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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, April 04, 1916, Image 1

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II
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS G

Voi. xixvi
BOISE, IDAHO, TUESDAY» APRIL 4, 1916.
TEN PAGES
No. 81
«
:
AGAIN ESCAPES FROM NET
v
j.
AMERICANS MUST HAVE
PSE OF RAILROADS OR
/ MUCH LARGER FORCE
far Department Informed of the Situ
ation Which Confronts the Expedi
tion—More Troops Are Sent Into
Mexico to Guard Communications
San Antonio, Tex., April 4.—Official admission of the
belief that Villa has fled far beyond the American forces,
now operating south of Chihuahua City, was made at Gen
eral Funston's headquarters today. Since yesterday
much information indicating that Villa is in the neighbor
hood of Sateva and is moving toward Parral, has been re
ceived, but that regarded by General Funst6n as the most
^reliable came, from Consul Letcher at Chihuahua City.
If it is proven beyond a doubt that Villa is on his way
south, perhaps to Parral, the campaign against him can
not be carried much farther unless the railroads between
Chihuahua and the border are made available Tor the
movement of troops, or enough troops are sent into
Mexico to strengthen greatly the communication lines.
This was frankly stated at General Funston's headquar
ters. It was also intimated that representation to this
effect would be made to the war department.
funstodTorders
ADDITIONAL FORCE
SENT TO MEXICO
Washington, April 4.—General Fun
ston today advised the war depart
ment that he was sending more troops
Into Mexico from Columbus to protect
the line of communication with Gen
eral Pershing. He did not state wheth
er ths additional troops had been sent
'forward to the military base.
So far General Funston has not sug
gested the re-enforcement of General
Perfihing's forces, except merely to
protect the extended communication
lines, and there is no confirmation of
border reports that extensive additions
to the fighting column be required.
Nineteen Apache scouts and trailers
have been ordered from Fort Apache,
Arls^ to General Pershing's column.
The army ceneorshlp has veiled the
number and personnel of the addition
al troops which have been sent across
the border. Major General Scott said
the extra troops left Columbus two
days ago, but no word of their move
ment had been allowed to leak out.
rO MESSAGES FROM
GENERAL PERSHING
RECEIVED TODAY
Columbus, N. M., April 4.—General
Pershing has established his camp so
far In the wilderness of the Guerrero
mountains and so*far beyond the range
of communication that his staff of
ficers were obliged to report again to
day that they had no knowledge of his
whereabouts. This information came
in reply to demands of the war depart
ment for a list of American casualties
In the San Geronlmo engagement.
Department officials have been In re
ceipt of numerous communications,
showing the anxiety of relatives of sol
diers In Colonel Dodd's command. Re
ports of heavy firing along the Amer
ican Une of communication caused
some fear that the threatened attempt
of the Vllllstas to cut off the truck
train had developed.
An Investigation proved that mem
bers of the engineering corps who
were repairing the roads from here to
Casas Grandes, had been hunting
game
A Record Auto Year. ,
There was more automobile
advertising in the newspapers in
1116 than ever before.
Automobile factories ran to ca
pacity to supply the demand.
There will be a still greater
volume of newspaper advertising
In 1910—manufacturers agree.
Commenting én this fact the
president of a leading motor car
company says:
"The fact that newspaper ad
vertising will sell automobiles
leads me to the conclusion that
It will sell any good product."
VILLA NOT WOUNDED
AND HAS 60 MILES
LEAD OF PURSUERS
El Paso, Tex., April 4.—Francisco
Villa, unwounded and accompanied by
only eight men, was at Satevo, 60
miles south of Chihuahua City, two
'days ago, according to Information re
ceived here from Mexican sources
which usually have proved reliable In
the past
If this information Is correct It bears
out previous reports that the bandit
chief is headed toward Parral and is
leading his American pursuers by at
least 60 miles. The nearest point to
Satevo which the Americans troops
are known to have reached Is San An
tonio, 60 miles to the northwest
The route said to have been taken
by Villa Is one with which he is thor
oughly familiar and which, indeed, Is
known among the peons as "Pancho's
road."
From Guerrero It leads across
the continental divide through the
Bachlnlba pass Into a broad valley,
which runs east to San Andres, Villa's
old headquarters, thence south to San
ta Ysabel, the scene of Villa's massa
cre of 18 American mining men, and
then southeast through Satevo to Par
Has Done No Fighting.
The man who brought the story of
Villa's arrival at Satevo here
circumstantial account of the bandit's
maneuvers and plan of campaign.
While his story Is impossible of veri
fication his own credibility Is vouched
for by reputable American
men here who have employed him for
several years.
"Villa," he said, "has never taken
part In any fighting with either Amer
ican or Carranzlsta troops,
the main body of his troops
Guerrero district with orders to
as far as they could the American ad
At the same time the
■were Instructed to give Information
freely to the American officers, always
provided that the information
false. The story' of Villa's being
wounded was carefully concocted for
the express purpose of misleading Gen
eral Pershing and Colonel Dodd Into
the belief that the bandit was In hid
ing in the mountains and thereby In
ducing them to split their forces into
small searching parties
waste their time In the wild Sierras
while Villa was making his way safe
ly southward."
gave a
business
He left
In the
oppose
van e
peons
was
who would
ZEPPELINS AGAIN
RAID THE COAST
Berlin, April 4. (Wireless.)—Another
Zeppelin raid was made on the British
coast last night .Fortifications near
Yarmouth were attacked. The air
ships returned safely.
No Damage Done.
London, April 4. (Official.)—No dam
age was caused by last night's Zeppelin
raid. There were no casualties.
Dutch Government to
Protect Neutrality
+
Holland Closes Her German Frontier.
Rome, April 4.—A wireless from Zurich"reports that Holland has closed 4*
4» her German frontier and massed all available forces there.
4 *
4*
4
4*
+
4*
4*4»4*4 , 4 , 4*4*4*4 , 4*4»4*4»4 , 4»4 , 4 , 4»4 , 4»4*4 , 4*4*4*4 , 4*4»4*4*4»4 , 4»4*4 , 4»4'4*
Amsterdam, April 4.—"I do not for a moment suggest there is a possibility that
Great Britain intends to land her new armies on the Dutch coast," said former Min
ister of War Colyn in an interview regardin the recent mysterious military prepara
tions in Holland. "We have the assurance of Great Britain that she will protect our
neutrality and we rely on that assurance. But the question is, 'What does Germany
think of this?'
If Germany judges our defensive capacity inadequate and considers that British
invasion of Germany through Holland is to be feared, would it then be strange if we
were approached from the German side with proposals to which we cannot submit be
cause they would mean an abandonment of our neutrality toward the allies?
ii
M
GERMANY ASKED
TO INVESTIGATE
LOSS OF VESSELS
The Norwegian Government
Will Demand Full Com
pensation if German Sub
marines Responsible.
London, April 4.—A Copenhagen diB
patch says the Norwegian government
has requested the German government
to Investigate whether German sub
marines were responsible for the tor
pedoing of the large number of Nor
wegian ships which have been de
stroyed within the past few days. If
it is proven that German submarines
were responsible Norway will demand
full compensation. Investigations on the
part of Germany regarding other Nor
wegian vessels which have been tor
pedoed since the submarine campaign
was Intensified have not yet been con
cluded.
COLLUSION ALLEGED
BETWEEN COLLECTORS
AND MANUFACTURERS
Washtngtpn, April 4.—Charges that
collusion has existed for years between
certain deputy Internal revenue col
lectors In New York City and cigar
manufacturers recently arrested In the
alleged $20,000,000 tobacco fraud cases,
are under Investigation by the treasury
department.
GENERAL REYES WILL
SURRENDER FORCES
Torreon, Mex., April 4.—General
Canuto Reyes, commanding the Villa
forces in this locality, has sent a let
ter to General Trevino, the Carranza
cofnmander, offering to surrender with
all his forces if given amnesty.
DENVER BASEBALL
CLUB IN NEW HANDS
Denver. April 4.—The Denver West
ern league baseball club was sold to
day to H. L. Jones, former owner of
the Lincoln club. The consideration
was not announced. James C. McGill,
former owner, will devote his time to
the affairs of the Indianapolis Ameri
can Association club.
Dallas Votes on Ségrégation.
Dallas, Tex., April 4.—Nine proposed
amendments ip the charter of the city
of Dallas were presented to the voters
for their approval at today's election.
Segregation of the white and colored
races is embraced In one of the pro
posals. The others relate for the most
part to proposed bond lseues and var
ious public Improvements.
Disastrous Lxplosion. •
London, April 4.—An explo- •
• slon In a powder factory in •
• Kent, caused the death or Injury •
o of 200 persona. •
FORMERRESIDENT
OF BOISE MEETS
A TRACKI DEATH
Bamford A. Robb, Promi
nent Attorney, Falls From
Eighth „ Floor of Office
Building at Seattle.
Seattle, Wash., April 4.—Bamford A.
Robb, a prominent attorney, leaped or
fell from a window of his office on the
eighth floor of a downtown office
building last night, suffering Injuries
which caused his death a few minutes
after he was taken to the hospital.
The »police said they believed Mr.
Robb had slipped and fell through the
open window overlooking an alley. Ap
parently he had tried to save himself
by grasping a bookcase by the window,
for articles which had been on top of
the case had fallen to the floor. Mr.
Robb was alone In the office, having
locked the door after telling business
associates he Intended taking a nap
before going home.
Mr. Robb was 47 years old.__ He was
born In Oregon and practiced""law sev
eral years in Idaho, where he was as
sistant surveyor general. He took a
prominent part In Republican politics
of that state. He came to Seattle 10
years ago from Walla Walla,
widow, Mrs. May Robb, Is president of
the Ladles' Musical club of Seattle and
well known In musical circles In the
northwest.
His
Bamford A. Robb, with his father,
B. A. Robb, and his sister, Miss Abigail
Robb, was a resident of Boise for a
number of years. He was assistant
surveyor general from 1898 to 1902.
He left Boise in 1902 and was married
a year later to Miss Bernice Sherman,
daughter of Mrs. John Sherman of
Boise. During his residence In Idaho,
Mr. Robb was prominent in Republi
can politics.
CHAMBERLAIN ENTERS
A VIGOROUS PROTEST
AGAINST AMENDMENT
Washington, April 4.—Over vigorous
Objection by Chairman Chamberlain of
the military committee, the senate yes
terday voted 35 to 80 for the Cummtbs
plan to amend the army reorganization
bill by creating a national guard sec
tion of the general staff. When re
cess was taken last night the chairman
and other members of the committee
were fighting hard against a second
amendment championed by Senator
Cummins and Senator Lee of Mary
land, which would eliminate the pro
vision for a federal volunteer army.
Senator Chamberlain charged dur
ing the debate that pernicious activity
on the part of officers of both the na
tional guard and the regular army
threatened to undo the months of se
rious work done by the committee, and
he threatened that unless the army
officers ceased attempting to influ
ence legislation through personal ap
peal to senators, he would seek to
have them disciplined by the war de
partment. He said officers who ap
peared before the committee were un
willing to see their plans worked Into
a homogeneous bill, and as soon as
they concluded their testimony began
to attempt to Influence friendly sena
tors.
REPORT GIVEN ON
RAID ON ANCONA
BY AEROPLANES
Three Austrian Aircraft
Brought Down by Italians
—Seaplanes Supported by
Torpedo Boats.
Rome, April 4.—Among the details
given In the official communication re
garding the raid on Ancona yesterday
by five aeroplanes, supported by two
torpedo boats, as a result of which
three persons were killed and 11 In
jured are the following: "Enemy gea
planes were attacked by anti-aircraft
guns on an arrhored train and by four
Italian aeroplanes. The seaplanes fled,
but three of them were brought down.
One was captured intact,
burst Into flames and was destroyed
and a third sank while being towed to
port Enemy torpedo boats remained
far out at sea during the attempted
raid."
a second
PLANTS ARE CLOSED
BECAUSE OF STRIKE
Chicago, April 4.—Twenty milk dis
tributing plants have been closed as a
result of the strike of 10,000 farmers
and dairymen around Chicago, accord
ing to the announcement of thé Milk
Producers' association. The milk pro
ducers want $1.65 per 100 pounds In
stead of the schedule of $1.33Lhat has
been affective for some years. Orders
of downtown consumers have been cur
tailed because of the milk shortage.
CONVICTED OF MURDER
Of WEALTHY CHINESE
Weavervllle, Cat, April 4.—Loren
Freyer, aged 18, was convicted here to
day of the murder of Lem Sing, a
wealthy Chinese. The jury recom
mended life imprisonment.
CHARGE OF PIRACY
WILL BE FILED IN
THE HUDSON CASE
New York, April 4.—The United
States attorney general has
local federal authorities here that a
formal charge of piracy on the high
seas, for which the penalty, on convic
tion, Is imprisonment for life, will be
preferred against Clarence Regina)»}
Hudson, alias Ernest Schiller, who took
possession of the British steamer Ma
toppo. Hudson has been sent to the
observation ward for 10 days by the
police magistrate.
Wsathsr Warning Issued.
The special warning to live- e
• stock men issued today by the •
• local weather bureau, reads: •
• "Unsettled, blustering and cold- •
• er weather, wltlf occasional rain •
• during the next two or three •
• days. •
*
STRONG POSITIONS OF
FRENCH ARECAPIURED
NORTHEAST OF VERDUN
German Official Report Tells of Pro
gress Southwest of Douamont and In
. the Caillette Wood—British Gain Suc
cess Against the Teutons.
Berlin, April 4.—(Official)—Strong French positions
southwest of Douamont and in the Caillette wood, nortk
p., have been taken. The capture by the
ine crater at St. Eloi, south of Ypres, which
the Germans have been occupying, is announced.
east of Verdu
British of a m
No Infantry Attacks, Paris Reports.
Paris, April 4.—(Official)—No infantry attacks
made last nig.it by the Germane in the Verdun region.
The French continued their heavy bombardment along
the Douamont-Vaux front northeast of Verdun. The re
sponse was feeble. There were violent artillery exchanges
near Avocourt and Malancourt.
were
STORVOF ATTACK
BÏ COLONEL DODD
SENT FROM FRONT
In Final Dash on Villa
Stronghold Cavalrymen
Abandoned Practically!
All Equipment.
At the Front, March 81, via Aero
plane and Motor Coiurles to Columbus,
N. M., April 4.—The strategy where
by, after two weeks!' pursuit, the Villa
band under Genera! Ellseo Hernandez
was overtaken by American troope and
dispersed, has been revealed here. The
plan was to send an American column
In a straight line along the "string of
the bow," while Villa Was taking a
longer route along tte "arc of the bow."
Coupled with this
general order to "ap
horseflesh." Reporl
departed from Guen
the American troops
surrounded the tow
lowed and the Vllllsias were dispersed.
Under these instructions the cavalry
men, with Colonel !>odd's brigade al
ways In front, pushed straight south
ward from the borler through the
Santa Marla river vs.lley and then over
the edge of mountains about 6000 feet
high. On March 22, Dodd's men were
reduced, by the necessity of leaving
patrols and the Illness of 40 men, to a
total advance guard of 400. They ran
out of provisions ard so depended on
what they found. In the final dash to
the Villa stronghold Wednesday morn
ing the cavalrymen abandoned all non
ftghtlng equipment except their blank
ets, canteens and messkits.
naneuver was the
are nothing except
s state that Villa
ero an hour before
reached there and
i. The battle fol
BRITISH WILL TRY
TO SAVE ZEPPELIN
London, April 4.—
nautical Institute ht
notified'!ernment for permis*
The British Aero
s asked the gov
lon to undertake,
at Its own expense, :he salvage of the
Zeppelin L 16, whlct is lying in shal
low water off the mouth of the
Thames. The institue believes if sal
vaging Is undertakei by aircraft ex
perts, "the Zeppelin can be saved, re
built and launched tgainst the enemy
within three months."
ASSUMES WAR WILL
LAST THROUGH YEAR
London, April 4.—In opening his
budget speech In the house of commons
today'Chancellor of the Exchequer Mc
Kenna said It was assumed the war
would last during the whole of the
financial year.
PAROLE ISSOIIGHT
FOR MURDEREROF
Effort Being Made to Secure
the Release on Parole of
Henry E. Youtsey, Serv
ing Life Term.
Frankfort, Ky., April 4.—An appli
cation for the parole of Henry E. Yout
sey, convicted 16 years ago of the mur
der of Governor William Goebel and
sentenced to life imprisonment, was
presented to the state prison commis
sion at Its meeting here today. The
application, which was presented by
the chairman of the commisston, de
clares that Youtsey Is entitled to pa
role "by work for the state, by length
of service and by the provisions of the
law and every dictate of fairness and
humanity." The application further
set forth that those "who sought to
profit by his net are all free, the bene
ficiaries of pardons, while ' Youtsey
alone Is tortured on the rack of life
Imprisonment."
The mysterious murder of which
Youtsey was convicted took place here
on January 30, 1900, when Kentucky
was on the verge of an tnterneclm
flict over the outcome of. a hotly con
tested election between William Goe
bel, Democrat, and William S. Taylor,
Republican. Taylor was declared elect
ed to the governorship, but Goebel con
tested the election vigorously. An ap
peal to a Democratic election board
proved unavailing. As a last resort
Goebel moved to have the legislature
unseat Taylor and his colleagues#Dur
lpg the ensuing excitemept, while hun
dreds of mountain men were in Frank
fort, Goebel was shot.
The next day, by direction of the
legislature. William Goebel on his
death bed was sworn In as governor
and J. W. Beckham $ook the oath
as lieutenant governor. ' Then during
the Investigation of the murder that
followed, W. S. Taylor, Charles Finley,
his secretary of state, and the rest of
his active partisans were .obliged to
flee. Caleb Powers was arrested In
conjunction with the crime, and was
four times convicted for the murder,
but Just a* often the judgment was re
versed, till he was finally pardoned In
1908 by the governor.
In 1909 Governor Willson cleared the
court records of the case by granting
pardons before trial to Taylor, Finley
and nearly a dozen others who had
been fugitive« from Kentucky ever
since the Goebel assassination. In
granting executive clemency the gover
nor declared that in his belief no one
but Youtsey had part in the murder,
and that it was not a conspiracy, as *
the Commonwealth charged.
Wheat Unfit For Milling.
Washington, April 4.—Wheat of the"
1915 crop unfit for milling la estimat
ed at 146,000,4160 bushels, according to
the results of an Inquiry made by the
department of agriculture from flour
mills and grain elevators.
e con-

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