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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, September 25, 1912, Image 1

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NEWS
THE WEATHER.
Fair tonight with H*ht
frost; Thursday, fair.
Vol. XXIX
TEN PAGES
BOISE. IDAHO. WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 25, 1912.
No. 72
PREPARATIONS FOR
AT BINGHAM MADE
BY MIES
Clash Has Not Yet Come But It Is
Feared the Effort to Disarm
Strikers Will Bring It
Bingham, Utah, Sept. 25.—Despite the active prepara
tions for war, another day has progressed so far peace
fully in the copper miners' strike for higher wages. An
nouncement by the county commissioners that firearms
were to be taken from the miners led this morning to a
declaration that "There will be shooting before it was
accomplished." Fifty sharpshooters selected last night
from among the deputies have not yet been posted on the
hill commanding the main workings of the Utah Copper
company. Strike leaders are still trying, with little hope
of success, to obtain a conference with General Manager
Jackling, of the Utah Copper company.
Bingham, Utah, Sept. 25.—As a re
sult of the fear expressed by operators
that the sheriff's posse might not be
able to control the situation in an emer
gency, county officials paid a visit to
the camp yesterday where 4500 copper
miners are on strike, and carefully went
over the situation. The strikers ob
served the movements of the party with
little show of interest. The visitors
were impressed by the unusual quiet
that prevailed.
The party consisted of John C.
Maekay, Oscar Carlson and Walter J.
Burton, county commissioners; Sheriff
Joseph Sharp and Deputy Sheriff Alex
Steele. ' We b< lievc that the county
will be able to cope with any emer
gency," said Mr. Mackay.
"We are favoring neither side in this
trouble, but are determined to spend
the county's last dollar in keeping the
peace. If need be, we are ready to in
crease the number of deputies to 1000
The 'commissioners said that the dep
uties here were to receive instructions
to destroy all breastworks improvised
by reeks on the mountain side, and to
arrest every man found carrying weap
one. Beginning Immediately, the pro
gram is an aggressive police campaign
to pave the way for the resumption of
work. This, it is admitted, may be
met with resistance.
Meanwhile the leaders of the strike
w ere busy holding conferences. A num
ber of telegrams were exchanged with
union officials in other cities. They
stated tonight they were prepared to
checkmate any move the Utah Copper
company might make.
"If It is a waiting game," said J. C.
Lowney, executive board member of the
Western Federation of Miners, "we
can stand it as easily as the company."
STATE CONVENTION OE
W.C.T.U. AT NAMPA
(Capital New* Special Service)
Nampa. Sept. 25.— Fifty-four dele
gates from southern Idaho are In at
tendance at the «täte W. C. T. U. con
vention which Is In session In the
Christian church. A review of the
work accomplished by the different
branches of the organization during the
past year was given today and offi
cers were elected as follows:
Stats president —Miss Daisy E. Beat
ty. Caldwell.
Corresponding secretary—Mrs. Jen
nie A. Stout, Caldwell.
Recording secretary—Mrs. Roberta
Polly, Welser.
Treasurer—Mrs. Sue Prescott, Glenns
Ferry.
Campaign In New Hampshire.
Concord, N. H., Sept. 16.—With tho
state convention of the progressive
party tomorrow the last of tho plat
form appeals to the voters of New
Hampshire will have been put In for
mal shape and everything made ready
for what Is expected to he one of the
liveliest campaigns the Granite state
has seen In years Winston Churchill,
celebrated In the literary world as the
author of "The Crisis'' and other stor
ies, la the progressive party choice
for governor. The novelist is one of
the pioneers In the political reform
movement in this state and Is ex
pected to make an aggressive fight.
The republicans have named Frank -
lln Worcester of Hollis for governor.
The democratic candidate is Samuel
D. Folker of Rochester. Governor
Bass, progressive republican, carried
New Hampshire two years ago by 7,
*71 votes over his democratic oppo
nent.
Interstate Levee Association.
Memphis, Sept. 25.—Advocates of the
Joint control of the Mlseisslppl levee
systems by state and federal govern
ments and those who believe the na
tional government should be asked to
assume charge of the taxation and
maintenance of levees, debated the
question today before the Interstate
Levee association in session here.
YOUNG WOMAN IS
SHOT AND KILLED
BY A FI
Salt Lake Greek Takes His
Own Life After Murder
ing Woman with Whom
He Wad Enamored.
Salt Lake, Sept. 25.—Tom Tltogus,
a Greek, who Rhot and killed Mrs
Mary Theordorson after midnight, as
she was going home with her brother
in-law from a Greek coffee house,
where she worked, wan found dead
this morning In a coal bln on West
Hecond South street, from self-in
flicted wounds. The Greek Is thought
to have been enamored with Mrs.
Theodorson, who was 19 years old. Her
husband Is said to be In prison In
Denver for trying to sell her Into
white slavery.
The murder brought out a story of
betrayal and mistreatment. Mrs.
Emily Wliltmer, the girl's mother, re
lates that she worked In a restaurant
at Ogden, where she met and mar
ried James Theodorson, lg months
ago. With his bride, not yet 18 years j
old, Mrs. Whltmer says, Thodorson |
moved to New Mexico and then toj
Denver, where he made attempts to
•ell Mrs. Thodorson into white slav
ery and was sentenced to prison.
Mrs. Thodorson was going to the
home of her mother from a coffee
house In Salt Lake, when Tliogus
stopped her, made a demand on her
for money and then shot her dead.
He wounded himself and was traced
some distance by the trail of blood.
Dater In the morning he was found
dead.
ALASKAN VOLCANO IS
AGAIN IN ERUPTION
Seattle, Sept. 25.—Mall advices from i
Valdez say that Mount Wrangle is
•gain In eruption. Lieutenant Prosser,
of the signal corpa, after a trip along
the military telegraph line between
Valdez and Fairbanks, reported that
Mount Wrangle waa throwing out vol
umes of smoke and lava was Issuing
and flowing down across the glaciers.
From Kotslna It Is reported that sul
phurous fumea are so strong that pros
pectors working near Kotslna glacier
have been driven out.
Amsriean Hospital Association.
Detroit, Mich., Sept. 25.—Tho an
nual meeting of the American Hospital
association began In this city today
and will continue over tomorrow and
Friday. Physicians and superinten
dants of many hospitals throughout
the United States and Canada are In
attendance. Training of nuraea, ef
ficiency In hoapltal management, and
ways and means of co-operating with
organized charities are among the
subjecti to be dlscuesed.
Taft at Altoana Celebration,
Altoona, Pa, Sept. 25.—With Pres
ident Taft as the guest of honor and
principal speaker, a notable program
of exercises was carried out hers to
day in celebration of the fiftieth an
niversary of the conference of loyal
governors that met In Altoona In 1862
and pledged support to the Union. In
addition to President Taft the partici
pants in the exercises included Gov
ernor Tener and a number of other
men of prominence.
WAR^^"^^^
" w f#r ^ Par *
JUDGE WILL R. KING, OF OREGON.
(Capital News Special Service)
Chicago, Sept. 25.—Joseph A. Davies,
acting Democratic national chairman,
today made tho following statement
concerning the campaign In the west:
"Judge Will It. King, national com
mitteeman for Oregon, and one of Wil
son's campaign committee, has been
designated by the Démocratie national
executive committee to have charge of
WILSON SCORES
OVER ENEMIES IN
HIS HOME STATE
James Smith, Jr., Is Defeat
ed for Nomination for
United States Senator—
Wilson Men Successful.
Newark, N. Y., Sept. 25.—That Gov
ernor Wilson won a sweeping victory
In the Naw Jersey primary yesterday
iq evident from the returns which
sifted Into Démocratie headquarters
early today. In the fight to prevent
the nomination for 1'nlted States sen-'
ator of former Senator Jnmes Smith,
Jr„ Wilson carried the state by a
plurality of not quite 20,000, winning!
every county except one. The returns
from 611 out of 1709 district» give!
Représentai ive William Hughes, the;
Wilson candidate, 17,020 to 11,751 for'
Smith. It Is believed tliut practically:
all Wilson candidates for nomination!
throughout the state outside of Essex
county were successful. All told each;
parly selected 12 candidates to con
gress. The vote was light all over the
state. The Progressives did not figure
In the voting except In Hudson county,I
where they defeated the regular or -1
ganlzatlon and'nominated three candi-!
dates for congress and the legislature.
In other sections of the state they
will nominate by petition.
Stolen Picture in Russia.
T/ondon, Sept. 25.— Leonarda Da Vin
ci's masterpiece "Mona Lisa," stolen
from the Louvre museum in Purls tn
August of last year ,1s hanging on the
wall» of a private gallery In £t. Peters
burg, according to a report published in
a Russian paper.
GOVERNORHARMONTO
STUMP FOR WILSON
Columbus, Sept. 25.—Governor Jud
son Harmon said that upon his return
from hta trip to the Pacific coast,
where he will make the official selec
tion of the site for the slate building
at the Panama exposition, he will take
the atump for the entire Democratic
state and national ticket.
For Oklahoma Land 8als. 4
Coalgste, Okla., Sept. 25.— Represen
tatives of commercial bodies In Okla
homa and of the Industrial bureaus of
the various railroads met here today
to agree upon a plan for advertising
the sale of the segregated coal and
asphalt and the unallotted Indiun
lands In Oklahoma The sale of the
871,000 acres of unallotted land Is
scheduled to begin early In November.
The tracta embrace more than 50,000
acres of good farming and graslng
lands.
( the state organizations. It has bee
j decided that headquarters will not be |
i opened up at Denver, as was at on*
I time suggested."
Governor Wilson's campaign In the|
Rocky Mountain and the Pacific coast j
states. Judge King has established
himself In the western headquarters at |
Chicago and will operate from that !
point, carrying on his work through the
various national committeemen and j
WEAVER ISEOUND
NOT GUILTY OF
MURDER CHARGE
Must Now Answer Charge
of Sending Poison
Through Mail in the Unit
ed States Court.
(Capital News Special Service)
ShosHnne. Sept. 25.—Ray Weaver, the
young man who was placed on triai
in district court hero Monday on the
charge of murder In the second degree,
as a result of the death of Miss Lena
Speers at her home near Rupert last
July, was acquitted last night. The
Jury, Hfter taking two ballots, returned
a verdlet of not guilty, and the pris
oner was discharged. He will, how
ever, have to answer the charge of
sending poison through the United
States mail for an illegal purpose, for
which he was Indicted by the United
States grand Jury at Boise.
Weaver admitted on the witness!
stand that h# sent oil of tansy to the!
Speers girl, but produced evidence to
show that lip did so at her request In
the hope of relieving her condition.
Weaver told a straightforward story.
admitting his part In the affair. It is
believed that the fact that Weaver Is
under Indictment in the federal court
had an Influence with the Jury.
Chicago Wheat Market.
Chicago, Sept. 25.—September wheat
closed today at 8S7|jC.
F Abe Martin J
9
JiSt.
What's become o' the ole fashioned
-andldate for nomination who, when!
i
defeated, used C publish a card o'
thanks' an' promise p support th'
ticket ? What we need Is fuller dinner
palls an' fuller skirts.
1 !
[QUEST INTO
GIRL'S DEATH AT
HOME OF DOCTOR
Chicago, Sept. 26.—The coroner's of
fice has started an Inquest Into the
death of Miss Anna Rise at the resi
dence of a physician, after wandering
two days about Chicago.
The coroner said the girl's body had
been mutilated. Detectives traced her
movements several days prior to her
deulh except for one 21-hour period.
She was employed as a domestic. She
received medical aid at the physician's
home, where she died. The doctor
said she was 111 of pneumonia and in
an enfeebled condition when he saw
her first.
MARINES TO BE SENT
TO SAN DOMINGO BY
THE UNITED STATES
Washington, Sept. 25.—Early dis
patches to the state department con
tained no advices of the revolution In
San Domingo. Preparations for mov
ing 750 marines to protect the customs
houses on the Haïtien border were
pushed forward today. The marines
will be concentrated at Philadelphia
and rushed south on the transport
rruirie.
ORANGEMEN PREPARE
TO FIGHT HOME RULE
Portadown, Ireland, Sept. 21 . —De
termination not to submit to home rule
was expressed today by 20,000 Orange
men and Unionists, residents of the
county of Armagh in Ulster. They had
assembled in the birthplace of Or
angism to welcome Kir Edward Carson
and other Unionist leaders.
LETTERS FROM MRS.
SNEED AT HEARING
Amarillo, Tex., Sept. 25.—Despite
the efforts of the prosecution the cor
respondence between Mrs. Lena Sneed
and Al G. Boyce for two weeks pre
ceding the shooting of Boyce by Sneed
was admitted in evidence.
I. en Boyce, brother of AI G. Boyce,
with whose murder John Beal Sneed Is
charged, testified In the Sneed habeas
corpus proceedings that he had writ
ten A1 Boyce In Fort Worth during
July this year under the names of
Johnson and Oldsby. John Pace, broth
er-in-law of Mrs. Sneed, testified of
receiving letters for Mrs. Sneed under
her own and other names after the
trial of Sneed for killing Boyce's father
at Fort Worth.
TELLS OE REFORMS
IN COLORADO PRISON
Chicago, Sept. 25.—Thomas B. Ty
nant, warden of the Colorado state
penitentiary, in an address before the
Chicago Association of Commerce, to
day described the results of the reforms
instituted In Colorado under which 1000
miles of improved state highway» were
constructed by convicts. He asserted
the healthy outdoors life led by the con
vict» In the road building camp» im
proved the temper and morals of the
most hardened criminal».
RAILROAD TRAFFIC
HAS BEEN SUSPENDED
Perpignan, Prance, Sept. 25.—Rail
road traffic has been completely sus-l
pended at Catalona, Spain, and there
has been considerable destruction of
property by strikers who quit at mid -
night. Dispatches from Barcelona,
statt that every section is now In the!
hands of tho military, as every em
ployee has Joined in the strike.
Draper 8tatue Unveiled.
Milford, Mass., Hept. 26.—The trlb-.
ute of bis home town to the memory
of the late General William F. Dra
per was paid today, when an Imposing
equestrian statue of the soldier and
statesman was unveiled with Interest'
ing exercises. The memorial, which
was designed by Daniel C. French, the.
New York sculptor, was a gift to the
town of Milford from General Dra
per'a widow.
To Fight Immoral Plays,
Toronto. Ont., Sept. 26.—A nation
wide crusade to rid the etage In Can
ada of immoral and suggestive plays
Is to be planned at the annual ineet
Ing of the department of temperance
and moral reform of the Methodist
church, which assembled in Toronto
today with an attendance of clergy
and laymen from all over the Do
minion
AMNESTY OFFERED THE
REBELS OE MEXICO
BY CABINET
Minister of War Is Instructed to Make
Offer to FoHowers of Orozco
— Federais Ambushed
Mexico City, Mux., Kept. 25.—A new movement for!
peace in northern Mexico was made today when Presi-I
dent Madcro and his cabinet instructed the minister of
wai' to offer amnesty to the followers of Orozco, the rebeli
leader.
AMBUSHED BY REBELS.
Cuernavaca, Mexico, Sept. 25.—Ambushed at Ojo De|
Agua, Captain Escobedo and seven of his 30 soldiers were*
killed by rebels yesterday. On receipt of the news here,!
Senorita Sofia Moneadia. actress and sweetheart of Es-;
cobedo, committed suicide.
D1ÏÏ IS FIXED
FDD OPENING Of
WORLD US
First Game Will Be Played
on Oct. 8 at New York— ;
Question of Sale of
Tickets.
New York, Sept. 26.—Th* opening
game of the world's baseball chain -1
pionship series will be held here oct.
8, the commission has decided. The'
games will alternate here, and at
Boston until the series Is concluded.
Members of the National baseball I
commission and representative» ofi
the Boston Americans and New York j
National league clubs met here today!
to fix the dates for the world's series.!
settle disputes over the question as
to how and by whom the sale ticket»'
shall he conducted, and to fix the price!
of seats and to announce the eligible!
players.
Although New York still is In need!
of two games to clinch the National j
league pennant, the commission pro- !
ceeded on the supposition that the
championship Is assured. The sched-;
ule, however, will be announced with *
a provision, in deference to the Chi
cago club, which is/second in the race.
Indications were that the sale of tick-;
ets would he left In the hands of the j
clubs, tinder the close supervision
the commission.
FRIEND OF AMERICA
IN CANADA IS DEAD
Kingston, Ont., Sept 25.—Sir Rich
ard Cartwright, died yestordny follow
ing a surgirai operation. Sir Richard
was born ln 1835 and devoted a greater]
part of his life to servire In Canada I
politically. He was a firm friend of
the United Htntos and as minister of
trade and commerce in the Laurier
cabinet urged commercial reclprur ity. j
HOMESEEKERS' RATES
FOR NEXT YEAR
Chicago, Sept. 26.—The homeseek-1
ers* rate to the Puelflc coast will not !
be discontinued next year ns sup-!
gested recently by two of the leading!
western roads. A referendum vote of!
the interested railroads decided in!
favor of the continuance in lfflS og
the rates now in effect. !
CHARTER DRAWN FOR
LOS ANGELES COUNTY
I^*s Angeles, Sept. 25.—The final
draft of the Los Angeles county char
ter, proposing changes in county gov
ernment, was placed on file today and
will be voted on at the November
election. The new charter reduces the
elective officers to three, In addition to
five members of the board of »super
visors. The officer« are the district
attorney, sheriff and county assessor.
Every officer elected or appointed may
be subject to recall. The charter also
provides for a public defender to de
fend indigents accused of public of
fences, to aid poor and harrassed by
litigation and to institute suits for
wases.
!$EX HYGIENE IS
TOPIC DISCUSSED
AT THE CONGRESS
Passing of Physical Exam
ination Before Marriage Is
the Problem, Says Dr.
Wile.
Washington, D. C„ Sept, 25.—The ac
tivities of various agencies In dissem
inating infectious diseases and the rel
ative Importance of flics, shell fish and
other carriers of bncalli in transferring•
typhoid fever, diphtheria, cholera and
Influenza were among the topics dis
cussed In today's program of the In
ternational Congress of Hygiene and
Demography. Experts of Germany,
France, England and the United States
are scheduled to talk.
When women make It plaint that
they will not marry unless the groom
can produce a doctor's certificate of
perfect health the problem of sex hy
giene will practclally be solved, de
clared Dr Ira S'. Wile of New York, In
an address In the exhibition hall of the
congress.
Pointing to charts, models, photo
graphs and life-size casts Illustrating]
the effects of disease, he declared h«
would rip out the whole thing, with the,
exception i f the section on the eugenics, j
"Do you suppose that chamber of!
horrors has a moral, reforming or even I
educational effect? he asked.
"I do not believe fear Is a high eth-|
leal concept to appeal to. Our efTortsi
must be turned, not toward dragooning;
young to do right, hut toward incul- '
cation to that right thinking which
leads to right doing. Education of)
girls Is the solution of the problem,
for they can most effectively train the
boys."
COLONEL FEELS LIKE
HE WAS IN CRUSADE
Little Rock. Ark,. Sept. 35.—"I feel
as If I had been In a crusade," said
Unlonel Roosevelt today. He continued,
that the progressive movement was a
religious one and o«ie of the things
that Impressed hint most was singing
"onward Christian Soldiers" at tha
meetings. He was to spend most of
the day here, leaving late for Mem
phis.
Medal for Honor Men.
Atlantic ('ity, N. J., Sept. 25.—One
of the most notable gatherings of men
entertained in Atlantic ('ity in a long
time—men who have been officially
recognised by congress for acts of
great heroism during the Civil war,
the Spanish ^ar and at other times -
assembled at the Hotel Monticello to
day for the twenty-sixth annual re
union and convention of the Army and
Navy Medal of Honor Legion. Ser
geant William J. Wray of Philadel
phia, commander of the legion. 1»
presiding over the sessions, which will
last three days.
• •
• •
• ••••••
Massachusetts Priamrios.
Boston, Kept. 25.As a result of
yesterday's primaries, Eugene
N. Foss will be the D mocratlc
candidate for a third term as
governor of Massachusetts. Foss'
majority over District Attorney
Pelletier Is 26,614, according to
today's figures. On the Repub
lican side Joseph Walker bed
10,302 over Colonel Evevrett C.
Benton.

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