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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, September 21, 1912, Image 4

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EVENING : CAPITAL : NEWS
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER.
MEMBER OF THE AS80CIATE0 PRESS
Published Every Afternoon and Sunday Morning at Boten. Idaho, a
36,0*0 People by
THE CAPITAL. NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY. LIMITED.
City ot
RICHARD 8TORV 8HERIDAN.
Entered at the Poet Office at Boise. Idaho, aa Seoond-dasa Mall Matter.
Phones—Business Office, 234; Kdltorlal Room«, *34; Society Editor. 1201-J.
BOISE, IDAHO, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1912.
PAYMENT.
Oh, Charles Adolphus, go your way, and paint the town from day
to day. until you've had your till; but every foolish act, gadsooks, Is
charged against you in the books, and you must pay the bill. One
thing Is suro ns death or tax, which Is that retribution whacks each
erring mortal jay; long years may pass, already yet, before you're
culled to pay the debt, but some time you must pay. Go, rake In wealth
with greedy paws, and violate all moral laws, and cheat and swindle
still; but somo day—maybe when you're old, and love seems better far
thun gold—you'll have to pay tho bill. Oh, loafer, loaf the hours away,
and waste tho golden summer day, refuse to toll or till! When winter
comes and workers rest In cozy homes, of ease possessed, you'll have to
pay the hill! Oh maidens, radiant and fair, who use peroxide on your
hair, and kalsomlno your cheeks; who twist your systems all awry
until the gods look down and sigh, "Oh. pipe tho dizzy«freaks!" With
all your paint and furbelows, and shoes that crush your aching toes,
you're surely out to kill; but when the glow of youth Is past, and ago
comes creeping on at last, you'll have to pay the bill. Each foolish
action that we do, each wicked course that wo pursue, we settle for
some day; tho captain's office open stands, where we must face this
world's demands, and some
time we must pay.
Copyright, 1912 by Geurge Matthew Adam».
FOR CAPTAIN DAVIS TO ANSWER.
Captain Davis, secretary of the Republican state cen
tral committee, published yesterday what he calls a denial
of a charge made in the Capital News that there had been
considered a proposal and suggestion that a number of
bankers, business men and others of Boise contribute a
campaign fund of $10,000 to the Republican state central
committee, and that when State Chairman Day made an
effort to secure such contributions he was confronted
with a demand that SenatQr Borah first eome out squarely
in favor of Taft; that Chairman Day and Secretary Davis
thereupon called upon Senator Borah and laid the matter
before him and asked him what he was going to do about
it and that Senator Borah refused to consider or comply
with the demands made upon him even though he was
advised to do so by the state chairman and state secre
tary. This alleged "denial" of Captain Davis, if care
fully read in connection with the original stories in the
Capital News concerning the same matter, corroborât»
all the essential points contained in that article. Perhaps
il was because the captain knew that any statement lie
might make would so nearly corroborate those articles is
the reason lie waited so long before making his statement
People do not usually carry the details of such statements
in their minds for ten days and more.
Bm in view of the fact that Captain Davis' statement
was intended, as it purports, as a denial we wish to call
attention to some vital matters that he overlooks in male
ing his statement of the facts, which omitted matters go
to the very vitals of the disputed point.
Who were the two men who met you, Captain, and
talked with you as to the uncertainty as to the attitude of
Senator Borah and to whom you say Chairman Day sug
gested that "we ask Senator Borah to meet with vou gen
tlemen and the others invited to meet with us, and explain
his position to you as he has explained it to us?"
Who were "Ihe others invited to meet with us," as
you quote tho statt« chairman? And who constituted that
list of 2") "names of well known business and professional
men of Boise," that you say was made by you? How far
wrong was the Capital News in tlie list of the same men
that it published?
If you want the people to be fully informed and to
know the real facts in connection with this transaction, as
you apparently seem to be, why not give them ALL the
facts so that they may judge for themselves?
Again you say; -
Senator Borah snld; 'Til meet with these gentlemen on one condition."
This condition he then stated, and then added: "If they comply with the con
dition I'll meet with tlirm and convince them that I am as loyal to the Repub
lican ticket as they are. If they do not meet the condition they have no right
to question my loyalty to tho Republican party."
Now, Captain, inasmuch as you have given a portion
of your conversation and inasmuch as you have taken the
liberty to quote »Senator Borah in part, you are good
enough lawyer to know that the jury you appeal to, the
people, are entitled to have that full conversation.
WHAT WAS THE CONDITION THAT SENATOR
BORAH IMPOSED? Now, out with it; DON'T LET
THE PEOPLE THINK YOU ARE TRYING TO PUT
THE SENATOR IN A FALSE LIGHT AS IMPOSING
CERTAIN CONDITIONS FOR A FEW BOISE BUSI
NESS MEN AND OTHERS THAT HE DOES NOT
GIVE TO THE PEOPLE. We do not believe that Sena
tor Borah is that kind of a politician, but you have left the
impression in your statement that he is. BE FAIR AND
JUST TO HIM, AND .TELL HIS FRIENDS WHAT
THOSE CONDITIONS WERE. His enemies in this city
have doubtless been made aware of them before this.
To whom did the senator refer when he said: "If
THEY will comply with this condition, I'll meet with
them ? " Did he mean just the two gentlemen you say vis
ited you and made the suggestion as to the "uncertainty
and confusion," or did he mean the entire list of 25 that
you prepared? If he meant the 25, how is it that Senator
Borah should feel impelled to stipulate a condition of any
kind, unless you informed him that they, too, were com
plaining of his "uncertainty" and of the general "con
fusion?"
Moreover, would these gentlemen from whom you au
ticipated these contributions comply with Senator Borah's
conditions and did they so comply?
Now, if you want to be fair to the people, let the people
know what the conditions were so that they may judge
for themselves whether the senator was fair about it.
Let them know whether the gentlemen comprising your
list complied with the conditions or not SO THAT THE
PEOPLE MAY KNOW WHETHER THEY ARE FAIR
TO THE SENATOR OR NOT.
You have undertaken to deny, but you have admitted
so much that it seems to us you cannot be just without tell
ing it all. The Capital News has accused you and the
state chairman and the majority of the state committee
with being unfair and in a measure antagonistic to Sena
tor Borah. WE STILL MAKE, AND RENEW THAT
ACCUSATION. Now show the people that we are wrong
by giving ALL the facts in connection with this trans
action.
FOR THE STATESMAN TO ANSWER.
The morning paper shows its friendliness for the Re-»
publican legislative candidates this morning by calling for
their resignation from the ticket. Not satisfied with the
demand that Borah get off the ticket that organ of Idaho
Republicanism is now demanding that the Republican leg
islative ticket which the other day met and signed a writ
ten pledge to support Borah for the senate also get off the
ticket.
Its demand is made upon an absolutely false basis, just
as nearly all its demands and statements are based, but tho
real purpose is clearly and abundantly shown.
In order, however, to have the question settled as defi
nitely as all political questions arc being settled before
tlie people this year, we demand from the Statesman to
answer fairly and finally the following questions:
Do you desire the election of the Republican candidates
for the legislature from Ada county and will you support
them all as now upon the ticket?
Do you desire the return of Senator William E. Borah
to the United States senate, and will you work fairly and
faithfully toward that* end from now until a senator is
elected?
The people are getting tired of the bushwhacking cam
paign being conducted by those who in words pride them
selves upon being supporters of Republicanism, but who
in deeds are cutthroats. They want not only the candi
dates, but the newspapers to come out fairly and squarely
as well.
The Evening Chit-Chat
By Ruth Cam«
Of
NE hears a groat deal of protest
from time to time against the
owners of houses and apart
ments and the hostesses of
boarding and lodging houses
who bar children.
Now It surety must be pretty trying
to find one's s$»lf shut out of a home
which one Is perfectly willing to pay
for, simply because he has dared to
help keep the race alive. But I wonder
if the landlords and hostesses deserve
all our blame. It seems to me that tin*
Ill-bred children and the careless
parents who bring down odium on all
children deserve at least half tlie
blame. Surely lie who abuses a priv
ilege Is just as much at fault when the
privilege Is withdrawn, as he who
withdraws it.
A beautiful apartment house was
recently put up In our town. Families
with children were not excluded and
two moved In. One family had three
children; they were well brought up
and did not cause any trouble. Tho
other family had but one child, a little
girl aliout six years old who had been
as thoroughly spoiled as a fond and
foolish mother could spoil her.
This child was an Inveterate tease
nd one of her most pleasing tricks was
WELCOME LITTLE STRANGER
\\
K
/
Fa
wHEH ARtr
'OL> G ORNA
c
T0R.H
oACK
t Rost
Loose
Kiddo
«*/.
rear
f the
f her
third
to get nut on the lawn in front
house and then argue at the top
lungs with her mother at tho
floor window.
Dialogues like this were frequently
howled into tlie ears of the other ten
ants:
"What are you doing down there? 1
told you to stay in the house."
"I want to go down to Ruth's."
"I told you that you couldn't. Come
right back up here."
"I don't want to. Can't I go down to
Ruth's for just a little while?"
"No, Margery. Come right upstairs.
I'll tell your father If you don't."
"Can I have some candy if 1 come
up?"
"Perhaps so. You come In and I'll
sec."
I have cut this dialogue rather short
on account of limited space, h :t some
of the tenants assured mo that Mar
gery and her mother were troubled by
no limits, and that such dialogues fre
quently lasted Hi minutes at a time, in
terrupting naps, rendering concentra
tion on work or play totally Impossible,
and generally making tilings miser
able.
The result of this and other displeas
ing ^habits of the youngster, quite too
numerous to mention, was that two
tenants gave notice and the landlord
finally had to ask the offenders to
leave. The rule has now been made
that no families with children will be
accepted In that apartment house.
"It Isn't that 1 don't like children. 1
love them,' said the hostess of a board
ing house In reference to her refusal to
take a family with two children. "It's
Just taht I can't run the risk of getting
Ill-bred children who will drive away
the rest of my guests."
Birthday Calendar
2
If This Is Your Birthday
You aro fortunate. If In employ your
efforts will be appreciated and re
warded. It Is better for you to remain
where you are and neither travel or
make groat changes In your affairs.
Those born today will be fortunate
and success will attend their efforts.
They will have talents which can be
trained for a literary or dramatic ca
reer and will win by their own ability.
WOMEN Of IDAHO ARE
ACM FOR BORAH
"1 believe that nearly every woman
in Idaho will vote for legislative can
dldntrs who are pledged to Senator
Borah," declared Mrs. Robert Spang
ler of Twin Kails, editor of tho Idaho
Clubwoman, yesterday.
"The senator has worked so hard for
Révérai measures ill wliieli the women
of this state are Interested that I be
lieve they »till give him a handsome
vote on election day. llis efforts for
the passage of the child labor law, the
children's bureau, and many other
things that romp home to every woman
make him popular among those with
whom I have talked on the subject,
and I think they will all support him.
"From the way the people In my
section of the state talk, I believe
that ho will receive heavy support all |
around Twin I^tlls and that tho pen- !
pie there are heartily In sympathy I
With the work that he has done for j
this state in congress,"
'
i
Not Going.
"Are you going to her wedding?" the
Jilted suitor was asked.
"No. I haven't tho least desire to
fee! like August Belmont at a Demo
cratic convention."
The Real "i hing.
Shy—George, you certainly look like
a waiter In that full dross suit.
George- I feel like one, too, after
waiting about two hours for you to
get ready for the theater.
me
The Gun Might Help.
Footpad (\vlth revolver)—(11
your money, quick.
Married victim—Certainly, my good
man. Come with me and we ll ask my
wife for It.
Pinches All Round.
Mrs Exe—My new dress Is
fashionable; it is so tight
pinches me.
-ortalnly
that It
Exe
lilf so
-Hugh! It doesn't pinch you
much as It pinches my pocket
A Moral Victory.
(From Judge)
"What's a 'moral victory,' pa?"
"Any fight you win where the loser
ts all the money."
The Evening Story
MY WANT
OF WISDOM
By MOLLIE K. WETHERELL
When 1 was eighteen years
my father and mother both being
dead, and I, not having a cent In the
world, said to a friend one day that I
thought I would take a trip to Europe. j j
I well romember the look she gave me. ! !
Indeed, eo Impressed was she with the |
absurdity of my Idea that ahe didn't |
think It worth while to remark upon *
It. The truth is I was dreaming aloud. I
But a few weeks later I learned
that I had been left a legacy of 9400..
Then I put my dfeam to practice. !
Dreamers are not understood. There
Is likely to be some method In their
madness, but their more practical ac
quaintances take no cognizance of this.
There wae s method In my madness,
though I hardly understood It myself.
Terhaps my story will explain it
What I did with my $400 was to buy
a two months' trip to England and
the continent of Europe.
When my friends heard of what I
was about to do they wondered If they
had not better shut me np in a lunatic
asylum.
"She's certainly gone daft," said one.
"What Is she going to live on when
she gets back?" remarked another.
"Do some hard work," put In a
third. "That will take the nonsense
out of her."
One of my chums repeated these re
marks to me that I might benefit by :
them. But I didn't. I prepared for ;
my journey and sailed away, remark
ing that I would have one good time
in my life If I never had another. The
last Morels I heard from the dock were:
"Are you coming home with that for
tune?"
"Tes. A pleasant ontlng Is a fortune
In itself."
Now, I didn't know any more than
they what was to happen to me. I cer
tainly had no idea that my trip was to
be completely spoiled, as it was. My
room mate on the ship going out was a
crabbed old maid. She was not only
seasick, but afflicted with an incurable
disease. She was so stingy that she
would not tip the room stewardess,
who would do nothing for her. Being
unable to go to the dining saloon for
0l<1 '
meals, the Invalid ordered the steward
ess to bring them In to her. The stew
ardess would say, "Yes, m'm," go away
j an d would not return,
What could I do—see the creature
' starve? Of course not. I waited on
i her all the way over, and when we
reached Southampton, she being unable ;
to leave the ship without assistance, I
was obliged to take her ashore with
me. When I got her there I felt com -1
pellcd to take her to London.
"Hadn't you any relatives to comej
with you?" I asked.
"No, and I couldn't afford to pay thej
way of any of them If I had."
"Can't you afford to hire some one to
take care of you?"
"No."
Well, the woman continued to grow
worse. I had the choice of deserting
her, leaving her to the tender mercies
of nobody or staying with her. I didn't
scruple to tell her that she was spoil
ing my trip. Her reply was that I hod
better go on and leave her to her fate.
She might as well have told me to give
her poison to get rid of her. At first
she wouldn't do anything to relieve me
if she could, and afterward she
couldn't. She continued to sink, but
remained alive, so that I couldn't got
away from her and pursue my trip.
There was one curiosity in London I
had always wished to see. One morn
ing I gave a maid half a crown to at
tend to the Invalid for a few hours
while I went to the tower. When l j
returned the maid told me that her I
charge had sent her out with a note for J
a man. who bad come to her und been
shut up with her for half an hour. He
had taken other persons into the room,
but only for a few minutes.
I didn't care to ask an explanation !
of this of the sick woman, for It was j
none of my business, ner Illness con- ;
tlnued so long that the time and
money I had put aside for my trip J
were nearly exhausted. One day the j
Invalid called me to her and snid to j
me: "I'm going to die. I don't wish j
any doctor to tell me so. He would
chnrge me £2 at least and I know It j
myself. After my death you will find '
five sovereigns In my trunk. Bury
mo here. My bones are not worth tak- |
lng to America. You'll find an envelope ;
tinder my pillow. Take It to the ad- j
dress In Philadelphia written on It."
Tho woman died just before the !
steamer sailed on which I hnd engaged ;
a return passnge. I bad barely time ,
to find a place to btiry her when I was |
obliged to go aboard. On reaching
port several of my friends were at the
dock to meet me. One of them called;
"Did yon Bee It all?"
"Oh. yes. I saw London; there's
enough there to see without going
farther. The tower Is immensely In
teresting."
A few days after my arrival I
thought of the envelope I was to de
liver and took It to the address on It.
Marbury & Smith, attorneys. One of
the firm opened the envelope and took
out a paper. Then he asked me some
questions, finally Inquiring my nnme.
When I told "him he gave me a quick
glance and said;
"You are the beneficiary of this es
tate."
"Estate! What estate?"
"This Is a will, it makes you heiress
to property worth $250.000."
The moral of this story Is that those
Who leave something to chance are
not always wrong.
ONLY THIS AND NEXT WEEK THIS
VISIT TO 8EE
Dr. C.D. Pons
.■
j
!
|
|
*
I
A
T
|
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EYE AND NERVE SPECIALIST, now
at the Wdstern rooms, corner Tenth
and Idaho streets. Hours, 9 a. in. till
12 noon, and 3 p, m. till 7 p. m.
Every lens fitted made by the doctor
himself. ALL EXAMINATIONS FREE.
Tlie Home of Good
Meats, Lard, Hams and
Bacon at Reasonable
Prices.
Boise Butcher Co
•11 Idaho 8b
Phono 69
FURNITURE
Wo are prepared to handle Furni
ture Repairing In all Its
Branches.
PUGH-JENKtNS FURNITURE BO.
Eleventh and Mdin.
EVERY WOMAN.
Is interested when you say grocor
ies. Every woman likes to bo able
to cook a good meal. It Is very es
sential that when you prepare a
meal that you have the best groc
eries.
Trade with us and you get the
best
BOISE MERCANTILE CO.
Union Block. Phone 10.
WE WILL MAIL YOU 91
for each set of old False Teeth sent
us. Highest prices paid for old gold,
sliver, old watches, broken Jewelry
and precious stones.
Money sent by return mall
Phila. Smelting & Refining Comp'ny
Established 20 Year»
863 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa.
TO DENTIST8
We will buy your gold filings, gold
scrap, and platinum. Highest prices
pa Id.
The
OWYHEE
BOISE, IDAHO.
Always tho Best.
European Plan.
Rates $1.00 and up.
Good Food—Cool Dining Rooms—
Good Music.
LEO J. FALK, (teenager.
the
IDAIV-HA
BOISE'S
LEADING HOTEL
Colonial Dining Room,
Rooms 91-00 to 93JOO
CHAS. GROUT, Mgr.
STOP AT THE
OREGON HOTEL
A Clean and Modern Family Hotel.
Rates Reasonable.
Special Wsekly Rotes.
Pacific hotel
THE HOTEL JUST LIKE HOME
Ninth and Idaho.
OXFORD HOTEL
Under new management. Rote«
reasonable. Elevator servies. In
the heart of the city.
HOTEL BRISTOL
Now and Modern,
EUROPEAN PLAN
Rates by the Day <6c and V%'
Special Rates by the Wnk
M. PARSONS, Prop.
OPT
CAL
BOISE OPTICAL
COMPANY.
Successors to
IDAN-HA OPTICAL
COMPANY.
1003 Main 8trset.
Boise. Idaho.
First National Bank
—OP IDAHO— ~
Tepneacte a Gansral Banking
Business,
Interest Paid an Tima Deposit»
Wanted-Wheat and Oa's
Base Predict aid CNMissiM (j.
409 South Eighth Street; Phone
32-J.

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