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Weekly Delaware State journal and statesman. (Wilmington, Del.) 18??-18??, February 05, 1869, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053132/1869-02-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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Published Semi-Weekly and Weekly by Henry Eckel, Editor and Proprietor, at the Mammoth Steam Printing Establishment, S. E. corner of Fifth and Market Streets.
WILMINGTON, Fill DAY. FEBRUARY 5. LS(i9.
VOL. XXXVII.
NO. 6.
JpectilijEW
I A Ml IOCS.
B 4 '
MARK.
TRADE
PACKaUK.
ON EVERY
.1
BAUGH & SONS, Philadelphia,
NOBTinilCSTKltN FERTILIZING To.,
CHICAGO,
HUI.E NANI F4CTIJRGR8.
PRICES.
BAUGH'S HAW BONK PHOSPHATE
«S» |>er a,0
BAUGH'S CHICAGO BONE FERTILIZER,
BAUGH'S CHICAGO BLOOD MANURE,
»l*bt
'Hr <llr.
»Illy
BAUatl A .'ON 8.
I LIKING Co.,
CHICAGO.
-BAUGH'» COMMERCIAL MANUHKB nu.y b
TH WESTERN
Jota
M
GENUINE IMPROVED
SU L'ER-PII OSPII ATE
OF
L 1 M E.
T A N D A K D GUARANTEED.
No. 27 NORTH FRONT STREET,
TUI LADEI.I'lllA,
No. 05 SOUTH STREET,
BALTIMORE,
And by dealer»
IIIIKIIO Ol'ANO, ofwl
IMIONPliATN k m,
leb MONO
Un», lb.
piticic 9no.(
i. na.
DISCOUNT TO DEALERS.
MORO PHILLIPS,
»»u -jvi«:tf
IT
MAN UP AUTO BCI>
UENRY llOWKIt, Ohiiulet, I'll ILA DELPHI A.
Super-Plioapliato of Lime, Ammonia and
Potash. -
ranted free from Adulteration.
IK.i
itted by
.1».
PARKED IN BAG» OF 200 POUND» EACH.
DIXON, SHAKPLK88 A Co.,
and 40 Hovth Bel. Avenue,
PHILADELPHIA.
RO trouth Wa
I.TlltOKE, I
by DmI«™
Clothing.
WILLIAM II. QUINN,
MERCHANT TAILOR'
No. 122 MARKET STREET,
W!I.MIMUTON, OKI.AW
HTIIKKT,
BUSINESS,
IK or Snlï
GOODS,
VHKNOH CLOTHS,
CANSIMKRKS AND VBSTINPb,
Mtected Irom Ur«« «lock«. of good«. U«
1 '
ood», w
.tyl
IAKMBN T A WAKKANTKD
FIT, and
FITKNIMHINO
I. H. QVXHN.
Jeridgiu
Uple
I. 11. QUINN
I. MULQACSRN
FASHIONABLE TAILOR,
MARKET STREET,;
WILMINGTON, DHL.
• rfcr.ll.
S. CAbSIMBRKS
8UITABLH roa
FALL AND WINTER WEAR,
THE" "LATEST" STYLES.
VESTINGS
\
ni end work
no pel n. to
E;
231UÏ0 ew.
G'
I t 1 HR
HTKKE1»
EAST FOURTH STREET,
.ItINGTON, DEL.
KrsIDKNUK— No.
niton paid to Job
*ny
.by.
lit:
. ' lv . \
.1
HALL,
5TKKKT, 1
CARPENTER & JOINER WORK,
ATI KVI l"N
JOBBING
I
<©t£ (ßooDs anD Crimnitngjf. |
^JOTTON GOODS DRPAI
8TRAWB1UDGE A CLOTH I HU,
CENTRAL
DRY GOODS STORE.
Cor. Mb and market Ntreels,
PHILADELPHIA.
ciihapfbt muslin dousn
-out.
lakh Bar
n a »tt nP muUlu«Ty *
THIRTY-1
BALKS
Comprising
PILLOW MUSL1NH.
W1UI BIUEIINGH.
FINK H11KKT1 NOS,
WAM8UTTA,
AKKWKI
WILLIAM8VILLB,
MILLS, BAT M
--ktoaln,
, I10USBKNMPKR.
2«0.
. i-V
3V4
HOUSE FDR211SUIN0 LIN Bit8,
STRAWBRIDGE & CLOTHIER,
CENTRAL
DRY GOODS STOKE,
Cor. 8th and Market Sts.,
PHILADELPHIA.
N
FALL AND WINTER
DRY GOODS
207 MARKET STREET.
FALL *fc WINTER DRESS GOODS,
I. IiKLAlNXH.
I.ANB NTS,
*>-I.A«.l
OAS8IMERES
VI.ANMKI.H low M
D. liU Mill
m ANDREW E. CROW & Co.'s,
207 MARKET STREET, WILMINGTON, DHL.
310
310
IAH1CICT HTKKKT.
IIARGAIflIS,
BARGAINS! BVRGAINH!
DRY GOODS AND TRIMMINGS,
At 810 Market Street,
WITHOUT IBSIBVe.
. K1.ANNKL8,
SKIKTS CL
IM8IKKT,
»TIM, JRAXB,
M81MKIUM, CALI
aiNUUAMS, TK1MM1HUS, A«.
W. w. UOOPEd & Co.,
810 MARKET HTREET, WILMINGTON, DEL
St-Call bifort •«
GLOVE*, DELAINES.
1115 CHESTNUT ITHCET. 1H5
HOOP SKIRTS.
I. T. HOPKINS,
tsnvfoeturtr ef the CUAUTION
SKIRTS
111Ö CUEtiTNUT STREET (GIRARD ROW)
PHILADELPHIA,
«111 alw«7» b. ft
• n SKIRTS
tirât) I. 1 m,
ln fcKIRT* made to ord
work
to
IT
my U hi
sgdu
■M II
•» lortjr
adju'I'og'^aiDOMlNAl/oORSETS, klgkly
fc, Pby.T.Ua..
m .iid prl«M,
.to $t
■ol lois.r 0
I *«*•■«
I.T. IIOFKIMB .
■ 1ZW1K 2. KCKKL,
NORTH
EIGHTH and ORANGE STREETS,
WILMISOTON, VKLAWAMK,
Job
CORNER
of PATTERNS
PATTERN» CUT CORRECT, and
PARTICULAR
arloiiaetjrlM no» o
ORDER
PATTKHNS TRIMMED
plain pattern. ch«ap.
TElMMIEGd
BEST ENGLISH UTKEL
STATION ERT af
BEI UTS, ol U. bMI
^ßcöital.
|
1.000
K"" 4
Cares Bcrofula in Its various Forms,
DISEASES OF WOMEN.
» App.llla,
rjr-RO?
O-i
8BCHKT QUACK KKMKDY.
ItKCOMMKN OKI» I.V
ioUdANDH UV î
ST CITIZrtNB.
Dr. J. J. LAW HENCE & Co.,
*44 BALTIMORE STREET,
BALTIMORE, MD.
DRUGGIST» 0 BN Bit A 1.1
j.uai-iy
EU1CAI. ELRCTUK
M
Da. C H. LAWTON,
No. 913 MARKET STREET
NERVOUS AND CHRONIC DISEASES
oil-!«
■î.
ft
«tty
• »ppll
.11? adapted,
.ly*
«I
:es
4Kb.
ii
» M .
a
.. kj»
«ui. epl
-I«
n...lly ft
KKM I I UN
by
«
S!
GREAT CARE AN1) ACCURACY.
FOSTER'S DRUG STORE,
N. W. Cor. of Front and West Street».
'KKKUMKItY.
of rhyUcian*
A '»Ii
ily I
by
,ly
ra'KU.ti!
l.iiZKNUKN,
»NIC BITTERN.
«'< fp9H N. w.
lABSBNPbl
U"'
PRACTICAL
NATU REP ATI 110 I 'll Y810IANÖ
! AND M'KKUY Ct
AU Diseases, Weaknesses & Infirmities
bllCATKO AT
809 AUCH STREET, PHILADELPHIA, Pa ,
by I
"iy
B>
.K
'!*i!
I It EAT
;kstukkil
AT V UK'S
N
SCIIBETZ'S
CELEBRATED BI7TER CORDIAL.
-»r
zc
tt
.j.
r
k It K I UK A,
■ NTtKY. BOWI
FAINTING*
liquor U
JtjrSoLU BY 1- ALL DltUQ UlS Th''
I
le-iy
(■I*.
3
TRi!
"y
by
• Ily.
pW'
KLINK
LtlKXKA,
1.
.lolphte)
IF
■via
Hi
»pw*J
■eptU-1
fReDical.
iSxÄS
Ïlï*
c
1
Î
v:
-ygfrL—
H A LI
9
a
Vegstable Sicilian Haif tower
Ere,
In rift/
mtin
/nitrons thnt it is f.i pi / nth /
its hint, s ii'
in i eases the /iopii
ul ankle Hair I* rep
li is ttnv to merit
r oh!
it hi!
• '
liant.
il to
•ho unie
• used it we c
eon/hh atl// sa//, that it is the only
reliable and perfected prépara -
lion to restore fill AY OK t'AOll'
B tilt to its youth fat rotor, mak
iny it soft, lustrons, and silk
the scalp, by its use, hero
white and clean ; It r
er u pt ions and damlra/f, and fcf
its tonic properties juerrats th
hair from faltiny oat,
ulutes and
{/lands, lly its use the hair arow
thicker and stronycr. In bald ne*
it restores the capillary yland/
to their normal vtyor, and wtk
create a new yroirt/i except in
extreme old aye. It is the monl
economical H A SIS IHe t;*»i AG
is it. rei/aires fv
applications, and y ires the hair
that splendid alossy appear
mrh admired by all. A. A.
Hayes, M. />.. State Assay er of
. **//<«• constituents
refait y selected for
tient, yuaiity, ami I consider
it the BUNT VTION for
its intended purposes,*' H e pub
lish a treatise on the hair,-which
we send free by mail u/wn appli
cation, which t
<tutor y n
physieiai
We hare
To

it stint
risites the hah
all
at
by
a
at
in
Mt
pill
tains
otic
, the p
made the study of the
hair and Us diseases a specialty
for years, and h
the most e/J'erti
the restoration
tion of the hair, extant, and
a ch
eat and 4'lie
J
lie
ray men,
it others.
of
tin
ration fir
prv
•ledyed by the best
**al Authority.
Sold by all Drop,lists and D, alers in Mrdicim.
R. P. HALL &l CO., Proprietors.
LABO RATORY. N ABRITA. N. H.
I DIAS
,r
to
HERR RITTERS.
»0 r*.lpl ...
lujliä
ed
General Debility,
Oomplaint, Dvspr-p.
, Nervous
'.Neuralgia,
I, Soro
ol tho Hkin.
>er, Conglis aud
the Liver aud Kid
Li
App
All.cii..
,Rbe
Dinrrbœa.Crauq
fula, Uloer
Fever ntid Ague, Interiui
Colds, lutta
I.
lie
to
ml all -.list
;
«
form,
.1 all
other dise
tbe impurity of ilie blood.
v
I
(
is
NO COMPOUND EQUAL TO IT.' ;
JOHN M. CUNNINGHAM,
DRUGGIST,
GENERAL AGENT FOR
ILMINGTON.
1110.1
ÆobactoniBtD.
. ltitonii it.
I I /
B
ALL LINDS 01'' Cl OAKS,
I Iu « lug
nul Smoking Tobacco,
No. 808 KING STREET,
WIUUNUTOS,
Hk I. A WAKS.
IT*.
JACOB
'IUA itN a:
T
H. W. COKNKK
SIXTH AND MARKET STREETS,
•j!
BtJM
illy on
mam:
KKPAIl
E. BPCHBR;
not6 8ui.
JOHN OTTO,
Onfen from tKe Country
Wholesale sad
Dealw Is
*
föümffe
PIPES,
Cbawinfc ét Smoking
TOBACCO,
No. 2 West Front Htrect,
Wax Her
Gt'iihigtuu, Del»«
•^ootfl anD s>Doe0*
N K W
HOOT & SHOE STORE.
GEORGE 8. HAG AN Y
At. No. 102 West Second Street,
BURTHEN T
»•''•dly «k.
zjBsr
S. «2
lu INKOKM
u y . tk«t b«
BOOT and SHOE STORK,
No 18 EAST SECOND STREET,
-k
HOOTS, 81IUK.'
<1 GAl'IKHM,
for*.! lb a pi*.,
INGTON. DHL.
« STRKLT,
no*!0-l»
AUOB KATZ»,
8. W. QOHNKR
J
WILMINGTON,
FASHION A BLB
DKALkll.
"a.UitUy ou I
.ri aa J BUppar« of
My Lady.
Morocco «oft that doth enclose
The while whereon my lady goon,
High heels Hint lift lier lips
And eyelids with a »'liver shine,—
Full not, malignant evening dows,
Lest you should wet my InJy's shoes.
o, purple grape-leaf
Iu silken benediction spread.
With wreal lis and ribbons, knotted, curled.
The col
her head,
of
a
a of a magic world—
not, summer rain, upon it,
should soil my lady's bonnet.
gb, weep
makes her slim,
Laces in which her shoulders
The daring graces that combine
The "Grecian bend's" delirious lino—
Leavos, sh
Lest you derange my lady's gown.
O, nameless
you liostie down,
Completest wonder of the time,
Inspirer of my fervid rhyme,
What odds and ends make up the ehow,
The gracious lady that 1 know !
Confusion bright oT
o Is Bwcct—but
and dress,—
possess ?
To
OUR SMALL SINS.
BT A WOMAN.
From the days of Solomoa downwards,
and iu all countries where proverbs crystal*
llzo the various affluents of experience,
womon have b
all the smaller vices Incidental
especially credited with
humanity
at large. We escape the abyss of the dark
reserved for
the teterrima eauea of all
evil,—only to fall upou the mud-heaps ef
the meaner sins; and psihaps tho accusa
tion is not entirely unreasonable. Let
begin with one of the most notorious of
small sins,—our love of gossip, accompanied
by that inveterntc habit of chattering about
ourselves and
a feminiuo characteristic everywhere and
at all times,—and surely we
that this is
in any degree equally shared by
when we find it In
crimes which
indeed,
affairs which seems to be
confess
instinctive faults, not
. Even
, do w« not brand it
vn translated, by calling it "
'—and are not all the worn-out
id the club
.•I
manisb?'
fellows who congregate
discuss the passing scandal of
the hour " old women " by th« discourtesy
of common parlance? Though, of course,
miserable little tallows who
of ourselves, and do
of fuss ami chatter than
most fluid woman
,, î !
ly
irindowa
there
far outstrip the
more in the
the fussiest
found in the kingdom, yet
likes gosBip
f
really manly
gives into the habit of
chatter. The petty details of the home, is
and minute aunoyanceB
gigantic to women,
to him; and it is distasteful
things demanding
them in the same |
way as Hiul in which the old Norse giant
bore tbe blows of Thor's hauimei,—" I I
a
Hie small eve
which
many nothings
to him to hear of them
much attention
found emotion. He be
worthy of
thought the leaves were tailing
last night, and that the birds wore throwing
moss over me," and shakes himself clear of
them aa Gulliver shook himself cloar of the
Liliputian eordage. To hear them magnifi
ed into heavy grievances, strong enough
weigh down the happiness of life, is a m
my face
direction ol force, n waste of pow»r, that
lie eannot away with, aud is
to him,
woman
liles of children, and hound
h
unpleasant
a large-minded
in tho squal)
gravely ad
judicate between the rival claims of Hose
« in- black cyrd doll; or Laura tho fair wigged
it would be
- she forced to live
Hut women take
artistic plensure iu
gossip; which indeed, with personal chatter,
is tbe solo iorm ol conversation generally
found possible with tho ordinary British
female. Like the elephant'» trunk, which
pick up a pin or crush a man's bones to
pulp, nothing is too small for the British
leinale to discuss, and nothing too large for
her to decide; because she makes every sub
ject which affects herself of supreme im
portance, how trivial soever it may he in
trinsically, while she narrows down tho
broadest questions to the pitiful level of her
ienco. From Mary,
Sunday bounet-tnmming to
personal
the maid's WM
the exact limitation of cook'b lawful wages
—involving the whole question ol capital
Hod labor—she is nt all times ready for tho
most fractional detnilsand the
ta'ivo decision. Not that she
limitation ot wages any connection with
that greater subject ot capital aud labor,
it bears
mean», and the convenience or inconvenience
to winch she may bo put according
balance at the banker's. If you
pronouncing
aulhori
in th»
n private
I" î
to tell
a branch
ldch had puzzled,
her that she w
of political economy
still puzzling, tlie wisest heads
straight, she would express liar opinion
that nothing was more easy to arrange;
d that, it men wore as clevor as they pre
leuded to lie, they ought long ago to havo
settled auch an easy and self-evident ques
tion. She would ulao he sure to settle it
against poor Mary, maid and cook; and
with her own allowance double that ol ber
mother's, contend that servants are & great
deal too well off as it is, aud what do they
with so much money? For one of tho
smull sius ol women is stinginess, and a
disinclination to pay well for work of eny
kind; but I am coming to this in ite
and
Tin kiu-lu u
always
fertile hunliug-grounds for the chatter and
gossip nl women; nud
being " the greatest plagues In life," half
tho women
moulded '' ft
reeietanee in the centre of their frothy talk.
The short comings ol their domestics
their darling grievance; and what would
the world be will
A legend i
heaven for
theii in English drawing rooms for many
hours! Their maids are " shop '' with wo
ol tin -
fur Irom servants
England would be " blue
of them as the pire« de
feminine grievances!
silence in
: would he silence
;
I they la'.k " shop ''
do. No officer chatters about hts
merchant id his clerks,
about their servanls; aud
ter—always excepting the miserable little
lcllowH licloie mentioned, who
uiHiiy luh»v, bearded women—would dream
of giving the
ami doiugs of his domestics
minded womeu give to theirs. Fancy a
peeping and prying behind the blinds
whether John ogled the pretty milk-womuu,
squeezed the hand ol the comely laun-
dress! Yet how many women aro thero not
tell you how Jane stands and talks
to that bold butcher-boy; and bow Anne
blushed when Bhe
-gate ycBlerday; and how that art-
ful liltle hussy, Sarah, always puts
most becoming cap when gentlemen
the house; and. " Did v»u
which sho looked at Mr.
women chatter
just
.. 1 1 « - 1 .11 ■ • u
the sayings
bo
b
dining
way i
when she handed him the bread? You did
not? Ah! you
with Miss Sarah's ways as I
should live with iter, and then, perha)»,
you would understand her aillulueaa."
In fact, there is a certain jealousy, a
: rivalry, bclwaan mistress
Ihr
well acquainted
I You
1
lam u
maid, which is sometimes tho reason why
the former takes such
—uot ol the most friendly kind—iu the
looks and ways of the latter. Both
women, und uot (infrequently the maid is
the prettier woman of tlie two; aud though
the mistreuH could neither individualise,
would even to herself confess her jealousy,
there it is all the same, us the motive force
Hutting many things In action. Of course,
will deny this passionately; but it
is true, nevertheless. Arc there sot many
engage
pretty servants because of tho attention
they would excite and the udmiration they
would attract ? They may giveafluo-bound
ing c
excessive iuteriHt
-mist reuse.» who refuse
î this relusal; it they »poke the
truth candidly, it would bu jeulousy.
A small »in very common
is their inle
the two ft
seusatioual gossip.
ong womon
craving lor excitement, in
holesome reading
Listen to a knot of
women scandalising their neighbors, and
liow eagerly they catcli up any detail
which rounds otr the cli
hurmonio
Hint tlicy wish any harm
1L, hut they liko the excitement of the p
ing drunm,—they
lienor at the dark
hope it muy not bo
mid he
finitely
icie and mnkes
story. Not
It
M.
A.
Mr.
shiver with a pleasant
sin juBt indicated,—they
and yet tho
complete,
mucl
ire thrilling! What an experi
ence, too, for tliemselvcB to fiud out that tho
fascinating foreigner admitted
homes aud hearths just like
selves was the leader ol a gang of swindlers,
forgers,—perhaps murderers,—end himself
a viilian of the deepest dye, though a gen
tleman of the nicest manners. To think
that those white, virtuous handB of theirs
had clasped iu friendship the hand of a pro
fessed cut-throat,—of an escaped convict,
with whom the aureole of high life contends
with the shadow of the Brest bullet 1 Hor
rible, yet how exciting I—making them feel
quite improper themselves,
or the pot and the
thing
happens; am when it does, it serves fora
lifetime. But the imprudences of Mias A,
and the gambling debts of Mr. B, and bow
the C'a half starve their servants, aud what
quarrols convulse the domestic atmosphere
of the D's,—all these are daily food for the
dramatic instinct to livo on: and are made
the most of.
Side by Bide with this sin of sensational
ism in daily lile is that of sensationalism in
literature, and the extreme aversion winch
most women fee! for "dull reading,"
they call anything grave or solid. What
do they first claim at Mudie's and the
sido libraries,—history or fiction? King
lake's Crimea, or Charlotte's Iuhoritanco?
Carlyle's Frederick, or Gtly Livingstone's
lateBlf What do they read in newspapers?
—the leading article»?—the letters from
groat names
liamentary debates?
police reports, the little bits of
gossip, that awful column of faceliæ, table
talk, odds and ends,—by what
the editor chooses to designate his sweep
ings from Joe Miller and the back numbers
of Puuch? These
a newspaper, with occasional interludes of
fbreign correspondence, if after the
ot the famous Daily Telegraph, which
bo writteu for ladies only 1 This
h i of l | ie mögt foolish
of the causes,
often
in
of tlieni
î
tho principle
—iuverleu. Auy
his, though, rarely
dramatic
ed
ot
by
to
gravo subjects?—the par
the murders, th»
the woman's bits
surely
dread of dull
things about women, and
alia, why their conversation i
not worth liateniug to. They gossip be
they cannot converse. They do not
cultivate that art of pleasant, easy, spright
ly conversation which comes In
the education of a Frenchwoman, and'which
necossary for her social success as the
art of dress or the scieuce ol appearances.
ThOBO few women among us who
easily and brightly on the current topics ol
the day arc nlways sought in Bociety, and
want of partners for
it
is
lion. They msy be old and ugly; but
with brains will icavo the pielticst girl in
the room, if a fool, for them, and neither
wrinkles nor harsli Hues will repel them, if
tbe wit is keen and the scuse is clear. But
women iu general think their enly social
value lies in their outside prettincss and the
amount of personal admiration they
excite; and so they neglect tlie beauty which
lasts for that which fades, and, when they
longer charming as possible lovers,
nothing to fall hnck upou as pleas
companions. One quite understands
important force of the instinct which makes
a young woman prize her i
her mi»«?, wlilcli makes young
gravitate towards beauty rath
wards character. Human nature, liko all
other parts of creation, has
impulses Hint work
of them. Hut
talk
coa versa
of
nt
is
h
11 ■
in
than to
unreasoning
good ends, and this 1 h
there issometing
re instiuct in humanity, so ought
be a further outlook and a higher
perishable preltineaa ol
than
there
aim ll
the hour. It is a favorite excuse often made
(or many of the special follies aud faults ol
say lliut thuir intellect is narrow
•umscribed;
they would
huvo more wherewith to do. Yet it is in
their
tho
their life sph
d that, if they might do
bunds to broaden their natural
hues without travelling beyond their appoin
ted boundaries; they could, if they chose,
ext-rciso intellect and cducnlion in thing*
which arc now suffered to drift like so much
wreck without roots, aud so make their
genorous and of nobler intention.
woman's natural
Home nnd maternity
officers and vocation. ThD, 1 thiuk, not the
boldest of the "strong minded" will deny.
And, as things go, nothing could be more
narrow. Hut whose
that? Whose fault is it that the
ulton" of the home has passed
id, and that men have a not quite
unreasonable jibe for every domestic cir
cumstance? What exquis't« beauty and
improvement, through tlio aid oi science,
might not au intelligent woman incorporate
into tho management of her house and chil
dren 1 Is there nothing to be learned about
the chemistry ol food?—and must English
cookery always be a simple application ol
heat to raw flesh, with sometimes a rude
dush of salt
which middle class intellect nnd ingenuity
attain? Must wo always stay where
, just a step in advance ot the savage
among
uninteresting
fault
"cold
the highest extent
who tumbles his fleshly killed
the ashes of his wood fire, and drags it
while Btill hall
that he may taste the
blood left in it? Is there nothing in this di
rection
interest the brains and worthily
employ the time of womeu? We know that
the quality aud preparation of food
battle with the young, aud
half the battle with all brain workers; and
bave tbe same capacity
possess, inasinrcb
pretty much what
be,—Blunted, emaciated,
comely, well
developed, hculthy, nnd finely formed.
Granting that the present mode ot house
keeping is a wretched thing altogether, and
that to give much
conducted would be
power, still tbu fault lies with women, in
thut they do not bring their intelligence into
the service of their duties, aud so raise the
wliolo platform, and make object, life, and
intellect all harmoniously great. Women
may say, "What! learn the chemistry of
food simply that my husband may have a
good dinner when be comes borne? Degrade
myself to the condition ot n servant, and
givo time and thought, aud my white hands
for such a result? No! let him ent cold mut
I do; if he caunot eat it, he ought to
be ashamed ot himeolf, and to go without."
Spoken or concealed, this would he tho
argument that would naturally
most womeu; (or indeed
soiling set of creatures, and
a fur Boeing judgment, where
is concerned, as a blind
by the scent of the roses growing on it, is
incapablo of seeing the wall ho is just going
hiB head against. We never reflect
the ultimate« ot things.
A medical man has to study botany, chem
istry, comparative anatomy, ns well ns the
immediate subjects ol his profession,
for tho result, among others, ot dipping
a liltle girl'K milk teeth, or poulticing a
maid servant's whitlow. Hut tbe greater
results ot the valuable lives ho
the human suffering he can alluviate,—do
they count foi nothing? Does he flinch from
his studies, and grudge hi
lion tiecauee the milk teeth
ignore that great, grand end which lies be
yond the petty delude of his practice? To
save life and alleviate I
quite sufficient moral motives lor those long
yeurs ol study and labor; uud.migh
great influence womeu?
physician is healing, in not the cook health?
We caunot free ourselves from the tether of
material conditions, and the food tether is
of the stoutest. Aud it woman would
lake up the subject, and really study it In
all its brandies.
.

that
which bees and
feed our pup» iuto
we choose them to
scrolulous, half vitalized,
t lie t
If
at present
wretched a waste of
unreas
incapahle of
, attracted
and alten
the whitlow
final cause? does he
suffering
Ii
! ol tbe posili
ly help lor Ward
very great iuceutive to
acieuce», they
ould uut
bapa, would be
of tho lighter
—but they would also
gaiu knowledge and find interest. A perfoct
knowledge of the chemistry of food and the
science of cooking seems to
open up
almost Illimitable field for the ouorgies
and education of women; and if tho prepar
ation seems great for tho result, and the best
node of broiling a mutton chop too mean an
object for varied sad extensive study,
must remember that the best mode of broil
ing a mutton chop is part of the means by
winch the best kind of race is made, aud
that food is potential humanity. And 1 do
not think that any woman could find that
object for tho exercise of her
but
faculties.
Again, with children—where is the
who sincerely studies the beBt mode of
education? who brings to the task of forming
the characters of the yo
losophy, any accurato
ng aay sound phi
observation? The
mother who thinks of her responsibilities
in spiritual truth, ought to under
stand all about the constitution of children
—their tempers, moral and intellectual ca
pacities, symptom« of disease, and thair
moral and physic*? danger» and
—which opens a rather wider
most women have wit eoough to plough,
She ought to know how best to teed them,
how best to clothe them, how to conduct
and manage them, bo that the good in them
may bo brought out and the bad
a rule she knows nothing of
part leaves her children to
of servants, to be ill treated or spoil
to the humor of the women and
î bey
tations
than
-mpt
pressed;
it at all.
and for the
tbe
ed according
Hie state of their digestive organs. Many a
broken constitution asd shattered nervouB
system date from the early days of
neglect and nurse's talk; but this
ot the small sins of women. It is
their largest and deepest and most shameful I
—a sin, indeed, that I cannot understand.
For if motherhood does not include the
panionahip of tho children, if it does not
mean tho training, by love, of their young
minds, and the rendering their lives happy
by judicious
cauce? To bo a
to be a mother.
All these things women have it in their
power to do If they honestly wish
their lives. But they do not honestly wish
tills. They
impatient ol their
mamma's
I

it mean? and
pleasure, its value, its signifl
huru&n rabbit
, what
enrioh
like children themselves,
assigned work while
grasping at that which their elders
They neglect their own part of life, _
bad delegates, while they
•warming about tho men's offices, and at
tempting to e*ler into competition with
them witliovt one qualification for the strug
gle. Aud what but a sin can we call the
fruitless endeavor which includes discontent
with ordained duties? It is only misdirec
tion of power, rather it ie that frank selfish
ness of the Frenchman, "Ote-tei, que je
mets," which does not
doing.
hand
it
v
î h.
swift, or the battle to the strong, but simple
spoliation of another's gains, and reaping
where wo have not sown. For my own
part, I think there should bo free trade iu
work, and that the best hand should be
chosen irrespective of
; but in that case
would prepare themselves lor high
class work better than they are prepared
now, and come into tho arena armed to win,
not only supplicating to be favored. Our
proeeni excuse is, our vast of teaching; but
that very phrase is a confession of Inferiority
which 1 cannot accept. Who taught men?
Did they not build up the various processes
of thought for themselves? and yet here
women, who can read and study at their
will, whimpering about their wroups
' being Let them teach
selves. If we had any real stuff m na» .....
were not merely so much wax in the hands
nt others, we would do this for ourselves,
and ask no help in that which
to do alone, nor leave to follow
whence we are uot barred. The fuss
make about cortain of our wrongs, which
we ourselves can rentedy, is one of the
humiliating things about us. If
mental chaîna • which
not break them? Is it likely that
will do this for us? If wo really resolved ...
netting oursclvos free from tho trammels of
, . deliver up eumelvc* into the
glorious liberty of knowledge and
we have the power t
own supinoncBB keeps us hound.
A small sin, with sometimes large
is the fata! habit,
, of letting
d family histories. We do
where
indeed, for some fierce
would slay the life had
we the courage. Failing which
slaughter repute. Hut
chatter about
in
able
in
ignorance,
reason,
do so,
litS,
personal secrets
betray the
thiuk
secrets intrusted to
may do barm,
revenge, when
family and our
friends, and in tho most artless way po3siblu
put ourselves into the power of one after
another of our intimates, and trust implicity
to the roserve in others ot which wo !
confessed ourselves destitute. There
very lew women who are really reticent.
Even silent women can bo brought at last to
the confidential point; while with impulsive
women, the well planted artillery of a din
-- hour will be sufücieut to blow every atom
of their defence work to pieces; and a
who cares to knew' the arcana of bis com
panion may, if sho is of this kind, get Irom
her the whole of her life history between the
soup and the grapee. I have known this
done. Wo give ourselves up to tbe impulse
of the moment; and, how much soever
may afterwards regret
at the time
foolish unreserve
powerless to prevent it.
Ibis inability to calculate consequences is
of the basic differences of sex—at least,
so it seems to me; and it goes through the
whole ef the feminine nature.
—woman, and nothing more—would
make a good strategist; but many, if they
had the physical strength, would be first
rate at brilliaut dashes, guerilla surprise»,
aud isolated ambushes. The same defect
in the want ol close reasomug
power, characteristic of us as a race. I do
think that want ia due simply to -the
differences of education between us and men ;
Were taught tho formulu ol
logic we should therefore learn
a
of
is
In
No
and that if
reason,
und leave ofl jumping to conclusions accord
ing to tbe wuy we have
And, furthermors, I think it would be a
bad day lor men if we did learn
The great hold they have
tho supremacy or our instincts, and what
pleased to call our 'intuitive perceptions'
reasoning faculties; and If
asido tbe Buperst;ti<
is by
and impulsive
parts of us, we shall then give tho "woman,
spaniel aud walnut tree" theory its final
deathblow; and men will have to meet
different terms from those of the present or
der of things.
One of our small sins is our small jealous
ly of each other. It is wrong to say that
womon cannot be fiiends together;
, firm, enduring friands; but I doubt
if any young woman's friendship
ted free Irom jealously. II
about
guard our rights against division
vigilance of a
not jeal
El
■III the
house dog guarding his do
l can understand the unrest
ing pettiness or Jealousy that exista betweeu
woman friepds; no man knows it for his
part, aud uo man would submit to it
his friend. But wc accept it paticully,
knowing whore the shoe pinches fr<
shape i
iu. No man
feet. As wives aud lovers
perhaps
ilous women
•arcely a wife in England who would allow
to admire any other woman, to
makcot any other a friend, or to show trank
pleasure iu her society. There would b«
pouting

d the
the world. There is
most jea
her husband
tantrums according to
individual disposition, and the whole har
mony of the household would be »wept by
tbe board; the practical upshot ol which in
uko Inonda outside their homes,
known to their respective J
very ollen the slmplo fact of secrecv change»
tho complexion of the whole affair, aud
mukca what would have been ouly a tuend
ship, if it canid have been (rankly ackuowl
intrigue lustead.
II.
,and thut
to
Girls, too, are
fully jealous of each nth
— ; I should call this the girl's distinctive
fault. 8eu them whan they are introduced,
or when they Aral meet at a ball or croquet
how cold I y critical they look at
each other, how insolently their eyes ro
erory portion of
read in their
party;
rival's d
the
Hie
result of their scrutiny: "You think y
bavo done it very well, but you have made
a I right of yourself, and 1 am much better
tlinn you!" Watch the disdain of the
admired among them; and h
nuughty for attracting
they think that Ada
the young
excessively
h attention
bom
Amy ah _
cluster. How bold she Is!—
overdressed she is!—how affected she
is!—and, oh! how ug!y she is! Sometimes,
if they aro deep, they will overpraise her en
thusiastically; but the ruse is generally too
transparent to deceive any one, and simply
counts for what it is-a clever feint that
does'nt answer. It is quite a study to watch
the way in which girls shake hands
get lier, or take hands in dances. The
limp, cool, impertinent wuy in which they
just touch palms, then let their a
if paralyzed, tells a volume to tli
read the lettering. Iu dancing they very
frequently do nolinkn l.unds at all, hut just
brush the tips of tho fingers, or make a show
ol doing so, and so pass on in the "chain,"
to press perhaps more than cordially the
next male hand that grasps theirs. It may
be all very right and quite according
dispensations of Providence, but it is
to watch, nevertheless.
Only women of a certain age are really
friends together. School girls are lovers
—gushing, sentimental, expausivo lovers,—
unconsciously rehearsing for the real drama
to come by aud by; and young ladies, when
out, are rivals, undergoing deadly pangs
because of bigger chfgnons and shorter pet
ticoats, and yet more audacious tournure»,
and u larger following of admirers; but alter
these turbid waters have run themselves
clear, then they can become friends; and of
, ?/, l *' e 8w eetcst experiences of a
woman s life aro those she has had from the
love, the confidence, the faithful sisterhood
dear "second self," wh
disturbs, and from whom
her.
Another small sin of ou
attracting attention. There are many ...
who would rather be infamous than oh
and who prefor the traditional thrasli
lng ol tlie Russian to immunity and neglect.
'. ,e 7 w111 do anything to attract notice, and
think the wallflower" position worse thau
Hie pillory. There is nothing of a noble
ambition in this; quite the contrary; it is the
restlessness of small egotism, the me
of vanity, the same feeling which, iu
another form, makes certain of us refuse to
grow old, aud have
eut, ne matter what, rather tliau confess
gray hairs and wrinkles. Neglect is wo
than death
our version of F
!..
:
« I ■ ! •
the
funny
tear
petty jealousy
desire of
,S3F
ol
notoriety i
ndmiration is
j , ,. Evou Madame do
Stael would have exchanged her brama for
Madame de Rccamier's beauty; aud poll the
world ol woman honestly, uot one in a thou
sand would dissent from her choice.
Another of
■ 1

small sius is, 1 am sorry to
«wy. °' 1C I alluded to before, stiugi
m-ss. It seems to me that the race of large
hearted, open-handed women is almost dy
ing out,—I caunot say has died out, for,
thank God ' I kuow
pies still left to us,
uot extravagance,
Hut, granting exceptions
, the small, stingy ways of
very painful, very rasping,
have increased in e
with the personal extravagance ot
as, indeed, is very easy to understand. Fur
is a fixed quuutity, horribly inalas
cousequeutly, "
thing, the less we have ft
liberal
'0 beautiful
î generosity i
economy
all know
woman iu
tl
general
They seem
another; tbe
to ourselves, the closer
neighbors; ami lavislinuBS
on the right band must needs include tight
purse-strings on the left. I by __
find fault with the household ecouomios of
:li odds aud ends,
and tbe little self-denials of "going without"
midi and such pleasant superfluities,—but
wi'h the habit ol beating down, the higgling
about pouce with the poorest sellers, aud
gi udging payment of the wages due
and the almost universal desire
deprive the retail traderin
profits.
,—such aud
lab u
ug uato
his rightful
Tlioro is scurcely a woman who
thiuk that she ought to buy bur
goods at trade price, and
card tho percentage of the middle
of her owu pocket. She
a traction the worth ot the lace
her bonnet, but ahe does uot
aku into account the expenses of her milli
icr's establishment, and lier need ot uaruiug
iu the bright days ot tier power enough
whereby to live wbeu the dark hours come,
ami Shu is no louger able to bake bur bread
by her dally labor. This grudging,however,
is only in '
confining
d<
much swindled
calculates t
«ml ribbon
the
"liltle milliner,''
the article ot dress which might
bo applied to every tradesman dealt
Given a
aud the cost is
uiysteriouB thing called stylo,
the percentage, and takes It <
gory of peculation. That makes it distiuc
; which is another matter altogether,
and a thing tliHt
:
liko that of Madame Elise,
calculated. Here that
, floats
ol the cale
bo paid for. Wliere
o we all pay, willingly, for the name and
favor of our respective Mesdames Elise, but
growl and dissect unflinchingly wh
"little milliner" sends in her humblo
count. We went wild a short time ago
' ME -operative stores, hut I
did much good with them,
about the
beurd that
that we got our goods lor less than their
market value. We will go miles in search
of bargains; and spend the difference twice
in cab-hire, under the Impression of
saving hugely; and
applications of
number ol pence due to cabby, with the
stem resolution to die
than give that extra sixpence outside the
legal tare.
Many other little sins
lorce among us,—sins which weaken
fluence and destroy our power; sins which
ownselves more than they hurt
neighbors, and which eat into our nobleuesa
more than many others of larger dramatic
«cope aud more deadly aocial effect. Aud
among them is one very patent to certain
bold speakers,—our impatience at rebuke,
aud the kind of Dalai Lama sanctity which
assumu for ourselves. We
shipped as the supremo of eroatiou. Hums'
pretty little bit ol gallant nonsense about
the "'prentice band,''and masterpiece must
be taken as gospel truth; we must be flatter
ed and coaxed and adored; taken c
and given
of the
"tables" iB the
I "î »i*i
the slake rather
in full
î n
î"
way at the
allowed to compete with
«landing, yet treated with the chivalrous
H|»oct due to tbe unprotected and fought
Wo must have no hard woik laid upou ua,
because wc are feeble aud delicate, but
must bava tho same salaries
ulsc wc cry out at the injustices ol meu, and
talk rubbish about tlie prejudice attached to
womim'i work; we may neglect our owu da- •
tics and blaspheme Ilium, and yet be suffer
ed to snatch the offices <
have a bard word said of us, but
erywbere argue the brutality of
their scIflsbuoHs, their hardueas, their dis
honor, aud their cruelty. Aud all liiia we
call the righla of women, aud flounce aud
flout when cast iu (
aro hitter truths to say of ourselves. Hut
the truth which makea the bitter
time;
their t
those appor
the baldest workers among
-sided suit. These
U i
ness .—Kerry Saturday.
8 EC
V'gdauce Cornu
are springing up ull
:es of
Movkment Against Turkey.—
et associa
New York
eu who compose them,
t lie Cuban expedition engaged atleullou a
lew wecke "go; b
tbe c
it has been nupercoded
by a movement on Turkey,
organization com|H»sud ol Greeka, Huaâiaûë,
German», Freue lune u aud others, including
Hebrews, baa recently been tunned iu this
city, whose avowed object is to unite with
any power that may muke war upon Turkey
to drive her buck to tier Mob
"The Grand Army ot Palestine
gauizallun is pleased to call U*«dt. Wl || t û
upou cleartug Asia M
eiu Europe ut the haled Turk.
A secret
'•'lau home
tbe
as well
Me .II.

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