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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, April 04, 1916, Image 4

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EVENING : CAPITAL : NEWS
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS _____
Published Every Afternoon and Sunday Morning at Bo lee. Idaho, a City of
30,000 People, by
THE CAPITAL NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY. LIMITED.
RICHARD STORY SHERIDAN. _
Entered at the Post Office at Boise. Idaho, as Second-class Mall Matter
Society Editor. 31S-J
Editorial Rooms, 234;
Phones —Business Office, 23«;
BOISE, IDAHO, TUESDAY, APRIL 4, 1916.
THE GOLDEN RULE.
Remember that we are brothers, so let's be good and kind to others,
acknowledging their rights; why make Jones hotter than a hornet,
by playing on your flute or cornet, when he would sleep o' nights !
Why keep a swarm of hungry chickens, which cause more trouble than
the dickens, as golden spring days pass, committing crimes no man
• can pardon, bv scratching in the neighbor's garden, destroying garden
sass? Why keep a dog that is so batty it thinks it is outclassing Patti,
or even Annie Case, when it spends all the evening howlihg. and pour
ing diabolic yowling, ih torrents through its face? While of our
goodly deeds we're 'spieling, we're stirring up much bitter feeling by
little, thoughtless sins; *we keep a cow that makes Brown maddish,
because it eats his early radish—#hy bark that neighbor's shins?
pious works our jseal is splendid; to see all vice and sorrow' ended we
go down in our jeans; and then we keep a rooster nutty that crows
until it jars the putty from neighbors' window panes.
Protected by the
Adams Newspaper Service, New York.
In
*
CJbtuxpi ——

HIGH MEAT PRICES.
The United States department of agriculture's report
on the condition of meat prices prevailing on March 15
shows an increase in the price of meat animals—hogs,
cattle, sheep and chickens—of 16.4 per cent over the price
a year ago this time, and an increase of 12.7 per cent over
the average price for the last six years on March 15.
That this jump in price was sudden is shown by the state
ment from the same source thaï between February 15 and
March 15 this year the price paid to producers for meat
animals increased 8.4 per cent, while the increase for the
same period during the last six years averaged 3.1 per
rent.
An-increase is to be expected at this time of year.
Supplies of feed laid in to carry meat animals over thé
winter are becoming exhausted, and as yet there is not
enough pasture, even in southern states, to keep animals
in condition. And this condition has passed the stage
where the producer finds it more profitable to sell animals
than*to buy feed. Most of the animals brought to market
now have during the last few weeks been subsisting on
They were, of course, held for the
pretty expensive food,
early spring rise in price. The large increase this spring
is, therefore, to be accounted for on the theory that at
tractive prices earlier in the winter induced selling which
in normal times would have been deferred until the pres
ent time.
There must, however, be a reason for early advanced
prices. The war has something to do with it, for large
quantities of tinned and cured meats are being exported
at prices with which the packers have publicly found no
fault. The belligerent powers need food badly enough to
pay well for it. and whether they like it or not domestic
consumers have to pay as much. Thus the strong foreign
demaud reduces the supply and forces upward the do
mestic prices. This condition, however, is one of the by
products of the war, one of the ways in which the Ameri
can pays a tax on the traffic in munitions. But in the
department of agriculture's report there is missing a vital
factor. How does the increase paid by the consumer com
pare with the increase received by the producer?
LAUNDRIES AND DYES.
Inasmuch as we have laundries everywhere, and the
fondness'for colors is general, a statement which was re
cently issued by the Laundryrneri 's National Association
of America is of more or less local application. Careful
investigation convinces the laundrymen's association
"that the wash goods in which the colors are most ques
tionable at present are red tablecloths and napkins and
towels with red borders; blacks in cotton ginghams, which
are apt to wash lighter and in some cases to 'crock' when
the damp goods are folded. Black stockings will probably
'bleed' and turn lighter. Light goods with blue, red or
black trimmings are apt to cause trouble.
The troubles of the laundryman are not hard to un
derstand. They had their counterpart a few years ago
among the cleaners. The latter, after many expensive
trials, decided not to guarantee colors in silks and other
fabrics. This dispute between cleaners and weavers led
to the disclosure that the silk mills—or some of them—
adulterated their cheaper silks. For the summer and fall
goods few "fast" colors have been obtainable. Hence the
laundrymen's ala mi. But if the laund'rymen fear to
guarantee fabrics as now dyed, what have they to do?
The answer is easy—recommend the wear of goods con
taining no coloring material at all. "In view of the sit
uation," continues the statement already referred to, "\ve
strongly urge our customers to use as much white goods
as possible until such time as the permanent dyes will
again be available."
For months an active campaign has been conducted.
More recently it lias been discovered that some laundry
price lists have been revised. The laundry price for men's
starched collars, which has long been 2i/o cents, is hence
forth to be 3 cents.
i I
THE DISTURBING MOVIES.
The fickleness of the moving picture heroes and
heroines is amazing. It 1ms been just 22 minutes by the
clock in the corner since that young man was convicted of
murder, which he had doue for the love of a certain smil
ing blonde, and here he is eloping in an aeroplane with
a
tall dark lady. It is a relief, of eourse^to know that after
all he was pot hanged, but he migjit have waited until to
morrow before changing his sweetheart or at least moved
with her to the next show. It used to trouble us not
little to see our>favorite stars made love to by a different
young man each season and now it is nothing to see them
falling in love and marrying and divorcing at least three
young men in a week, and very likely two in one after
noon. Of course, it may be that we should take some of
the responsibility upon ourselves, and go to see each one
of our heroes or heroines only once in so often, but as long
as we know they are there, going through the fickle per
formance, we might as well see it and be done with it
to be wondering which young man is making love to which
young woman this time.
1 The movie is a disturbing thing at best. It, develops
a unique sense of romance in us so rapidly that we can
scarcely see a big automobile rounding a comer without
expecting to see another one in close pursuit. Every time
we look up at a ten-story building we are a little disap
pointed that there are not two or three people crawling
down the front of it. We learn to judge the types in the
performances on the screens and label everybody we
in the street cars as a hero or a villain or a detective in
disguise.
Most disturbing of all, however, are these endless love
affairs with their infinite variety of changing partners.
The peculiar part of it is that each new arrangement
seems perfectly satisfactory,
should be .most unhappy if the certain young man did not
marry the certain young*"woman, no matter if we were just
as anxious for him to marry a very different young woman
just 22 minutes ago by the clock in the corner. Twenty
two minutes ago? The fact is that the young nlan may be
making love to a different young woman—perhaps two
three different young women—in every town in the coun
try, at this identical moment.
a
as
see
In each nerfonnanee we
or
Kidnaped
/V\.R.S«
£\A. LEONARD
a
THE ELLSONS LOSE NO TIME IN FOLLOWING UP THE CLUE.
"Nell," called Olive Ellson from the
machine as her friend came to the
door in answer to the doctor's lum
mons, "get on your wraps and come
along. I believe we have a clue to
the whereabouts of the baby at last.
I want to tell you
about It."
In a very short
time Nell and lit
tle Hal were seat
ed in the automo
bile and they were
speeding down the
road.
"Tell me alt
about it," Nell ex
claimed, leaning
forward eagerly.
"About half an
hour ago," began
Olive, "Mr. Far
rer, a farmer who
lives about five
miles from here^
rang the doorbell.
He asked if I was
Mrs. Ell son and said that he had read
of our trouble in the paper, and had
at once decided to come and tell us of
a strange experience lie had had the
very day the baby was stolen. He ov
ertook a woman walking and carrying
a baby, when he was a mile from the
cross roads where we found the bug
gy."
:■
"X;
\
. & ■
"Which way were they going?" ask
ed Nell.
"Toward Judson's corners. She got
out there and started east."
GET OUT OR GET UNDER!"
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that, she was walking and carrying
heavy baby on a hot day like that?"
asked Nell.
"She did not account for It. He
could not get her to say anything ex
cept that she did not live in these
parts."
"How long ago was this Mr. Far
rer at your house?" continued Nell.
"Oh, not more than half an hour.
Gaylord came about fifteen minutes
after he left ffnd you can imagine it
did not take long for us to get started
on our search."
"Well, there is one thing, if a woman
has started: out with a heavy baby on
foot, she cannot be very far off," com
forted #!ell.
"That is What T told Olive." The
doctor turned toward them as he
spoke. "Yes, but it makes the affair
all the more mysterious. What woman
in her senses would plan to walk and
carry a heavy child? Why did not she
leave it in the buggy?" There wa s a
worried wrinkle between Olive's eyes
as she spoke.
"Oh, she evidently planned on get
ting rides," remarked the doctor. "She
knew that a thorough search would be
made all over the adjacent roads and
that there was no chance of getting
away with a buggy. She knew she
would be able to get rides to help her
self along and planned on it."
"Who could do such a thing?" asked
Olive sadly. There was no answer
from either of her companions.
"I think this Is Judson's corners
ahead here. You say the man saw her
going east from there?" asked the
If 100 fAT GET MORE
FRESH AIR
BE MODERATE IN YOUR DIET AND
REDUCE YOUR WEIGHT. TAKE
OIL OF KOREIN.
Lack of fresh air it is said weakens
the oxygen carrying power of the
blood; the liver becomes sluggish, fat
accumulates and the action of many of
the vltul orguns are hindered there
by. The heart action becomes weak,
work is an effort and the beauty of
the figure is destroyed.
Fat put on by Indoor life is un
healthy and if nature Is not assisted
in throwing it off a serious case of
obesity may result. ,
When you feel that you are getting
too stout, take the matter In hand at
once. Don't wait until your figure has
become a joke and your health ruined
through carrying around a burden of
unsightly and healthy fat.
Spend us much time as you possibly
can in the open air; breathe deeply,
and get from Charles L. Joy & Co. or
any druggist a box ,of oil of ko
rein capsules; take one after each meal
and one before retiring at night.
Weigh yourself every few days and
keep up the treatment until you are
down to normal. Oil of lcoreln is ab
solutely harmless, is pleasant to take,
helps the digestion and even a few
days' treatment hns been reported to
show a noticeable reduction In weight,
—Adv.
doctor.
"Yes, he looked back as he drove off
and she was walking slowly down the
road." replied Olive. The machine
turned in the direction indicated.
"How are you going to proceed with
the search?" asked Nell.
"I shkll comb this district with a
line toothed comb," he announced. "1
shall call at every house and question
every person I meet. Somebody Would
surely sec her In the course of the af
ternoon, and she would have to stop
for food and shelter by night. It
seems to me we stand a very good
chance of finding the woman. Whether
she had our baby or not remains to
be seen." The doctor's tone was
cheerful. It was such a relief to have
something definite to do to prosecute
the search. He had spent the best part
of two days in traveling aimlessly
about, trying to light on some clue.
(To be continued.)
*
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a

o
DAILY LESSON IN HISTORY.
One Hundred Years Ago Today.
1816—A measure calling for
large appropriations to Increase
the United States navy was be
fore congress.
Seventy-five Years Ago Today.
1841—William Henry Harri
son, ninth president of the Unit
ed States, died In Washington.
Born In Charles City county,
Virginia, Feb. ». 1773.
Fifty Years Ago Today.
1866—The first general con
ference of the Methodist. Epis
copal Church, South, since the
beginning of the war, was
opened at New Orleans.
Twenty-five Year* Ago Today.
1891—Edwin Booth played
Hamlet in Brooklyn, and bade
farewell to the stage.
»
*
Insomnia.
Indigestion nearly always disturbs
the sleep more or less, and Is often
the cause of insomnia. Eat a light sup
per with little if any meat, and no
milk; also lake one of Chamberlain's
Tablets immediately after supper, and
see if you do not rest much better. Ob
tainable everywhere.— Adv. T. Tit. S.
HE value of a bank connection is best cite
the fact that—every successful business
son has one.
Build up your fund for independence at the
bÿ
T
ir
Pacific National Bank
DAILY PUZZLE PICTURE
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FASH I
urn
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Wmktig rtSf ** 1
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SBrtillSi
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SWEET EMPLOYMENT.
New doth the wife ail other cares forsake.
And on the fashion book Intently pore;
Then to the milliner's her way doth take.
And hubby pays the freight ae oft before.
Who pays the billsf
ANSWER TO YESTERDAY'S PUZZLE.
Right side down, above wheelbarrow.
*
+
* Dinner Stories.
"Some people certainly has got
queer idears,'' observed the hobo,
glancing up from the scrap of news
(taper he had rescued from a rubbish
heap.
"Referrin', I s'pose. to the guys wot
insists on havin' a cold bath before
breakfast every morninV' said his pal.
"Worse'» that! I was just readin'
here about a bloke wot's raisin' a
turribie rumpus 'cause somebody wants
to build a brewery right across the
street from his house."
Will Crooks. M. P.. ha* a well
deserved reputation as a raconteur. At
a lecture the other evening he caused
great diversion by defining the differ
ence between an optimist and a pes
aimist. The author, he said, was a col
onel who confided the definition to him
a man
who has 'done' everybody, and takes
on his recent visit to the front.
"An optimist." he said, "is
good care he is not ' done' himself. A
pessimist Is the man who lives with
him."
_ ...
pressed me as being a leader of men.
a ten-thousand-volt human dynamo.
clarion-voiced exar who would brook
no. opposition; but when f met him the,
second time, in his office, I sized himi
up for a pusilanimous mouse,
Where diu you meet him the firstj
time?"
"On the telephone.''
"What's your opinion of Bommas
ter?"
"Well, when I first met him. he )m
• •••••••••••••••••
One Year Ago in the War,
April 4. 191a—Russians cap- •
• lured amolnik and Rostock •
• Pass, In the Carpathians; Turk- •
• ish cruiser Mejidieh reported •
» sunk by Russian mine; Paris •
• reported French gains In the •
• Woevre region; Germans sank •
• British steamer Olivtne and •
• Russian barque Harmes off •
o Isle of Wight.
• THEATER PROGRAM MON- •
DAY AND TUESDAY,
Strand Theatar.
Douglas Fairbanks in
Hi* Picture in the Paper,
Isis Theater.
ly "Diplomacy.
Comic Theater.
Mixed Program.
A big laugh at every show.
a
9



Marie Doro i
BACKACHE AND RHEUMATISM
Dear Mk. Editor:
For the benefit of others, I gladly
Ihc
I thank him and wish him success
give this statement regarding
merits of Dr. Pierce's Anuric Tablets.
Am nearly 76 years of age. I suffered
from backache, weak back, rheuma
tism, and could not control the excre
tion of the kidneys. I can safely say
that "Anuric," the n«nv discovery
Dr, Pierce, Buffalo, N. Y., has done
me more real good than anything
have ever taken for these ailments.
ln his field of relieving the suffering.
Sincerely yours,
MRS. N. M. FLINT.
NOTE:—Up to this time, "Anuric"
has not been on sale to the public, but
by the persuasion of many patients
and the increased demand far thi*
wonderful heating; tablet. Doctor Pierce
TOBACCO HABIT ,
EASILY CONQUERED
A New Yorker of wide experience, has writ
ten a book telling how the tobacco or snuff
habit may be easily and completely bani died in
three days with delightful benefit. the au
thor, Edward .1. Woods, 830 K,Station 1C, New
York City, will mail his hook free on requot,
The health improves wonderfully
nicotene poison is out of the system, Calm
, tranquil sleep, clear eyes, norm ! appe
tite, good digestion, manly vigor, -t" ; ;i m m
ory and a general gain in effki. tu v ar
among the many benefits reported. Get rid
of that
cigar, cigarette, snu
acify morbid desire.
~
feeling;
h! of pipe
more
ff or chewing tüiïiteca tù
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS.
Evening Capital News—
Dear Sir: As our text on civ,
somewhat out of date, our pupils vvottM
appreciate It if the Capital New
print a list of salaries of the following
officials;
Federal—President.
senator, speaker of the' house, repre
«tentative, cabinet officers, justices su
premo court, district courts, etc. -
State—Executive officers and Iecis
B. M. LYNCH.
! iS
would
vice president.
kitive.
The salaries of federal officers are
as follows: President. $75,000; vice
president, $12,009; senators. $7500;
speaker of house, $12,000; represenia
• *«500; cabinet officers. $12,000;
chfpf juetiff , mlpreme court
a8S0clate 1us tices, $14,600;
judgre , ,- 0 o„ ; district Judges, $6009.
State-Governor $50004 Justices su
preme court jsooo
$4000: secretary of state, $3000; state
auditor. $3000; state treasurer, $4000.
tiv
.'ircuit
attorney general,
superintendent of public instruction,
$2400; senators and representatives, $5
per diem for not more than 60 days in
regular session.
Special Rat „,
Dur ,j p!me! [lhotos reduced to $2.5?
for $0 daya; schoo , ch11dren> eet bus} ,
stamper s, ground floor studio, corner
9th wld ] da ho.—Adv
AIS
• ••••••••••<»••••••
POLITICAL CONVENTIONS •
AND ELECTIONS IN 1916 •
April 20—Republican state S
convention at Twin Fails. •
April 22—Progressive state •
convention at Boise.
May 18— Démocratie state •
convention at Pocatello.
June 7—Republican national •
convention at Chicago.
June 7—Progressive national •
convention at phieago.
June 14—Democratic national •
convention at St. Louis.
Sept. 5—Statewide primary •
election.
Nov. 7—Gene! al election.
O
e
I



e
I
e
e
has finally decided to put it into the
I dt, dg stores of this country within im- J
! mediate reach of nil sufferers.
Simply ask for Doctor Pierce's Ami
ric Tablets. There can be no imitation,
Every package, of "Anuric" is sure to
be Dr. Pierce's. You will find the slg
nature on the package just ns you do
on Dr. Pierce's Favorite Prescription,
the ever-famous friend to ailing wom
en. and Dr. Pierce's Goldea Medical
Discovery, proven by years to be the
greatest general tonic and reconstruc
tor for any one.
At any rate don't give up hope of
being cured of your malady until ''Anu
rie'' has been tried. Jmt a few doses
have proven that it will make one feel
like a different person.
EDITOR.—Please insert this letter
In some conspicuous placé in your pa
per—Adv. '

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