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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, May 16, 1914, Image 4

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EVENING : CAPITAL : NEWS
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RitlliM Every Aftaraoan and Sunday Morning at Bolaa Idah* n City *f
•0,000 People, by _
THU CAPITAL NEWS PUBLISHING COMP ANT. LIMITED
RICHARD STORY SHERIDAN.
Entered at the Poet Office at Boise, Idaho, ae Second-alaaa Mall Matter.
Society Editor. 113-J.
-Buelness Office, 234; Editorial Rooms, 234;
Pbonei
BOI8E, IDAHO, 8ATURDAY. MAY 16, 1014.
a
FIELD PERILS.
a
• The farmer planta his flfeld of corn—the kind that doesn't pop—and
• hopes that on some autumn mom he'll start to shuck his crop. And
• shuck hla crop he often does, which is exceeding queer, for blights and
• perils fairly buzz around it through the year. I think It strange that
• farmers raise the goodly crops they do, for they are scrapping all their
• days against a deadly crew. To plant and till will not suffice; the men
•• must strain their frames, to kill the bugs and worms and mice, and peets
The cut worms cut, the chinchbugs chinch, the
a with Latin name*.
• weevil weave« It« 111, and other pest« come up and pinch the corn and
• eat their fill. And then the ralnworks go on strike, and gloom the world
• enshrouds, and up and down the burning pike the dust Is blown In
• cloud«. And If our prayers are of avail, and rain come« In the night,
• It often brings a grist of hall that riddle« all In sight. And still the
« farmers raise their crops, and nail the shining plunk; none but the
kicker stands and yawps, and what he says Is bunk. If all men brooded
• o'«r their woes, and looked ahead for grief, that gent would starve
• who gaily goes to thresh
• the golden sheaf.
• Copyright, 1014, by
• Th« Adams Newspaper Servie«,
«
a
THE COST OF HONEYFOGGLING THE PEOPLE.
A
There are several cases pending before the public utili
ties commission wherein it is sought to secure a reduction
iln rates upon some portion or other of the Oregon Short
fLine. That railroad will, of course, set up as its chief de
fense the amount of expenses incurred in the operation of
the road to show that its rates are not exorbitant.
It will, therefore, be interesting to consider some of
the items of expense which the railroad company will pre
sent to show why its rates ought to continue to be the
highest charged any people in any civilized section of the
earth today.
One of the items included in this bill of expense which
the people will be asked to pay for by continued high rates
is that of "industrial and immigration" bureaus. We, of
Idaho, have some idea of what this item is for. We have
an "industrial bureau" maintained in this state. We all
know how liberal the railroad is in providing the repre
sentative in charge of that bureau expenses not alone for
his own entertainment but for the entertainment of others
whose influence is desirable at the moment of the enter
-iainment.
He is blind who cannot and who does not see the real
purpose of the maintenance of such a bureau. This item
of expense for the year ending June 30, last, was $090.770.
To be sure the "industrial bureau" maintained in
Idaho is not the only one maintained by the Sho-t Line,
but the one maintained in this state will give a general
idea of the purpose for which this vast sum, equivalent to
almost 7 per cent of the entire expenditures of that sys
tem for the same year, have been expended. This
does not include avertising as a part of the immigration
activities of the Short Line system, either. At least, the
item of advertising appears as a separate item of expense.
So, when these cases come up for hearing before the
public utilities commission, the request for a reduction in
the high rates will be met with a presentation of the
penses of the road included in which will be this item of
$690,770 for a single year's expense of the maintenance of
"industrial and immigration bureaus," which, being prop
erly interpreted means, "The cost of honeyfoggling men of
influence so as to receive their support, against the people
whenever a demand comes from them for fair treatment.
sum
ex
• '
OUR POSITION.
The Bulletin Is an absolutely Independent newspaper, free from debt and
alt other Incumbrances which may Influence Its policy.
It has always stood
and still stands for the best Interests of tho Minidoka projeot. Cassia county
and the state of Idaho.
This paper believee In strict Immigration
laws for th* protection of
American labor from cheap competition at home, and likewise a tariff for pro
tection against still cheaper labor In foreign countries; also for the protection
of our farmers against the products of cheap foreign land and labor.
Yet, the regulation of the tariff alone will never solve the great acenomlo
problem confronting this country today. It will require direct legislation to
effect a Just distribution of wealth, and prevent Its further centralisation Into
the hands of a few.
This can never be accomplished by a forced competition
In trade, as la being attempted by the Democratic party at the present time
Great combinations of wealth are economic necessities in this age. Competi
tion Is not only extravagant and wasteful, but It Is In direct contradiction to
the best business method of the present day. Big business regulated in the
interests of the people as a whole and the laborers In partloul&r, and later
public ownership, is the only solution of the problem.—Burley Bulletin.
In the above the Burley paper outlines a good Progres
sive party platform, a platform, too, that is distinctively
Progressive, and one upon which neither our Democratic
nor our Republican friends can agree. We have but one
exception to make to it and that is the conclusion that
public ownership must ultimately come. As we view the
situation public ownership is rather the natural outcome
of the Democratic and Republican policies which, fur
nishing no other solution, must inevitably force the people
to public ownership, which the Progressive policy, if
adopted in time, will avoid.
With just and competent regulation why should there
be public ownership? If the public utilities commission
should give fair, just and competent regulation in the in
terests of the people of the electric power and light com
pany now serving Burley, for instance, what excuse could
there be for demanding public ownership? If the neces
sary light and power are supplied at the actual cost, plus
only a reasonable profit after an economic administration
of the company's business is enforced, why should any
body want public ownership or anything else? All that
the "people demand is adequate service, courteous treat
ment and for that they are willing to pay adequate and
■ir prices. If they are assured the adequate service, the
courfeouB treatment, and are then made to know as the re
sult of actual investigation by their own authorized rep
resentatives—the public utilities commission—that the
rates arc no more than they should be, the excuse for
public ownership would be eliminated.
The great objection to public ownership has
always been the danger from political coercion or
corruption through the multiplicity of employes
who would necessarily be more or less under the
dominati on of officials elected by the people or appointed
for them, and, consequently, more or less under the domi
nation of the politicians. With individual or corporate
ownership still maintained, and with satisfactory relief
afforded through regulation, this objection would be obvi
ated, while at the same time, the relief sought would be
obtained. The employes would still be the employes and
agents of the individual or the corporation and they
would bo responsible to their employers only and the po
litical ir fluence would be kept at the minimum possible,
but by adequate and competent public supervision all the
benefits of public ownership would be accomplished.
Please note that we say with "adequate and competent
supervision. And we believe that such supervision can be
secured just as well under public supervision as it could
be under public ownership. _
>>
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'SMUKa <1 F<MM*
MRS. THOMAS P. GORE.
(By Selene Armstrong Harmon.)
"My hobby," laughed Mrs. Thomas
P. Gore, when I asked her, "Is one per
fectly appropriate for a senator's wife;
Campaigning. I dearly love It. I have
recently made my first tour of the
state of Oklahoma with Mr. Gore. It
was splendid fun. We went to little
towns and big, traveled, not pic
turesquely by buckboard, as you fond
ly Imagine but by train and automo
bile; changed cars at every conceiv
able hour of the 24; arrived at dawn,
departed at midnight, and throughout
It all had he time of our lives."
Few women have played so promi
nent a part In their husbanchs' careers
as has Mrt. Gore. This Is as It should
be In order to round out and complete
a romance that had one of the prettiest
of beginnings. When Mrs. Gore, then
MIsb Nine. Kay of Palestine, Tex.,
drove with her father one day, some
years ago, to one of those combination
STYLE MOVIES
WATCH FOR THIS NEW REEL!
f THIS GREAT DRESS REFORM MELODRAMA*
r MODESTY WINS!"
."FREAK STYLE S MUST <50?"
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44
/TLL GOPAR^
BUT I'LL
j\ R'RE'TURN -
VBELIEVE ME?
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PASSED BY
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fite
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picnics and political gatherings so
frequent in the south, she heard a
public speech which she probably
knows almost word for word today.
It was delivered with burning zeal by
a young Populist of Oklahoma, whose
reputation as a speaker had preceded
him. Ho was 24 years old and blind.
'Of course I did not know that very
day how It would all end," Mrs. Gore
says, with the naivette of a girl of 18.
But the young blind orator knew.
He went back to Oklahoma and said to
the woman he always loved best:
"Mother, I have met the girl who Is
going to be my wife."
That Bettled the thing In his mother's
mind. Had not the boy always accom
plished the things upon which his
heart was set? Four years after the
political speech made by the young
Populist at the Texas picnic, Miss Kay
became his bride.
It,was when William Jennings Bryan
I
first loomed up larva on the Democratic !
horizon that Mr. Gore Joined the Dem
ocratic party.
•1 always had a great ambition for
my husband," Mr*. Gore says. "When
our friend* out there In Oklahoma
begged him to run for a seat In the|
house on the ground that the cam- j
palgnlng necessary to win that elec
tion would be comparatively light, l|
did not want him to do It. I wanted i
him to announce for the senata And
he did."
As soon as her husband's candidacy
for the senate was announced, Mrs.
Gore moved her sewing machine out
of the sewing room and turned this
place Into an office and went about
her new Job of oampalgn manager In
a perfectlp business-like way.
he had been elected to a seat In the
senate, Mr. Gore uaed the little sew
ing room ae campaign headquarters.
Needless to say, when her husband
was elected to the United States sen
ate, Mrs. Gore was the proudest and
happiest Individual, his mother not
excepted. In the state of Oklahoma.
It Is safe to surmise that Mrs. Gore
Is the only statesman's wife In Wash
ington who has read as much political
economy as her husband, and It goes
without saying that ehe has read more
weighty books than any other woman
in Washington. During the years of
their married life she has been reader
to Senator Gore, who sees the world
largely through his wife's eyes. This
may be the reason why It seems to
him beautiful and a g«od world.
The Gores have two children, Nina
and Thomas P.. Jr.
Until
THE EVENING CHIT-CHAT
HEN I looked at a friend In the
mirror one day I was struck by
the difference In the mirrored
Image and the real faca
"You don't look at all the
In the mirror aa you really do," I
same
exclaimed. "You look much better In
reality."
In return she examined my mirrored
face. "Why, you're different, too," she
said.
Since then I've looked at many people
In many mirrors and find that the same
Is true In practically every case.
The majority look much better In
reality. A few look less attractive, and
many simply look different. I suppose
this Is due to some flaw In the mirror.
But It seems to be true of all of them.
And even If we could each have a
perfect mirror we would never see In
It the face we turn to our friends. We
would only see a specially composed
mirror face. People who unexpectedly
see themselves in a mirror often fall
to recognize themselves. I know one
woman, a trifle near sighted I must
admit, who dodged herself for two or
three minutes In a department store
mirror and finally was" Informed of her
mistake and led away by a floorwalker.
It's an Interesting thought, Isn't It,
that we really never know Just how we
look? We go through life presenting a
certain face to all about us and never
know Just what that face Is. Think
of It! We who are most Intimately
concerned and Interested In Its ap
pearance never see It.
What about pictures, says someone?
Pictures are worse than mlrrora Our
picture says one thing and one another.
Gather together a half dozen snap shots
of yourself taken within a few months.
Include a slt-for-your-plcture photo
graph if you wiBh, and see how they
vary. And not only In expression—that
Is to be expected—but In the lines and
cast of your countenance. One makes
you out fat, another thin; the one that
seems best to you, your friends declare
doesn't look a bit like you; and the
one you threaten to tear up they insist
Is a perfect likeness.
So we never can know what our per
sons look like, and more than that we
never can know what our personalities
are like to others.
Every man has three distinct per
sonalities. First there Is the personal
ity he himself thinks he possesses.
Second, there Is the personality oth
ers see; and this In turn Is divided into
innumerable personalities, for that
Rame name stands for one personality
or
EVERY
FORTUNE
THE
18 LAID WHEN
THE FIRST
DOLLAR 18
SAVED.
FOUNDATION
LET U8 HELP YOU BEGIN TO SYSTEMATICALLY SAVE.
4 Par Cent Interest Paid on Tima Deposits.
ThePacificNational Bank
U. S. DEPOSITARY
Safa Deposit Baxes, $3.00 Per Year.
Start the Boy Right
Implant the habit of saving in the
boy when he is young and you have
taught him the fundamental prin
ciple of success.
Impress upon him the truth of
those words as spoken by the great
Gladstone, "Believe me when I tell
you that the Thrift of Time will re
pay you in after life with a usury of profit be
yond your most sanguine dreams, and the waste
of it will make you dwindle, alike in intellectual
and moral stature, beyond your darkest reckon
ings.
BOISE
CITY
NATIONAL
BANK
BOISE,IDAHO
yy
BOISE CITY NATIONAL BANK
ESTABLISHED EIGHTEEN HUNDRED EIGHTY-SIX
to his wife, for another to his neigh
bor, for another to hla business asso
ciates, tov another to his enemies. Ev
eryone who knows him or hearing his
name gets a certain mental picture ac
cording to his own particular knowl
edge of Its owner.
Third, there la the personality aa It
actually is—In other words, the man
whom the Infinite Knowledge sees.
And no man can know all these other
personalities. Especially is It impos
sible for him to know the personality
his name calls up in the minds of other
men and women. His personality as It
actually Is he may perhaps got a
glimpse of by self study and analysis,
for his own mind Is accessible to him;
but other men's minds are not and so
he must forever be ignorant as to what
his personality looks like to others.
It's a queer thought Isn't It 7 You
and I and every one walking about
the world presenting a certain person
and a certain personality to all we
meet, and utterly Incapable of knowing
what they see. We used to love to
read about enchantments ani spellsjn
the fairy tale«. Could any enchant
ment be stranger than this?
Who Ars Wo?
We cater to people who desire qual
ity In laundry work, who want their
laundry when It Is returned to be ab
solutely clean. Our eanitary methods
enable ub to turn out the tery best
class of work. Send us your next
order. Idaho Steam Laundry. Phone
141.—(Advertisement.)
Holsum Bread, highest quality, larg
est loaf.—Advertisement
M2)
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OmA
A The Early Worm ^
O NCE there was a worm; who
tried to become very wise!
"What matters it, he sad to
himself, "that I am only a corimon
every day earth worm. I can isten
and think and become the very
wisest earth worm in the sihele
world."
"You're foolish," laughed a broiler
worm, ''don't yon know that witl all
your thinking you can never be uy
thing but a common earth wortnf
"You are the foolish one," an
■wered the ambitiou* worm, *4ou
are very stupid, too."
And he turned on his tail fad
'started away.
"Someday," he called back »I er
him, "when I am very wise, I ' ill
come back and teach you mi iy
things."
And he burrowed deep Into îe
ground for a quiet study.
All winter long he stayed downdn
the ground.
Some folks said he stayed th re
because he was asleep. Some s id
he stayed because the ground s is
frozen and he couldn't crawl up ie
•aid he stayed because he wanted :o
think and grow wise.
You see, about earth worms is
about most everything else in t is
world of ours, you can believe 1
most anything you please, accord g
to the kind of a person you are.
Along towards spring, when ie
breezes began, to blow soft i d
warm from the south land, when |c
birds began to start north, the ca n
worm felt a desire to dig his w|y
up to light.
"I believe," he declared to himsff,
"that if I am
thing I will
snyself."
h
So he dug and he prowled and e
wormed his wav upward throu li
the soggy half thawed soil.
Pretty soon he remembered e
worm who had laughed at him. f
I could only find that old fellow," e
ever to amount to ai ■
have to Mart to w< k
A.
EMMETT NEWS NOTES,
(Capital New* Special Servie«,)
Emmett, May 16.—Mr. and Mira p.
J. Bliss have returned from Chicago,
where Mr. Bliss has been under medical
attendance, Hla oondltlon la very much
Improved.
Mrs. Ellen Woodrul of Ontario wo* In
the city Thursday, looking over the
country.
The P. A. DeClark family motored
out to the Charlie Vandeusen ranch
Wednesday to look Into the sheep
shearing business, which Is going on
full Ibloat. Twenty machines are at
work and an average of 2B00 sheep are
sheared a day. Mr. DeClark says that
It was a fine sight to see and well
worth the trip.
An enjoyable reception was given
Rev. S. M. Hunter, new pastor of the
Presbyterian church, Wednesday, by
the various churohes. A delightful pro
gram was rendered, the pastor
welcomed, a pleasant lunch was served
and an all 'round good time was en
joyed by all.
As a result of the failure of the first
team of the high school basketball boys
to beat the second team, an automobile
ride was given the second team and
their partners Wednesday evening.
The Christian Endeavor met at the
R. H. Greene home Thursday evening.
vas
(From Judge)
We always remember those who
have done us a favor— when wo want
another favor dona
Subtoribo for the Capital News.
declared, "I'd Mil him sonM *f m)
wisdom.
And then, as happens somstimes
in this world, he found him.
"Good morning, lazy worm/* ha
said, "why don't yon work as I do,
Only the workers can find tha Hght.
"You don't know much," scoffed
the lazy worm, "1 don't intend t«
hurry Jnyself. Haven't yon ever
heard the saying, 'the «arty bird get*
the worm'? I assure yon 1 don't in
•"hand very early/
^haf* a foolish afcying 1 , quoth
the wise worm, H l intend to work
«• L ha "»*_*• b *
happy. 1,1
~r
"flU.
MX.
A robin came along qnd gobbled up the
worm.
So he worked very hard and ha
worked very fast. He crawled up to
the surface of the garden just as the
morning sun peeped over the hori
son.
j u , t then a robin came along and
gobbled up the worm—wisdom and
everything!
All of which merely proves that
you never can tell what may hap
pen!

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