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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, March 14, 1916, Image 5

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1916-03-14/ed-1/seq-5/

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1
PROTEST AGAINST
THE CALLING OF
BOND ELECTION
The Board of County Com
missioners Hears Argu
meats on Proposal, but No
Action Is Taken.
X
Seven farmers appeared before the 1
board of county commissioners this
morning and made vigorous protests
• against calling a *300,000 bond election ;
for the Improvement of the roads of .
Ada county. The objections were that '
taxes were already too high, that the
bonded indebtedness of the county wan
high, when it war taken into consider
ation that there were not only *270,000
in county bonds out, but in addition ;
school bonds, bonds against the city,
highway district bonds and bonds for
» Irrigation canals, the interest on which
all had to be paid by direct tnxatiou,
except tlje former bond issue for good
roads, which was paid by a special
automobile tax at present, but which
law might bo changed, even at the next
session of the legislature, thus caus
ing additional burdens upon property
• owners.
W. M. Briggs, former county com
missioner, was the first speaker. Hu
declared he waa opposed to the bond
TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY
LANTERNS at Kimery's, 816 Idaho
St.
M18
FOR SALE—Sheep shears at Kimery's,
816 Idaho St.
M18
VIOLIN MAKER
Robert Ballot at Sampson Music Co. tf
HIGH GRAPE granlteware at Klm
M1S
ery's, SIS Idaho St.
FOR RENT—7-room modern house;
no children; 1124 Franklin.
M20
FOR SALE—DeLaval separator. No.
13, practically new. Call 84-K-3.
Ml-'.
DANCING CLAS8ES
1916 and fancy dancing. Phone 435-J.
A14
x.
WHY WAIT for paint-up week. Begin
now by buying at Kimery's, 816 Ida
ho St.
' I
FOR SALE—Team, harness and wagon
for *275. Percy McFarland, Merid
ian, Idaho.
M2
HIGHLY improved 40 acres, clear, for
F. M. Eby I,and
M20C
sale, trade or rent.
Co., Room 333 Yates Bldg.
WILL EXCHANGE good linnet canary
vlll pay
singer for yellow singer;
some difference if suited; must be
two years old. Phone 376-W.
M 1
WE HAVE unincumbered vacant lots
to exchange for_equity in five or six
modern ' bungalow.
H. G.
room
Myers & Co., 423 Overland Bldg. M20
FOUND—Two roosters. Owner may
have same by proving property and
paying for this ad. Address J. L .
Crowder, Boise, Ht. 1, Spaulding
crossing • MIS
TO TRADE—Gang plow (2-14s) in good
condition, for work horse, grass seed
or good heifer calf. See. J. D. Breeze,
Eagle.
M14c
FOR SALE OR TRADE—Five acres
near Collister, not incumbered; 4
acres in one-year-old prune trees;
will trade for house In Boise. Phone
32,' in evening, 1009W.
M20c
LOST—Purse between Overland cor
ner and Interurban depot; *35 cur
rency, 2 silver dollars, fish and game
license and a receipt from Capital
News. Return to Capital News and
receive reward.
M15
FOR SALE.
5-room modern house
Full corner lot
Sidewalks all paid.
Price, *1900: TermA
Hub City Realty Company.
219 Idaho Bldg. Phone 50.
ill!
e WANTED s
e Everybody to know that the •
• new Excelsior Autoeyele has e
• arrived. Henry W. Baker, 113 e
• 8. 11th.
M20 •
À BARGAIN—Good 6-room house, two
screened porches, four city lots, all
In fruit and berries; barn, chicken
and buggy sheds: an ideal suburban
home; price *1850; a small cash pay
ment down, balance as rent. Phone
208S-W or address 1366 care Capital
News.
M14c
WANTED.
To exchange, good 40-A. for
Vacant Lots.
WANTED.
Household Goods, at the
Independent Telephone Building.
C. C. GRIGSON.
311 N. 10th St.
M14
FOR SALE—6 acres located 4 blocks
from car line; 5c fare; with «-room
plastered house, with good cellar; 1
acre berries pnd 75 bearing apple
trees, balance pasture, meadow and|
garden; a good barn; 60-foot chicken
house; price for quick sale, $3800,
A 5-room modern bungalow for sale
for *1400; terms.
A «-room modern bungalow for sale,
«2250; terms.
A 114-acre ranch 6 miles from rail
road station; 4-room house, barn,
fruit, spring water piped into house;
«25 per acre; easy terms.
«0 gores near Meridian with paid-up
water right, for sale so cheap
hate to mention the price. Call and
Ml*
see us about It.
H. G. MYER8 A CO.,
483 Overland Bldg.
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Puts Roses In Your Cheeks
A pretty skin—the evidence of cleanliness and
glowing health—distinguishes the woman who uses
JAP ROSE
The Wonderful "Sunday Morning Batlv*
SOAP
The perfect soap for toilet, bath and shampoo.
Fragrant, cleansing and refreshing. Large cake 10c,
at leading Druggists and Grocers.
Use but little — It's all lather
For Free Sample Write James S. Kirk & Company, Dept 860 , Chicago, U. S. A.
Issue and was certain that it would not
carry. He said the commissioners
would do a bettor work by taking the
money that an election would cost and
spending it upon putting the roads in
to condition. He stated he favored
good roads, but not a bond election,
that he favored the use of the extra
auto license being expended on the
roads and with a small bond issue,
good cross roads could be built lead
ing to the main thoroughfares, thus
doing a good work without going to
sueli a heavy expense. He stated the
valuations In the city and county were
from one-third to one-half higher than
they should be and higher than <n
other sections of the state. Over at
Nampa, he stated, the real estate deal
ers were selling land and business was
good at Twin Falls and Idaho Falls,
where land was not assessed as high
as it is here and where, he stated, new
land was producing better crops than
are raised here.
There are three classes of men in
Ada county, stated the former commis
sioner, professional men and business
men who are living oft the producer
and consumer and thirdly the men who
do nbt pay any taxes but are able to
vote and willing to put a burden on the
tax payers of the county.
Compared With Illinois.
Mr. Briggs took the commissioners
back to Illinois and pointed out four
counties in that state where he stated,
taxes were much lower, the counties
. c , -, ..
T _ " *'' or 0 lection.
Jess B, Hawley, the newly elected
e. r ?k den l 0f , ? e „ B °i"!u C ™" 1
club, spoke ln ta vor of the bond elec
ion. He stated that he represented in.
terests which pa,d taxes in Ada county
r7! . T 8 e r° Un n
had voiced objections. He said they
. * „ '
were not asking the commissioners to
build good roads, but merely to call
an election and to ascertain the senti
ment of the residents of the county and
If they ex, cased themselves by a ma
Jority vote in favor of a bond issue,
then the matter was settled, but that
it lay with the people. He stated he
was sure from the sentiment he had
heard expressed that 70 per cent of the
people of the county wanted to bond
the county to complete the system of
good roads and all that was being ask
ed of the commissioners was to hold
an election and let them express them
selves. He declares those whom he
represented favored it and felt the
commissioners would not be doing their
duty, tf in the face of the petition, they
refueed to call th> election.
Others speaking in the Interests of
richer, where there was coal mining,
manufacturing and big pay roils and
>' et hp not one of those unties
hud as S° od a system of roads as Ada
county now had and even a county,
which held the capital of that great
state, did not have as good a system i s
Ada county.
Farmers living under the Riden
baugh canal, stated Mr. Briggs, soon
have a bond issue coming due which
will cost them *3.50 per acre. Then, he
stated, there is an additional assess-
ment of *2.50 per acre for interest on
outstanding bond.) and maintenance.
Add some *3 to *3.50 more per acre
for taxes, he said, and likely 60 cents
per acre for a drainage system for the
benefit of Nampa and Caldwell, and
farmers here will be paying *9.10 per
acre on their land on a valuation of
*225 per acre, which he declared was
too heavy a burden to carry. He urg
ed that the commissioners take no ac
tion in calling the election.
Others who spoke against the bond
election were. H. G. Wilson, Robert
Wilson, A. Wilson, Frank Hammer, Mr.
Baldwin and W. R. Whipple, a rancher
from Dry creek.
calling the election were W. El Pierce,
o. P. Hendershot, L L. Truax, 8. M.
| Coffin. W. N. Swept, George A. Ander
• aon _ \ v . N. Northrop, Ira T. High. n.
w . A i len and R . K DavU . They nll
j ra ve briefly their reasons for wanting
we'.er Howell was not present at the ses
&|on and Mr. Carlson refused to make
la statement at this time, but Intimât.
Jed that he would favor the calling of
! the election.
I the election called and believed it was
a step in the progressive line which
the county should take. All urged the
commissioners to take favorable action.
Commissioner Coffin announced that
he was in favor of improvements and
by bonding and that he favored the
calling of an election. Speaking for
himself as a member of the board, ne
said he would vote for It. Commlsslon
CADET SYSTEM IN
SCHOOL PROPOSED
Board of Education Consid
ers Proposal Made by
W. T. Booth.
The proposition of organizing a cadet
system in the Boise high school, serv
ice in which would be compulsory for
the older students, was discussed at
some length at the meeting of the
board of trustees last night and finally
taken under advisement. W. T. Booth,
who has been familiarizing himself
with the cadet system in the high
school at Cheyenne, which has ac
quired national reputation, felt that a
similar system should be installed in
the high school here,
the preparedness program in the Unit
ed States and stated the belief that
good military training received by
young men was an aid in their physi
cal development and would give them
a knowledge which might be of great
value to the nation.
Superintendent Rose differed with
Mr. Booth concerning compulsory
training, but stated he bel'eved more
attention should be paid to the physi
cal development of the students, both
boys and girls, and he urged action
along that line.
March 31 was the date set by the
board for the closing of school for the
spring vacation of one week. The board
also authorized Mr. Rose to use his
own Judgment in granting a half ^ay
holiday to the students during "dress
up, clean-up and paint-up" week,
which was asked by the committee in
charge. Mr. Rose informed the board
upon a query, that school would close
this year on June 9.
The school board granted the use
of the Boise high school again for the
Boise Summer Normal school and
stated they would be pleased to have
Mr. Rose officiate at Us head as re
quested by the statë board.
A request for the purchase of a
piano for Park school resulted In the
appointment of Mrs. Graveley and Miss
Etigleson as a committee to make an
investigation of the piano needs of the
schools and to see what kind of a deal
they could make in exchanging old
. '
The report of the secretary showed
)h #con had been exerclsed th , B
the boola and that to daU
thlH t the expenditures had been
*1300 less than last year, regardless of
. ... .. . „ - / T - ._
the fact that the board has had to ex
„ , 7000 not down on the bud t
__ . L
^ ""T c ZÎZ T*?
" 9 J***? « . , , ,°f
2"°„ ! -7„on ° , l
South Bolse ' ,300 ' and raany cxtra * ub '
He cited
( »THE FREIGHT HANOLER 19 ON$
OO I "KNOW ft JUDGE, "N
we all know its \
THE real tobacco chew/
C OO YOU KNOW
WHAT IT lS._
(
t
S TEADY tobacco satisfaction—ail day, every day, from » cUoa,
chew. W-B CUT Cbswia«~d>c Reel Tobeew Chew, mm nt. Imt And- t«i
yoa mint it tn tante-- and fast* loader tfesn tbe ordinary trins. A* "*
it. yon hearteiito* tbeirIriead*«boat «£* A*«/ T***k*C ksw, Ontn.
M.4. by WETM AN KUTOH COMPART, SO Shim Sqmra. Mew Ta* Cky
DEFENDS REPORT
Committee of Farmers' Pro
tective League Passes a
Number of Resolutions.

The Farmers Protective league, an
association tor the protection of the
farmers on the Idaho Irrigation com
pany project, has forwarded through its
president, Fred Gooding, its vice presi
dent, Ben Dal*rah, and its secretary
treasurer. Fred F. Gwin, a set of reso
lutions adopted by the resolutions com
mittee of the league, indorsing the ac
tion of the last legislature in creating
the irrigation and drainage code com
mission and its report on the condi
tions relative to the Idaho Irrigation
company project, standing by Ahe
truthfulness of its findings.
"We hereby disapprove," says the
resolutions, "the unwise criticisms pub
lished regarding this commission and
Us report, as being made by an ill
advised and misinformed critic or
critics." The league condemns in an
other resolution the attempt made by
representatives of the above-named
company before the land board to lay
the blame for the injury to crops and
orchards of the projoct through the
water shortage, to the settler». It is
asserted the loss was due to the short
ness of water delivered or the misman
agement of water on hand with the
company. The league states It has
come to its knowledge there is a move
ment afoot to create a desire for the
Carey act principal of purchasing and
contracting for a proportionate amoun*
of the waters available for the irriga
tion of any irrigation project and this
.policy is branded as "an inestimable
detriment to all Irrigation projects
and would spell ultimate financial ruin
to the majority of the settlers there
on."
Other resolutions passed recommend
ed to the legislature that the legis
lation now existing affecting the Idaho
Irrigation company project fixing the
duty of water at five-eighths of an
Inch per acre continuous flow be not
changed; branding as false the reports
taken to the state land board that the
settlers on the project are not indors
ing the activities of the league; con
demning and resenting the alleged re
ported threat made by the company
that If settlers' Joined the league the
company would foreclose their con
tracts and make them trouble and ex
pense; indorsing the action of the land
board ordering the sale of land in
the project stopped until the state en
gineer con complete a survey of the
project; demanding that a survey and
recheck be made of the canals, head
gates, etc., on the project and that
the true condition of them may be ac
curately ascertained.
stitutes this year because of sickness.
The board instructed the secretary to
give notice that in the future ull bills
to be allowed for the month had to
be in the hands of the secretary not
later than the fifth of each month.
Superintendent Rose gave a report
on the operations of the schools of
Gary, Ind., and the system used there,
but stated he did not think such a sys
tem would be practical here.
NELLIE MINE IfILl TO
BE PUT INOPERATION
(Staff Correspondence.)
Horseshoe Bend, March 14.—The
10-stamp mill installed at the Nellie
mine here the past winter will be put
in operation in earnest this week. There
is a largo amount of ore on the (Jump
and this will be run through the mill
first. It is free milling ore. A crew
of 25 men will be kept busy in the
mill and in the mine. M. E. Hopkins
is the well-known manager of the Nel
lie mine.
There is more mining activity in the
Horseshoe Bend district than at any
I lime during the past 20 years.
*F
•F Bowling Results •*
*
*
*
The Pirates made It three straight
with the Red Sox in the City league
bowling match played off at the Re
creation alleys last night, piling up
2819 pins to 2551 tor their opponents.
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The Smoke of Men Who Win
A fresh-rolled "Bull" Durham cigarette almost says "Speed
right out loud. Keen-eyed, clear-headed young fellows
"Bull" Durham because it has the sparkle and the "punch
—the youthful vim and vigor. Every time you "roll your own y
with "Bull" Durham you open the door to Hustle.
GENUINE^ •
**
upl
smoke
ft*
*$
Bull Durham
SMOKING TOBACCO
t
Bull" Durham is unique among the world's tobaccos. It is distinguished
from all others by its wonderful mildness, its delicious
mellow-sweet flavor and its distinctive aroma.
,
A • k for FREE
package of
with each
"papen
Sc each.
That'« because it's made of the very choicest of
rich, ripe Virginia-North Carolina "bright" leaf—the
smoothest and mellowest tobacco in the world.
You get a lively smoke and a satisfying smoke
when you "roll your own
with "Bull Durham."
An Illustrated
Booklet, ahow
ng correct way
■ to "Roll Your Own' Cigarettes,
and a package of cigarette papers,
, will both be mailed, fire, to
I address in U. S. on request,
j dress "Bull" Durham, Durham.
? N. C.
FREE ;
aI
TU AKBfUCAJI TOBACCO CO.
Scott racked the highest score in any
one game recorded this season, bowling
279 in the third game. For the three
games he bowled 741 pins for the
Pirates which is about as good an in
dividual record as has been recorded in
Boise for some time. The scores;
Pirates.
. ...
When you see a cheerful and happy
old lady you may know that she îas
good digestion. If your digestion ;s
impaired or if you do not relish your
meals take a dose of Chamberlain's
Tablets. They strengthen the stomach,
improve the digestion and cause a
gentle movement of the bowels,
trlnable everywhere.
3
Players—
Miles.
Streeter . .
Meholin . .
Scott.
Titus . . ...
1
_ 166 255 208
_170 161 162
_ 130 136 176
_ 234 228 279
_ 156 189 175
Totals.
Team average, 940.
Rsd Sox.
856 »69 994
1
3
Players—
Wtlcox , .
Why man
O'Donnell
Randall .
Graham . .
. 169 198 167
. 165 155 ISO
. 179 143 178
. 150 136 182
_ 182 182 215
' f
815 814 922
Totals.
Team average, 850.
Sign of Cood Digestion.
Ob
adv
If TOO TAT GET
MORE FRESH AIR
BE MODERATE IN YOUR DIET AND
REDUCE YOUR WEIGHT. TAKE
OIL OF KOREIN.
Lack of fresh aid It is said weakens
the oxygen carrying power of the
blood, the liver become* sluggish, fat
accumulates and the action of many of
the vital orgaps are hindered thereby.
The heart action becomes weak, work
is an effort and the beauty of Hie fig
ure is destroyed.
'Fat put on by Indoor life Is un
healthy and If nature is not assisted in
throwing it off a serious case of obesity
may result.
When you (eel that you are getting
too stout, take the matter in hand at
Don't wait until your figure
your health
once.
has become a oke and
ruined through carrying around * bur
den of unsightly snd unhealthy fat.
Spend as much time as you possibly
can in the open air; breathe deeply,
and get from Charles L. Joy Vk Co., of
any druggist a box of oil of keretn
capsules; take one after each meal and
one before retiring at night.
Weigh yourself every few daye and
keep up the treatment until you are
down to normal. Oil of korein te abso
lutely harmless, is pleasant to take,
helps the digestion and even a few
days' treatment has been reported to
•how a noticeable reduction in weight
—Adv
PAYETTE GIRLS WIN
IN BASKETBALL GAME
(Capital News Special Service.)
Payette, March 14.—The Payette
high girls' basketball team won from
the College of Idaho girls' Friday ev
ening, score 42 to 11. The game was
staged at the Y. M. C. A. in Payette
with Joe Bohrer refereeing. Slow !
playing because of the fact that the i
teams were so unevenly matched pre- ]
vailed throughout the game with Pay- j
ette high school having the advant- |
age. The lineup follows;
College of Idaho— Ruth Unterkofer j
and Frances Rise, forwards; Martha j
Rice and Ethel Long, centers; Fern j
Unterkofer and Freda Elrlck, guards, j
Payette—Mildred Stark and Hazel :
Ensign, forwards; Hazel Ruse and j
Mamie Reimers, centers; Jennie Roney !
and Lola Stark, guards.
In the second half, Lola Stark of j
Payette threw her thumb out of Joint
and Alda Hurd finished the game. Fein
Unterkofer of Caldwell struck her
head against the wall. As Çaldwelt
had no subs, the second centers were
taken out for the rest of the contest.
T be Payette girls now have a record
o |. B ; x victories and no defeats und
have reason to feel proud.
Following the girls' game, Frulttand
high played the Payette high school se
cond team. Payette ran away with the
Fruitland aggregation. Score, 53 to 1Ï.
roadway
1 limited
|a (l l r s»s .
JSSm
I2 4Ù
us« r
»,40 em.
2:4S p.
Ar» EmLimmE
AtrCßfam
Chicago- 4
NewYork
20 HOURS
0,4« am.
4,
Pennsylvania
Unes i
ÎÂ* - *
W. F. TOO, i
Trav, Arm. À9L
m Judge Bldg.
THE BEST V^AYANY DAY
HIAWATHA lump, *7.S0; stove, *7;
nut. *6.50. Western S. G. Co. 9 Ac Grove.
P1NNEY THEATER
The Distinguished Russian Actor
MR. THEODORE
LORCH
And Ids most excellent company,
will open their engagement tn
the brilliant comedy
yj
Help Wanted
u
MONDAY, MARCH 13
And continue for three weeks,
changing the play each Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. Matinees
Wednesday and Saturday.
Prices; 25c, 35c, 50c. Matinees,
10c for children, 25c foY adults.
Any seat.
We give you one ticket free with
each S5c or 50c ticket you pur
chase for opening night only.

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