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Blackfoot news. (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1891-1902, January 30, 1897, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056017/1897-01-30/ed-1/seq-2/

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Lord stayed his hand.'"
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j MISS RHOOA'S MEASURE.
Miss Rhoda sat in the west doorway.
Her face was turned toward the sweet
sky, radiant with its rays ot red and
golden light: it was nature's "with
drawing season."
right was a field ot stubble from which
the wheat had been harvested. At her
left the corn still stood, like Indian
wigwams, all over the field, waiting for
the husking time. At her feet the ma
ple leaves, so gorgeous in their autum
nal plaids, were falling.
there the note of a stray bird which
had tarried later than Us fellows fell
upen her car. There was a chill in the
air; the wind was rising, and tt stirred
the locks or silvery hair which usually 0
lay with such calm precisian about
Hi ss Rhoda's face. She folded her black '
j
;
At Miss Rhoda s
Here and
ahawl closer about her shoulders, but
•til! she linge'rcd.
There was no kindly voice to warn !
her of the dangers that might come ;
from longer exposure. No loved form ;
to come to the door and say, "Come in. i
now; the air ia chill and the fire is
burning brightly. It lonely in the
room without you." Miss Rhoda was ;
alone in the world: she had outlived :
those nearest and dearest to her. ;
In the afterglow of the lives of those
who had belonged to her In the old
borne sweet memories lighted up the j
closing day. and as she looked Intently
at the western sky she seemed to see ;
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a vision oi tae peariy gates, behind
whose portals those loved ones were |
dwelling. Watching the red and gold
light fade away, and the darkness
gather, she. like Christian, "fell sick" ;
at the glimpse of the glories and
wished she could be among them.
As she turned and went Into the 1
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HE'8 TOO CLOSE-FISTED
house, there was a look on her face
which, if an artist had caught it at that
moment, might have Inspired him to
paint a picture and call it Renuncia
tion. The most notable thing after
one has grown old is the fact of re
nunciation,
that of Mi«» Rhoda, it is a more deep
ly felt fact than in others.
"I was passing Miss Rhoda's house
Just at sunftet to-night, and I saw her
sitting at her west door," said Mr.
Bate?, as be sat down at the supper
table. "I know she was trying to work
out the kinks and knots about that
mortgage on her place. But old Tom
Carpenter will foreclose when the time
comee. She can't expect any mercy
from him: he is too close-fisted for
that."
"Dear me!" exclaimed Miss Martha
Bales; "what will become of her,"
"3he will have to go to the town
house. I suppose. It will be very hard
for her: Mis? Rhoda was always a
high-strung woman." her brother re
plied.
"And after all that woman has done
to help other folks when they were In
trouble!" exclaimed Mrs. Baten. "Think
how she tooiS In those Butler chil
dren and kept them after their mother
died; and how she kept that young man
Vho was too sick to work all winter.
In own mother couldn't have done
more for hlm. I declare if Miss Rhoda
Nas to give up her place and
Ae town at her
«harne."
But In some lives, like |

to you again? asked Arthur, the tali i
boy at his mothers right. "How do
you reconcile that passage of scripture
with Mias Rhoda's prospects of going ,
to tlio town-house? All my long life
I have-looked upon Misa Rhoda as one
V ths fireside saints of the earth; she
go on
age, It will be a
"Doesn't rhe Bible say, 'With what
measure ye meet It shall be measured
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has always been in some good work.
aml has ^ a kinU worjror every- '
body."
0 f criticism which her nephew had
shown of late about reconciling state- i
' ments of the Holy Scripture. She spoke
j up in a quick way and said. "Miss
; Rhoda hasn't gone to the town-house
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Aunt Martha did not like the spirit
! yet."
"No; but the finger on the signboard
;
; points that way," replied Arthur,
i "it is dreadful for old people to be
obliged to give up their home and old
associations and go 'where they would j
; not.' " said Mrs. Bates. "Young folks
: can bear changes—many really en
; joy them—but it is different with the
aged."
Aunt Martha had not married-—her
j acquaintances called her "a maiden
lady." It was not because she never
; had opportunities to marry, she told
her nephews and nieces, but because
she loved them too well to break her
home ties with them. It had long ago .
been settled that the Bates family
could not do without Aunt Martha, and
Aunt Martha could not get along with
out them. "How dreadful it must be,"
was her thought that night, "to have
no lovelight in one's life/*
!
Then Miss Martha sax down and j
wrote a letter to her brother Johu. j
who lived in the city. She told him
of Miss Rhoda; what a patient, faithful
life hers had been, and now, Just aa
nearing the end of the Journey, she
must be forced to give up her home
and go to the town-house. Then she
added. "JohD. you and I must pay oil
that mortgage, and give Miss Rhoda
the home for her life. We are able: j
| let us be wllflng to do It What a j
joyous Christmas we shall have U we j
do this! Miss Rhoda must have ttoe
; measure meted out to her that she has j
meted out to others." !
The result was that Brother John
1 who was quite apt to act on sister
Martha ssuggeittons. Joined her in the
a
In
labor of lov» for her neighbor. When
Miss Martha went over to see Miss
Rhoda, a short time before the fore
closure of the mortgage, she found her
looking over her things—«he could not
| carry many with her; for the room
was small she expected to occupy. But
there was this little memento and that
gift with sweet memories associated
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"THE LORD STAYED HIS HAND."
about them which made It a hard
matter to decide what to take and what
to give up. There was the mother's old
workbasket, once so full of the mak
ing and mending for the loved ones,
and her copy of "Dally Food" lying In
It, and father's well-thumbed Bible,
wltb here anrl lhere words of comfort
i and explanation written on the mar
do g| na —those of course must go with
h er .
, Tear-maVks were on Miss Rhoda's
f ace as she offered the mother's rocker
a
to her visitor,
"Yen, Miss Martha, I'm getting ready
It's something I never dirt
to move.
before, and it's sort of trying.
But
I'm thankful I don't fool au unrecon
ciled and unhappy about it aa 1 thought
1 should when 1 first made up my mtnd
that there was nothing eise 1 could do.
My eyes are so poor 1 can't sew any
more. I say with John Bunyan, 'Rer
haps my way to heaven lies through
this very valley. It is just as near
the town-house, heaven is, as it is to
my old home here, but then— weil. I
won't say one word against the Lord's
dispensations. The Lord keepeth the
feet of his children. If this is his
way for me to walk, I hope he wlil
give me strength to follow without fal
tering step."
"But. my dear Miss Rhoda, it is not
going to be the Lord's will for you to
leave your old home, you are to stay in
it as long as you live.
When Miss Martha told her how her
home had been secured to her. ahe
exclaimed. "1 never thought before
how Abraham must have felt when be
was ready to sacrifie» Isaac and the
Lord stayed his hand.'"
lt was Arthur who planned a house ]«f
warming for Miss Kboda on (.Tu-istmas |
I
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eve. The young men and young wi
I of the church and town filled her wood
shed with wood and coal, and her eup
i board-shelves with things needful for
the necessities of the body. The fatb
i ers and mothers Joined in the work of
j love, and there was never auch a
thorough house-wartnieg dune in thaï I jj,
j locality before. A new light came into ) rT
Miss Rhoda's face that Christatantide. I
j It was lovelight—she was not alone
; in the world any longer; she belonged
j to her good neighbors, and they be
j longed to her.
t jj P c hur<-h*belfr-r «n^hrtiirnieü*«*— i* 1 I
' " Mtrr on *«■'
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ing the people heard them with glad- i J
ness, and thanked the Lord that they *•
had been enabled to help return Mias 1
Rhoda s measure running over full I
j
(By James Rolfs Hapgood » j
•>v »
r f should w
ft tap at your old
f ; hum«- doer
j L,v© V On the Chnatmaa !
IriàmSâ nH - ,roi flg fait.
'A'lth a prew ot for
£ Sum rou M<1 » !M,r
fi f little «earn.
W'-'aM Say. wouldn't you
4-ert? Claire?
CHRISTMAS RAPPIMCS.
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If a boy ehouid rap at your J
)
On the CferirAfift» mb* j
ing fair—
. Your wandering boy, that you thought
if * babe should rap at your old heart
old home door
was lost—
Say, wouldn't you open, Claire?
door
On the Christmas morning fair.
j To giv# you a kiss or a bug or two,
j Say, wouldn't you open. Claire?
1
If a should rap at your old bttfigt
door^ ;
On the Christmas morning fair, !
give you a Son witb a heavenly
home.
Say, wouldn't you open, Claire? j
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bjf . frankl> tbo« who «nay
grieve or annoy you, by persuading
enemies to be reconciled to each other
and by daily prayer to God to pr^T,
the nations of the «trUtfrom the dead
ly horrors ot war. And you may in a
great many ways show good will to
men. Are there not poor people with
in a short walk of your own door who
will receive no Christmas cards,
nice presents of food or good clothing,
whose children have no nice toys or
picture books, of which some of you
hâve su«h an abundance that
scarcely know where to find room lor?
—Cbrittian Herald.
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Wh«l Make» a Happy Clirlalno
It doea not require much money, nor
Indeed any money, to make a happy
home circle on Christmas. The eblef
thing is a warm and merry heart. It
will devise v/aya and means for fill
ing the home with cheer, Joy and glad
ness. A little invention, a little ef
fort, and much love will give the day
a halo brighter than tinsel and gold.
Hod did not require extra material to
paint every tree and hush in all this
region a crystal whiteness the other
night. He used only a little moisture
and a little cold, and In the morning
men exclaimed In wonder, "What beau
ty!" 8o the simple things beautify
and glorify the home, and make holi
day« bright with Joys beyond the pur
chase o« money. Michigan Christian
Advocate,
In
Christmas gifts for thee,
Fair and free!
Freelous things from the heavenly
store
Filling thy casket more and more;
Holden love In divin, *t chain.
That never can be untwined again;
Silvery carols of Joy that swell
Sweetest of all In the heart's lone cell.
VKMSTIAfc
The art ot glass-blowing tef«w* the
lamp Is now curried on in the iii'jui
1'russlnu Museum ot Mechanical Arts
in tUe «um» uuuiuov U>
practiced by tbv aid X oMllMfii dunuc j
the most flourishing period of their |
TUt* fiuw»u* 9m uri r
jdus* i ml uh try
krt. Fr. Zttsmuuu af iMaia» mmnb
pies a routn toi the museum ui %
he produees from lus -took of fk um
tubes uf different strength and eotoir.
by liJowtog tbuse fine and deheate
drinking »esseis. carul-e». rases. *
as are seen in the numerous culte-ta
t> f U ui Venetian glass IMbr jo
acts of more «HH» dut«' are Is* ns man- |
ufactured again in Veuioe and Muta
no since SMM, when th»- industry w as |
revived In kaivtu' : and l*y the Rhen- ;
iah i .lass company «<f Ahfiujsue 1-1»' *
feid
These fact one* are opera-mig on v
large s«-aie and wit
ail the upjüt'ue-e« t
ojry cun i uruish JEJtsai
other hand » ork* » tlwff any *>
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ury
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not use et» >*ra
I ttattid fur su- h fan
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and imv» vje fit
V ni ted Ma'
and migi-'y thing»
bat afterr aflL iV
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gw*test **n » to»-»»
j amuiig a ptv^pb- w b
i»u »uje-r»' tvei»
been bum mi the
I stance. Hv» yuu H
i J #• eonnifier wane »if tlheur Wf
*• ^y ]rr»aa *#
1 * rfor ?**'^ **** ri **\ é""
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j we hate ruvesitiy ie-ar-i *
tjelief that if the
Chitijuae. wew tv 4
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unce. and »<eBld d.
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rtai* age. for as
*y that ti
ay fr^rn th»* fsm
uf the kitvc 4jie
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Harper « tt> wA Ta
4eatb
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kiguur Ardi'J. <iv well gi u,a
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bis lueiu'.ir* In I>o>4ua. A vjx.iig «be
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M ti>- **atj>rr «lid juv* kj. w e ; . : .
; j>- tuM hiv< it- m.»' b"
! ». jf kfatitified lefvr» be . re -.*»
any money.
But J do wa kuuw any L- V
j pro«e«rt>4 «b* »*»• al d-r-o-r
1 uu-uts and p . u-ot|j ,..j «
Î "**' you a"^d the''u*era. y ; ,g
: mau? - ' I
I "Krequeutly." and ilm r. I
am very f< ud of *-j -
^ ^ ^ i-»'" -
u«l t.ztv/r Ard; 1 ' tt»*d '»i ,g "i? b.s 1
h^l is- »urmd hto iau-k u;^ ;
tor ami la*« rigor.*u«ly «o m imag ery
or'to»wtra
ob - J« ex.lam^d «b» '-a»h:er a'
<**- "« know O e b.<k uf your 1^-d
^Zy to te „£££
without further *rU„Atr U*rvir$
Hound Table. '
j many an endet*» te teß» t» tte M 1
bad *j«b a b
w -
uy
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Now that •'b-ntlais have barte I tew
, . _ , ,
b» ptiotograph a »mg aa it «,!„** from ]
the singer's throat, it is hardly #<jr- *
prising to tear that ttey can wrigh a
man's though-«
'i hink of It! A »l- ta-tel man ></«.
il*g over and telling by «be d-ieate
ne» veBients of an iteltoator wtetter
you are studying bard on your «ext
history le««ou or only thiokhig <-alu<)y
t/f what you will have f,»r dinner
Hut-prising as It may «rem. a rna
ebiue lias teen inveuW by an Italian
srientlst named I'rof. Momm. wiii<h
will actually weigh thought* Ko <p
cute fa It In its e-uiistrin-tion that It w..|
tte difference of exert Ion
n> eded to read «»reek from that r*-«»i|ir
ed for I*tin, The nish of tie blood
I« the tend for various kinds of m< »•
ta I operations Is wlial tuins tie* wales,
the brain requiring more bl/iod for ,-i
dJfllcuit subject tlian forait easy one.
Nft»hl«« That W»l«k» Th*ssh,a
K„r K«« at « Parly.
When the fun at the party big«, »tort !
up und tell tiiow- pr-w-m, quite confi
dentially, that you can place a gl-i«» of '
water on the i.-ihh- *•> that no one <
remove It witliout Ufwiting a. t,
course everyone w ill say lh.it you can't
do It. U'ltliotlt waiting for i-tphua
lion*, fill it «In -K to Hie brim and cover
It. with a pie,e of paper which coic,-»
well over tint edges, tente
flat. I'lnce tte pal II of Ihe
it. and. by a quick mot
id,aide doivii D|wni tlx
the paper gently,
main in the glass, but i<
-un
the pit per
biinil over
.'•lit. turn it
ililu Wlil,draw
The wiih-r will re
one
, . il II re
move the nimbler without »pilPug p
With n Utile p, ii,lice, any l,oy oi'glij
can do «It!** lih-k very en«llj
"
L-lTO.
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SPRAINS O ^I' ^ncohH Oil the foil Vte
O it and promptly feel the cure.
».j *W. Init that is something rfttre.
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That'*
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W AS it your own baby or your
that drove tweet tkcp away?
I necettary. Cabaret* Oniy Cathi^
tweet to the tatte, mild but effective, ttop
I find colic In babict, and make P*r,
[ liver lively, tone hit inteatinet and puf»T
E * A Ï CASCARETS
Thev perfume the breath and m»ke fhinn A
«ovni. A, youf druggy', JOc, 25th. 5&u « ^
tor price. Address
sresLMo s sue or oompanv, eiaosoo «• s' 1 *
CANDY
cathart^
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