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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, February 04, 1916, Image 1

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T% EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
£
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No. 21
BOISE, IDAHO, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1916.
EIGHT PAGES
Vol. XXXVI
*
FIRE DESTROYS
PARLIAMENT
The Canadian Govern
ment Structure at
Ottawa Bined
BELIEVED EXPLOSION
CAUSED THE DISASTER
_
**» WynyaM^l Wlton
irerisnea in rne isunu ng
and Many More ere n
jured Estimates as to
♦ Via T.f)S<?
me JjUSS.

Ottawa, Ont., Feb. 4. —The hlstorio
Canadian parliament building w
Btroyed last night by a fire declared
unofficially to have been caused by the
explosion of a gas bomb or an infernal
machine. Two women, guests of tho
wife of Speaker Sevigny. were
come by smoke and perished,
policemen and firemen w
under debris when one end
building collapsed.
It has been established that the first
burst of flames In the reading room of
the house of commons was preceded by
at least one explosion and probably by
two. The force of the concussion was
de
-er
Several
buried
of the
r.
severe that persons standing some
the floor.
distance away were hurled t
A rigid investigation to determine the
cause of the fire already has been un
îcrtakrn by tho dominion authorities.
The flames spread with such amazing
rapidity that the Ottawa lire brigade
was helpless to cope with them. Aid
was sent trom Montreal on a special
train.
The loss cannot be estimated In
money. The building was valued at
«bout J5,no0,000. But the contents are
ot inestimable value. There was no
insurance.
Many Had Narrow Escape*.
Members of the parliament, specta
tors in the gallery of the lower house,
government employes and others who
were In the building, narrowly escaped
death or injury. Within a few minutes!
after the fire began, corridors were
fUlc-d with amok«, ami at many point«
walla of flam« barred progrès«. Thar«
were many doors to the great building
hut s noe the outbreak of the war all,
, except he main portals have been
V closed to safeguard the legislators.'
w . A . , j #
This precaution made escape more dif
_ , . .. mi#
ficult, and probablv was responsible for
Î, „ * ,, . .
tho deaths of Mme. Bray of Montreal
and Mme. Morin of Beauce In one of
the rooms of the speaker «suite.
Mme. Sevigny saved her two chi -
dren by dropping them into a firemen s
aafety net and then leaped to eafety;
herself. Another of her guests. Mme.
Dussault, saved herself in the 8am0
way.
Among those severely burned
vas
. . r , .. .
Minister of Agriculture Burrell, who
fell unconscious after plungmg through
a. curtain of file and groping his
along a smoke-filled corridor.
ERECTED AT COST
OF FIVE MILLIONS
Ottawa, Ont., Feb. 4.—The Canadian
►re situated on a
parliament bulldlngp
bluff 150 feet high and. overlooked the
, .. . .. ... . . „
Li 'c- « e Zen * ' t
King Edward VIE.. In I860. The cost
o const i uc ion * as •». 1 "• 1 ar j< s< v
a y B f en u (f ' , ...
e * 5 L ai r
ur> *' <l 1 r ' [ irv ° U1 ' n ° n
building was said to he one of the fines.
examples of Goth ^architecture orithc.
continent. (ream-colored sandstone,
revted fro
Ottawa river. They w
1859 to 1865 nnd the cornerstone
as
lavishly buttressed, was used In
Lord Dalhousle, the first.
la, was large
structlon.
governor general of (';
ly responsible for the design of the
building.
The central building, which had two
The New Goods
Are Appearing
February marks the beginning
of spring business in the stores.
The first of the new goods be
to appear; the first sug
gestion of the advanced styles
gL
are seen.
To the up-to-date woman this
is an interesting shopping month.
index to her of
ill buy a little later
often it is a
what she
'■I:
She likes to visit the stores
and look.
She lik^s particularly to watch
the newspaper advertising for
helpful message's that will
assist her in forming a definite
the
opinion.
And the merchants, knowing
crowd their advertising
this,
with notes of the. new.
DISLIKED BECAUSE
OF GERMAN BIRTH
V. '
o
a
A'
A
*
A
«
A
•' -A
I
!
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' ■ ; >
t: /' A
y
I
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II
viscount Mtiner.
" coun , ' I
!
tas been made the center.of attack |
| , r ï f ^ , to B ^ ti ( 1 ' liat P Mnnpr w a ' hcrï in !
Germany, and never became * natur- j
alized lhiiiflishman. Viscount Mil- :
ner . B father p f Charles Milner, j
came from Tuebingen, Germany. i
_
wings, was 470 feet In length and had j
a tower 220 feet high. To the rear of |
the central building was the library of |
parliament, a polygonal structure with !
a dome. The senate chamber wan to
the right of the entrance and the house
of.commons to tho left. Stone carvings J
and paintings of prominent Canadians
embellished the halls and corridors, j
The library contained more than 200.000 '
volumes.
The buildings
more than four acres, on what is known
as parliament hill.
EFFORT MADE TO
INJECT POLITICS
verod an area of
Attempt to Pass Resolutions
Condemning Action of the !
Governor Fails at Horti
culturalists Meeting.
fCBpltRl N>ws social Service)
Tw , Fa|lg Feb . „.-Attempts to In
C8 , oonfcr(nt . e of t l,e
^ Horticultural association
( 8esslon berP , mpt wlth ln ,serable
... . . .
failure yesterday afternoon and ro
. . . _ _,, „ _. , Ä _
suited in a cold shoulder being given
4 . . . . . , . ,
to ardent backers of a resolution hav
that obJert ln vlew aa offpred by
j Rlnsp , of Bol8e , 8pol(Pn for nnd
L uppor , Pd by Walter K. Wood.
fatp mpt an attPmpt to bPllttlp
!thB R of statfi Horticultural In
0lly Graham. By unanimous,
association sitting as a com
)n , ttPP of the w h o!e defeated the Slnsel
resolution. Then those in attendante;
The
paid a tribute to Inspector Graham by
, hBt biR work ns horticul-!
ra| lnf , p{ .„ nr waa not
factory but much more so than had
been the inspection work under the
previous administration of the office.
Protests From All Sides.
The association went Into committee
of the whole late in the afternoon. The
proceedings before It at. this time are
entirely Informal nnd open discussion
atters of Interest to
When the
satis
nly
is permitted of
the horticultural industry.
Sinsei resolution was presented there
were loud and forceful cries of protest
from all parts of the convention hall,
SppnUf . rs df!Plarod that 1ho attempt to
inject politics into the proceedings of
: the convention was ill-timed and in
their opinion bad taste. They declared
that the horticultural hoard fight was
nnd that lhe
wag very satisfactory in every
. ... .
manner. The strenuous opposition to
the resolution caught the authors un
j a wares. It was apparent they expect
Quite the
»vive the tight
»Id board after
was ousted as president
and present board
was organized, recalling as it did the
I allegation which has been repeatedly
denied, that the appointment of E. F.
Stephens and C. P. Hartley ns mem
bers of the board was made In pursu
of nn understanding between them
■ould carry out
was repudiated fol-j
lowing the discussion in the committee
of tho whole convention and praise;
w as giv en Guy Graham for his work a*
ns poet or.
The convention today discussed at
length farm market problems. One
the more important addresses given
ork
f the new
j
•d t r» créât»
be true.
Resolution Repudiated.
Senator Zuck, a member of the hoard
f horticultural inspection, made a vig
| orous defense of Governor Alexander,
! against whom the resolution was dl
; reded.
■ that waged about the
I Henry Burma
pposite appeared t
It sought to
; and wh< n the ne
n
find tho governor they
the latter's demand to have Graham
appointed as horticultural inspector.
The resolut i
was that of W. G. Rcholtz, director of
f irm markets, who told the delegates
f the wotk the fa
markets bureau
! performing and the future plans for im-1
j proving the horticultural market.
GERMANY WU1 NOT ADMIT
SINKING OF LUSITANIA
WAS ILLEGAL ACT
Infonnation reaching the Associated
Press indicates that under no circumstances will Ger
many admit that the sinking of the Lusitania was an il
legal act. The new instructions forwarded to Ambassador
Bernstorff, according to the information, contained simply
! one phrase of the new formulation of the proposed note of
regret for the sinking of the -L/USltRUlcl. 1 he suggested
'sentence consists of eight words and does not contain the
j word "illegal. It represents the extreme limit ot Ger
1 manv's concessions in the Lusitania ease.
Berlin, Feb. 4.
I
Lansing and Ambassador Confer.
Washington, Feb. 4.—
.quest Secretary Lansing
I Bernstorff late today on 1 he Lusitania negotiations.
! ambassador h,is roroiv«! Berlin's answer in the l.nsitania
| r*ase. Count von Bernstorff said before the conference
! lie did not understand how the instructions could be »in
j satisfactory to the United States.
:
j
i
... it, , «,
At Ambassador Bernstorff s re
will confer with Count von
rpi
1 110
HEAVY TOLU FIRES
j
|
|
!
FIVE
LIVES LOSE
AT ATLANTIC CITY
IN A HOTEL FIRE
Guests Trapped on Upper
Floors Unable to Escape
—Others Injured Are Ex
pected to Die.
Atlantic City, Feb. 4 ,—Five persons
lost their lives and eight others were
seriously Injured in a fire which de
stroyed the Over brook hotel here early
today. Several of the injured are ex
pected to die. It is believed the fire
started in the kitch<
Those killed
were trapped on the upper floors by the
fire. One woman was seen to faint
after calling for help and burned to
death
windo
to help. The engineer of the hotel hung
out of a window until the fire reached
his hands,
to the street. He was killed. Another
woman, who managed to crawl out of
indow, fell nnd was killed in the
hile her body lay across the
sill In view of hundreds unable
vhich caused him to drop
the
street.
Ohio Governor Condemns Continental Army Plan;
More Costly and Less Efficient Than National Guard
By Governor Frank B. Willie of Ohio,
rjTVtKSIDENT WILSON has sub
IX# I to congress the most far
I | I reaching program for national
preparedness In the history of
the lessons taught all too vividly by)
the past few months, he has reversed
the views of a life time and ha* come
to realize that a great people like ours.!
with s
the United States. Recognizing
great, coast line must be prepared
against war if permanent peace is to
be its fortune.
A very large part of the people of the
United States will agree with the pres
ident that it Is foolish to continue as
though we are favored peoples and not
..
tlon.
As a pnrt of the policy for adequate
hand defense, the secretary of war, with
the president's approval, has submitted,
to congress the plan of a so-called
"continental army." As a second line!
of defense, back of the regular army,
Increased to 150,000 or 200,000 men, he
would have a civilian army (consisting!
on paper of some 400,000 men whose
military training would be limited to
six weeks or two months in the year,
with little, if any, systematic training
j between for a period of three years,
j Apparently 200 men of this army are
j assigned to each congressional district,
Officers and general plan gre to be
worked out on paper—the men to be
eallcd out In time of war. The Na
tional Guard is to be relegated to the
l third line of defense, but its members
i may individually become part of the
so-called "continental army," and they
are invited to do no.
Second Army Costly» Impractical.
To this policy of creating a new' so-I
| called second army, and relegating the
I National Guard to an obscure place, I
, believe every man w'ho has given care
of|ful study to military affairs will be
steadfastly nnd vigorously opposed. It
ch great resources and such a
give attention to adequate naval nnd
Ultary resources for our own protec
:
disregards the best Judgment of almost)
| every man competent to Judge of mill
isitary affairs as they relate t
army in the United Rtntes, entail vast
a civilian
ly increased expenditures and give no
SIX WOMEN ARE
BURNED TO DEATH;
HOME DESTROYED
Brooklyn Residence of Mrs.
Casimir Tax Is Burned as
a Result of Defective
Wiring.
New- York, Feb. 4. —Rix
their liv(
vom en lost
in a fire which destroyed the
home of Mrs. Casimir Tag of Brooklyn.
ident of the
Mrs. Tag, ivho is the widow of the pres
German Savings bank,
daughters per
The other dead are a cousin, a
went to the room of her sister, where
she was trapped by the flames. Mr.
Tag left an estate estimated at $1,-j
000*00.
escaped, but her t\v<
lshed.
nurse and two maids. The fire is at
tributed to defective insulation of
Miss Caroline Tag. wh'
phoned the alarm, n
was being overcome by smoke.
tele
larked that she
vires.
She
aided her mother to escape and then
actual, practical and efficient results.
In place of a careful, definite policy, it
would substitute an involved indefinite
experiment. In all probability it would
mean that the country is again, at the
beginning of another war, ,to depend
largely upon raw, undrilled recruits for
its soldiers and sacrifice them by the
thousands until the opportunity. If any
such Is granted, is presented for ade
quate training. More than this, it
mean« the destruction of the National
Guard. The continental army would be
more favored, nnd the young men of
our nation, who voluntarily enter mill
tar> service, would enter the more fa
vored division.
Taking the country over, our Nntion
al Guard Is now more effective than
lever in its history. Careful attention to
the recommendations of its skilled offl
cers would, in my belief, shortly make
M

\
N
m
A'
■mmii
( 1 OV. Frank B. Willis.
it a far more effective force for the
tional defense than any continental
tion
army that can Le «devised.
f Secretary Garri
volves 48 distinct na nagements, is far
The objec
n thnt it In
BOOTLEGGERS ARE
FINDING WEM
VERY POOR FIELD
Vigilance of Officers Has
Reduced Illegal Sale of
Liquor to Minimum in
Washington County.
. (Sta " correspondence.)
been reduced to a minimum in Weiser
und in Washington county, due m
sheriff and police departments and the|
count > attorney s atric«. Th« authon
tics have been relentless In hunting
down and prosecuting bootleggers In
this town and county. The result is
i
! that there is very little offending of
! this kind being done here. ■'
during mi there «ere only seven
; bootlegging cases tried in the district
court of Washington county, according
I to a statement made by James Harris,
I the prosecuting attorney of this coun
ty. Six ol' them were convicted. The
seventh one skipped out and forfeited
his bond. Of the six who were con
victed two have taken an appeal to
the supreme court of this state. These
cases are now pending.
I During the January term of the dis
1 trict court here which came to u
; close last Friday, Judge Bryan on tHe
bench, there was not a single bootleg
ging case on the docket. There was
only one criminal case of any kind
just closed. It was a petty larceny
case in which Harry Skin, a floater,
victed and sentenced to thr«
months in jail for attempting to steal
money from the Weiser News com
vas c<
rany.
Ed Gibbs, a rancher of near Good
rich, was brought down to Weiser
Thursday and given a hearing as to'
his sanity. He was ordered commit
ted in the asylum at Black foot, on
different nights this week he
wandered aimlessly about in the deep
result that both his
snow, with the
feet were frozen.
Dr. Thwing's Anniversary.
Cleveland, O., Feb. 4.—Dr. Charles
F. Thwing today rounded out a quar
ter of a century of service as presi
dent of Western Reserve university
in this city. It was on Feb. 4, 1891,
that he was formally installed as pres
ident of the university and of Adel
heid. college. Dr. Thwing is ranked
among the foremost educators of
America and is also widely known as
a preacher, author and lecturer. He
has been honored with the presidency
of the Intercollegiate Peace associa
tion and the Religious Education as
sociation and has served as secretary
of the Carnegie Foundation for the'*
Advancement of Teaching.
| •


• ••••••••••••••••I*
Wire Trouble.
Owing to wire trouble, as a re
sult of the storm, the Associated •
Press report is today in abbre
viated form. The Western Union
wires are out of commission to «a •
• great extent and news service is •
badly crippled as a result. •





more easily obviated than the creation
of a new' an' experimental army,
standard Natical O'
nationl staff compose J of Loth National
Guard and regular army officers would
quickly
A
ird system v/*th a
uniform basis,
pported by congressional fin
ancial legislation, would bo adequate to
meet every defense.
work
out
vhich.
^ Ienlistment
Umirdsmçn j n the army of the 1 nlted
States at the Unie of their enlistment
National Guard would eliminate
another difficulty without the necessity
a constitutional amendment. This
wol, !d obviate the objection the Na
U°nnl Guardsmen could not be taken
on * ' nited States. At the same
Urne the National Guards should be re
Hcved of police duties, such as are re
^uire«! in strikes, and which are better
car * a constabulary
Suggestions for Strengthening Army.
I do not believe a general staff of
regular army officers should be permit
ted. Trained as these men are. they
do not realize the factors of normal ci
vilian life which must be considered in
connection with
They are accustomed to ordering
they please and have their orders car
order goes. This is all right in regular
army affairs, but It does not work out
for a civilian army in time of peace. A
»f both regular at
•ombined,
>f fleers in the
quickly work out
would give the coun.
f service
voluntary
service,
hen
National Guard
and National Guard offlcei
with National
majority,
uniform plan ttiat
try an effective s
at minimum expense.
luard
would
id line
if the National
ght
force.
The working out of these plans, ac
companied by an increase of the Na-I
tional Guard to two or three times
present sitfe, together with an adequate!
salary scale of say perhaps 20 per cent
of regular army pay, will give the Uni
ted States In the quickest, most
pensive and most effec tive fashion, the
protection that the nation
have far better than any continental
army can give it
SEES MUTILATED
MEN MADE OVER
(»/Olivo*#
a]
prjj
I
>
Î
/ -f
Mrs. William R. Vanderbilt has
just returned from her third visit to
Paris since the outbreak of the war.
She says she saw many wonderful
operations on wounded men. in one i
case a man's rib being taken out and ,
used to make a jawbone. ,
Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt.
Japanese Liner
Sunk and 160
Lives Lost
_ I
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#
î
I
I
I
_ , _ . . rp W ;
Spokane, Feb. 4.—The Northern'
_ ' î.. .. . ..
Pacific announced toda> that it ex
... .« .î, ,
pected to have its line through the
.......
pen h> tonight and start a
train from Pasco for Seattle. A ro
tarv started at (Me El urn expecting to
ir.uh St.impede, winie No. 4 has
been H"»«-bound two day. am. then
estward. The Milwaukee ex
. . , .. .
pects to have ts line through the Gas
1 .
cades open tomorrow. The Cirent,
.. . , , ,
Northern is unable to say when its Lne
, .. .
w.ll hr open. Trains from the cut
are being turned back here.


Shanghai, Feb. 4.—The Jap
anese liner Dianjin Maru was
Wednesday night in a
collision with the steamship
One hundred and sixty
lives were lost and 21 persons
were saved. The Linan was
badly damaged and is return
ing to Hong Kong.
sunk
Linan.


AREPREPARINGTO
RESUME SERVICE
( 'a sea des
HAßD DO T[Dl)ADI7C
KUdIl K o IlKKUKIll
proceed
Clarion, In., Feb. 4 Fight robbe
ight terrorized citizen» of Sham
a series of unsuccessful
attempts to blow the safe of the State*
bank there. Citizens who left their
homes at the sound of
were ordered back to bed at the point
of revolvers. The robbers finally
caped to the country. They are being
pursued b^ a posse.
last n
bn ugh
ith
he explosions
TURKS EVACUATE
im I
f|||
Novoe
the effect
that the Turks have evacuated Er -
e of their principal strong
holds on the Caucasian front
ASTRONGHOLDON
|
Petrograd, Feb. 4. —The
inex-|vremyn asserts that it has received
j trustworthy information t
I zerum.
ACCEPTED
The Prussiao-American
Treaty Applies in the
APPLICATION OF THE
TERMS NOT DECIDED
Much Speculation as to
What the German Com
merce Raider Has Been
Doing Since the Capture
of the Appam.
Washington, Feb. 4 . —Secretary
Lansing today indicated that the
United States had decided to hold that
the Prussian-American treaty governs
in the Appam case, as Germany con
tends. All that now- remains to be de
cided is the interpretation of the ap
plication of the treaty's terms.
ENGLAND DEMANDS
RETURN OF APPAM
. , .
of the Appam "*«** *,£
,< ' rman l>rlze * a d p '°"
controversy with Great Britain Is
foreshadowed as the Bnltod States has
practically derided to hold the prize
belongs to Germany.
2.—A mbassador
Washington,
Spring-Rice today presented a formal
demand for the return t
Feb.
its British
IDENTITY OF RAIDER
STILL A MYSTERY
Newport News, Feb. 4.—British and
American authorities are satisfied that
the raider which captured the Appam
was a new- fruit trader built at Brem
erhaven and originally named "Pon
ga,'' fitted out with heavy guns and
sent to sen as a commerce destroyer.
The Germans say the ship was ths
"Moewe," commanded
Count Dohna of the
their answers to questions as to wheth
er she is a converted merchantman are
non-commital.
Captain Gaunt said Thursday that
all of the captured British masters
agreed that the raider was a fruit ship
mounting about six-inch guns. He be.
lleved that after being fitted out at a
German Baltic port, she passed
sea through the
lines flying tho Swedish flag.
Everybody here Is waiting expect
antly for another ship to appear with
a German prize crew and stories of
the operations of the raider
has not been heard from since she
parted company with the Appam Jan.
17 off the coast of Spain. As she cap
tured seven prizes in the four days
before the Appam was overhauled, it
is taken for granted she probably has
something to show for the past 10 days.
Small Amount of Bullion on Board.
Various reports about tremendous
sums in gold bullion aboard the Ap
" , , , .
pam were cleared up Thursday when
\ , , , . n _
the commander informed ( ollector
... .. . .
«Hamilton that she
w . ,
j bullion, but that It was taken off by
!
-p^e Appàm's general cargo of eight
remain« in her hold and
1 , . , ... .... . .
; what disposition will be made of it
. .
rests with Washington,
I Lieutenant Berg, commanding the
. . . . . .
prize ship Appam. talked for the first
| ln8 t niBh t of hi. rrulae. He ridl
J ,. ulpd the «„ggrs.ion that his raider
was the new fruit trader Ponga, lnsist
| ing that she was the Moewe. He con
! firmed the accounts of his capture of
the seven English vessels and declared
he had nothing to say regarding his
: future plans.
by Captain
German navy, but
t to
British blockading
vhi'-h
htd carried 36,060
$172,000) in
the raider.
I
VERDICT Of GUILTY
I
|
!
,
IN THE GILLIS GASE
Olympia, Feb. 4.—John * F.
! was found guilty of forgery in first de
gree today. It was alleged that by
j means of forged claims, Gillies col
I lot ted over $15,000 for fictitious in
! juries to persons engaged in indus
i tries in the state. The jury was out
! 14 hours. Sentence was deferred.
Gillies
To Check Pine Blister Rust.
Washington. Feb. 4.—The advisabil
ity of placing a federal quarantine on
shipments of five-leaved pines and
cultivated black currants from several
stern states, as a measure of pro
tectlon for the white pine forests of
the country from the diseases known
i as the white pine blister rust, was the
j subject of a public hearing conducted
nt the department of agricul
I ture. The states which it is proposed
1 to quarantine are Pennsylvania, New
j York, Connecticut, Massachusetts,
J[V r ermont and New Hampshire.
| today

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