless all signs of His-1 &bU
conttnt that now pioun.se the disiup* j ko
tion of his party hereabouts fails. | ße
That Lewis O Vniulegrift, E. E.
Cochran, Ji., and John ^ II. Rodney | l0 jxj
will represent the New Castle County
Democratic clubs at the national to
meeting in New York on Octobr 1.
tlio
That the State Republican Commit- at
•e preparing a schedule of meet por,
lags to be held throughout the State, 1 biu
i . « *1 * -ii ji expect
anti means that we will carry the > m \
State it there is any possibility of the
doing so. fully
rpi , ,, . r „ . w .. „
1 hat County Chairman Martin B. cail
Burns is made of the right kind of fnglgr
stuff, and knows the difference be
tween good politics and sham sen li -.
ment. He is an able successor to Mr. bid
Towiucml.
tee
That y
must be registered before
you can vote, and as tlii.y is registra- A
tion month it will not be policy to *?Pr
, , , I, . . 1 { ■ cu
neglect jour duty. Registrar Arm- ti'ibc.
strong sits in the Leader office every 0 f
Saturday to take your name. |
rp, . j i j 6,000
1 imt John G. Armstrong re pro
seated »St. George's Hundred at Dover '
on Thursday last, and was greatly stone.
impressed with the speech of Black- their
burn. Tlio registrar is sure that
r...... ,,.;n ,•
io\\.i will now go Democratic, as
Boies opened the campaign there last state
woek. able
land
That the Smyrna Times says: »S.A.
McAllister, chief supervisor of elec
tions for Delaware, was in Dover last
week consulting prominent Repaidi
cans and Republican supervisors at
, ^ e ^'Publican club rooms.
ported that the Republicans propose
[ 0 g „ alleal , aml out „
tion according to their ideas oT quali
tied voters, and contest tho election
under the State registration,
That the New Era thus sums up
l ^ ,e political situation: "The Republic
«ms arc active; they are determined
to Will it possible, relying wholly on
, |l0 a|)utilJ ( illd 4^ llce J tll0
] Democrats." The New Era, however,
is a little off in reference to the "in
difference of the Democrats." It is
u ." tho dlacontoi.t among the host
element ol that party that the Kepub
jj çans ,j e p eI1( i.
ns n
is
'rhe
orated
Q
ians
on
It is re
kind
a
This
tlio
proof
up
and
aro
that
with
dDor,
Capo
That the Wilmington Republican
thus eulogizes one our citizens: "The
Republican County Executive Com
mittee, so ably presided over by Mr.
George L. Townsend for the past two
years, is fortunate in the selection ot
Martin B. Burris, of Middletown, as
his successor. Mr. Townsond, who
conscientiously believes iu the princi
pies of civil service reform, having
accepted the office of Collector of tai
l !"' lWt Uf y , 'l |n 'ngton t resigned as|
-- . !
The Democrats can take some con ^ ! ^
sol!lt ' 10 '' °"t of the Maine election
,atui ns when they learn that not a
' Democrat will lie a member of the aud
",legislature and onlv 4L' out of 151 is
! the way the senate will stand. The
vote was very small, hut just the
fiame ll,e Republicans made a gain of 01
tour members of the .State legislature. |
,
j
I *0
i cir
; j
, ! he
;
1
j
i
j
J
I
JOB PRINTING
V.'v.y'l
SHE PASSENGER TRAIN CONDUCTOR.
tfto M««t Exacting* Position In til* linn Ua
of Uallroad Eluployoti
The passenger tmin conductor has
in many respects the moot difficult
position in the railroad ranks. He
Should be a first class freight conductor
and a polished gentleman to boot. But
in his long apprenticeship on a freight
train he has very likely been learning
how not to fulfill tho additional ro*
â tdrements of a passenger conductor
hip. In that sorvico ho could bo un
couth and even boorish and still fill
his position tolerably well; now ha
feels tho need of a lifo limo of tuition
in dealing with tho diverse phases of
human nuiuro met with on a passen
r train. lie must now manage liii
fain in a sort of automatic way, for
no lias his mind filled with tho goto of
his passengors and tho collection of
tickets. Ho must bo good at figures,
keeping accounts, and handling
money, though tho freight train ser
vice has given him no oxp
this line. Year by year Û
work connected with tho taking up
tickets and collecting of cash fares!
boon increased until now on many
roods an export bank clerk would bo
none too proficient for the duties im
.nosed. The conductor who grunt
-
jenonce in
io clerical
) of
11
blinglv averred that "it would take a
Philadelphia lawyer with three heads' 1
to fill his shoes was not far out of tho
way.
Every day, and perhaps a number
of times a day, ho must collect fares
of fifty or a hundred persona in less
gmothan ho ought to have for ton.
Of that largo number a few will gen
erally havo & complaint to make or an
objection to offer or an impudent nssor
tion concerning a,fault oftliorailroad
company winch tho conductor cannot
remedy and is uot responsible for. A
woman tviil object to paying half faro
for a 10-ycar-uld girl or to paying full
^omeisZ ÜÄlft
«awes will argue twenty minutes to
avoid paying W cop ta more (m cash)
than lie would have been charged for
tt tieket. Passongers with legitimate
questions to ask will couch them in
vaguo and back handed terms, and
those with useless ones will take inop
portune times to propound them.
These are not occasional but every
day experiences. Tho very best and
most intelligent pcoplo in the com
munity (excepting thoso who travel
much) arc ambng thoso who oitencst
leavd their wits at homo when llioy
ioko a railroad trip.
All theso people must bo met in a
jonciliatory manner, but without
varying the strict regulations in the
least degree. Tho officers of tho voXh
nue department aro inexorable mas
tors, and passengers offended by
nue department aro inexorable mas
tors, and passengers offended by
alleged uncivil treatment are likely to
teako absurd complaints at tho super*
»ltondCllt S OffiCO. A COlldUCtOr drOOdfl
investigation of this sort, however
'Reasonable tho passengers' com
lUoonse> Butoftor becoming habitS
nted to this sort of dealings, tlicro are
st.Ul left the occasional disturbances
which no amount of philosophy can
Q^oko pleasant. Theso aro tho on
counters with drunken and disorderly
passengers. Tho conductor, starting
n* the forward end of his train, finds,
&'who° K Sof lZ
ùiu arc spoiling for a tight,
Cnro must ba talien with tliis eort of
&bU to
ko will, when sobered off, quite likely
ße induced by a eharp lawyor to sue
| l0 jxj ono whe has (in his freight train
experience) dealt with tramps is ablo
to copo with his customer and confine
him.to^tho baggage car or pr - him off
tlio tram. Bu t a tussle of this kind is,
at best, far from soothing to tho tom*
por, and tho very nest car may con
biu tltc wife cfn iniVlloiudre M'howill
expect the most genteel treatment and
m \ icia i y object to any behnvior on
the part of tnj conductor*which is not
fully up to tho highest drawing room
Btandoi'd. Tfa pcricnces o| this Kind
cail bo rcadil.v imagined, aro exceed*
fnglgr Tho conductor cannot
glrenimseli up completely to learning
gentility, tes ?.io «fill lias need for liia
bid seventy.-• -B. B. Adams, d», m
boribner u Mugmuuo.
U
T1 *° otxmdnga Indian Tribe,
A S°°d piettwo of tho state of affairs
*?Pr 5baled .T*"'
cu la seen m tiio case of tho Onondaga
ti'ibc. This tribe owns a reservation
0 f c,000 acres on tho site of tlio old
| council fires of tho Six Nations» Theso
j 6,000 acres aro uniformly of tho
-Loicest fanning lands, und include
' quarries oi tlio finest pray lime
stone. But tho Indiana neither farm
their lands nor work their quarries
«■« t'yenty-mx ehiota for fUU
nembera of tho tnbo. Tho old Indian
anguago is still in common uso. Tho
state or morals is absolutely indescrib
able in decent English. The tenure
land is tribal. Tho renunciation o*
Christianity is a requisite to election
ns n sachem ; but nominal Christianity
is professed by about half tho tribe,
'rhe Feast of tlio White Dog is celq*
orated with indecent c&rcjnomea» Tho
Q uestion of what to do with tholu
ians is now necessarily to bo recon
sidered. It is not enough to hold them
on reservations and feed them.—Gloho
Domocrut.
How Janano.RO Rooms Aro IJ.e'.itcd.
Light is admitted into Japanese
rooms, not by glass windows, but by a
kind of wooden gratings, over winch
white paper is putted on tho outside.
This paper diffuses tlio sunlight about
room very pleasantly, but it is not
proof against ruin; in rainy weather,
therefore, tho shutters havo to bo put
which nvo/rtfted closothovemndU
house in the nighttime, end which
the only doors m a Japanese house
that it is thought necessary to furnish
with a bolt. As tho putting v.p end
fairing down of theso ehuttero # is q
matter demanding sumo time, it La
usual to havo 'a small door nado in
(hem, which L called "flic earthquake
dDor, to provide nutips «1 quick cs
Capo iu coso of cmorgAncy. -CtitHoU'o I
Family Magazine.
The French artillery und mi trail
lotuses responded vigorpasly to tlijj
Krupps, aud with deadly effect, but tin
tai * f i:i Ç ou -J - o the German loft
thn^nÏÏ
always made t > tho king first, and |
^ l . CUCV01 ' anybody urrived with;
„'^3 to Item- the no'™, Oran Vo,1
Moltko unfolding a map moamvliilf
aud oxpkjning thociUiution.
This done. tLo chief of tho staff.
^hiloawaiting tho next report, woula
01 . W ould occupy the tirao vvalking
about, kicking clods o? dirt or snuiU I
Äonc;j hero and 'ihr re, his hands !
clasped behind hi ; box !:, his face pala j
and thoughtful. He was then nearly ;
*0 years old, but because of his cma
cir ted flguro, tho deep wrinkles in hi® |
face, and crow's feet about his eyes, '
he looked even older, hi? appearanco '
being suggcnlivo of tho practice ol
.nhui'ch aocoticisras lather than of his ;
well knovm ardent devotion to Ilia
vilciltc.
I
1
jtary profession.—Gon. Sheridan
fcA'-ribyw'« Mmnr/iiia
J. G. ARMSTRONG
Odessa, Del.»
GENERAL
MERCHANDISE
COUNTRY PRODUCE
!
TAKEN IN EXOIIANOE.
E. N. MOORE,
DEALER IN
Grain for tho Wm. Lea & Sons' Comp'y
ODESSA, DEL.
JOS. H. ENOS,
0 EMBALMEK
ODESSA, DEL.
ODESSA INSURANCE OFFICE.
JOSEPH G. BROWN
NOTARY PUBLIC
Ani General In-uranco Agent.
Fire, Tornado,Life and Accident Insurance
Placed in Responsible and duly Au
thorized Companies at Llw
est Rates.
SUMMER ARRANGEMENT.
STEAMER CLIO.
CAPTAIN E. S. CROOKS,
WILL LEAVE
Odessa for Philadelphia
AND RETURN FROM
PIER 9, NORTH WHARWES
Will leave Odessa during September :
Will leave Odessa during September :
Thursday, 22d, 8-30 P. M.
Monday, 26th, 12 M.
Thursday, 29th, 2 P, M. '
Leave Philadelphia during September
Friday, 23d, 6 P. M.
Tuesday 27Yh, 8 p. m.
Friday, 30th,* i 1.30 A. M.
Grain, Fruit and Stock
Freighted at Reasonable Rates. At
tention given to the careful handling
and prompt delivery of all consign
ments.
F or information in regard to freights
apply to
F. B. WATKINS,
Oliver ,Stevens, ODESSA, DEL.
Clerk.
L.V. ASPRIL $ SON
ODESSA, DEL.
MANUFACTURERS of
Light and Heavy Farm, Market
and Mill
A P i( r \
\ r
\\
Rollers, Harrows, Cultivators and Gen
eral Farm Implement®; Whole
sale and Retail.
Repairing and Horse Shoeing
ipt attention.
Given pre
Taylor's Little Diamond Cultivators
Thomas' Ilay Hakes and Tedders,
Whitcley's Solid »Steel Binders and
Mowers, South Bend Chilled Plows
The .Soil' Sharpening Slip Point
Plow.-hare, adaptep to all Plows.
KEYSTONE DISC HARROW
■ .
•T
: ■ -:v;
m.
--"'-SïÜttÉfc
--"'-SïÜttÉfc
ENGINES. THRESHERS & STACKERS
I
FRANK DUGGAN,
Odessa, Del.
Frick Com
Threshers am
Q ''s Eclipse Engi
ichincrv.
mes.
FINE GROCERIES
CHOICE BHANGS OF
|
I
!
j
;
|
'
'
ol
;
FAMILY FLOUR
CANNED GOODS
TOBACCO $
CIGARS
PROUISIONS
ETC.
DAVIS BROTHERS,
»lain St„ Odessa, Del.
^20 Faïorite Singer
Sewing Machine.
HIGH ARM $25.00.
Each Machine has a drop leaf,
fancy cover, two large drawers,
with nickel rings, and a full set
of Attachments, equal to any Sin
ger Machine sold from $40 to
$60 by Canvassers. A trial in your home be
fore payment is asked. Buy direct of the Manu
facturers and
!•/
agents' profits besider- getting
certificates of warrantee for five years. Send for
testimonials to Co-operative Sewinn Machine
I Co., 269 S. nth St., Philadelphia, Pa.
1 A*-WE PAY
P hiladelphia,Wilmington and
BALT1MOKE RAILROAD.
DELAWARE DIVISION.
On and after June 2'th, 1892, train* wll »
leave as fellow&t
SOUTHWARD
MAIL. EXP.
MAIL
A M
P M
r m
87 27 $10 83
11 18
S3 58
Philadelphia..
R*«!timoré ....
Wilmington..
Fnmhurst....
N-w Cattle...
^tate Road...
11 16
<; r»
r. Hi
3 <»/>
:• « 1 1
•1 3 -
ra h
!
f4 68
fll 43
Kirkwood
ML Pl-asam
Armstrong ..
Middletown..
8 54
9 O''
f9 O'
11 69
U 11
9 2u
al 2 44
6 ' •'
f. 80>
19 25
Blackbird.
Green Spring.
Cloy ton.
Lv. Smyrna..
Breitford .
Cteswold ....
Dupont..
Dover.
Wyoming.
Woodaide.
Vio'a.
19 81
r;
9 87
1 02
6 IS
0 27 12 03
f9 42
6 .C!
f9 46
f 12.33
000
18 89
10 00
no is
al 2;
no 17
10 29
FeltJU.
1260
8 li
nl 4
Hur ingto i...
Farmington...
Greenwoi'd...
Bridge ville ...
Cannons.
Se&ford.
Laurel.
Dolrnnr.
i <u
10 85
fW4v
flO 61
o214 11 (0
fll (ft
a2 2«; 11 1ft
n'2 38 11 27
2 50 11 40
6 80
nl 50
ft 07
f6 88
f6 44
fl 14
f 1 42
froo
1 33
7»8
f 1 44 1 7 19
1 53 7 30
NOBTHWAltD.
KXP.
MAIL
PASS
Head Ui
Philadelphia..
Baltimore.
Wilmington.....
Farn hurst..
Nrw Castle.
State Rond..
TTcnr..
Porter's.
Kirkwood.
ML Pleasant..
Armstrong.
Middletown....
Townsend.
Blackbird.
Green Spring..
Clayton.
Smyrna«.,,,,.,.
Brenford
Che* wold........
Dupont..
Dover..
Wyoming.
Woodiide.......
Viola .
Felton..
Harrington ....
Farmington....
Greenwood.
Bridgeville.
Cannons...,,,,,,
Senford...,
Laurel..
d
v M
t N
||5 1(
212 01
12 3ft
11 15
?7*69
9 25.
■I 18
6 12 7 '4ft
ii 08
7 ( H j
no 66
flO 51
10 46
10 42
no 33
16 63
f6 48
6 43
4 48
6 28
fQ93
4 31 0 18
10 25
10 10
no n
p.3 20
4 9?
1604
3 co
10 oi
9 5t
3 50
8"
f5 47
fö 40
2 60
9 40 3 54
ft 33 f 3 47
]>2 44
!» 26
1617
9 a
r 18
1)2 32
1*2 22
fS 36
0 li
3 90
It 50
f4 47
f8 51
f4S8
pl 48
C
f4 24
p2 51 4 17
p2 4f 4 06
II
r
1 1
810
8 53
ill 08 8 05
£2 30
|| Daily. ? Daily oxcept Sunday.
"a" "Stop* to leave pasgengor* from Wfi
mington and points north, c
for points south of Delmar.
"r" Slops on signal,
take passenger«
r on notice to
"p" Stops to leave passenger* from point*
eonduotor,
for points
"r" Slops on signal,
r on notice to
"p" Stops to leave passenger* from point*
»oath of Delmar, or take passengers for Wil
mington and points north, and Dover.
"t" Stops to let off passengers from point*
K>uth of Harrington.
NkNt Castlk Accommodation Trains-*
Leave Wilmingtqn 12:06 a in, and 9:50 p n*
daily, and 11:23 a m, 3:50, 4:40 and 6:\& p tu
week-days. Leave Now Châtie OsHQa m.land
10:14 p m duily, 1:20, 4:15, 5:35, and 7*-22 p m v
1URANCH It4kAI>S.
Delaware , Maryland and Virginia X. JR.—
Leave Harrington for Franklin and war
lions 10:38 a. m., week-days. 6:35 p m. Tue*'«
days, Thursdays and Saturday*. Returning,
train lcavesiFranklin C ty 6:00 a ni,iweek-day*
2:00 p in .Tuesdays, Thursday* and Saturday*.
Harrington for Georgetown, and
ni, 6:35 p in. Returning,
leave Lewos 7:35 a m,3;30 p m.
For Rthoboth, leave Hairington 10:38 » m
6:35 p m. Returning, leave Kehoboth 7:20 a
m. 3:15 p in.
For Berlin, leave Ilarrin'-ton 10:88 a. ro,
week-days, and 6:36 p ro, Tuesdays, Thurs
days nnu Saturdays. Returning, leave Berlin
7:02 a ro, week-days, 2:59 p m, Tuesdays,
Thursday* and Saturdays.
For Chincoteogue Island, train leaving
Harrington 10:38 a m, week-day*, eon nects-e?
Franklin City with steamer tor Chincoteagr«
Island. Returning, steamer leaver 5:00 a ro,
connecting with train arriving at Harrlugto^
9:01 a ro, week-daje.
Cambridge <fc Seaford Jlui/road<~-LtnY*
Scafordfpr Cambridge and intermediate »tâ
tions 11:20 a m week-days, and on Tuesday*,
Thursdays and Saturday*. 7:10 p w. Return- >
Jpg, leave Cambridge 6.30 a ro, aud on Tue#»
days, Thursdays ana Saturday** 3:00 p m.
CHAS. E. PUGH,
Genl Manager.
eonduotor,
kjdayB.
L
Lewes nt 10:38 a
J. R. WOOD.
Oen'l Pom.
NOW
WE COME SHOUTING
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No man can be a simon
pure Citizen who refuse®
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The Leader
Being the only Republi
can paper published in
New Castle County and ■
the disseminator of the
local news of Odessa and
contiguous territory, see
your duty ? Certainly !
So man, if you are a simou
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and Town of Odessa,
which will he found in
the columns of that
CONSERVATIVE
REPUBLICAN
HOME PAPER,
The Leader
Devoted to tho rapid de
velopment of the Com
mercial and Sßcial lutey
csts of Odessa and tlio
dissemination of Repub
lican principles.
Published every Wednesday aflernopn
SI)
CENTS
Pays your subscription Iron, now until
JANUARY 1st, 1893.
NOTICE
TO DELINQUENT TAX PAYERS.
The School ara( Tpwu T(ti(es %
1891 are now past due and mqst
paid or I shall proceed tu collect them
by law.
The duplicates for 1892 are now in
ray hands for collection.
JOS. II. ENOS, Collector.

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