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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, March 08, 1916, Image 1

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EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
Ü
v
BOISE, IDAHO, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 1916.
/
TEN PAGES
Vol. XXXVI
No. M
£
t
GERMANTS POSITION EXPLAINED
}
Willingness to Operate In Accordance;
With International Law Prevailing;
Prior to the War If Great Britain Will
Not Violate the Same Laws
Washington, March 8.—Count von Bernstorff today
handed Secretary Lansing a memorandum explaining in
detail the German position regarding aimed ships and the
causes leading up to the decision of the Teutonic powers
to torpedo without warning all armed enemy merchant
men. Boh declined to divulge the contents of the memo
randum. It is understood to contain the allegation that
Great Britain has taken advantage -of the contention of
the United States that Americans must be safe on defen
sively armed merchantmen, to have those ships act of
fensively toward enemy submarines. Germany, it is un
derstood, concedes that as the submarine is a new engine
of warfare, international law as at present constituted,
makes no provision for its use. Germany, it is under
stood, expressed a willingness to operate submarines in
accordance with the international law prevailing prior to
the war, provided Great Britain will not violate the same
laws.
CONGRESS STANDS
BEHIND PRESIDENT
8.—President
March
Washington,
Wilson yesterday completely and de
his long fight to compel
cisively won
to acknowledge that it stands
congress
behind him in the submarine negotia
tions with Germany.
To the rallying cries of "stand by
the president" and "is it Lansing and
Wilson or von Bernqtorff and the kais
er" a b Democratic majority and
nearly half the Republicans in the
house rolled up overwhelming votes
against the movement to warn Amer
icans off armed ships of the European
belligerents.
The celebrated McLemore resolution,
around which the anti-administration
forces centered their fight, was tabled
_In other words killed—Just as
jthe Gore resolution for a similar pur
pose In the senate last week
1 From the outset of the fight T * i
day the president's supporters,
out regard to party, swept ove.
opposition.
a a
the
The First Vote.
On the first vote, which was a par
liamentary
opening the McLemore resolution to
amendment and unlimited debate, the
administration forces carried the day,
25* to 160. On that, 192 Democrats, 63
Republicans and one Progressive voted
to support the administration. Twenty
one Democrats, 132 Republicans, five
Progressives, one Independent, and Re
presentative London, the lone Social
ist In the house voted against It.
This was the crucial vote of the
light, the one point on which adminis
tration leaders were uncertain. With
victory in hand, they moved on to the
next proposition, the adoption of a
special rule for four hours discussion
of the McLemore resolution.
Again they carried the day, this time
271 to 138, and then pushed the vic
tory to a conclusion hv tabling the
McLemore resolution, 276 to 142.
Session a Turbulent One.
proposition to prevent
In seven hours of tense, turbulent
session, in which the administration
opponents charged that the president
wus contending for a doubtful legal
right, and was shifting the responsi
bility of diplomatic negotiations to
congress, the house swayed back and
forth in the most sensational congres
[sional spectacle of a decade, probably
"unequalled since the eve of the declar
ation of war on Spain.
President Wilson, calm and confi
dent, heard the early results of the
voting in the cabinet room at the
White House with some of the cabi
net grouped about him. He told them
he was much gratified with the sup
port of congress.
Released from the bonds of embar
rassment forced upon him by the dis
senslons in congress, which have been
represented in foreign capitals as in
dictating that he was making hi* de
mends on Germany In direct opposition
fo the sentiment of the elected repre
tentatives of the people, President
Wilson now stands prepared to go on
[wlth^the 'submarine negotiations with
tB« central powers.
REPORTED KILLED
BY VILLA BANDITS
El Paso, March 8.—General Gavlra,
of Juarez, today received accredited,
but unconfirmed reports that two
Americans named Franklin and Wright
acre killed Monday at Pechaco by
Villa bandits.
KILLED IN FIRE
AI FORI CIBBON
Fairbanks, Alaska, March 8.—Three
soldiers were killed and two seriously
Injured In a fire which yesterday de
stroyed the main barracks of the am
munition houses at Fort Gibbon, occu
pied by company B of the Fourteenth
Infantry. The dead are Privates Her
man Lund, Henry Miner and Curtis B.
Willis. The injured, Sergeant Anthony
Klvinak and Private Gross Kelly.
SUPREME PURPOSE Of
PRESIDENT IS TO KEEP
COUNTRY OUT OF WAR
Washington, March 8. — Senator
Stone, chairman of the foreign rela
tions committee, declared in the sen
ate today after a confèrent* with the
president last night, "that so far from
the président desiring to Involve the
country In the disastrous European
war, his supreme wish Is to avoid that
calamity."
.
GILL IS RE ELECTED
MAYOR OF SEATTLE
Seattle, March 8.—Returns from the
city election show large majorities for
the following candidates.'
Mayor, Hiram C. GUI. ,
Corporation counsel, Hugh M. Cald
well.
Controller, Harry W. Carroll.
Treasurer. Ed L. Terry.
Gill's majority is estimated at six
thousand.
The following
Willian Hickman Moore. Regl
ere elected council
men :
nald H. Thompson and Cecil B. Fitz
gerald.
Official returns from 217 of 277 pre
cincts give Mayor GUI 3923 majority
.over Austin E. Griffiths.
)
British Transport Is Torpedoèd; Mahy Mules Saved
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Steamer Nord man, torpedoed by German« and beached near
The above photo ehowa how a transport steamer looks after being torpedoed by a aubmarine. This steamer is
the Nordman. carrying 4500 mules and munitions of war, after she had been beached near Saloniki, Greece. Meat
of the mules saved.
FIRE FOLLOWS AN
EXPLOSION IN BIG
CHEMICAL PLANT
Canadian Militia Is Quickly
Mobilized at Niagara Falls
—Claimed the Plant Was
Bombed.
I
Niagara Falla, N. V., March 8.—Fire
following an explosion In the chlorate
department of the Niagara Electro
chemical company today threatened
the destruction of the plant. The
damnge is eetimated at $ 150 , 000 . The,
across the Niagara in Canada and it
caused the hasty mobilization of the
militia guarding the frontier. Dr.
Hector R cravath, manager of the
company, issued a statement saying
Firemen had difficulty in fighting
the Are because the water mixing with
the chemicals added fuel to the flames._
No one was Injured In today's explo
sion. One man was killed and another
Injured by an explosion last night
Carvath said he was convinced the ex
plosions resulted from outside agen
cies He believed bombs were set off
inside the peroxidal plant.
ALL OF GERMAN BIRTH
TO DISFRANCHISED
Sydney,
cabinet has decided to disenfranchise
nil German-born electors for the dura
tion of the war following the arrest,
and internment of several hundred al
lies who were considered of a hostile
disposition.
N. S. W„
March 8.—The
BAKER TO TAKE OATH
OF OFFICE TOMORROW
Cleveland, March 8.—Newton D. Ba
ker, former mayor, departed today for
Washington where tomorrow he will
take the oath of office and become sec
retary of war. To some friends Baker
Jokingly said: "I shall have a great
deal to* learn. As a boy 1 never even
played with tin soldiers."
SOUTH HAS ENJOYED
. BIG TOURIST SEASON
Atlanta. Ga., March 8.—With the be
ginning of- Lent the biggest tourist
season the south has ever known
reaches Its climax. More visitors and
more money have flowed into Dixie
this winter than ever before. AH the
tourists' hotels of. Florida and Georgia
are reported full and railroads have
foünd it necessary to expand their pas
senger service between the south and
the east, north and middle west. The
Increased patronage of the southern
resirts Is believed to be due In largest
measure to the extensive campaign of
advertising launched by the hotels and
railroads. The war. of course, has al
so contributed /to the increased busi
ness.
INDICTMENTS ARE RETURNED
AGAINST JUDGE GARY AND
SIX STEEL COMPANIES
/
Youngstown, O., March 8.—An indictment was re
turned today by the Mahoning county grand jury against
the United States Steel corporation, five other steel com
panies and Judge Gary, chairman of the steel corporation.
They are charged with having formed a trust to'fix the
wages of common labor in violation of the Ohio laws. The
indictments follo-w a probe into the East Youngstown
riots and labor troubles.
The specific offense charged against the six steel con
Perag j s that thev conspired to keep the wages of com
mon labor at the same figure at the time of the strike at
the Republic Iron & Steel company and Youngstown Sheet
omi. , , . T 1 " —, ° ,
& lube company plants in January. The announcement
was made by companies within two da vs* time of a 10 per
cent increase in wages. This action was held to be due to
the agreement. The report sets forth that the grand jurv
__, , , _ _ ,. , » . • r
was unable to fix any particular cause for the recent not.
Gary Calls Indictments Travesty.
New York, March 8.—When informed that he had been
indicted at Youngstown, Judge Elbert H. Gary said there
were no facts to justify the indictments and that the "in
dictment is an outrageous travesty."
PALESTINE MAY
RECEIVE AiDFRON
UNITED STATES
Planned to Send Collier
With Food to Sufferers—
Government Is Asked to
Provide Ship.
Washington, March 8.—Henry Mor
genthau, ambassador to Turkey, today
took up with the navy and state de
partments the question of sending a
collier of food to sufferers In Palestine.
A group of Ne.v York men are willing
to supply 9000 tons of food. s He re
fused to discuss reports that Turkey
desired a separate peace. Regarding
reporta that he might resign, Mr. Mor
genthau stnted a number of friends
had urged him to work for President
Wilson's re-election, but It was his
present intention to return to Constan
tinople. He said, however, he might
resign If it was shown during the next
few weeks that/he could do work for
the president which could be accom
plished by no one else.
ORPET IS ARRAIGNED
ON CHARGE OF MURDER
Arch 8 . —William
fr the murder of
Waukeegan. HI.,
H. Orpet. Indicted
Marian Lambert, a high school girl,
was arraigned In circuit court today,
following his Indictment by the grand
jury. His attorney moved that the in
dictments
he quashed. Arguments
were sot for Mondag.
TO KEEP SENATE
IN SESSION UNTIL
VOTE IS SECURED
Debate on the Shields Water
Power Bill Is Resumed
The Newlands Amend
ment Is Defeated.
Washington, March 8.—The senate
today resumed Its debate on the
Shields' waterpower bill. Senator
Shields announced he wopld seek to
hold the senate In continuous session
until It reached a vote. Senator
Newlands' amendment, embodying the
commission plan of dealing with wat
erways, with an annual appropriation
of * 60 , 000,000 for 10 years waa re
jected.
PROHIBITION BILL IN
MARYLAND DEFEATED
Annapolis, Md.. March I.—The state
wide prohibition t> 1!1 waa amended in
to a local option bill by the house of
delegates last night by a vote of 58 to
Counties already 81 rv are to re
main so, but Baltimore city, the wet
counties and the wet sections in dry
counties are to vote as units on the
proposition.
The senate previously had adjourned
until today without taking action on
the state-wide bill.
47.
Winfield, Kan., March 8.—Robbers
blew open the safe in the State bank
at Rock, Kan., today and «scaped with |
Rabbers Blow Up Safo.
,13000.
GERMANS ARE SLOWLY
ADVANCING ON GREAT
FORTRESS OF VERDUN
Terrific Battle Raging Along the line
'From Chephy In the Argonne to forges
In the Woevre Section—Great Masses
of Men Employed
Paris, March 8.—The Verdun battle developed both in
intensity and extent yesterday and is now raging along a
line from Chephy in the Argoime to Forges in the Woevre,
showing that the second attack on the stronghold will be
made on a larger scale than the first. So far, according to
reports, the Germans, employing masses of men without
counting the cost, have obtained some slight gains both to
the west of the Meuse and in the Woevre, where Fresnes
was taken after a fierce struggle. Desperate fighting is
a£ain progressing on the left bank of the river. Follow
ing up yesterday's advantage the Germans, going around
the foot of the slope which served them as a mask, fol
lowed the railroad and entered Remnieville. From there
they launched 18,000 men against hill No. 265 to the east
of Cote de l'Oie, and carried it. Thus they control the
loop of the Meuse within which Regnieville is located. The
French withdrew their right flank from within the loop
and it now rests on the Meuse above Cumieres. The Ger
mans later, by hurling masses of men, gained a footing in
the Corbeaux woods, but elsewhere their attacks were re
pulsed. In this district centers at present the chief in
terest of the battle. The Germans' supreme effort-is
awaited with much confidence by the French as they rely
on their defensive preparations.
Germans Report Capture of Positions.
Berlin, March 8.—(Official)—A French position west
of the Meuse on both sides of Forges brook below Bethin
court, six kilometers wide and three deep, has been cap
tured. The villages of Forges and Regnieville, the heights
of Raben and Cumieres woods are in the Germans' posses
sion. Fifty-eight officers, 3277 men and 10 cannon were
taken. In the Woevre district the French were driven out
of the last houses they held in Fresnes village and over 700
were made prisoners.
WORKSTOPPEDON
ENTRENCHMENTS
IN NEUTRAL ZONE
The Bulgarians have ceased the
the neutral zone along the Greco-Bul-,
Paris, March 8.—An Athens dispatch
says:
work they began on entrenchments in
garian frontier, as a^rc suit of the Greek
protest. A German aeroplane dropped
a bomb, which failed to explode, on the
Franeo-British camp at Saloniki.
SEAT OF GOVERNMENT
_ ____ ......
f|L MfiNTKMFrOll lillMf
lir niUll I LIlLllllU llU If
V* IIVlilMihVlIvlivii
LOCAIEDAT BORDEAUX
Lyons, France,- March 8.—The seat
of Montenegro's government has been
transferred from Lyons to Bordeaux.
The king and other members of the
royal family and cabinet officers de
parted today to take up their new resi
dene near Bordeaux.
Health Board to Colobrata.
New Y'ork, March 8.—The New
York City health department will cele
brate, tomorrow night, with a dinner
at the Plaza hotel, the semi-centennial
of its foundation.' The department
was formed in 1866, and ..was then
known as the Metropolitan Health
board. The speakers at the anniver
sary dinner will include Mayor
Mltchet, Surgeon General W. C. Gor
gas, U. S. A., State Health Commts
sloner Hermann M. Biggs, and Dr.
Peter Brice, of Canada.
PUBLIC HEARINGS
IN THE BRANOEIS
CASE CONCLUDED
Washington, March 8.—Public hear
° n the nomination of Louis D.
Hrandels to be supreme court JustlOS.
were terminated today by the Judiciary
subcommittee of the senate after a
month's Inquiry The committee gava
no indication when, it would report to
the full committee.
FAMOUS CIRCUS
CLOWN TAKES LIFE
New York. March 8.—Frank Oakley.
whfl »» Olivers, a circus clown, made
millions laugh, was found dead today,
a suicide, in a theatrical boarding
Messengers of Cheerl
Each advertisement In this
newspaper la* a cheery messen
i
ger.
It comes carrying the offer of
service. It is addressed to hu
)
•man wants.
It is backed up by men who
are prepared to make good their
promises.
There is satisfaction In buying
advertised brands and In dealing
with merchants who come out
Into the open day with their
offers.
Advertising Is a recorded
promise. It must be kept, for the
ultimate profit to the advertiser
Is in the satisfied customer rath,
er than in the first sale.

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