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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, March 19, 1916, Image 12

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1916-03-19/ed-1/seq-12/

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ENTERS THE RACE
AGAINST ELDER
Twin Falls Attorney Candi
date for National Com
miteeman—County Chair
man Against Primary.
• •••••»••••••••••
• Initructed for Elder.
• (Capital News Special Service.)
• Coeur d'Alene, March 18.—The
• Kootenai Democratic county
• § committee today selected
• * delegates to the Pocatello con
• ventiun, placed them under the
• unit rule and Instructed them
• to vote for the re-election of
national
President Wil
Governor Alexander
a
24
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Arthur M. Bowen of Twin Falls, one
of the most prominent attorneys in
the state, is a candidate for national
committeeman, subject to the will of
the next Democratic state convention
to be held at Pocatello May 18. This
was the authentic information received
by leading Democrats of Boise last
night. The fight for the committce
manshtp is therefore Just beginning,
for it is understood tfiat Mr. Bowen
will probably not have the field to
himself.
d'Alene, present national committee
man, is a candidate tQ succeed hlm
id several favorite
• Robert H. Eider
• committeeman.
• son and
• were also Indorsed.
•••••••••a»»»»»»»
Robert H. Elder of Coeur
self and it is
will be brought out by counties
over the state. Some of them pro
pose to carry on the fight for Sena
tor Jerome J. Day, in spite of the fact
he announced his withdrawal.
Mr. Bowen has been prominently
Identified with Democratic party af
fairs for a number of years. He
sons
»served one term in the state senate
Irom Blaine count) ami took a profil
inent part in the enactment of im
portant legislation. During the recent
rneetipg of the De .o *atia state en
trai committee he made a strenuous
fight on behalf of the rank and. file
for a preferential primary and a party
primary but was unsuccessful owing
to t K e manner in which the Penee
Nugent-Eldcr machine jammed their
through,
aroused
reactionary proxy program
Apparently this action has
more revolt in the Democratic party
in this state than it has seen for aomej
years. It is understood the reactionary
program, s to be carried out in detail
in every county in the «täte by re
fusing to hold party primaries for the
selection of delegates to the state con
vention.
In Ada county, a majority of the
county committee instructed the county
chairman to call
he has served notice through the press
he does not consider the meeting of
the committeemen regular and »hut in
due course of time he* will call the
Ada Chairman Against Primary.
party primary, but
committee together for the purpose of
electing the delegates to the state con
vention. This is taken by the rank and
file of the Democrajic party as notice
from their county chairman life will
carry the state committee fight into
the county committee and at'-mil to
/
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T HE same reasons why Firestone Tires
took their leading position are the
reasons why they hold it.
The finest materials in most libéral measure, built
layer by layer and double cured, by the leading, lar
gest tire specialists of America.
Tirestone
Tires cost you very little, if s"?. more than ordinary
tires which are made to sell at a price. Look to the
inside reasons as well as the records and reputation
and there find the cause of the Firestone Fact —Mott
Milet per Dollar.
Idaho Tire & Rubber Co., Inc.
(THE HOME OF Fl E8TONE TIRES)
i
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control It with the object In view
preventing » party primary. During
the meeting* of the state commute
the Ada count# chairmen was conspi
uous as a proxy holder fighting again
the direct primary. Hie.tnain ground
of opposition whs that the county com
mittee was now- in debt and he alleged
could not afford to go to the expense
of calling
Hawley'Offere te Pay Expen»»».
Apparently the county chairman'»
bluff as to the expense has been com
pletely and decisively called by James
it. Hawley, ex-governor of the Btaie,
who has given out that he will hear
the total expense of a party prima
election in Ada county if the coufjty
committee will cull such a primary. J|lr.
Hawley is a strong advooate of ths
primary and stands opposed to the
machine domination which appears
be so evident within the party. He be
lieves that the Democrats of Ada eoi
ty are entitled to a preference vote
party matters.
St
primary
> i
he
lan
.
ir
e
re
tec.
to
to
His offer to meet
of a primary, therefore, *jt.p
to relieve the county chaira
expenses
pears
from worry over that feature. ,
Nugent to Make Poreonal Appea
It was broadly hinted in some qu
tors and openly charged in others t|iat
of Ada county
the Democrats
about to witness the spectacle of one
of the party leaders, John F. Nugent,
appealing to Democratic county cjm
irai committeemen to stand against a
party primary on the grounds of per
sonal friendship to him. These
ports have daused not a litt t< (roe
tritleism Many Democrats claim that,
w hue the former state chairman niide
(tM , fight before the state commit
j K , lsona i as against the Day broth
he
srs,
ill hardly resort to carrying the
same kind of a fight into his own
county to bind committeemen to op
pose a policy they favor because of
pet sonal obligations In him and per
sonal'lriendshlp. However, It is pout
ed out, Mr. Nugent did not hesitati
make a personal attack before the stato
comniittco and this is cited as grounds
for the charge he may do the same
thing in his own county.
There was every indication in Dem
ocratic circles last night that the re
volt against the reactionary, machine
domination within the party is rapidly
reaching a climax and open re\ o|t
facing the Pcnce-Nugenl-Eldor
chine |ii mgny ol the counties,
the Eitler people are desperately en
u control the county dele
dcuvoring t
rn ji
NN hile
gates, many of them pi-omisc tc
Pocatello convention either
Intruded for some other "favorite
or
|j ant , eB j n picking the strongest
would tr>
go
in
son"
free
uninstructed, making them
mail
to defeat the machine candidate.
that
•taine
It was reported some time ago
the Pence-Nugent-Klder
to bind delegates from the
counties they hope to control by the
mit rule. This they were able tj» do
in Soy. Perce < «>unty, the first to elect
delegates to the state convention, but
ma
OWNERS AT STAR
s
HIAWATHA lump, *7.50: stov«T $7;
•gin'was very small. The
the
a mo
3 UI 1
ruse v\ill be attempted in other c
t j ea to j )ind delegates,
TUT PprpjiiTp ryci T atvtt\
A ^ ^
• A meeting of the land
• on the north side of the Boise
» r iver between Boise and Calc'
! •
j «

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well will be held at Star qn
Monday evening ai S o'clock f<ir
the purpose of organizing |&
drainage district,
owning land or who are inteit
• ested in the agricultural devej
• opinent of this section, are re
• quested to attend.
i *
All t luise
«
1 nut, $8.60. Western S. G. Co. • £ throve.
• ••••••••»••••••a
People of the State Galled
Upon to Observe Arbor
Day.
An Arbor Day proclamation was Is
sued yesterday by Governor Alexander j
calling on all citizens, public schools :
and state Institutions to observe the 1
day on the dates te b» set by the su
perintendents of public Instruction of
the various counties by planting trees
I or ornamental shrubs. The proclama
j tioft Js as follows:
"Whereas, In order to call especial
attention to its importance and to add
greater assurance to its due ob*erv
ance, It has become customary for the
governor of the state to issue his proc
lamation urging that one day in each
year be set aside in the public schools
and other educational Institutions of
the Btate, to be known as Arbor day.
"Therefore, I, M. Alexander, governor
of the state of Idaho, do get aside and
proclaim aj Arbor day, In each of the
several counties of the state, that day
which the superintendent of public In
struction of each of said such coun
ties of the^state of Idaho may deter
,„|ne best suited to the requirements of
climatic or other conditions for the
better^ promotion of a due regard for
the care
shrubs and ornamental plants, and I
do call upon the citizens, school au
thorities, children and parents of each
such county to observe such desig
1 listed day by planting some tree or
I
| ..rnamental shrub ns well as to ns
tremble to participate in instructive
iind entertaining public exercises in
aid and encourage their
and • cultivation of trees.
tended to
propagation and protection.
"Done at Boise, the capita! of the
state of Idaho, this 16th day of March,
"M. ALEXANDER,
"Governor."
J.916.
i
i Attest:
GEORGE R. B.YRKERS
Secretary of State.
FESTIVITIES HELD BV
!
LATTER DAY SAINTS
The Latter Day Saints' Relief society
of the Boise ward celebrated the sev
enty-third anniversary of the organi
zation of, the association St. Patrick's
day, March 17, by rendering a splendid
program, serving a sumptuous banquet j
and closing the day's pleasure with a
dance in the evening.
The festivities and exercises were
I held in th ■ G. A. R hall and were'at
tended by nearly 200 people. The ex
ercises commenced by the rendering of
la program on which Bishop George W.
Lewis of the Boise ward and Heber Q.
Hale, president of the Boise stake, were
the speakers, the former treating the i
; subject of "Our fathers and mothers," I
and the latter speaking to the topic.
Mile stones in woman's evolution." [
The singing was rendered by Mrs.
Hebet* Q. Hale and members of the so
ciety. At 5 p. m. 200 people, including
the ladies of the society and their hus
| bands and the old folA of the ward,
I sat down to a substantial banquet
served under the direction of the so
ciety, after which dancing until mid
night" was indu'ted in, brin ing to a
close the most successful and enjoy
able occasion in the ward society's his
i
tory.
Judge Alfred Budge acted as mastei
of ceremonies at the banquet and
toasts were responded to as follows:
"The Old Folks," W. M. McKendrlck:
"The Anniversary of the L. D. S. Re- |
lief Society," Alfred Hogensen; "The j
Boise Ward Relief Society—Its Past," '
Mrs. Julia S. Handy; "Its Present* and j
Future," Heber Q. Hale "Its Presi
dency," C. Oscar Winkler; "Its Rank j
and File," Mrs. Florence Lewis.
A pleasing feature of the occasion !
wax the entertainment of all the old ;
folks of the ward, those who had at- j
talned the age. of 60 years and over, j
These veterans were the guests of
honor and were taken to and from the
hall to their homes in automobiles. The
oldest gentleman present was 76 years
old and the oldest lady, 93. Both of j
these were presented with china and
cut glass presents, respectively, as
evidences of esteem and distinction.
The day's festivities were under the
direction and supervision of the presi
dency of the relief society with Mrs.
W. M. McKendrlck, its president, pre
siding.
W. C. T. U. NOTES.
That the public library was being
supplied with books on the subject of
prohibition, whose statistical accuracy
was questionable, and whose sentiment
was insidiously wrong, was the discov
ery made by a recent investigator in j
search of information, was reporte, at
the monthly parlor-meeting of the
Central Vf. C. T. U. held at thj lume af
Mrs. J. L. Thompson on Friday after
noon. Following this statement, the
state president spoke on the same sub
ject and said that the national organi
zation ad reported s-icu work done
in various places by the liquor inter
ests and a committee was appointed to
more thoroughly investigate the sub
ject. The matter for consideration for
the afternoon was the life and work of
the Hon. Neal Dow, the "Father of
Prohibition." Mtb. Roan was the speak, i
er, and for an hftur she held the close !
attention of the women by her charm- '
inggmd unusual treatment of the tub
ject.
After the close of the program, the
time was given over to sociability. The
house was deco, ated with carnations
and violets and the guests were invited
into the dining room where a lunch
was served cafeteria-style, nt very
prettily appointe! tables.
The next regular meeting will bo
held at the W. C. T. U. rooms, 405 Em
pire building. Friday, March 24 at 2:3.
Subject,. "Campaign Plans."
Leader, Mrs, Vanco,
i>. m.
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Let High Art Clothes
Testify to Your Good
Taste in Dress
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These unusual ready
to-wear clothes for
Spring are in a class by
themselves.
You will never realize
how well you really
can look until you've
worn these super-style
garments - - ■ ■■■■■■ ■■==
Our store is full, our tables
are crowded, all styles are
represented. Your good taste
will lead you to buy. We ex
tend a cordial invitation to look
over—to try them on.
V ,
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HIGH ART SUiïS
$17.50 to $25 Suit
c
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Different Hats
For Different Heads
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Not dozens but hundreds of pretty
new styles in Spring Stetsons
and Astors.
'

Stetson's fancies $3.50
Astor Hats
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$2.50
y 5
IK
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ft
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PRETTY NEW STYLES
Boys' Ajax Two-Pant Suits $4, $5, to $7.50
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The new adjustable knee band, elastic and adjustable. One of
the 1916 Ajax features, should be seen.
Sport waists, and everything new and up to the minute for
the little fellows. v
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BOYS' WAISTS
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ALEXANDER
ONE PRICE CLOTHIER
NINTH AND MAIN

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