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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, November 05, 1912, Image 1

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Full Election Returns Will Be Flashed on a Screen Tonight at the Evening Capital News Office
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
TIME SAVED
TELL YOUf. WANT*
To the People On the
Classified Page.
THE WEATHER.
Probably fair tonight
and Wednesday.
Vol. XXIX
EIGHT PAGES
BOISE, IDAHO, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1912.
No. 112
POWERS ARE UNABLE TO
AGREE ON A POUCY
IN THEBALKANS
En gland, France and Russia- Willing to
Mow the Balkan States to Annex
the Territory Conquered
London, Nov. 5.—The great powers
are aligning themselves on either si.le
of a very sharp line regarding the fu
ture of the Balkan etates. Public
opinion In England, Prance and Russia
Is that the allies should have the terri
tory conquered and Russia has warn
ed Turkey that conditions will only
become worse should further disaster
occur at Tchatalja. The other side,
Austria-Hungary, Germany, Italy and
Austria, which are the nearest neigh
bors of the Balkan states, will not, it
is believed, sit quietly watching «he
Balkan league establish itself across
her patch to the Aegean sea in which
direction her trade is expanding, while
at the same time, the Servians spread
to the Adriatic.
The Austrian government points out
that the Albanians are as much a na
tion as any of the allies and Albania
should be reserved for the Albanians.
A dispatch from Belgrade says that
Servia, first claiming 20 miles of
Adriatic coast, now wants 60 miles and
in return Montenegro is to get more
than her allotment of the district of
Novipazar.
In the meantime Bulgarian troops in
the vicinity of Tchorlu are préparas
to resume their advance on Tchatalja.
The Bulgarian army near Tchorlu is
being reinforced by troops from the in
vesting force around Adrlunople, whose
places are taken by Servians, it is
officially stated in a dispatch from
Belgrade that the Servians who have
annihilated the Turkish army in
Macedonia, have been ordered to assist
the Bulgarians, Greeks and Montene
grins.
The sultan's soldiers are in bad con
dition. Besides the host of wounded
thousands, men have dropped out of
the ranks exhausted from want of
food, and most of these threw away
their rifles. It is reported today that
the Greeks made a premature attack
on Saloniki and were repulsed. A
combined attack by Greeks, Bul
garians and Servians is expected
shortly.
The water supply at Constantinople
was cut off today by a large Bul
garian force at the end of the aque
duct, according to a dispatch from
Sofia.
Powers Have Not Replied.
Constantinople, Nov. 6.—None of the
powers have yet replied to the Porte s
request for mediation. The belief Is
held here that King Ferdinand will not
be sorry to accept European Interven
tion. as It is considered that, after its
tremendous sacrifices, the Bulgarian
army must be nearly exhausted.
Abdulah Pasha, commander of the
Turkish eastern army, Is still at
Tcherkesskeui, and at noon yesterday a
Turkish detachment destroyed an im
portant railway bridge at Tchorlu.
It now becomes clear that the de
ficient commissariat was largely re
sponsible for the Turkish reverses.
Turkish plans aimed at encircling the
Bulgarian forces by an advance on the
right wing. The Bulgarian general
concentrated his efforts on the Turkish
center at Serai Rod the left wing along
the railway. The Turks were meeting
With much success, but the commis
sariat broke down completely on ac
count of bad roads and preventing land
ing operations at the Turkish base.
Mldla.
As a consequence Mahmoud Mukhtar
Pasha, commanding the right, was com
pelled to sacrifice the advantage gained
because his troops were without food
throughout the day.
8ultan Himself Deceived.
All preparations have been com
pleted for the heir-apparent to pro
ceed to the Turkish headquarttrs ac
companied by Ghazi Ahamed Mukh
tar Pasha, the late grand vizier, but
they have not started.
It 1s asserted that the sultan him
self was deceived by Nazim Pasha's
optimistic reports and only realized
tbs true situation when an English
erulser brought the latest news, which
was conveyed to the Porte by the
British ambassador. The Porte then
aaked the powers to intervene.
The difficulty in maintaining order
Is increasing. It is said that a mob
went to the war office at Stamboul and
asked for weapons with which to nt
tack the Christians, and this was the
reason Kikalmil Pasha asked tho am
bassadors to have warships at hand.
• •
•••••••••••••
No Attack on Martin.
Spencer. Ia„ Nov. 4.—The
statement signed by me that
Higgins and others are repu
table men was not Intended as
an attack on G. H. Martin and
should not be so considered.
GEORGE A. HEALD.
WOMAN IS FOUND
GUILTY AND GIVEN
TERM IN PRISON
Mrs. Louise Lindloff Found
Guilty of the Murder of
Her Son—Must Serve 25
Years.
Chicago, Nov. 5.—Mrs. Louise Lind
loff, spiritualist and crystal gazer, was
found guilty of murder last night and
her punishment was fixed at 26 years
in the penitentiary. She was charged
with poisoning her lS-year-old son,
Arthur.
Mrs. Lindloff laughed hysterically and
cast a sneering glance at the jury when
the verdict was read.
Later she collapsed while standing
in an anteroom surrounded by friends.
She was revived and led back tc/ her
cell in the county jail.
"There Is no justice here," the wo
man sobbed. "Those that are guilty
are turned loose and those that are
Innocent get the worst of It. I will
show my Innocence before I am
through. It will only he a question of
time. I did not kill my boy or any of
the others. I am lrmocent, as God is
my witness."
A formal motion for a new trial.was
made by the woman's attorney and the
court set November 16 as the date for
hearing arguments.
Mrs. Lindloff is the first woman con.
victed of murder in the Cook county
courts in three years. Seven women
have been tried in the criminal court
for murder, but in each case the Jury
returned a verdict of not guilty or dis
agreed.
The jury retired at 8:45 in the after
noon and a verdict was not returned
until 9 o'clock last night.
History of the Crime.
The Lindloff boy died June 13, last,
and the state Charged that he was poi
soned, with arsenic.
Mrs. Lindloff was arrested June 14 on
suspicion of having poisoned two hus
bands and her three children.
The death out of which grew the
police investigation was that of Arthur
Lindloff, 16 years old. When she was
arraigned, June 17, charged with the
murder of hier son. she was ordered
held without bail and by agreement of
counsel the preliminary hearing was
postponed until June 27 without the
Introduction of testimony. Meanwhile
a chemical analysis of the dead boy's
organs disclosed quantities of arsenic.
•Exhumation of the bodies of Wil
liam Lindloff, one of the woman's hus
bands, and Alma Lindloff, a daughter,
was the next step, and on June 27 Pro
fessor Walter S. Haynes, who made
the chemical analysis, reported that he
had found arsenic in the internal or
gans of both. On June 29 came a dis
patch from Milwaukee saying that ar
senic had been found in the body of
Julius Graunke, former husband of Mrs.
Lindloff.
Police Investigation proved that
Arthur LlndlofTs life had been heavily
Insured and a motive for the alleged
killing was believed to have been es
tablished.
Austrian Aviator Killed.
Vienna, Nov. 6.—An Austrian military
airman was killed this morning while
flying around an army aerodrome at
Goerz. The wings of his machine col
lapsed at a considerable height.
WILSON PLANS TO
RECEIVE RETURNS
Princeton, Nov. 6.—Governor Wilson,
when asked how he felt, replied, "Like
a boy out of school." He admitted the
campaign has been a hard physical
strain. His scalp wound received In a
motor accident did not'trouble him.
He -planned to epend most of the day
answering letters. Tonight a small
party in the Wilson home will hear
the returns by private wire.
Wilson voted a straight Democratic
ticket at 10:16 in the Interior of an
engine house. He was in the voting
booth four minutes and remarked that
the ballot was so big he had a hard
time finding the Democratic presiden
tial electors
FIRST PICTURES OF GREEKS IN BATTLE AND OF DESTRUCTION
WROUGHT BY T HEM TO TURK FORTIFICATIONS REACH AMERICA
At the toi», Greek Infantry In actlsn .at
Classons, on tho Orooco-Turkish
frontier; at tho bottom, Turkish fron
tier station aftor being demolished by
Tho lint pictures of tha Qrook sol
dim on tho Urin« Uno have reach
ed America. They wore taken on
tho Grmoco-Turklsb frontier, whore
them have boon numerous bloody en
gagements. In these lights the
Greeks have shown remarkable valor
and have been uniformly successful.
The entire Greek army la m aee l og on
the frontier, while but a small por
tion of' tho Turkish forces can be
spared to ward off their advance. In
one of tbs sooompanying pictures
Greek Infantry la seen in action at
Elaaaona; in tho other is shown a
Turkish frontlsr station which they
demolished.
A few years ago Greece suffered
humiliating defeat at the hands of
Turkey. Now, apparently, the tables
are to bo turned. Tbe Greeks are
spurred on by a spirit of mingled pa
triotism and rsvenge and show no
quarter to their Turkish foes.
NAMELESS NERO OE
THE SEA SAVED THE
STEAMER NOREUGA
Norfolk, Va., Nov. 6.—A nameless
hero of the sea Was brought to light by
the collision Friday between the Nor
wegian steamer Noreuga and the sail
ing ship Glenlui. The Noreuga arrived
last night in a sinking condition in tow
of the revenue cutter Onandago. She
was sa6ed by the wireless operator who
refused to give his name. When the
crew deserted the stricken vessel the
operator stuck to his post flashing sig
nals for aid. Finally he succeeded in
raising both shore stations and the
vessels of the Atlantic fleet. The
crew were rescued as they were about
to founder. The Glenlui is expected
later in the day.
VOTE HEAVY INNORTH
IN SPITE OF RAIN
(Capital News Special Service)
Lewiston, Nov. 6 — In the first
Lewiston precinct with 740 registered,
held as a strong Wilson precinct,
Roosevelt is holding his own with Taft
a weak third. With the women's
vote Roosevelt will gain. Martin is
also running strong with Haines and
Hawley. Voting is heavy in spite of
the rain.
SAYS THAT SILENT
VOTE WILL DECIDE
Chicago, Nov. 5.—The silent vote will
decide this election, said David Mil
vane, western Republican campaign di
rector today. "We have no reports of
course to show definitely how the ele.c
tlon will go, but our communications
from western territory shows a big vote
will be polled. We have no reporta of
fraud anywhere."
HADLEY IS FAVORED
FOR SECOND PLACE
New York, Nov. I.—Twenty members
of the national Republican committee
have thus far, in an informal poll, ex-
pressed their intention to vote for the
selection of Governor Hadley of Mis-
souri to fill the vacancy on the Repub-
lican ticket caused by the death of
Vice President Sherman, according to
a statement by Chairman Hilles of the
Republican national committee last
night.
Chairman Hilles said hs had received
yesterday messages from two mors
members of the committee—Messrs.
Murphy of New Jersey and Hart of
Idaho—both of whom, Mr. Hilles de-
clared, said they would vote for Had-
ley. With those who have announced
similar preferences, there are 20 out
of 26 members thus far heard from
whom have entered the "Hadley column.
There are 53 members of the committee.
CAPITAL NEWS ELECTION
RETURNS.
Tonight the Capital News will
flash election returns on a
screen In front of Its office on
Idaho street.
Complete returns will be re
ceived by a special wire in the
office.
The entire nation will be cov
ered rapidly. In addition we
have organized a most complete
force in every county in Idaho.
A special long distance tele
phone wire has been installed
and reports will be received
and bulletins Issued as early as
possible.
The polls close at 7 p. m. In
Idaho, but we should begin re
ceiving eastern reports'by 6:30
or 7 p. m.
The editorial rooms of the
Capital News will be closed to
the public as it is impossible to
receive and compile reports
when there Is a lot of noise and
confusion. Our friends are
therefore requested to watoh
the screens tot the latest re
ports.
• •
• • • •
• ••••••
Memorial Colleges for Booth.
New York, Nov. 5.—A national "tag
day" was conducted by the Salvation
Army In many of the principal cities of
the country today to raise funds for
the erection of memorial colleges In
honor of the late General William
Booth. The colleges will be located in
New York and Chicago and will be for
the training of men and women work
ers In the Salvation Army.
Special Election Edition.
• The Capital News will serve
all its readers 'with a special
jnorning edition containing all
the election returns. This
edition will be put out Wed
nesday morning and all delivery
subscribers will find the paper
at their doors tipon arising
Wednesday morning. Mail sub
scribers will find a copy in the
morning mail at their proper
address.
• ••••• •
• • •
[ Abe Martin J
f/V
ft
siamn
You'd naturally think a neighbor
with a tourin' car would ask you t' ride
occasionally Jlst t' make It run easier.
Th' ole fashioned girl that could sew 's
a thing o' th' past.
ROOSEVELT LEADS IN
THE FIRST PRECINCT
TO ANNOUNCE VOTE
Boston, Nov. 6.—The first two
precincts In the United States
to report their vote were Nor
well and Acushnet. The vote of
Norvvell was as follows: Roose
velt. 104; Taft, 97; Wilson. 73.
The vote of Achushnet was:
Taft, 104; Wilson, 52; Roose
velt. 50.
• ••••••
• •
• •
ROOSEVELT SPENDS
THE DAY AS USUAL
Oyster Bay, Nov. 5.—The only sign
of election (lay at Sagamore Hill was a
lineman who ran a telegraph line Into a
large room on the second floor of the
Roosevelt home. Colonel Roosevelt
passed the day like any other. He sent
for his secretary as soon as he finished
breakfast and went to .work on his cor
respondence In the library.' He then
took a walk. Ho expected to vote
about noon.
QUIET FOLLOWS NIGHT
OF RIOT AT BUTTE
Butte, Mont., Nov. 5.—Quiet reigned
in Butte this morning following the at-
tack last night on Governor Norris, T.
J. Walsh, Democratic candidate for sen-
ator. and S. V. Stewart. Democratic
candidate for governor, and a wild dem-
onstration which followed the singing
of a parody on "America" by a So-
cialist speaker. Mayor Duncan and
Sheriff O'Rourke bare appointed 40«
special officers.
IMPROVEMENT SHOWN
IN THE WOOL MARKET
Boston, Nov. 5.—The market for wool
is broadening on general buying hy
nearly all the leading mills. Values are
firm, some holders asking higher prices.
Half blood Montana sells at 26 cents in
the grease.
GIRL MAKES CONFESSIO*
TO SETTING HOTEL ON FIRE
St. Louis. Nov. 5.—Barbara Gladys
Arnold, 18 years old, nurse girl, is said
to have confessed that ehe set tha
Berlin hotel on fire In which two Uvea
were lost. ' 1
Light Yets at Caldwall.
(Capital New» Special Service)
Caldwell. Nov. 6.—Voting In Caldwell
precincts up to 2 o'clock was very light.
In East Caldwell precinct only 200
votes had been cast cut of a total reg
istration of 600 Jb West Caldwell only
155 out of 608 ^d In North Caldwell
only 175 out of u_'5.\
RECORD BREAKING VOTE
IN AU PARTS OF
THEJHNTRY
Unprecedented Interest k Being Shown
in Ae Election—Heaviest Vote
. in History of New York
. * ^ „ i
Midday reports from every quarter indicated a nation
wide record-breaking vote. The interest is unprecedented.
In addition to the election of a president and vice presi
dent and members of congress, 33 states are voting for
governors and 36 for legislatures which will fill vacancies
in the United States senate. Generally favorable weather
conditions have prevailed. In certain sections of the mid
dle west, particularly in southern Illinois the overcast
skies and threatened rain augured ill, but heavy voting
was the rule. New Yoyk City and state are casting the
heaviest vote in history. In Cincinnati 50 per cent of the
total vote was cast before 11 o'clock.
ADA COUNTY VOTE
OF TWO YEARS AGO
For comparative purposes the fol
lowing table showing the vote on gov
ernor by precincts in Ada county In
1910 may prove interesting:
Brady. Hawley.
No. 1.................... 146
No. 2.................... 94
No. » ............... 184
No. 4.................... *1
No. 6 .................... 58
No. 6.................... 96
No. 7 ................... 193
No. 8.................... 114
No. 9 ................... 242
No. 10................... 218
No. 11 .................. 259
No. 12 .................. 183
No. 13................... 182
No. 14 .................. 182
No. 15................... 192
Fair Grounds............ 176
Whitney.............. 99
Kuna............— .... 66
Mapld Grove............. 57
Dry Creek............... 20
Union.................154
South Boise ............. 210
Soldiers' Home .......... 166
Meridian........... 316
White Cross............. 71
jTen Mile ................ 19
Green Meadow .......... 123
Intermountain.........186
Barberton........... 5
Total................4135
. „
The following figures on the election
In Idaho on governor in each of ^ the
* '
VOTEON GOVERNOR
III DAHO HI 1910
counties of the state may be useful for
comparison purposes with returns of
the present election:
Brady.
Hawley.
Ada ............
3.944
•Adams ........
Bannock ........
.......2,064
2,423
Blalno ..........
1,390
Bear Lake......
909
Bingham .......
2,264
Boise ...........
T21
Bonner .........
.......1,893
1.198
•Bonneville .....
Canyon .........
2,620
Cassia .........
783
•Clearwater .....
Custer .........
669
Elmore .........
765
Fremont .......
3,776
Idaho ..........
1,695
Kootenai .......
2,932
Latah ...........
1,599
Lemhi ..........
891
Lincoln ........
1,640
Nes Peroe .....
2,717
Oneida .........
1,412
Owyhee ........
578
Shoshone .......
...... 1,718
2,571
Twin Falls .....
1,808
Washington ....
...... 1.525
1,659
Totals .......
......39,961
40,856
•New county since last election.
Foetbail Player Injured.
Washington, Nov. 5.—Jack Hegarty,
captain of the Georgetown university
football team. Is suffering from an in
jury so severe that he will never play
the game again. In the struggle Sat
urday with North Carolina Hegarty
sustained a broken ankle, tore tbe lig
aments in his leg and Is on the verge
of a nervous breakdown
In Chicago the early hours saw ev
ery polling place filled with long lines
of voters waiting to get into the
booths. Very few availed themselves
of the opportunity of using voting ma
chines, which was taken to indicate
scratching. In Pacific coast states
early voting was heavy, despite the
inclement weather In Seattle, Portland
and northern California. Governor
Wilson was first of the three leading
candidates to cast his vote. Rose
velt voted at Oyster Bay in a fire truck
house. President Taft voted shortly
after noon and took full five minutes.
Reports received by national chair
men of the three parties showed a
heavy vote cast throughout the coun
try. Half of the votes in Massachu
setts cities and towns were cast by
11 o'clock, while Republican state
headquarters srf New York said ad
vices were that two-thirds of the vote
of New York was cast by noon!
Much splitting was reported in
Michigan. Estimates differ as to the
hour when the results on the presi
dential contest will be known tonight.
Political leaders figuring on a land
slide, say the result would be known
by 9 o'clock, while other believe it
will be midnight.
Record Vote in New York,
New York. Nov. 5.—A record vote is
expected in New York City and the
state today. The weather is clear and
cool throughout the state. The total
registration in this city is more than
700,000, and a vote of 650,000 is pre
dicted. Twelve hundred thousand are
expected In the state outside of New
York City.
In the first hour's balloting not one
of the 10,400 policemen doing election
duty in New York City had made any
report of trouble.
Working for Prohibition.
Wheeling W. Va., Nov. 5.—Hundreds
of women appeared at the polling
places today, urging voters to support
the prohibition amendment. Prayer
meetings are being held in all sec
tions.
Ballets Disappear.
Spartanburg, N. C., Nov. 6.— Every
__printing press at Spartanburg was
rughed thJg mornln(f to tha
j ballots for today's election, which had
been either destroyed or concealed. No
light was thrown on the disappearance
of the tickets. Other ballots were pre
pared in time.
Heavy Vote in Utah.
Salt Lake, Nov. 6.—The fair weather
here brought out a heavy early vote.
8traw Votee In Washington.
Washington, Nov. 6.—Residents of
the capital, having no franchise, are
contenting themselves with casting
straw votes. Hundreds of polling
places throughout the District of Co
lumbia opened at sunrise and will con
tinue to receive ballots till sundown
when an effort will be made to assem
ble the vote. Both men and women are
voting. It Is estimated 7000 govern
ment employes have gone to their
homes to vote. Chief Moore, of the
weather bureau, was happy when fore
casters the country over began to re
port predictions of generally fair
weather.
Kansas Vote Heavy..
Topeka, Nov. 5.—At 10:80 o'clock the
skies of Kansas were overcast with
clohds, but the vote in town and county
was very heavy.
Quebec Legislature Opens.
Quebec, Nov. 6.—With the usual cere
monies the session of the Quebeo legis
lature was opened this afternoon.. Es
corted by a military guard, the admin
istrator of the province arrived at the
parliament buildings, a salute being
fired from the citadel. The speech from
the throne was not an exceptionally
long one. It was moved and seconded
by Messrs. Tessier and Scott, both mum
members, of the house.

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