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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, March 26, 1916, Image 15

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1916-03-26/ed-1/seq-15/

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PINNEY THEATRE, WEEK STARTING MONDAY, APR. 10
ELLIOTT & SHERMAN PRESENT D. W. GRIFFITH'S
' „ - r • ; >
V
WORLD'S MIGHTIEST SPECTACLE
Matinees at 2:15
Evenings at 8:15
0
V
COST
$500,000
3.000
HORSES
The Play's
Message of
Peace
"DECISiVE BATTLES OF THE CIVIL WAR"
"SHERMAN'S MARCH TO THE SEA"
"THE BURNING OF ATLANTA"
"LEE'S SURRENDER AT APPOMATTOX"
WHAT ,WAR COSTS MOTHERS, WIVES AND
SISTERS"
"THE ASSASSINATION OF PRESIDENT
LINCOLN"
"THE RISE OR THE KU KLUX KLAN
"THE COMING OF THE PRINCE OF PEACE
?
\
If this graphic presentment serves no other purpose,
its message for universal peace marks it of great impor
tance. Morally and educationally it establishes the fu
tility of armed conflict. A member of the senate of the
United States expressed the foregoing sentiment.
"Anyone contemplating war should see this picture,"
added the senator. "I sincerely believe it will do more to
deter people from engaging in war than anything written
or spoken on the subject in years."
Great care has been taken not to glorify battle. Even
the music stops in its motif of glorification to sound the
note of terror and desolation which is the real truth of
war.
A
A series of wild rides that commandeered a county for
a day and cost $10,000.
Night photography of battle scenes, invented and per
fected at a cost of $12,000.
Wonderful artillery duels in which real shells, costing
$80 apiece, were used. Miles of trenches, thousands of
fighters, "war as it actually is."
Musical score of 25 pieces, synchronized to the several
thousand distinct and individual scenes.
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Armies seldom settle disputed questions of state. But,
where they accomplish this much, in the wake of conflict
arises newer and more terrible questions. But for the
hatreds engendered in the Civil war, the suffering of the
Reconstruction period would never have been known.
i
The Birth of a Nation" has
No Competitors.
To See It Is a Treat.
To Miss It Is a Misfortune.
44
\
From coast to coast the most
stupendous Dramatic Sensation
this country has ever known.
Now playing to delighted and
enthusiastic multitudes.
It's worth $5.00 a seat.
—New York Journal.
Remember, the Engagement is
Limited in Boise
5,000
SCENES
18.000
PEOPLE
•>
Taken From Thomas Dixon's "The Clansman
=Symphony Orchestra
Never Before Has This City
Been Privileged to Witness a
Photo Play of Such Magnitude
25
25
*8
P»i« Dc . Evening
X X ILco. Matinee
50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50 and $2.00
25c. 50c, 75c and $1.00
Mail Orders Now Being Received. Regular Sale Opens Monday April 3d.
e Birth of a Nation/' Greatest of Moving
Pictures, Is Coining
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tarai Loa'a Last 8tand at Pstsrsburp, Seen* From "The Birth of a Nation," at tho Pinney Theater Commenc
ing Monday, April 10.
"The Birth of a Nation," which with
i superb and inspiring musical set
ig, rendered complete by a symphony
chestra, its bewildering Bound and
iht and color effects will be present
fat the Pinney theater, for a limited
Logement, may be generally "cover
F as follows;
are 13 reels of vivid, realistic
juries which teil ihe story, of a
le romance, which explains the at
ere
titude of the North and the defense of
the stubborn South over the slave is
sue, and which carry one through
scenes of thé long, cruel war. Its mes
sage to the world being "Liberty and
Union, one and inseparable."
Colonel Stonemnn of the North is in
love with the sister of Colonel Cam
eron of the South. And Colonel Cam
eron 1* infatuateif with the sister of
Colonel Stonem . These romances are
depicted before the war and the view*
show how the drawing of lines and the
commencement of war worked es
trangement, distress and hardship of
the young lovers and members of their
families.
Brave young men embrace their
mothers, sisters and sweethearts and
depart for army gervice, their emo
tions
face*
lining depicted in their resolute
. The pictures also show patriot
ic women at home sewing and knitting
for the soldiers.
The mfcgic films reveal the interiors
of northern and southern homes. One
secs vast armies mustered to march
away to war.
In a twinkling the scene changes and
the sun shines brightly on a snowy
cotton field in the south, with scores
of negroes of all ages plucking the
white blossoms. Festive little pica
ninnies caper about and at nightfall In
cabin quarters singing and dancing are
indulged In by the slaves. Bondage is
visualised with Its sorrows and its
joys. As the war progresses great
battles are fought and the thrilling ac
tion from rifle fire to cavalry clashes
and artillery duels Is depicted in pic
torial form as true to life as it is pos
sible for human agency to stimulate.
Scenes are unfolded in which fully
18,000» soldiers and 3000 cavalry, the
largest theatrical army ever assembled,
are active in this performance of the
good and bad deeds of warfare, une
sees a bayonet charge with a quiver of
excitement and closes his eyes at sight
of the dying and dead. Ambulance
drivers arrive to carry away the fallen
and hospitals throw doors open to re
ceive the injured. Gentle nurses flit
from cot to cot to minister to the wants
of the patients.
Histpric scenes are depicted with
realistic effect, ranging from battle en
gagements such as the battle of Get
tysburg. the siege of Petersburg, Sher
man's march to the sea and the fall of
Atlanta, to events in Washington.
In the picture General Robert I,ee
strides forth to clasp the hand of Gen
eral U. S. Grant, his conqueror at Ap
pomattox. Another historical event of
lasting impressiveness is the assassin
ation of President Abraham Lincoln,
presented as accurately as the details
are remembered by eye witnesses and
as exact reproduction of the play
house in which the martyred president
lost his life. Peace is exemplified in a
brilliantly impressive pageant and the
pictorial story continues with the for
tune of the re-united lovers and the
troubles experienced in the south over
the abuse of political power vested in
the emancipated negroes. Mob vio
lence and outlawry are depleted, fol
lowed by spectacular views of the Klu
n.lux-Kiansmen who organized secretly
to control the negroes through their
superstitious fears.
The Klansmen were fearless night
riders and thejf wore white shrouds.
Acts of vengeance were perpetrated
under the cover of darkness and the
pictures show clearly why such ex
treme measures were necessary for the
continuance of -taw and order. '
In point of Interest the Kituismen
spectacles rival the war aspects of the
graphic photoplay.
Phone Compton Transfer Co. for the
best moving job you ever had. Phone
48.—Adv.
tf
LAST WEEK FOR THE
LORCH COMPANY. Aï
THE'PINNEY THEATER
Commencing tomorrow night, Theo
dore Loroh and his company which
has been at the Pinney theater for the
past two weeks, will begin • its last
week at this theater, of course pre
senting a new line of plays—making
changes Monday, Wednesday and Fri
day nights, with a matinee Wednes
day. This company lias given the
theater goers of Boise a fine line of
plays, all mounted iri a most excellent
Mr. Lorch promises that his
manner.
last week will be up to his usual stand
ard. and possibly will appeal to the
theater goers more, in-as-much as the
plays to he "produced this week will be
more on the comedy lines than any he
has offered before here.
Begin nlu»; tomorrow night Mr. Lorch
will present one play from his own
pen, "The Man Who Does Things."
This Is a play that is said to be full of
heart interest with a splendid vein of
comedy running through the entire
production.
Commencing Wednesday matinee
will be a play particularly pleasing to
the ladies, "Wife in Name Only," with
plenty of comddy, heart throbs and
something the ladies cannot help but
admire. Some handsome gowns are
worn by the lady members of the cast.
The engagement of this company wilt
close Friday night with a pretentious
production of "The Struggle for Life,"
a melo-dramatic form of amusement.
Each production this week will be
staged in Mr. Lorch's usual' manner,
particular attention is given to all the
details, all special scenery, electrical
effects, costuming and everything that
goes forward to making a play a real
hit. Mr. Isjrch and his company have
made many friends during their stay in
Boise and it is to be presumed that all
their friends will take advantage of
this their last opportunity of attend
ing these excellent performance* this
season.
ARTHÜR KACHEL IS
TO BE SEEN IN BOiSE
.The T. M. C. A. reports that It^has
».enured Arthur Kachel a great dra
matic artist to render "The Music
Master." by David Warfield.
Kachel is the only artist, who reads
"The Music Master" with the consent
of David Beloaco. He will be here
April 12,
Moron Olses, who gave George Ber
Mr.
nard Shaw'* "The Devil'* Disciple,''
last week as one of the Boise lecture
course numbers speaks in the highest
terms of Mr. Kachel. Mr. Kachel is
gifted with a great voice and a splen
did Imagination. He has been wisely
and thoroughly trained. He has ar
rived at a place In hie work where he
can be classed as a true exponent of
v-MEM
V
- tf^nAISYDEAJNT -
INTIL recently Douglas Falr
I banka stood aa one of the few
living white men .who never
had attempted to write a play;
but now he has succumbed and
written the scenario for the new pic
ture in which he Is to appear for the
Triangle-Fine Arts.
Fairbanks was watching the making
of a Triangle-Ince film not long ago,
in which Bessie Love played opposite
William S. Hart, and he then and there
decided he would like to do a picture
play, with Bessie Love for his leading
woman.
■With tears in his eyes he
pleaded with Director Griffith to take
Bessie away from Ince and Hart and
let her play with him. But the cele
brated producer shook his head.
But Fairbanks was not dismayed. He
sat down and wrote a scenario of such
nature that Bessie Love was the only
one who could possibly fit the leading
female character, and In which no
body but he himself could do the lead.
His scheme worked perfectly, and his
play, "The Good Bad Man," will short
ly be released on the Triangle program.
At LastI Movie Without a Hero.
Extry! ■ Here's a motion picture
series without the dashing, fearless
hero who Is always on hand at the cru
cial moment to gave the heroine from
pressing dangers. It's "The Social Pi
rates." and George Bronson Howard,
the famous novelist and playwright, is
the radical responsible for the Innova
tion, But to make up for the lack of a
hero the author has given two heroines. 1
Marin Sals and (Mile Kirkby. who are'
seen as "The Soqjpl Pirates," two fas- !
cinatlng heart-breakers bound by a;
compact to deal jostles to those who
prey on the helpless and unsophisti
rated.
Gertrude Robinson will play the,
principal feminine part in The Qual
tty of Faith," recently placed In work j
at Jacksonville, Fla. Miss Robinson
has been on the stage since she was a
little more than a buliy. (n^H
Quality of Faith,"
lowly origin, she is
life of shame through the love of a
young minister. *
Grace Punard, who was forced to
make a trip to the hospital a* the
-.*—4 - c, , * ■ ;
"The
as Marna, a girl of
s redeemed from a
the art.
is also fortunate in his selection of
plays. He deals with the modern plays
—the live, the sentient, the drama of
the hour. He is a graduate of Leland
Powers, one of America's famous dra
matic artists and is said to be his best
product Mr. Olsen is also a grad
uate of that school.
His work.is distinctive.
He
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Bessie Love and Douglas Fairbanks
in "Tb* Good Bad Mgs."
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TRIAZOL*
•\
This snapshot waa taken during a
thrilling loy* sosne. If more of tha
picture were visible. Miss Love's arms
.
w ® u, f "• n vw c ' ose, >' «"twined
* bout th * n,ck of Mr ' Fairbanks,
jault of three Injurie« in nurresslon, has
ed fey illness. JShe Is far from well, and
fears that she may be forced to sub
mit to still another operation, the
fourth since her injur;' in the "Luclte
ra-iLove" serial.
i
returned to work to complete the two
photoplays iif whiefe she was uppear
ing with Francis itaril when interrupt*

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