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The Delaware farm and home. (Wilmington, Del.) 1885-19??, August 22, 1895, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88053137/1895-08-22/ed-1/seq-6/

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Published Every Thursday
—at—
Wilmington, Delaware
Publication Office.
HO and 113 Froneli Street.
Subscription Price 50 cents a year
in aiiiiance,
Fertilizers tor Wheat.
There seems to he a popular idea
that a fertilizer for wheat should con
sist chiefly of phosphoric acid. Com
mercial fertilizers for this crop con
tain on an average, from 2 to 8 per
cent, of ammuuia: 8 to 10 per cunt, of
available phosphoiic acid and about 2
per cent, potash. That this propor
tion of the fertilizing principles is
absurd hecumts clear upon a little
reflection.
While the analysis of plants is not
an invariable indicator ot fertilizing
proportions, it is mute nearly so than
any other single item of cultural
data. Taere can be no question hut
that the plant must have these prin
ciples, and in approximately the pro
portions found by ctiemicat analysis.
There are soils so rich in some par
ticular elemeut of plant food that
some may he largely omitted from
the fertilizing material used, lias
couditloa, however, is almost wholly
coariaed to awtuoaia alone. Legumin
ous crops, by the usual rotation for
wheat, supply largely the necessary
ammonia, hut there is no way of get
ting putash and phosph ric acid for
nothing, so to speak. Whatever may
be the allowance for soil nitrogen,
under the average condition of farm
, , T - - . .
lilllCl 111 tilt l lilted JlUlteti, tue potîiüll
ami phosphoric' acid, removed by |
cropping, i-Uöt bo UlUlWllilv returned i
to the soil, it therefore; become J
an important matter t , know what |
the demand of an ordinary crop ot I
wheat upon the soil ,s 1.1 pounds as I
Well *tï 3 liet' CeliUO'fcS !
i 1 « a ,1 j
ill Computing tilt.* deiliiiua ot tue i
soil, Of any crop, the whole pk.it
must be taken into consideration. A !
careful auaijsisuf the whuie piitut, |
glam, straw, chuff, stubtiie uud
shows the following requirement of j
potash aild phosph nie acid, for each
100 pounds of grain:
Potash, 14 lbs.
Available pnosphuric acid 13 lbs.
This may seem like a small quan
tity of fertilizer to produce a 1,000
pounds of grain, and it is ail that
would be necessary if the whole
amount could be so managed as to I e
applied to actual vegetable growth.
This is plainly impossible in field
operations; the data is more useful in
showing the relation between the
different elements of fertility. Instead
of a wheat fertilizer, requiring an
excess of phosphoric acid, it plainly
required more potash than any other |
mineral. A fertilizer for wheat should !
contain phosphoric acid and potash j
in approximately equal quantities. ]
There is one more point t > con
sider: What is the particular effect
of a deficiency of each individual ele
ment? Of the ammonia in the wheat
plant taken as a whole, G 3-6 per cent,
is found in the grain and the remain |
der about equally distributed through
the straw and roots etc. The effect
of ft deficiency of nitrogen, the other j
elements being present in ample
quantities, would he to produce straw
at the expense of the grain. Of the
phosphoric acid in the whole wheat
plant, 71 per cent is in the grain, 8
per cent- in the straw and chaff, and
21 per cent, in the roots and stubble
It iß evident that a deticieucy of tills
element, the others being in full sup- ;
ply, would first diminish the gram
"UÜ tis I
produced and then restrict further
growth by checking root develop- ,
nient. Under the same conditions as !
given above, potash is distributed as j
follows:
Grain, 87 per cent.
Straw and chaff, 84 per cent.
Stubble and roots, 29 per cent.
This is, equally throughout the j
whole plant. There may ha ammonia
and phosphoric acid present for 1,000 j
pounds of grain, hut if only euougn
potash for 100, it will be impossible
to get more than the bitter amount.
In fact, the prod noli .n of grain is
measured directly by the potash; the
value of a feitili/er is no greater |
tima its potash efficiency. This is, |
however, almost equally true of the I
other elements, except that to a j
limited extent, a deficiency produces j
profitless plants
assaanxst
Society
Printing.
We have a full assortment
of cuts for the use of the
various secret societies, and
are always willing to esti
mate on any Printing you
niav want clone.
A
$15?. 00 every month given away to .my one who ap
plies through us for the most meritorious patent during
the month preceding.
| ÄÄÄSÄ
i keep track <f their blight ideas. At the sail
J ' v,shtoi,npreiiupunll,epublicth<:factthat
| IT'S THE SIMPLE,TRIVIAL INVENTIONS
I THAT YIELD FORTUNES,
I
! "sauce-pan." "collar-button," "nut-lock," "bottlc
j stopper," and a thousand other little things that
i any one can find a way of improving; and these simple
!
Pointer.
You will always find our
prices right, and our work
delivered when promised.
Correspond with us.
Diamond Printing Co.
110 112 French Street,
Wilmington, Del.
Phone, 650.
$1800.00
GIVEN AWAV TO INVENTORS.
ST IS NOT SO HARD AS IT SEEMS.
|
j
|
!
j
]
|
j
9 CORDS IN 10 HOURS
8
JMe = î cï= E$i§ 4 , 4 ^. #1 £ ^|U ' jijib
BY ONE MAN. fiend for free Illustrated catalogue,
;
»
Patents tiiken out through us receive special notice in
I the" National Recorder," published at Washington,
D. C., which is the best newspaper published in America
in the interests of inventors. We furnish a year's sub
this journal, free of cost, to all
clients.
•f Co-? , i he invention each month
:ui l hundreds of thousands
I Recorder," containing a
sketch of the winner, and a description of his invention,
will.be scattered throughout the United States among
capitalists and manufacturers, thus bringing to their
s of the invention.
■ t vr;•!i
We also advertise, fr
which wins our $
1
of copies of th
h
s regarded strictly confidential.
All com
Address
JOHN WËDDERBURN & CO.,
Solicitors of American and Foreign Patents,
618 F Street, N. W.,
Washington, D. C.
Reference— éditer of this taper. Write for our
•* t]fREE .
Box 385.
/■
J
-■ -■ vn»..-.
MUVIN
o
z
«
save.
o
\{}]in 2 iuni[ jo sjji
Xup-XjaA 3 UOIUUIOD
nip sojn^ : auto
'!P 3 I\[ ^l! ure ,tl
-pueis tuopout
cn
CA
7 S
cn
r
m
TI
s-N-v-d-i'a
BAtVB IHUYl
TUFFS.
KUN8KA8K
Mo
BukuhM*]
ivi'l^h» j
only \
Deafness Cannot be Cured
by local applications, as they cannot
rea;h the diseased portion of the ear.
1 here is only one way to cure 1 >eaf
ness, and that is by constitutional
remedies. Deafness is caused by an
inflamed condition of the mucous liu
ing of the Eustachian Tube.
j this tube gets inflamed you have a
rumbling sound or imperfect hearing,
j and when it is entirely closed Deaf
ness is the result, and unless the in
flammation eau he taken out and this
tube restored to its normal condition,
hearing will be destroyed forever
nine eases out of ten are caused by
When
| catarrh, which is nothing hut an in
| flamed condition of the mucous
I sufaees.
j We will give One Hundred Dollars
j for any case of Deafness (caused by
catarrh) that cannot be cured by Hall's
C.tarrh Cure.
Semi for circulars,
free.
F. J. CHENEY & CO , Toledo, O.
JSejysmld by Druggists, 75 c.
Make Cows Pay.
What is the use
|.'x of keeping cows
unless you can
make money with
them? No other
fijjk s business would
stand a waste of from 25 to
50 per cent, and the dairy
business will not. You
waste that much butter
by pan skimming. Get a
Safety Hand Separator
and save it.
P. M. SHAnri.ES, Wes:Chester, Pa.
Rutland. Vt.
. Y
'D-.
Send f<
£33 :xs 3 tmuBm*sak m -x&
YEW
a ftiJ m
ŸftfE NTs
i
CAVtHIO.inflUUVIflltKS
COPYRIGHTS.
TAX Ï OBTAIN A PATENT t Fr.ru
prompt answer and an honest opinion, write to
III CNN iVr CO., who have had nearly fifty years'
experience in the patent business. Commun ioa«
tions strictly confidential. A Ilnndhoek of In
formation concerning I'ntenfn and howto ob
tain them s *nt free. Also
leal and scientific hooks sent free.
Patents taken through Munn 8c Co. receive
special notice in the Sri ni tille A mer icon, and
are brought widely before the public with
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper,
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, has by far t be
ientifle work in the
•pies sent free.
■J.f >0 a year. Single
very number contains beau
a log no of median
largest circulation of any :
W«rld. a year. Sample . ,
Building Edition, monthly,
•pies, *i 5 cents. Every numb»
I plates, in colora, and photographs of
ses. with plans, enabling builders to show
cts. Address
the
hou
latest designs and secure cont
MUNN & CO.. NEW York, 3 (it BUOAUWAY
> /V H H ! i A> I iLALLV
__ $ \\rtP(ANGED
".Agricultural
DVERTIS!N0r
•-#*-V v %LWAYS
MsSNItTENTION
KNOW MORE ABOUT IT-fUtes. Estimates, etc
write FRANK B. WHITE CO.,
••11111 aOBICn.TlTIAL I Th. Rmlrrj.CUwir
■ti ChlAL. ÄIIV LlUTSiXlj. 1 »1 Times BulMIng, Aevrlür.
i A S *
c
m
OF
>Wz.
Ib-cord Building, second, ti
-jis cEi stout st.,ph:ladel:;
iViorningi nfierncon and Night Cjessions.
itd ScIkihI
end <ounh ftjc.rs.l
\ in.
lii.ii
•10*1*1
»ui Ini
\
■I «
I»b.i
rbb-.l
•rriid
I !. »
f'.r
d.
till
is hi
li
li
'
M I
i successfully assisted to positions.
r<* Atimtal, PIiog
> f (>i'iuluuting Ex
SliSBiiS 'IAY PEIECE, Ph.L'., Principal «id Ysnsdß'*
ui
, call
•l»l
I'
NEW YORK CLOTHING HOUSE.
NEW YORK
i

b
î
31(1 Market S|., Wilmington.
SS, $10 anil 5 12
MEN'S SUITS.
for
$ 5 , 00 .
The more you think of this
offer the more rediculous it
will appear, but if you will
i come to our store and examine
the excellent goods we are
selling at 55 for a full suit
which in each instance is

worth from $8 to $12. you will
readily see why so mn
peo
ple are taking advantage of
this offer, which cannot po>si
bly last much longer.
Store dosed evenings after 6
o'clock except Saturdays■
N, Y. Joihing House.
316 Market St.
MAX CPH KA1 Ai, Prop.
I
I
Strictly one price and if dis
I satisfied with vont purolun-e we
I will return your money,
will deliver your purchase 1ree to
I any part of the city.
We
I rrrrttssrsrrrrssttrssssjj
$ 100.00
Given Away
Every Month
}
ft
I
to the person submitting* the
most meritorious invention
during the preceding month.
WE SECURE PATENTS
FOR INVENTORS, ami the
w object of this offer is to cr.
courage persons of an invent
ive turn of mind. At the
same time we wish to impress
the fact that :: :: ::

t
f
t
• •
H
It's the Simple,
Trivial Inventions
That Yield Fortunes
1
»
:
I
—such as T)o Long's Hook
and Eye, "Seo that Hump,"
"Safety Pin," "Pigs in Clo
ver," "Air Brake," etc.
Almost every one conceives
Q a bright idea at some time cr
other. Why not put it in prac
tical use? YOU It talents may
lie in this direction. May
make your fortune. Why nut
try? :: :: :: :: ::
%â9 >v rite for further information and
mention this paper.
!
!
:
.THE PRESSGLHIMSGO.
Philip W. Avirett, Gen. Mgr., fj
618 F Street, Northwest, h
WASHINGTON, D. C. 1
Mf'The responsibility of this company
may l»o judged by the fact that its
stock is held by over one thousand
of the leading newspapers in the
United States.

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