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Blackfoot news. (Blackfoot, Idaho) 1891-1902, March 13, 1901, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056017/1901-03-13/ed-1/seq-3/

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ICTO'RIA LEFT VAST ESTATE
2 S.OOO.OOO.
Worth fl 2 S.OOO.OOO.
Victoria was the Brat English
• Vfi had property
GUEEN
t >
lia w*" 1
All ber predecessors upon the
, yquestbsd their
debts, which parliament
oiled upon to pay.
Htcd the nation thus ta eel
f her uncles. King
successors ■
While the
9 perm
... lUbllltM
m IV. and Kin* w '* ,ltara ,v • *•»*
immediately after her
off In full the very !
contracted by her father,
I bis, the portioning
a well as some of I
i point
lioo to
. If bl»
liait of Kent
Wr iaugluei* "
déaugbters, who have in each |
from her a dowry of J
rying, and the settle- j
i union of some very I
of the prior« of '
pm
r«cfi*<u
AW o# ni»
I os one '
Si, tab 1111
a aif b
«.') " r >
***& ha i
« <!w a ■ '
■ Id lo have constituted :
heavy cap. tin » which
«-rn called upon lo meet t
d* tl the throne In 1M7. i
Uoé Lorjff 1'rix/y furor.
fis® thaï
ta sf a ci» -I liai am .»ling lu cioae
Of Ibia the
c forth h« wu
in re- !
fl.KW.wO a year
r portion was
I of royal expenditure.
'»signed to definite
But
devoted to wht
» ye
prit y pure« and
Set money, of which
ver asked.
the queen
■Ctaied her p
» »»
tth*b»d at her dlaposal the net
■oaf» of the duchy of Lancaster,
Lk-aldea
>unl *4
Urr •
n *n average t i
From thu it
J# • y**
* mr tl j* 'ft«*r having all th«
mon,
T
\IB
l
(I
EDWARD VII. NEW
or »very conceivable charac
r very *naitti<e and sort
del aved out of tue
d a »um of at Icaat
ar to dispose of and
*n to have ae; a«ld*
**»» to
■**:» wa*
JM »1,-1,
1 Ik» I, t
> h ttie f
* hen added up. repre
■ m of |3*i.tKW.000. and,
ilwied that the r*ve
»y of l^ncaaler are nil "
> ng. the net revenu»* c
• uK no li
compared with aioo.tw'.
year* ago and that,
queen's m* ni< have
only Invested, for the \
nd which ha* incre#s«'d _
in value during the la**
i- no exaggeration
c»cnt fortune
•c antircea alone es In
I of til'll 000,000
* Ccruort Left MillionJ.
»•ni la known to
1 1 gu
I it I*
v the
hs* Inert
hn „
than tw.ooo,
KkilSSi *
R*
|l
the
Soil JtadlJ
Ntt In la
* tetifold
t»otv,ry. n
dl« the I
to
»f h«i
T fr
th
rl
of
hit a
liequcuthing his entire
uecn, nlihough It was
to probate or officially
Luring the twenty-three
ei » 'lied between hla mar
death he had received
Kill» trenmiry an annuity |
a
lo the (J
* Mmlis. ,i
w .
'Ut tnt.
p um ),|
• 111» Ei
I'd! a
». bei
fort un
Mm al.
Li 4 * «uevii
!*!**•
which he had
of hi* own
hi.
which
it $20,000 a year mure,
husband, he had prac
'f of nny k | |l(1 to rocet ,
"■ ,e all defrayed, like those
■HD'stv. out of the assigned
hr* n> nf lll<> clvl * *'* 1, * n< * "
lisi 1 Wal1 Bhl ' t0 ***
is
i" l<-asl $100,000 a year
This j
The major
!** Ibis was moat Judiciously
8 ln lurid at South Kensington,
»I that time little else than
, «round, but which today I«
*lth the most coati y and luxu
«•Ion» in tendon and is worth
»he square foot than It
1 H»«rs The
•Otlt
_. big married
j, " art to $2.300,000.
life.
forty
H»«rs ag„ f 0 r the acre. The prograei.
SI
III
JLJ
H
ll
? ' - "
OF RESIDENCE.
,R castle, victoria*» principal pla( k
GUEEN VICTORIA. BORN
MAY 24, 1810; DIED JAIwAIIY 22, 1901.
I

ËSeSÎisD
|
J
j
I
'
:
t
i
!

m
&
«II
14
«
P
• *J

\k

\7
*
e •
AT
*
*11 -
!
' cd
]
|
1
by
KINO OF ENOLAND.
fortune bequeathed by the prince c* n
p-t(mated to have or
,ii dav the mini
sort to hie widow I
tue attained at ihe pr*
mum value of IS-VO
90.
Change.t in Emptrt.
The territorial gror
empire during the reigi
torta ha
n uf the British
nil "
c
the \
_
la**
In
to even greater
Before 183* *
mania
nies L
of Queen V.c
lu Asia !
lOUt.
i been prou
183Î and the territory of
hs. Tanjore, Imwi r
Satlaru. Jhansl and
c *cre brought under British di
mlnion. In the latter year all British
ndla was transferred from the British
,i ihe crown. And
« • i »
Sdnde of the
Bormnb. Nagi
East India comp.
»inre that
Shan states, Bclucbistan. Manipur and !
fhitral have b-sui ann xed Nor > must
mniiH v valufible ter
ipkon« be forgotten a* one
Purmah. the
l nnrr
«tnt*
to
h«i
the Utile but
en*
rl tory of H
of the acquisitions of the reign.
Asia to Auetraiasta.
have occurred.
•anelijg from
• chang
New South Wales and 'las
,nly organised colo
in that region and the r> st of the
•tlcaily un
Simc then New Zealand,
Qtr eus
was
great Islands
mar- known land.
victoria.
| a nd and West
a added to the mighty
which L
thi
w I n
; i
were
South Australasia.
Australia have
i .osier of Brit.ah
been
that
now dominate
FIJI, part of Bor
many
-iilonlcH
mure, quarter of the world,
prac- ami of New Guinea and
, „„„j, pr inland groups are now also to
those b( , ro iored with British red on
wor i d - * map.
the
F»tv Change* in West.
hemisphere
is
there
In the western
year
This j
major l'n < ' 8 ;
crn
tbc area
than '.">. n ada has, however,
I« Dominion tQ , he d | HC overy and
luxu- been aim»» 1 ^ oont | n ent. Finally.
worth annexatl ha(1 men suipemloui
It to Africa. *•" nK0 tlreat
The prograei. 8l*W y
in territorial
tow changes
nave been
the northwest
British title <» .
has been confirmed aud >
Guiana somewhat
development of
territory
of British
the
The
iured
xcept
No
Jueen
ile
oyal
nored

obeying
•vise
.trown
tood
elf
ly
own.
•■'ay,
was
iW
proceed,
a
To
one
with
means
all
act
■vhat
fcjl
her
If
made
eager
» -2
»
I
\
4
■ '■■j
(>
111
m
am
if
£
m
I;
N
hi
»V,
r -J
jt
A -
• L
* •.
QUEEN ALEXANDRA,
Britain owned Cape Colony and two
mere footholds.
these three-siore years she has acquir
cd in the southern part of the dark
continent the territories of Natal, Ba
sutoland, Bechuanalsnd. Zululand and
finally the vast territory administered
by the Britisli South Africa company, !
xtendlng north y», l*ake Tanganyika,
Tho recent acquisition of the Trans
or three other
In
!
!
'"V44.
•pii
M »n
«
m ■mssjgt 3
m
fU
£ -
i
n.i
"in 1
jj
filii
I '.J
|T|
i
U
y
'
If
VICTORIA'S PRIVATE DINING
State gives ,
!
vual ami the Orange V ree
absolute control of South Amca. |
the east she had practically taken
square*mIles'of "hinterland" extending
the Congo stale In the heart of Af- j
rlca and northward to the Egyptian
Soudan. In West Africa she secured
Imperial domain In the Niger coun
and In the north she has a tempo
rary control over Egypt, of which the
end no man can yet discern.
pire, compurod with
of Alexander, Trajan and
Solymnn seem Insignificant. At ttie
beglnntng of the reign the total popu
latlon of the British empire was about
127 500.000. Today It is 383,500,000, or
more thnn one-fifth of that of the
whole world. The area of the empira
Is now H 334.391 square miles. That !
ominl to nearly three times the area
of Europe, or to about one-tlfth the ;
land area of the globe. In the United j
Kingdom itself there were sixty years j
ago only lfi.000.000 inhabitants. Now |
(here are about 39,000.000. .
her
>
In
to
an
try
cm
It Is an
which those
is
Humored by Weacon*field.
Beacowsflalil Pie««*« 1 t he Que«» * n «»• 1
way by agreeing to call bar "Empress
it India." Hence her majesty permitted
ilm a freedom of address never en
iured from any other of her ministers,
xcept Lord Melbourne.
No sovereign was more successfully
.nanaged by a prime minister than was
Jueen Victoria by Lord Beaconsfield.
ile recognized fully the truth of the
oyal saying that ladles must be hu
nored and he pleased the queen by
He was
obeying all her little whims.
•vise enough, too, to cultivate John
.trown and to place himself in the
tood graces of that worthy servitor.
If
Let's
The
And
That
And
And
And
Gladstone could never forget blm
elf or fail to hint*, If be did not clear
ly show, that he had a mind of his
He always was masterful In his
own.
•■'ay, and never hesitated on occasion
suggest to the queen that his way
was tiie best—often the only way—to
proceed,
a favorite with her majesty.
Hence Gladstone was never
Ituti*ted on funty.
To obtain purity In her court was
one object which the queen sought
with strenuous vigilance. By some
means she learned the peccadilloes of :
all personages likely to come into con- j
act with her, and when justified aho
nesltated not a moment, no matter
■vhat their power, to exclude them from ! If
i Till
And
. And
So
her favor.
If an author, a painter or a musician
made a stir in the world she was as
eager to know all about him as any j
to
a
j
1
I
in
»V,
V
«Alj
i
- V.
!
j is
] to
I
in
* •.
!
O
]
i
j
!
!
CONSORT OF EDWARD VII.
two
dark
Ba
and
! ment for an Important office. The rea
son for her refusal was that the ap
potntment would bring the man Into
diligent reader of the popular praw. ;
There was not a prominent politician !
whose relations with his family were j
not fairly well known to her.
long ago she refused to sanction the
appointment of a very able man who
had been recommended by the govern
In
Not
'fm
/i&J
'
!
i
i
i
j
V
g§g
J*#
M »n
w 2®
'.J
U
IS
j t
DINING ROOM AT OSBORNE HOUilE.
gives , personal relations with her, and tm
! result would be uncomfortable for hint
because she would not receive his wlf*
For obvious reasons It was necessary
Amca. |
taken
for her to be more charitable regarg
Af- j Ing the foibles of the Prince of Wal«,
secured
coun- Here are a few of the moat lmpor
tempo- ^ eV enta tn the late Queen Victor
the )g , g B orn a t Kensington Palace
Majr 24, isi9 ; ascends the throne June
with 2 o, 1837; married to Prince Albert o!
and Saxe _c 0 berg-Gotha Feb. 10, 1840; first
ttie dallR hter. Empress Frederick of Ger
popu- many> bo rn Nov. 21, 1840; first son,
about Prlnce ot Wales, born Nov. 9 1841;
or deat i, 0 [ the Prince Consort Dec. 14
the lg6 t ; proclaimed empress of India May
empira j 1S75 . oe |r,brates her golden Jubile»
That ! )une 2 o, 1887; celebrates her diamoni
area j ubllee Junp 2 0, 1897.
the ; -
United j There Is now before the Missouri
years j legislature a bill providing for a monu
Now | m ent to Thomas H. Benton. Govern*»
. Dockery, the mayor of St. Louis nud
three others, to be chosen by th® »»v
»rnor will form a commission tf kava
Victoria'* Life m Hri%f.
«»• 1 «be matter In charge.
1
¥
the
to
her
west
in
to
would
of
man
ask
prove
the
Then
tain
man
wheel
did
which
not
would
ans
man
either
he
the
Mr.
er
his
«••VI
4
J
AVÎV»;
It Living la Hnt Warft!
If living is but warfare, a fierce and
vast campaign,
Let's be good soldiers in our day, the
kind that don't complain;
The cheerful breed that on the march
so steady strides along.
And gathers 'round the bivouac of
night with heartening song;
That bears the brunt of battle as
bravely as may be.
And cultivates a laughing eye, the
brighter side to see;
And self-respect's a steadfast mark to
guide your marching by.
And the world loves its good soldiers,
that bear them straight and high.
,, , , , . ... . „
If Ilvin « 18 but warfare, lets make it
splendid war,
Till of some noble purpose tells each
honorable scar;
And vanquishment shall only mean a
worthy deed deferred;
And victory's cry as that of night tri
umphant shall be heard;
So glorious that when the grand Te
Drum strains arise
God's angels shall lift up the chant and
choir it through the skies.
And the trumpets of archangels shall
sound the proud release
That signals to good soldiers God's ul
timate of peace!
—Ripley D Saunders, in St. Louis Re
public.
and
will,
the
of
has
the
Life In American Arn$T«
The chances are that when "rooky"
enlisted he intended nothing more than
to serve out his three years' time. In
a good many cases this is all he does
serve. Yet it is a notable fact that the
recruit who becomes the best soldier j
land
almost invariably elects to remain
with the army for life. In addition to j der
the inducements of good pay and am- j
pie provision for life, the enlisted man |
in our American army has ahead of j
is
ons
him a great prize for which to strive.
By sticking closely to duty it is fairly
easy for him to become a corporal,
A man,
and* after that a sergeant,
holding the grade of either of these
non-commissioned officers may, if he
! convinces his officers that his service
j is "meritorious," apply for permission J
] to be examined for a commission.
I must pass a stiff mental examination, j
but a fairly well educated young man
can, with the time he finds for study
in the army, gradually fit himself for
such a test. He must serve in the army
two years before he can try for a com
Then, if he is ordered up
He I
as
in
mission.
for examination and passes, he can be
] come a second lieutenant. The meri
i torious non-commissioned officer has
j the first chance after all of the current
! year's graduates from West Point have
! been given commissions. At present a
large number of young men are being
appointed annually from the ranks to d
commissions, and some of the best of- g
ficers in our army have so risen. And ,
once the enlisted man progresses to a
lieutenancy the whole scale of promo- p
tion is open to him. He can rise, if
fortune favors him, to the command of
All in ai , tiere aie ew
satisfactory careers in the conn
;
j
;
!
j
;
!
j
th° army.
more
try than that which opens up before
' Jones when he 6igns his name to the
! rolls. He is likely to do much better I
than in civil life. He has always a j
i strong government at his back, and one
i that looks well after him. To be sure
i the discipline is strict, but the man
j who cannot submit to discipline is
worth very little in auy walk of life.
A large percentage of the higher rank
ing officers in our army can look back
to the days when they wore the prl
Thc danger of being
vate's uniform,
killed in army service? Statistics show
that the chance is not a very great one
and of course the man who values his
life above all else would be worse than
He is not want
useless in the army,
ed, and will be sorry that he ever en
tered the service.—H. Irving Hancock
in Leslie's Weekly.
Able Seaman Wee».
There are times when names may
even
lead to serious consequences,
though Shakespeare did ask, "What a
in a name?"
Neptune line steamer Runo has
dellbly impressed upon ills memory a
that he will ever consider has
element of danger In It.
down the coast on October 31. bound
from Rotterdam for Baltimore, all
hands, except the man at the wheel,
were engaged burnishing up the bright
work about the decks to have the Runo
look attractive when she reached Bal
timore. On the forecastle was a man
named West, who was wanted to join
the brass polishers aft. The Runo at
the time was steaming her best on a
course southwest by west. Cape Charles
lightship bearing on the
bow. The second officer had left th®
bridge and Captain Evans took the
deck during hie absence,
that the man West was wanted Captain
"West!" and went
Capt. Tom Evans of the
o!
14
nud
»»v
kava
ln
name
Coming
an
starboard
Learning
Evans shouted
down to the lower bridge. It appeared
to him to be but a few minutes when
over the side and to hie
he looked
borror alscov'-ed that the Runo had
Cape OhArles lightship and Hog Island
In h r port bow. Such a position was
inconceivable to him. and be rushed to
the bridge and ordered the wheelmata
to change the course as speedily M
possible to almost east. Satisfied with
her safe position, the southwest-by
west course was again resumed. Then
Captain Evans demanded of the
in no uncertain language why he dared
to change the vessel's course, which
would have run her on the low shores
of Virginia within a short time. The
man was surprised that the man should
ask such a question, which did not Im
prove Captain Tom's humor after hla
recoverey from a scare. The man said
the captain changed the course himself.
Then came the revelation. When Cap
tain Evans Bhouted "West!" to th®
man In the forecastle the man at th®
wheel took it as an order from th®
master to change the course, and h®
did so by bringing her up three points,
which put the bow directly inshore and
steaming at a good speed for the dan
gerous shoals ofT the coast It would
not have been long before bottom
would have been found. Captain Ev
ans says he will never have another
man In his crew
either North, South, East or West. If
he finds one that man must respond to
the name of Smith, Jones or Brown.
Mr. South is chief officer of the steam
er Ohio, of the same fleet as Runo, but
his position requires others to place a
handle before his name, which pre
cludes the danger of the man at th®
wheel changing the
South."
man
and
the
of
as
the
to

it
each
a
tri
Te
and
shall
ul
Re
who is known as
course "Mr.
New UriiUh Artitlerv.
The rearming of the British artillery
and the replenishing of the stores of
ammunition and other war material
will, it is stated, necessitate a vote at
the next session of the British parlia
ment of from forty to sixty millions
of dollars. A good deal of this money
has been already spent or anticipated,
the Krupp works in Germany being
employed on an order for fifteen bat
teries of quick firers, and large orders
have been placed in the hands of
than
In
does
the
soldier j Messrs. Vickers, Sons & Maxim in Eng
land for guns and mountings. One or
to j der is for forty-two of the 4.1-inch
am- j guns that are reported to have proved
man | very serviceable in the South African
of j war, and another is for thirty-five
howitzer batteries with the wagons,
limbers and carriages. The same firm
is also at work on the mountings for
twenty-seven garrison battery 9.2-inch
guns of the Vickers type, one of the
most powerful and destructive weap
ons in either the British land or sea
strive.
fairly
man,
these
he
service
J service. As the orders for these orna
j parliament, the necessity
man must be very urgent. The dispatch of
study arms and ammunition to India for the
for
army
com
up
He I ments were given without reference to
for them
rearmament of the British garrisons
there and the transfer of the discarded
rifles to the native regiments proceeds
as rapidly as the arms arrive. Arrange
ments for making smokeless powder
and other war materials have also been
made, the establishments being located
in central India.—New York Sun.
be
meri
has
current
have
a Honoring u*n<i Hero»»,
being g a ilormen are receiving honors these
to d g in E Urope Oporto, Portugal,
of- g monument to Prince He nry. the navl
And , f recenUy unve üed. The king
to a an(J were presen t, and a small
promo- p ortuguese squadron , a Spanish bat
if tleghi and the E ng )i s h cruiser Pacto
of lug entered thg por , tQ salute the sov .
ew ereigns. The French have recently hon
conn- oreJ their dggd fiaüor aQd s0]dier pa .
; triots with two statues, one of which
was dedicated at Port Said, Egypt, on
Oct. 28. It is in bronze and represents
an officer pressing close to his body
the beloved tricolor. The officers and
men of the Cassard took part in the
consular auspices. Ai Brest, France,
ceremonies, which were held under
j the soldiers and sailors of Brittany
were remembered with a shaft erected
; to commemorate their services for
! Wreir country, which was officially in
j augurated on Nov. 1 by the minister of
war in the presence of a large con
course. A Russian battleship visited
the port for the occasion.
before
the
better I
a j
one
sure
man
is
life.
rank
back
prl
being
show
one
his
than
want
en
Hancock
Nucleus of Modern Fleet
The receent arrival of the Albany on
the Asiatic station places at the dis
posal of the cominander-in-chief a sec
ond vessel capable of maintaining her
efficiency at sea for an indefinite pe
riod, the Albany being one of the for
tunate few of those ships in our navy
provided with a sheathed wetted sur
face. The New Orleans and the Albany
form the nucleus if a really modern
fleet of sheathed vessels under the stars
and stripes, and it is perhaps not put
ting it too strongly to assert that these
two ships are as valuable for the pa
trol service as any three of the un
sheathed vessels with naked bottoms.
may
even
"What a
a
has
bound
all
wheel,
bright
Runo
Bal
man
join
at
on a
Charles
th®
the
Captain
went
the
ln
Coming
Pott-Gradnat* Coin» In German Army.
An Important part of the work of
the general staff of the German army
is that of instruction in the Krtegs
Akademie, an institution that date*
from the time of General Scharnhorst
and the reorganization In 1806. It 1«
a school for the higher instruction ot
officers. No student is admitted until
he has served from three to five years
in command of troops, and then only
after he bas passed a thorough and
searching examination aa to mental
and mo"al qualifications. The cours®
of stud»' lasts three years, and gradu
ates either go back to active service, or
may at once be received as members ol
the general staff.
starboard
Learning
appeared
when
hie
had
Island
was
to

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