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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, March 07, 1916, Image 1

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EVENING CAPITAL NEWS C
Vol. XXXVI EIGHT PAGES BOISE, H|AHO, TUES DAY, MARCH 7, 1916.
ADJW/JV/S7J?A77(^V WINS ITS FIGHT
No. 53

TEST VOTES IN HOUSE
SHOW RESOLUTION IS
DOOMED TO DEFEAT
1
By Big Majority the Forces Opposed to
Warning Americans to Keep Off Armed
Slips Defeat Opponents In the Pre
liminary Moves.
Washington, March 7.—President Wilson's stand that
congress shall not advise Americans to abandon their
rights to travel on the seas on merchant ships armed for
defense, in accordance with international law, was in
dorsed in the house today by two heavy test votes on the
McLemore resolution. The administration forces de
feated attempts to amend the resolution to the liking of
ithe president's opponents and put it before the house
without amendment for a vote under a special rule at the
*nd of four hours' debate. About 6 o'clock tonight the ad
ministration forces will move to table the McLemore reso
lution and the heavy votes they polled in the two prelim
inary tests indicate they will kill it by a substantial ma
jority. In quick succession the house rejected the pro
posal to allow amendment and then adopted the special
rule by votes of 256 to 160. ^nd 271 to 135.
i
ALL DAY FIGHT IN
THE LOWER HOUSE
Washington, March 7.—The house at
11 o'clock assembled for an all day
light of the administration forces to
kill the McLemore resolution to warn
Americans off the armed ships of bel
ligerents. Speaker Clark was in the
chair. Acting Chairman Pou of the
rules committee, offered a privileged
resolution containing the special rule
and obtained unanimous consent for
a 90 minutes debate on the rule. The
debate then began.
Representative Pou opened the fight
and got an outburst of applause by
saying: "All the imps of hell never
vised a more infamous lie than the
claratlon that has been made that
the president wants war."
Representative Campbell of Kansas,
Republican member of the rules com
mittee, announced when Pou concluded
that If a motion to close the debate on
the rule was defeated he would, off er a
substitute for the McLemore resolu
tion, which would be a direct warning
to Americans to keep off armed ships.
First Test Vote.
In the flrst test vote on the armed
•hip question the administration forces
won, 266 to 160 .
TTie prospecta of a sensational de
bate attracted a record crowd long
■«fore the house doors opened. Many
brought lunches and books. A spirit
of combat seemed to be in the air. Two
negro barbers In the house barbershop
wound up an argument by throwing
toilet water bottles at eac,. other. Both
%
were locked up.
Debate on Resolution.
Opportunity for amending the Mc
Lemore resolution was removed by
vote. The house turned to debate on
the resolution Itself with indications
that It would be tabled as the presi
dent desires as a demonstration to
foreign nations that the dissension
•gainst his foreign policy does not re
present a majority in congress.
Republican Leader 'Mann pleaded
L with the house to defeat the rule in
I order tjjat the McLemore resolution
! might be amended, and
1 straight warning reéolutlon obtained.
When the time for the debate on the
rule expired Representative Garrett
moved the previous question. When
Speaker Clark put It there was a
thunderous chorus of ayes, and noes.
Representative Campbell of Kentucky
demanded division and Representative
Pou demanded a rcll call. The vote
on the previous question resulted 256
uto 160.
■ The question to adopt the special rule
Fwas then put. Representative Campbell
' demanded the yeas and nays and the
rollcall began on the adoption of the
rule to consider the warning resolu
tion. "If this rule Is defeated," de
clared Representative Harrison, Demo
crat, of Mississippi, administration
I leader, "You will not only Bend Joy
I to the hearts of the people In a foreign
I capital, but you will stab your own
I president in the back." The rule pro
f r iding for a four.hours' debate on the
I motion to table the McLemore resolu
ition was adopted by a vote of 271 to
1136. One man voted present.
vote on a
Nomination Sent to Sonst«.
Washington. March 7.—Newton D.
aker's nomination as secretary of
hr was sent to tha mate today.
at
day
to
bel
the
the
rule
for
The
by
the
that
on
a |
[
de
THEPRESIDENTON
Washington, March 7.—-Representa
tive Page, of North Carolina, will not
be a candidate for re-election because
he disagrees with the president In the
submarine controversy,
tive Page, who is a brother of the am
bassador at London, so announced to
day in a letter to his constituents. The
announcement caused a sensation In
the house at the moment of the vote
on what was practically a proposal not
I to interfere with the president's diplo
; raatic negotiations.
Représenta
EIGHTEEN DEAD AS
RESULT OT FIRE IN
EL PASO CITY JAIL
8
by
on
to
El Paso, Tox„ March 7.—Eighteen
dead, two probably fatally btirned and
a score or more less seriously Injured,
whb the toll of an explosion and fire
late yesterday at the city jail. The
name of one American is Included in ;
the list of dead, and l! are numbered !
among those seriously burned. Sur
geons said last night that the death !
list would probably reach 20. and that
many of the injured would not live
more than a few hours.
re
in
the
a
to
a
GREAT INCREASE IN
THE COST OT LIVING
Washington, March 7.—The cost of
living in Constantinople has increased
185 per cent since the beginning of the
war, according to confidential advices
to the state department.
and nil the leading theatrical maria-j
gors, actors and actresses, journalists
and many other persons contributed j
their service* to make the affair a,
huge success. j
Honor Dean of Dramatic Critic*.
New York, March 7.—A large part of
New York was interested today in the
testimonial to William Winter, the dean
of dramatic critics, whose name for
half a century has been most honor
ably eminent ,in connection with criti
cisms of the acted drama in this coun
try. The Century theater was the
scene of the testimonial performance,
D.
of
Great German Fleet Is
at Sea: Report Held
Up by Censors
\
Rome, March 5, via London, Marçh 7.— Twenty German dreadnoughts have 4»
left Kiel, according to information received here.
The British censor held up the foregoing dispatch two days.
Another dispatch tiled in London early today said a fleet of 25 German war- 4*
ships was observed Monday cruising in the North sea. This message was re- 4*
eeived fronyVlieland, in the north of Holland.
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SEATTLE MAYOR,
ONCE RECALLED.
J
,1
1
Hiram C. Gill Opposed by
Austin Griffiths in To
day's Election — Charter
Amendments Submitted.
Seattle, March 7.—An election
city officials, held in Seattle today,
l"ZTLZ*\T a L
the United States because uf his re
call and subsequent re-election. Op
posing Mayor Gill in his candidacy for
re-election was Austin E. Griffiths,
wealthy retired lawyer, born in Eng
land. Griffiths lias served the city as
councilman and as chief of police.
Mayor Gill's participation in Seattle
politics began 18 years ago, when, at
the age of 32 s ears, he was elected
to the city council. Since then he has
been councilman or mayor most of the
time. He w as elected mayor in 1910
and recalled by tho votes of the new
ly enfranchised women in 1911 be
cause of scandals in the police de
partment. He ran again In 1912 and
was defeated. In 1911 he was elected
mayor by 17.000 majority. Last month
he was renominated by a majority of
Other offices and candidates for them
at today's election are;
Corporation counsel—James E. Brftd
ford, (incumbent); Hugh M Caldwell,
benO mP W 5l c r H Ed tt K TBrry '
"JrrirS
senator and former judge; Reginald H.
Thompson, engineer who leveled Se
attle's hills and laid out Strathcona
park on Vancouver island; Cecil B.
Fitzgerald, councilman; otto A. Case,
former county auditor; Dr. Edwaln J.
Brown, Independent Socialist, (opposed
b.v regular Socialists), and Charles
Marble, councilman.
3000 over all other candidates.
Former
Moore, \vh
Mayor
William
.
The campaign leading to the prt
maries on Feb. 22, and the subse
o.uent political activities, have been
without bitterness
person^litles. Alt
candidates promised good government,
The state prohibition law has not been
an issue in any way,
Charter amendments for preferential
voting; elimination of wards and boun
darles, and placing of certain city em
ploy
surance act were voted on.
under the state industrial In
ENGLAND TO INTERN
ALL ENEMY TRADERS
London, March 7.—AH enemy traders
in Togoland, German West Africa, will
be Interned on the ground of military
necessity, according to government no
tice. The order
branches of large German firms.
will effect several
Speaker Clark's Birthday.
Washington, March 7.—An unusually
large bouquet graced the desk of
Speaker Champ Clark today to remind
all beholders that It was the natal day
of the celebrated Missouri statesman.
Though Mr. Clark's entire career in
public life has been linked with the
"Show Me" state, it was in Ken
lucky that he first saw the light Of
da >'— i UHt years ago. During the day
the speaker received the personal con
gratulations of all of the members of
the house, while many senators came
over from their end of the capitol to
add to the congratulations. Numerous«#
messages and letters of greeting also
were received by Speaker Clark from
friends in Missouri and other parts of
the country.
1
fl
GREASE IN BRITISH
AVY SINCE OUTBREAK
OFWAR MILLIONTONS
london, March 7.—First Lord of the
Admiralty Balfour stated in the house
of commons today that tho tonnage _>f
the British navy had been increased
by 1,000.000 since the outberak of the
« ",4 wh l'® the 8tre " s ' h ot ,he , air , <?'
-——
of WLLIAM ORPET CASE
DtrAffC AM lilt II 11)11
DLiUaL (iKANU JUKI
_
Waukegan, III., March 7.—The fate
of William Orpet. the young University
a uf Wisconsin student accused of hav
Ing caused the death, of his former
sweetheart, Marian Frances Lambert,
a T.ake Forest high school girl, nowjthe
; reals with the Lake county grand jury
j in session here. Miss Lambert is nl-is
1 leg« d to have come to her death by
! cya tide of potassium poisoning. A
! liaison, according to Orpet,
j between the t
I
existed
j possession of the district attorney it
j appears that the girl feared approach
i ing
! had
Lan
; to lier appeal for an Interview. The
nex; day her body waa found in the
woods near her home,
rmmrvr nnntn — _
i 01 IMP}. D|)QIP Tfl 111 T ||
»"lIUlL DvIUU III II LU
AUSTRIAN PRINCESS
| ami
;
motherhood. Orpet after arrang
an alibi to make it appear that
not left Madison, Wis., visited Miss
ibert at Lake Forest in response
R
B;rlln, March 7.—A marriage is be
ing arranged between Prince Boris,
the eldest son of King Ferdinand, of
Bulgaria, and the heir to the throne,
a princess of the House of Haps
burg, according to the Journal des
. Balkans. Empertjr Francia Joseph
heads the Hapsburg family,
Woman on Trial for Murder.
McMinnville, Ore., March 7.—Mrs.
of
Wiiliamina, is alleged by the state to!
have been the result of Mrs. Booth's |
infafuatlon for William Branson,
Mrs. Booth
I







j Agn
j 1
j d ial
i witl
linn
es Booth, aged 33, was arraigned
(he state circuit court today for
indictment charging her
the murder of her husband, Wil
Rootli, last October. The killing
Booth, a well-to-do resident
n
on
if
Is 10 years her junior,
and Branson were indicted and tried
Jointly for the murder last November,
when the jury failed to agree on a
verdict. Subsequently Branson \ks
given a separate trial and was con
victed and sentenced to life imprla
onment.
e THE FUNOTION OF ADVER
TISING,
e
Advertising is
vital force
• ih the problem of distribution.
• But to be nearly 100 per cent
• efficient It must be linked to the
• selling end of the business.
• K Manufacturers arc turning to
• newspaper advertising because
• 1; ties up with the men *vho
• sail their goods—the retail deal
• ers. I
• Retailers are not only news
• paper readers but they directly
• feel the effects of newspaper
• advertising.
• They are cordial to products
• when manufacturers advertise
a them In the newspapers,
• Manufacturers are invited to •
• g;nd to the Bureau of Advertls- •
• Ing, American Newspaper Pub- •
lishers Association, World Bldg,, •
a hew York, for a cop;, of the •
• booklet, "The Dealer and His a
• Friends." a
•••••••••••••••••
INDIANA VOTERS
EXPRESS CHOICE
FOR PRESIDENT
the
_>f !
the
<?'
The First of the Presiden
tial Primaries Is Being.
Held Today in the Hoosier
State.
Indianapolis, March 7.—Indiana 1s
lto,din ® lts flrst statewide preferential
r lmary '"7 V0 T-?° w ; nK
arSÄÄÄrSÄ
governor, members of congress, mem
bers of the state legislature, county of
floials and electing delegates to. the
state conventions. President Wilson
and Vice President Marshall have no
opposition. Charles \V. Fairbanks
nowjthe only person seeking the Republi
can nomination for president. There
nl-is no candidate for vice president on
by , the Republican ballot.
A
; OTHER STATES TO
it HOLD PRIMARIES
Washlngton, March 7.—The eyes of
he'all pol'tlclans are now turned on In
diana, where today Is being held
the first of the direct primaries for the
selection of delegates to the presiden
tial nominating conventions. After the
Hoosier state starts the ball rolling
there will be a constant succession of
state primaries until the first week In
June,
Twenty of the 48 states have direct
primary laws. Vermont will he ndded
to the list if tts primary law Is adopted
by a vote of the people at a referen
dum to be held next week. These 21
states. If Vermont Is Included, will
elect 697 delegates to the Republican
national convention and 600 to the
Democratic national convention,
both of the national assemblies the
delegates elected by "direct" vote will
be In a large majority.
Of course, on the assumption that
President Wilson will be renominated,
this prevalence of the primary system
will be of far less importance to the
Democrats than to the Republicans,
who must seek for the most available
of
In
man out of a group of possibilities.
On the Republican side It Is expected
that many state delegations will be
spllt and that solid delegations for any
individual will be few. In Maryland
of the delegates will be instructed by
to! their districts .and the delegates at
| large by the state convention. In Call
whojfornia ihe delegation will be chosen by
the vote of the state at large, in
some states the ««legates w ill be chos
cn directly hv the voters, while in oth
er* the primary will be for a choice of
delegntes to a state convention, which
in turn will elect the delegates to the
natiiAin] convention.
Obviously, the primary affords less
scope for the leaders to get together
and settle on a candidate, while the
marïcs'are t haT aspira n'tsfo^the'pres':
•idency can do less personal work than
ever before. They may go into dif
ferent states and make speeches, but
any agreement they may make with the
leaders of their party may be complete
ly upset by the voters. From every
viewpoint the coming Republican qa
tlonal conventual will be far more dif
a
fleult for the politicians to control than
any of its predecessors.
Brooklyn to Hava Auto Show.
New York. March 7 —Greater New
York's third automoile show of the
present season will open for a week's
engagement tomorrow In theJwenty
third Regiment armory tn Brooklyn,
It will be the fifth annual Brooklyn
Automobile Show and from present
Indications It will be the most notable
affair of its kind ever held In that
borough. About three hundred pas- j
senger carrying cars will be displayed*,.
together with comprehensive lines of
motor trucks, motorcycles and accès- j
sortes. j
BY INVADING TROOPS
Germans Capture Hill No. 265, After
Losing Heavily In Men—Village of
Fresnes Is Also Taken and Advance
Made Along Railroad.
4»4*4*4*4»4»4 , 4 , 4*4'4»4*4*4*4 , 4 , 4»4*4»4*4*4*4*4»4*
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French Admit German Progress.
Paris, March 7.—The Germans have made fur
ther progress in the Verdun region to the west of
the Meuse. It is semi-offieially announced that
the Germans have succeeded by violent bombard
ment in pushing along the railroad in the Regne
ville neighborhood.
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I Paris. March 7. — (Official)—A German troop division
has Captured hill No. 265. Tile Cliemv's attempts to OC
a mine orater were repviaed in the Argonne district.
Wrat of the Mo«« French artillery continued bombard
mg the German Communicating lines. In ta kill" hill No
OC-. OTlf>TY ,1 .,,,f i ;i ■ „ i „ " ,
' * ' ' IlUIli iGSt, lit .1 \ lit 111 mull D6C<lllSP Ot OUI' artillery
I Hlld UiacllilK* gllll tire. The PrCUCh ho](l the VÜIaiïP of
! Rßl1iirw,nm,t + 1 ,,, „„„x „r ri.î t, , * , ,
Is. . t, 111 git IPSP.lSt Ot tllP I 'CSCOrbpaUX Wood Slid
I the heights of Cote de 1'Oip. Al'tillei'V fi°'llting COUtillllpd
I loot nirrl.t +L,, „„„i ,v a j ^ ...
, • ' ' * Ulgtll T( lilt (.1ST Of tile iVleilSC, 111 tile W U6Vl*e
district «Hid illso ill tllB Fl'PSIlPS Sector,
Fresnes Captured by Germans. ' "™ ' -
j Berlin. March 7.—(Official)—The village of Fresnes in
Uhe Woevre district, southeast of Verdun, was captured
-today.
of
BRITISH TROOPS
AIDING FRENCH IN
In
VEflDHNDEFENSE!
I
An Australian Brigade Is
Engaged in the Great Bat-:
tie Before the French;
Stronghold.
London, March 7.—A Melbourne dls
; Patch
lag that Minister of Defense
had announced that an Australian hri
gade is fighting at Verdun. This Is
the first statement printed here that
British forces were operating with th«!
French there, it had been reported
that more British artillery had been
moved to Verdun and had been doing
; great execution but It was unknown
; whether the big guns transferred were j
j being manned by British or French I
artillerymen.
—— - e.» ——
... .....
lUrVIr N I'ill I Hr A Pf I
fl LOI Lilli UUlUImUU
}
|f| 1 AIIU T â| Allfll Allllft
ft AllAIN oNUWBUUllD
as published here today stat
Pearce
:
Denver, March 7.—For the sei'ond
time this winter southwestern Colo
rado is snowbound. Durango, the
center of the storm, has been cut off
12 hours from outside communications. I
Thirty-five passengers on the Denver
& Rio Grande have_ been held at
Chaijia. N. M., for five days on account j
of drifting snow.
New Orleana, March 7—The arrival I
today of Rex, king of the carnival. '
and presentation to him of the keys!
of the city by the mayor marked the I
climn* of the Mardi Gras carnival '
that will end tomorrow. The arrival
and reception of Rex has for many
years formed the principal feature of
the Mardi Gras festivities. Thou
j sands of visitors from all sections of j
(he country witnessed today s pageant, j
The carnival festivities will be brought j
j to a close with a grand ball tumor- i
j row night.
Carnival Crowds Fill New OHaans.
WILSON REU
TOCO-OPERATEIN
PEACE PROJECT
Declined the Invitation of
Sweden to Join in Move
ment to Put an End to the
War.
den * Wilson's co-operation for eon
j eerted mediation toward peace. Fresl
dent Wilson, who already- at an early
stage of the war had hts offer rejeet
jed, declined to Join the movement until
j requested by the belligerents. It Is
I stated in Stockholm that in other neu
Irai capitals the question is being dis
'cussed of forming a mediation confer
««me without the co-operation of the
United States.
I.on don, March T,—Reuter's Copen
j hagen
correspondent says that in
Swedish political circles it is stated
! that Sweden on two occasions applied
to the United States to obtain Presl
Official Neutral Board Propossd,
I.ondon, March 7.—The Ford peace
party
ill present a qgtition* to the
: forthcoming -Conference of Seandlnav
ministers at Copenhagen request. *
ing neutral governments to form a«
official
' :
I
j
•onsideration board to estab
lush peace.
strikeInMkan
RAILROAD IS ENDED
I
'
I
' strike of men employed In construction
on the government's Alaska railroad
ended yesterday, when -the federal
labor union at 'Anchorage/ voted to re
turn to work, pending a settlement ol
the wage controversy. A scale to bi
fixed by a committee representing th.
union and the Alaska engineering com.
mission, will be made retroactive ti
Jdate with the resumption ot work.
Seward, Alaska, March T.—The

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