OCR Interpretation


Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, September 21, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1912-09-21/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Colonel Roosevelt Tells of Mis First Buffalo Hunt in Sunday's Paper
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
TH* RESULTS
Of Want Advertising
come quickly.
THE WEATHER.
mir tonight and Sun
day. Probable frost to
night.
Vol. XXIX
EIGHT PAGES
BOISE, IDAHO, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,1912.
No. 68
F
GO BACK TO
ON
Prepared to Prevent Non-Union Men
Being Put to Work in Mines
of Utah Copper Co.
Bingham, Utah, Sept. 21.—Three hundred strikers re
appeared this morning in the fortitication on the moun
tain side from which firing was done toward the Utah
Copper mine on the first days of the miners' strike here.
The men are supposed to be part of the force which
came down from the rocks to hear the address of the gov
ernor Thursday. The fortress was deserted yesterday. It
is believed the reoccupation is due to predictions that non
union men would be put to work in Utah Copper today.
Superintendent .lackling denied this. More deputy
6heriffs were sent out on the Bingham & Garfield railroad
[this morning to strengthen the patrol and prevent damage
(to the line in case strikebreakers were shipped in. No
ifiring occurred since last night although the strikers re
tain all their weapons.
Assistant Manager îî. C. Gemmell, of the Utah Cop
per company, arrived here this morning and General Man
ager ,lackling is due later today for a conference of mine
officials and members of the sheriff's posse. It is reported
plans for putting strike breakers to work will be discussed.
COUNTRY BANKS
MUST KEEP CLOSE
TAB ON ASSETS
Important Ruling Is Made
by the Comptroller of Cur
rency — Instructions for
the Examiners.
New York, Sept. 21.—A ruling of
great interest to the country banks
IwaB laid down today by Comptroller
ef the Currency Murray In an address
to a gathering of national hank ex
aminers. After Oct. 1, he said, he de
■tred that at the examination of all
country banks, the hoards of directors
!>• convened and an examination of
the assets made In their presence. Ex
aminers are cautioned to Inquire very
rarefully Into any undue concentra
tion of the loans or the batik In com
panies controlled by the banks' offl
tera or directors.
STREET CAR SERVICE
IS BADLY CRIPPLED
Duluth, Minn,, Sept. 21.—Street rar
Service was confused today as a result
ttf the strike. Cars were run with
out headlights and some took sudden
turns up avenues not marked on the
Blgnboards. Others were Padly off
schedule. Aside from attacks by boys
with sling shots on the strikebreak
ers and the beating of one motorraan,
the situation Is quiet.
• • • • •
THE
• ••••••
8UNDAY CAPITAL
NEW8.
The Sunday Capita! News to
morrow will be brim full of ex
cellent features. Colonel Koose
velt's own story of his African
hunting expedition la proving
to be a story of Intense Interest,
not only because of the atory
Itself, but because of the au
thor's Inimitable style. This,
la the most authentic reporl of
the expedition that has ever
been written. -
Frank a. Carpenter has as his
subject "The Mountain Capital
of Costa Rica." Ragea will be
devoted to fall fashions and
other themes dear to the hearts
of women readers. Correspond
ents at the capitals of Europe
will tell all the news of the old
world, political and otherwise.
In the news department the
Sunday Capital News is un
rivalled In Idaho. Its tele
graphic service is the most com
plete received in the state, and
the local field !b thoroughly cov
ered. The political news of the
day, both local and general, Is
told without partisan bias.
BODIES LEFT IN
STREETS BY THE
MEXICAN REBELS
Terrible Conditions Re
ported at Ojinaga by Peo
ple Returning From That
Place.
Marfa, Texas. Sept. 21.—People re
turning from Ojinaga. where the féd
érais were defeated Sunday, saw as i
many as 15 bodies of Mexicans lying I
In the streets as late as Thursday. |
Rebels Near Ague Prieta.
Douglas, Sept. 21.—A force of 1700
rebels Is within striking distance of
Agua Prieta. The rebels were reported
last night at Cenesas Springs, 12 miles
southeast of the town. Rojas, the rebel
leader, sent word to the federal com
mander that he expected to have a
force of 2400 men and that he would
take Agua Prieta within a few days.
In tho battle with Salazar's rebels
Thursday, Colonel Obregon took pris
oner Major Benjamin Aranda, who
served under Madero in the revolution
last year. Under the suspension of
guarantees he and the other prisoners
may be executed. Complete details of
the fight at the San Joaquin ranch
transmitted In the official report of
Colonel Obregon show that the first
battle was the most Important fought
since the rebels moved Into Sonora
from Chihuahua. Obregon reported
that he attacked Salazar's force of 550
rebels with a force of 11 officers and 181
men. including 25 rurales, and the re
mainder Yaquts. They fought from 3
p. m. until dark, when the rebels were
driven to the btlls after a fierce hand
to-hand fight. Early yesterday Salazar
attacked the fédérais, but was re
pulsed and 11 prisoners were left In the
fédérais* hands. Including a woman,
reputed to be Salazar's wife.
Salazar's rebels are reported to havs
burned a bridge on tho Nacozarl rail
road, 15 miles south of Agua Prieta, at
the same time cutting the telegraph
wires.
Orozooo la Located.
El Paso, Tex., Sept. 21.—Reports of
a skirmish between the rebels led by
Orozco and the fédérais defending
Ranch Coahulla, on the Chihuahua
state line, indicated today the course
being followed by the rebel comman
der-in-chief.
BRIDE IS ARRESTED
ON MURDER CHARGE
Danville, Ky., Sept. 21,—Mrs. Helen
Williams I^ane, a bride of three monthe,
was arrested today, charged with kill
ing her husband at her home last night.
Lane was shot twice. Lane was 80 and
his brid; is Mb
SPEEDY TRIAL FOR VIRGINIA OUTLAWS
IMPLICATED IN HILLSVILLE MURDEI
21
a
Wesley Edwarde and Stdna At lea.
Roanoke, Va, Sept. 21.—Stern Vir
ginia Justice will soon bring to trial
Sldna Allen and Wesley Edwards, the
last of the Allen-Edwards gang Impli
cated In tho assassination of Judge
Thornton I* Massle and two others at
Hlllsvllle on March 14 last. The men
are In Jail here awaiting trial.
Tho Allen-Edward.t gang. 11 will he
recalled, murdered Judge Massle, At
torney Foster and Sheriff Webb at the
Hlllsvllle courthouse shortly aftor the
sentencing to one year's Imprisonment
of Floyd Allen by Judge Massle Mem.
OPERATORS OBJECT
TO INTERFERENCE
FROM OUTSIDE STATE
Charleston, W. Va., Sept. 21—Inter
national officers of the United Mine
Workers, assembled hero to confer
with Governor Glasscock, repre
sentatives of commercial bodies and
the coal operators concerning the trou
bles that called 1200 militiamen into
the field and placed a large area un
der martial law, declared disappoint
ment over plans for the meeting, it.
was stated today that the strike In the
Kanawha coal field would not he per
mitted to enter the discussion as the
operators objected lo the Interference
of persons outside the state.
ANOTHER ARREST IN
SNEAD CASE IS MADE
Amarillo, Tex., Sept. 21.—In the
arrest of B. B. hipping, a farmer on the
Snead ranch near Paducah, Tex., the
police believe thej have the mysteri
ous confederate of John B. Snead In
his concealment for a week near the ■
scene of the killing of Al G. Boyce, Jr. j
Epplng was Identified by the owner ofi
the house In which Snead Is said to
have been concealed, ns the man who
rented it. According to District At
torney Bishop, Epplng admits having
been In Amarillo with Snead, but de
nies any knowledge of the plan to
kill Boyce.
SYMPATHY FOR THE
CHURCH OF PORTUGAL
Boston, Sept. 21.—In the name of the
Roman Catholics of the United States.
American Cardinals O'Connell. Gibbons
and Farley sent a memorial to tho arch
bishop of London offering sympathy to
the Portuguese church, it ssys In part;
"In the great republic of the United
States where the Catholic church ful
fills Its mission, It Is Inevitable that
great sorrow will be caused by the per
secution to which Catholicism Is con
demned In Portugal."
GOVERNOR WILSON
PLEASED WITH TRIP
Harrisburg, Pm, Sept. 21.—Governor
Wilson, traveling home today from his
first real campaign trip Bince his nomi
nation, said: "It la hard for me to
view the trip objectively. What Inter
ested me most was the frlondllnesa of
the people toward me and the friendly
look In their faces. I observed espe
cially that the plainest fellows were
the most cordial. They seemed to feel
that there waa no offishness, and I
was accessible to them all."
WOMEN EXCUSED
FROM TESTIFYING
Washington, Sept 21.—The widow
of Edward H&rrtman and Miss Bllaa,
daughter of the late Cornelius Bllaa,
will be excused from testifying before
the committee on campaign expendi
tures, having agreed to supply all doc
uments In the effects of the dece
dent»
women and children were shot In the
pursuit of the outlaws, who knew all
the dense forests cover and other hid
ing places In the mountains.
Floyd Allen and Claude Allen have
been tried and sentenced to death, and
Freel Allen and Sldna Edwards have
been given long terms In prison. Vic
tor Allen has been acquitted.
Sldna Allen and Wesley Edwards
express confidence that they also will
be acquitted. Some of the best legal
talent in Virginia will be retained In
their behalf.
OIL HELD IS
DISCOVERED NEARTO
THE PANAMA CANAL
New Orleans, Sept. 21.—What prom
ises to be a wonderfully rich oil Held
with latent possibilities of solving the
fuel problem of the Panama canal, Is
reported to have been discovered lit
Colombian territory not more than a
day's Journey from tho eanal. A Ger
man discovered the land and American
capitalists are investigating.
I
I
HAINES DISCUSSES
CAMPAIGN ISSUES
(Capital News Special Service)
Rexburg, Sept. 21.—John M.
Haines. Republican nominee for
governor, opened his whirlwind
campaign for election with a
speech setting forth his views
upon the issues of tho campaign
and describing in detail the
business administration that he
will give the state as a success
ful and progressive business
man of the state, If he Is elected.
Mr. Haines' speech, taken down
in its entirety at the time, Is
verbatim in full as follows:
"Ladies and gentlemen—I'm
not going to take up more than
one whole minute of your time.
I will give way to our matchless
senator who will address you.
To close 1 want to ask you to
take your tax receipt with you
when you cast your ballot. Take
a good look at It before you vote
for governor."
I
!
:
I
'
!
I
GRAND JURY RETURNS
SECRET INDICTMENT
Boston, Sept. 21.—A secret indict
ment was returned today by the Suf
folk county grand Jury investigating
tho alleged illegal distribution of
dynamite In Lawrence during the tex
tile strike.
[ Al» Martiw J
4
Uncle Ez Pash wants t' know If
Governor Wilson la any relation t'
Wheeler an' Wilson that wuz defeated
In 1278. It muat be a great surprise
F some o' th' political floppers F
read how prominent they've allua been.
I
I
i
j
;
!
1
J
COLONEL OPENS
BATTLE IN
Cites Result of Nebras
ka Primaries as
Example
itineraryTör trip
IS BADLY TANGLED
Colonel Roosevelt Says the
Tail Objects to Being
Wagged by the Dog
Gives a Little Sermon on
Subject of "Irregularity."
Kansas City, Kan., Sept. 21.—"The
tall said It was Irregular for the dog
to wag It." said Roosevelt today of the
statement that the Progressives had
bolterl the Republican party. "In Ne
braska, for instance, at the primaries
last spring Taft polled about one-sixth
of tho Republican votes, yet our oppo
nents called themselves regular and 83
or 84 per cent of the voters bolters."
Roosevelt came Into Kansas to re
main two days, campaigning today and
resting tomorrow. He did not know
where he was going for Ids itinerary Is
tangled up and no one in tho party
knew how to straighten it out.
DEMOCRATS INDORSE
NUGENT FOR SENATOR
(Capital News Special Service.)
Rexburg, Sept. 21—The Democratic
andidates in Fremont county at a
meeting held here this week amidst
great enthusiasm indorsed the can
didscy of John F. Nugent of Boise for
the United States senate and tho logis
lative candidates pledged themselves to
vote for him for that position In ease
of their election. There was no op
position to this program except on the!
part of Senator Poole who attempted
to stem the Nugent tide in favor of'
I Hawley for the seriate.
INDICTMENTS FOR
OPIUM SMUGGLING
San Francisco, Sept. 21.—Robert
Donaldsen, assistant superintendent of
navigation of the Pacific Mall Steam
ship company, and Henry Gallagher, I
United States customs inspector in-,
dieted late yesterday by a federal grand
Jury on a charge of complicity In an
opium smuggling conspiracy in which.
It Is said, many other men are impli
cated.
The Indictments were bated upon the
testimony of David Powers and Emil
Fiedler, who were arrested Ir. Oakland
Dec. 13, 1911, with several hundred tins
of contraband opium In their pos
sessstnn. Powers and Fiedler served
four and six months, respectively. In
the Alan/eda county Jr.l .
The supposed connection of Don
aldsen and Gallagher with the smug
gling plot first was revealed through
the interception by government of
ficials. of a letter given by Fiedler,
while In Jail, to a discharged prisoner.
The letter implicated both men and
eventually reached Lieutenant of Cus
toms Joseph Head.
Chicago Nationals Finad.
Chicago, Sept. 21.—For permitting
the baseball park to become over
crowded during the recent series with
New York, the Chicago Nationals were
fined <600 today. The charge was filed
by the fire prevention bureau. Tickets
were sold exceeding tho seating ca- 1
parity and aisles were blocked by
spectators.
Former Utah Justice Dead.
Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 21.—Stephen
B. Twlss, formerly federal court Justice
of Utah, died today of a lingering Ill
ness, aged 85. Twlss was appointed
territorial Justice by President Hayes
and retired In 1885. His interpretation
of the Edmunds law against polygamy
attracted widespread notice.
Vanderbilt Race Poatpenad,
Wauwatosa, Wla., Sept. 21.—Owing
to continued rain the officials of the
race meet decided this morning to
postpone the running of the Vanderbilt
cup race, scheduled for today. A con
ference was called to discuss another
date for the race.
Chicago Wheat Market.
Chicago, Sept. 21.—September wheat
closed today at 90ttc.
n
[EBELS FIRE ON
NAVAL FORCES OF
UNITED STATES
American Marines Have
Been Engaged in Fighting
in Nicaragua — Delayed
Reports Are Received.
No Uneasiness Felt.
Washington, Sept. 21.—Early
dispatches to the state depart
ment brought no news of Ad
miral Southerland and the ma
rines, believed to have fought a
battlo with revolutionists who
sought to delay their march to
Granada. Officials are puzzled
at the difficulty In communica
tion. No uneasiness Is felt for
the safety of the United States
forces.
Managua, Sept. 20—(Delayed)—
Three American marines were slight
ly wounded by insurgon bullets fired
at Major Butler's battalion as the
train bearing bluejackets and marines
was passing through Masaya Thurs
day night for the purpose of opening
up the railroad to Granada. The
American force, arriving at Granada
today, found the population on the
verge of starvation.
Washington. Sept. 21.—Severe fight
ing between American naval forces and
Nicaraguan revolutionists is believed
to have occurred In the last few days
near Barranca, although reports from
the scene are so meager that officials
here have no definite idea of what has
happened.
Rear Admiral Southerland Is In the
field, probably with upward of 2000 men,
and If plans have not miscarried by
this time he has cleared the route of
the National railway of opposing rebels
and relieved the famine threatened city
of Granada.
European attention to affairs In Nic
aragua at this time Is believed to hi'
one of the possibilities. The Washing
ton government Is sending relief to the
beleaguered city, Granada, populated
by many foreigners, and hoped to avoid
any pretext for landing European mil
itary or naval forces on Central Amer
ican soil.
The British consul general at Ma
nagua and the British vice consul at
Matagalpa have reported two British
subjects murdered by the rebels at
Aehuapa. It is expected, however, that
the British government before taking
action on its own account will await the
result of the American campaign.
A delayed telegram from Admiral
Southerland, dated Managua, Septem
ber IT, and reporting that American
bluejackets and marines were fired
upon as they attempted to open the
railway, reached the navy department
yesterday. Delayed reports said the
Granada relief party had been fired
upon last Sunday; that tho officer in
command had halted and sent to Ma
nagua for reinforcements, and that Ad
miral Southerland had gono to the res
cue with two companies of marines and
a detachment of sailors.
Whether there was more firing from
the rebels before the additional Ameri
can force arrived is not known, but It
Is possible the brush referred to In the
dispatch received yesterday was the
one that took place Sunday.
Upon his arrival at Barranca, Ad
miral Southerland sent word to General
Zeledon, a rebel leader, that he pro
posed to open the railroad to Granada,
and to keep It open, and that he would
give the rebels 24 hours to clear the
front.
While Zeledon hesitated. General
Mena, former secretary of war of Nic
aragua and the principal leader In the
revolution, came northward from Gra
nada with another large force of rebels
and Joined him. After a consultation
they sent a formal defiance to Admiral
Southerland, announcing their purpose
to oppose his advance.
It Is not known exactly how many
sailors or marines composed the ad
miral's force at that time, but It Is be
lieved It did not exceed 30ft or 400 men.
At any rate. In view of the large num
bers of rebels In his front, and unwill
ing to run the risk of temporary defeat,
the admiral called for reinforcements
from Managua, where It Is believed
there were still about 1500 sailors ami
marines available. That was the situ
ation when the last cablegram was dis
patched from Managua, three days ago.
O'NEIL TAKEN TO
KOOTENAI COUNTY
Wallace, Kept. 21.— B. F. O'Neil,
who Is to be tried In the Kootenai
county courts on charges In connec
tion with the failure of the State Hank
of Commerce, was taken from Wallace
to be placed In the custody of officials
lu Coeur d'Alene yesterday. Sheriff
Michael J. Maher had charge of O'Neil.
His departure from Wallace was quite
a contrast to his arrival here some
months ago. when state officers
brought him back to his home town
from Canada. Then he was received
like a hero and was everywhere greeted
by a crowd of former acquaintances.
When he went to the train yesterday
there were practically no acquaint
ances on hand to bid him farewell.
RESENT TRICK
PLATED ON
BORAH
Friends of Borah In
dignant Over Action
of Committee
ITRY TO MAKE BORAH
PULL HAINES THROUGH
Plan Is Arranged Without
Knowledge or Consent of
Senator, Who Is, Evident
ly With Design, Placed in
Embarrassing Position.
Friends of Senator Borah have been
unable to restrain themselves or to
conceal their displeasure at tho trick
turned upon the senator by tho Re
publican state central committee In
sending John M. Haines, the Repub
lican nominee for trover nor, to cam
paign with Senator Rorah, without the
request or knowledge of the senator,
ns they believe»
They point to the fact that 1t lias
been known all along that It was t •
desire of Senator Borah to conduct
his own campaign and to make Ills own
Itinerary. The state committee, how
ever, demanded the right to pre|>are
Ills schedule and Senator Borah, so It
is understood, out of deference to
them, gave his consent. It was first
arranged that lie should go to Fourn il
and Meadows and word to his friends
there was sent out to that effect.
Without consulting him and without
his knowledge this vas changed and
he was routed from Parma where lm
went to speak, to go to T,eadore and
Salmon in Romlii county, and then to
Puster and Mnckay, in Puster county.
The dates were so arranged that the
senator could not possibly make tho
necessary connections and ho was
forced to return to Boise and get mat
ters straightened out. Tie was then
sent to Glenns Ferry with the under
standing that he wa* to go from there
to Mountain Home and then to Bm
neau, In Owyhee county, and then re
turn to Roise. when a schedule was
to be agreed upon that would accom
modate him.
Standpatters Active.
Again chaos was brought about and
tho Mountain Home and Rruneau
meetings were called off and the sen
ator sent to Rexburg ostensibly be
cause the county fair was In session,
but as It now appears for the purpose
of giving tho standpnt Republican
leaders of that section an opportunity
to demand that he come squarely out
for Taft and In support of Haines.
Among the leaders who made such de
mand upon him were National Fom
(Contlnued on Page Two)
MONOPLANE FALLS
AND TWO OFFICERS
INSTANTLY KILLED
Freiburg, Germany, Sept. SI.—^Two
German military officers wore killed
while flying near hero today. The
monoplane, piloted by lieutenant Ber
ger, earning I Jen tenant Junghans as
passenger from rhemnitz to Berlin,
while passing over this city suddenly
plunged from a high elevation, the
airmen being instantly killed and the
monoplane smashed to bits.
CHARGES XgAINST
FOREIGN MINISTER
Ulna, Peru, Sept. 21.—Serious
charges were made against Foreign
Minister Martinez, during a discussion
of tho Putumayo rubber outrages in
the chamber of deputies last night.
The minister was without a defender.
The belief is general that the govern
ment will publish a statement explain
ing the measures taken to stop atroci
ties and also showing the present con
dition of Indians in the rubber regions.
• • «
• • •
• • • •
I:
CRISIS IN SAN DOMINGO
THOUGHT TO BE PASSED
Washington, Sept. 21.—The
danger of more revolution In
San Domingo is thought to he
passed. The gunboat petrel,
v) Ich has been watching events
in the troubled zone, left Guan
tanamo yesterday for New
York.

xml | txt