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Blackfoot news. (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1891-1902, September 08, 1894, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056017/1894-09-08/ed-1/seq-8/

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The Blackfoot Kevsis
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY.
PERCY JONES. PUBLISHER.
TERMS OP SUBSCRIPTION :
$3.00
One Year
Six Months..
•Three Months
1.75
1.00
ai>pH»atton.
Aq-.erttsiiur rates furnished
Entered at the postoffice at Blaoitfoot, Idaho,
for transmission as second class mail matter
BLACKFOOT. IDAHO. SEPTEMBER S, ISM
The bicycle has revived the style
of dress worn by Amelia Bloomer
forty yeaip ago.
The St. Louis Globe-Democrat says
the Populists of Arkansas will contest
the state election because it was held
on Labor day—a national holiday.
Gov- Waite, of Colorado, the old
man-with-blood-on-his-bridle has rid
den into the Honor of re-nomination
for governor for another term. There
will be something rich in Colorado's
political camp this year.
se
It is an tncouraging sign of the
condition of Democratic thought and
purpose when tbe-Democrats of Illi
nois select as their United States sen
ator a man who believes that trade
should he as free as men are fiee.
What's the matter w*th Nevada
Senators? Are they all right? Sen
ator Jones has formally withdrawn
from the Republican party and joined
the Populist, and Senator Stewart has
joined the Breckenridge-Pollard-GIass
cock crowd.
General George Stoneman, ex
governor of California, died in Buf
cam.,"nd
paigns on the highest plains of civil
falo, New York, Wednesday morning.
He was one of the generals of the
Civil war who conducted his
ized warfare, and who left the tented
field with :;his escutcheon ; just as
bright as when he rode to the front.
All California will mourn his death.
When Mr. Cleveland left the White
House in 1889 there were one hundred
million dollars in the national treas
ury. When he entered it again the
treasury was empty, the one hundred
millions were gone.
When be leaves
again there will probably be anothei
hundred millions on hand.
The gov
emmental income for August
$9,000,000 in excess of the
was
amount
paid out.
Arkansas ami Vermont.
Arkansas and Vermont held State
elections last Monday.
In Arkansas the Democrats made a
clean sweep. Counties that before
went Populist or Republican
Democratic by handsome majorities.
The Populists lost in every county.
In Vermont the Republicans
the winners.
went
were
The latest estimate
gives the state to the Republicans by
25,000 majority.
Blackfoot School Items.
School opened on Monday, Sept. 3,
with an attendance of 160 pupils.
The board is to be complimented
upon the excellent condition of tb.
house when the work for the
ppened.
Material is
yea I
now on the grounds for
enclosing the school yard ami making
walks, wltich will add greatly to the
pleasant siirrouudings.
The work started
very pleasantly
in all the departments, teachers and
pupils vicing with each other in mak
ing the work interesting,
suing hangs on the outside,
and see ns.
The luteh
Come
» *
The Wool Market.
Boston, Sept. 5. —The wool market
during the past week shows several
large transnetious in territorial grades,
but the general trade is quiet,
bulk of business now being done
effected before the new tariff hill went
into effect, but this does not have ant
particular influence to stimulate trade
as prices have for a long time been
a free wool basis,
in bond is uow
>.
ter-j
14c
The
was
on
Much of the wool
on the way to the
mills. The prices are us follows :
California wools, northern, 14 to 16
fall wools, 25 to 40c; Oregon wool'
lair. 9 to 10e; choice, 11 to 13c;
ritrjVV f*yv.1u TJq
1 o
OUR FALL CLEARING SA
LADIES' Ai DEWS' SEA
!
OU
Hose, Summer Dress Goods, White Embroideries, broken stoi|
Boots and Shoes, Slippers, Silk Remnants and other goods.
MUST BE SOI-* 13 AT COST >«
CALL AND EXAMINE THEM.
iornej
AXjXj
ifttlow
jpieM
NO TROUBLE TO SHOW GOODS
C. BUNTING & Cul
*«*
Michigan and Ohio unwashed, 12 to
14c; Ohio and Pennsylvania immer
chantable, 15 to 16c; Australian j
combings, superior. 42 to 46c; me-J
diums, 38c; delaine fleeces, Ohio 22 j
to 23c; Michigan delaine fleeces, fine, '
21c.
Women for Breekenritlge.
Never in the history of the country
was there so much interest worked up
in a congressional nominating conven
tion as is found in the Ashland dis
. , » t . ,
teens or class books are on the scene ,
clamoring either' for or a a . t t
nomination of Mr. Breckcnnd„e. But,
»t «rNf loot mil< ,L 1
the excitement will not last ® ut "
longer; the convention to decide the
matter will meet on the 12th inst.
Some of the women who favor Col.
trict of Kentucky to-day.
Men of all professions, women of
high degree and of low degree and ;
school children not yet out of their
Breckenridge are among the best iu
Mrs. Dr. i
the district and the state.
Chinn, whose blood is of the bluest ;
cam.,"nd whose beauty would make hercon^ j
j â P icuous ia " u y company of women j
i in America and who is the mother of
j two children, thus expresses herself
on the nomination :
j
j
j
i
,
"The question of endorsing or con
derailing Col. Breckenridge's private j
character and conduct is not involved !
j
in the contest at all. We women have |
nothing to do with his privatecharac
\\ e have learned to admire his i
brilliant talents and trust his public :
probity. If he is defeated, the seal,
of sanction will be set upon euch
women as the one who has caused him I
ter.
so much trouble, and I am certain the i
true womanhood of Kentucky does
not want to be guilty of such as this.
She is by no means a representative
of Kentucky women, but if we allow
her to undo so strong'and forceful a
man as Breckenridge, the outside
world will look upon her in that
light."
I
!
I
a
But for all that may be said and
done for him it looks like the Colonel
will be defeated.
Minnesota's Misfortune.
The story of the forest fires in
Minnesota presents m-try terrible fea
tures and appeals with peculiar force
to public sympathy. When we read
that six towns have been entirely de
stroyed. and 500 persons burned to
death, with as many more missing, it
is easy to understand the awful ener
gy of the flames and the hopelessness
of fighting against them. Such fires
are eyen worse than those which
sometimes sweep over the Western
prairies, inasmuch as they have more
material to feed upon, and thus gain
greater volume ami fury. It is report
ed that in one case 200 persons at
tempted to flee before the danger and
were overtaken and consumed, whole
groups,
and no oue escaping to tell the tale. !
The fire is described as making q« i
progress by huge leaps and in whirl- !
winds of heat and smade that twisted !
diameter
I
families dying in pathetic
off trees several inches
and filled the air with burning fiag
inents. There was much heroism dis
played by the people in their attempts
first to save their homes, and then,
when that could not be done, to get
away with their lives, if possible.
The losses arc estimated at several
millions, and they fall principally up
oo those who are least able to tie
them, having nothing left even in the
way of ordinary food and clothing.
Aside from the personal loss and
>. suffering, the calamity is to be deplor
ed as another proof of the need of|L0
*• — r " <•
in
;
h
:
the forests on account of their value
to the country. It is estimated that
$25,000,000 worth of timber is an- j
Dually destroyed in this way, and the
available supply has been retluced to
a poiut where resolute and effective
measures are necessary to prevent
it from being exhausted.—Globe-Deiu- !
j
I
I
oerat.
SENATOR JOHN P. JONES
Leaves the Republicans ami Joins the
Populist Party.
!
' I
:
He says it is not tin ^
P art - V for 8ilver an ' 1 henceforth he will
b(J w|th that party which will bring
that overmastering issue to the front.
In a letter to ibe chairman of the
...
hjt a te centnl committee, dated W ash
i ngton , D. C., August 29th, 1804, he|
Senator John P. Jones, of Nevada
ba3 formally withdrawn from the Re
pobUcan party>
[
!
says :
"Having been fully convinced that
tbe i{ epu hlicao party organization is
unalterably opposed to the free coin
age of »j^er at tbo ratio 0 f 16 to 1.
or at all, except with the consent
f orel „ n governments and at a ratio to
^
;
be
lie dictated by them, I have to an
nounce I can no longer act with this
party.
j
!
In the immovable conviction that
j the progress, the prosperity and hap
| pineHS <)f uot only thc ^ )p!t . of Nt ,
vada hut thosc of thc entire countrv ,
i ^ more i mDB ediately dependent on
: raoljetary reforln than an y other
issue tllat ean preseptw | f or
I, action r ghal | henceforth, vote
I and act with , he partv that hri ngs this
overmastering issue to the front."
i
The Fires Fatal Fury.
I St. Paul, Sept. 4.—A Pioneer
! Press special from Pine City says :
I Buried at Hinckley and vicinity.
Sandstone, 67; Pokegama, 25; Miller,
12; estimate of dead not found, 50.
Total, 379.
The Hinckley horror is dawning in
its awful magnitude. There are now
lying in desolate cemeteries under a
shallow covering of sand 216 biidies.
F. J. Weber, of Pine City, has had
entire charge of the interment and
5;
a
if
to
lie
ed
The figures are Ins and 1 ,,
. , .
include those buried by their friends, i
has kept a most accurate account of
the boilies.
a . , „ . ... P
Chicago, Sept. 4.—Reports to the i
_ „ ' * * led
Tribune from portions of Minnesota, ;
,
loss of property at a low estimate has !
now reached $12.000,000, not includ- j
ing the standing timber destroyed ,
lint t*vcn worse is the Joss of life*
, . . . , . ... . , .
wlnen it is feared will reach ns liich I
K
as a thousand. About 20 towns have ,,
, , . . , .. .. .
been destroyed, driving thousands of .
, ... , . ,
famines from their homes, ,
Fi'oonkr, V is.. .Sept. 4. The de- j n
! 9trilction ,,f B*row»flT was complete. 1 an
i Gne lone building is left of the city |
! inhabitants. One man was |
! bllrtl(:t *
j° f 11 ,nillion '
Michigan and Wisconsin,
ONE LONE BUILDING.
The total loss is n quarter j
.Shell Lake has 521
dwellings burned, with a loss of $75 -1
000 .
of|L0 (, 0 destitute refugees from the
Hinckley and S-if-Mom fh-oc now In
Three hundred and sixty peo- .j
pie are homeless and many are with-j trft
out a dollar of insurance. Deeds of
heroism arc plentiful. One widow !
dragged her sick son from her house !
-1
into a potato patch and there protect
ed him from the (lames, while the rest
of the inhabitants fled in terror,
fires are now under control in this
vicinity.
The
SORROW STRICKEN.
Duluth, Sept. 5 —There
arc over
Duluth. Over #81,000 has betu t . -
ed for relief and fisxl. Clothing au-l J
lumber are being donated liberally, j
The relief society yesterday ** , " t
100 of the unfortunates to frieod* and
relatives in other cities. One »ad
feature of the catastrophe is the large
number of cattle, horses, sheep andj
hogs, as well as fowls, that mintcu-j
lonely escaped the flames anti ure uow |
slowly dying from hunger
One OMee*Seeker's Evolution.
' During Mr. Cleveland's first admin it
istration, es-Gov. Porter, of Tenue*
see," said a politician, -was Assistant
^ ecretar y 0 f «State, and just about the j
üme ^ , he unf for waa
a frl ^ ut ,. 1>r ter » up |
on privale buwm ^ Tlw , i#ilor
. . .
waa a hule hound IK'iuoenit, who ai
ways worked like a beaver for party
success, and who had never been a
candidate for either an elective or au ,
appointive otli -e. He was a man of j
excellent business attainments and
was blessed with a wife and a large
When he had trän»
family of boys.
acted the business which called him
here, Gov. Porter asked him when he !
was going to return to Tennessee, and |
was told that bis friend would leave J
the next afternoon
" -Wouldn't you like to meet I'resi ;
dent Cleveland liefere you go, Jim? I
queried the Governor.
"Jim said he would right smart, *o
Porter told him he would make an j
engagement so the President might
be baridslmken the next morning ;
The Governor went over to the White
House a little while later and told ti e
President that he wanted to tiring a
friend over to sialute him,
"•lies one of the liest men in Ten
nessee, Mr. President—a never say-die
Democrat, and he don't want any of
said Porter.
flee,'
The President
liearned.
" -You dont mean it. Porter,' he
claimed; 'yon certainly
earnest. A Democrat who don t want
a place. Bring him over right
if yon can find him, but Ih:
®V
can t be in
away,
sure not ;
f
"Porter nsr.ired the President that !
to let him escape you
d. '
lie had spoken the truth and
ed to give Jim s history to him Next
morning the pair went to the White
,, , , .
House. Jim never bad such a sur
procec
P ris<! in hi * Tb® President
, , , ,, ,
led to know all atomt him
seem
and was
cordial as an intimate, lie »lapped
! 3 " t l3 ' H ,'. !W " 1 el,, * w, !
^ '^aUh« Whiu- rionTanv"^
, ltl ll!ipp( . m . (l to ,, in Washing on,
, . , ,
'Break bn»a«l with me some time
. M
when you get up this way/ was the
,, , ..
President s parting remark, and Jim
. r . . W1 , „ ,, ...
lert the W bite House like a man in a
, ,, ,
dream. \\ hen Gov, Porter asked him
how he liked Cleveland Jim was will
j n g to tlirnsh any one of hi*
an ,| «wore he had neve
cordial and approachable
118
critics,
r met such a
man. Pretty
soon the hotel was reached where Jim
wns stopping, and Gov. Porter held
out his hand,
'Well, Jim, old fellow,' he said
.j reckon Ï won't see von before the
trft in leaves this afternoon, so [ || « av
good liy ' 3
•I reckon I've about concluded
not to go,' said Jim. i U
"'Not go!' ejaculated Porter; -why
not, man?' |
'Why not,?' repeated Jim.
'Why !
not? Why, Governor, didn't you see '
how Cleveland treated me? lies
stuck on me, and doggone if J don't;
believe I'll stay here and get him
make me Consul to Liverpool!" '_
Washington «c, r
r
fctapiw 111
_ _ _ __ _
J ^ VJT» »*»• Hi A I ) <JL l~i r\ Q
fcsrille,
ifek
I
1
WHol.fc.vtO: M tNl I aiTI UK US AND WUu- «
I gew
Harness, Saddles, Collars I
l&e. A#
2448 VV/aohington Am«., OgdUn.
-
K
;■ »
ÎVMu order to keep the public acquit) ted «tth tk{
it i* hard tint-a — therefore we are making great Cm» t»
We have a Large Stuck of Harne»» of Ail (inwti|iafl
Varieties and a good stock ot all Other Goods ia ih|M
line. Write u» for Price* and be convinced H
■vis
Bil

lai
I
THE FULTON MEAT M"
tff'W
à
VOGLKK k fl
B

Sift,
Fresö Hall
U. I
r V..
BLACKFOOT,
H
" 1, *'
All kinds »fvÄ""'
■^^■oiir
-y»
I,
MMi É*

,Fhh and OttKH
m î
*1* I
!
1 m
Our prices arc tin* lowest in the vallcTt'BM*
j;oo<|s they arc of the very ln*st. Head jpjÿyk
n
; Currants, I » pound*..1 00 Malrhi*. 1« bo*«* M
f R«'*inw. II •• .UM> Oat Meal, 21 pnaoèM
! Bfans. "| • ., ||,.,i Laundry
l oo Syrup in one galloti*
.1 to: Syrup in keg*. I 8Ö. 1
Vrlmi kle t <>ffee, l pound*.1 oo Candy, 15 el* or 21*»*
Chewing Tolittcci
M fi
lit.
' ^'"I 1 . 3 |»mndt
Green Tea

ai
>c. 3 <■
from 25 to 15 eta. All othot goo<l*)o»ti*
-
! , "J >° U S ^ OI »l«I HOt trafic wInTC VOU
1,10 ,UOSt ^° 0(,S VOIIF IIIOIH'V.
«t tllO loW l)ricC8 IoUIhI OllljT «>
• 1 J
DO YOU SEE ANY REA!
BULL'S STO:
c. BUNTING & CO., BANK
IN0ORPORATED,
I raws acts A General Banking Be
HLAGK Ff jot,
INTKHKMT ALLOWED on TIME DEPOSIT*.
/.s.v/// <!rajix tUred on all principal citn'S °/
a'Tivb iikkruiru Acmnrrr holkttbi»
astHi
tea
I'KWCTPAI, ( orrenpomiekts «
BANK - _
A
i U II ASK NATION \L
FIRST N \TIO\
| 1 l,N '
OMAHA NATIONAL
al bank,
«W
!
' FIItST NATIONAL
MeCORMCK
tol*^*^* NATIONAL
BANK, -
BANK,
& ( '0 . BANK BUS,
BANK,
li
o»e
associate rank «
r ,R " T NATIONAL BANK.
OCATKH
p

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