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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, April 05, 1916, Image 1

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BOISE, IDAHO, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5,1916.
Vol. XXXVI
No. 82
TEN PAGES
GERMANY HAS NO DESIGNS ON U. S
%
a
SILLY IMPUTATION" 18
TERM THE CHANCELLOR
APPLIES TO REPORTS
Bethman-Hollweg Outlines Germany's
Position In the War and Places the
Blame tor Its Continuance on the
Allies—Speech In the Reichstag
Berlin, April 5.—(Via wireless)—Chancellor von Beth
man-Hollweg protested vigorously in the reichstag today
against the report that Germany now or in the future con
templated aggression against the United States. The
chancellor indicated in his speech that any suggestion of
peace on the basis of destruction of the Prussian military
power would make possible only one answer—the Ger
man sword. He stated if Germany's adversaries desired
continue the slaughter of men and the devastation of
urope the -guilt would be theirs and that Germany
would have to "stand it as men.
In his speech, which was the most comprehensive the
chancellor has made since the war began, he said:
latest offspring of the calumniating campaign directed
against us is the report that we, after the end of this war,
shall rush against the American continent and that we
shall attempt to conquer Canada.
This is the silliest of all the imputations invented
against us. Equally silly are reports that we contemplate
the acquisition of any territory on American soil or Brazil
or any American country whatsoever. We have fought
for our existence and for the future—for Germany, not for
space in a foreign country are Germany's sons bleeding
and dying on the battlefield. Everyone among us knows
this and it makes our hearts and our nerves strong. This
moral force strengthens- our will in order not only to
weather the storm but also to achieve final victory.
* The chancellor turned to the subject of the eventual
conditions of peace, after brief reference to Portugal's en
trance into the war. He pointed out that in a speech on
Sept. 9 he declared his readiness to enter into a discussion
of peace, but that then, as now, Germany's enemies de
clined.
ii
clared the chancellor.
Hungary intended to touch the Polish question but the
fate of battles brought them in contact with it. Now this
problem' stands before the world and needs to be solved.
Germany and Austria-Hungary must and will solve it.
History will not admit that after such earthquakes things
will ever become what thev were before.
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After the war there must be a new Belgium/' de
N either Germany nor Austria
44
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TURKISH LEADERS GETTING UNPOPULAR

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Enver Pasha (left) and Talaat Bey.
Here ia a new picturd of the leading figures in Turkey. Enver- Pasha,
minister of war, is the man who cast the lot of Turkey oq the side of the
Teutonic alliances in the war. Talaat Bey, Turkish minister of the in
terior, is Enver's right hand man. As long as the Turks were victorious
those men retained their popularity, but the recent Turk reverses in Asia
jbsve put them out of public favag.
Position of Holland Is
Outlined In Address
The Hague, April 5.—At the opening of the second chamber of the Dutch parlia
ment, after a preliminary secret session, the president of the chamber read a state
ment declaring the recent suspension of furloughs of army officers and men was a pre
cautionary measure, as Holland was warmly resolved to maintain her neutrality and
there was a possibility of it incurring increased danger owing to the course of the war.
The suspension order, he said, was not in consequence of present political entangle
ments, but was decided upon on account of certain information which had reached the
government, which the government did not judge it opportune at the present time to
make public.
GROUND GAINEDBY
FRENCH TROOPS IN
Fifteen Aerial Combats En
gaged in and the Germans
Lose Three Machines—
French Official Report.
Paris, April 5.—(Official)—JThe
French gained ground north of Cail
lette wood, northeast of Verdun, dur
ing several engagements last night.
In the Verdun region French aero
planes yesterday engaged In 15 aerial
combats, during which a double
motored German machine wag brought
down. Two other German machines
also fell. All French pilots got back
without damage.
RATES ON SUGAR TO
IDAHO ARE ASSAILED
Washington, April 5.—Carload rates
on sugar from California points to
Montana and Idaho, were today as
sailed as unreasonable and discrimina
tory by Montana distributors in a com
plaint to the Interstate commerce com
mission. The petitioners charge that
rates to Montana points are In excess
of rates to St. Paul and Omaha.
SENATE IS URGED
TO HURRY ALONG
THE ARMY BILL
Washington, April 6.—President Wil
son today urged the senators to speed
up the army bill. Senator Stone told
him every effort would be made to
dispose of it as quickly as possible.
The first amendment today was offered
by Senator Sutherland, Republican, to
Increase the coast artillery consider
ably over the Increases proposed by
the committee.
PASSENGERS ROBBED
ON THE UNION PACIFIC
AND BANDIT ESCAPES
Cheyenne. Wyo., April 5.—The bandit
who last night held up and robbed pas
sengers on-west bound Union Pacific
train No. 1, evidently rode to Laramie.
No trace has been found of where he
left the train, which was going 30 miles
an hour. A revised report shows that
he obtained 1767 and a gold watch from
five men passengers. Two women in
the observation car at the time were
not molested.
Charge Unfairness in Trade.
Washington. April 6.—The firm of
Goldin Brothers, a New York thread
manufacturing concern, has been cited
to appear before the federal trade com
mission today to show cause why the
firm should not desist from alleged
unfair methods. The case Is the first
In which a formal complaint of unfair
business practices has been made by
the commission. The complaint charges
that 1 the firm has manufactured and
sold mercerized cotton thread as silk,
and that the product contains no por
tion of silk. The matter was brought
to the attention of the commission In
charges filed against the firm by the
Silk Association of America.
DRYS MAKE GAINS
IN ELECTIONS IN
ILLINOIS TOWNS
Nearly Four Hundred Sa
loons Put Out of Business,
While 250 Will Be Oper
ated Again.
Chicago, April 8.—Almost complete
returns of the local option elections In
various Illinois towns and townships
Indicated today that between 850 and
400 saloons would be eliminated In the
near future, and that former dry ter
ritory which before the prohibition vic
t-rles In 1912 sheltered about 250 sa
loons would again permit the sale of
alcoholics:
Moline and Waukegan voted to oust
saloons, while Bloomington and Lock
port, after two years of prohibition,
voted for the return of saloons. Near
ly all the other towns in which local
option elections were held remained
either wet or dry as they had been be
fore. The largest city In this class was
Rock Island.
THOMPSON MEN ARE
BADLY DEFEATED
Chicago, April 6.—Democrats scored
heavily In Tuesday's aldermantc elec
tions in the 35 wards of the city. They
carried 21 wards, the Socialists 1 and
Republicans but IS.
There were 85 holdover aldermen,
and with the lineup revised to date the
Democrats came within four wards of
wresting control of the city council
from their rivals.
Of the Repdbllcanc elected only three
bore the Thompson label. The others
belonged to the anti-Thompson faction
In the city hall.
Issues involved were local or purely
political. Involved was Mayor Thomp
son's ambition to succeed Roy O. West
as Republican national committeeman.
The election for committeeman will be
held next Tuesday.
8aloons Voted Out.
Omaha, April 5.—For the lirst time
In Its history North Platte voted out
the saloons by a majority of 90. ,
Republican Elected Mayor.
Kansas City, Mo., April 6.—George
Edwards, Republican, was elected
mayor of Kansas City yesterday by
8160 votes, according to the unofficial
count complete. He defeated Mayor
Henry L. Jost, Democrat, who was
seeking re-election. The vote an
nounced Tuesday night was: Edwards
30,818, Jost 22,658.
Socialist Elected Mayor.
Milwaukee, Wls., April 5.—Returns
from the Milwaukee city election show
Daniel A. Hoan, Social Democrat, can
didate for mayor, to be running ahead
of Mayor G. A. Badlng, non-partisan.
Experts forecasted the election of Hoan
an hour after the polls closed.
Mains Progressives Meet.
Bangor, Me., April 5.—The Progres
sive state convention of Maine as
sembled here today and was called to
order by George G. Webber of Aubprn.
The work of the convention will be
confined to the selection of delegates to
the Progressive national convention to
be held In Chicago In June.
Merit's Jteward
Merit's reward is often Imita
tion. ^
It Is the article with character
that is copied, but Imitation Is
seldom more than label-deep.
No reputable dealer ever offers
to sell you a substitute for an
article you ask for.
You are Justified, If the store
keeper trys It, In asktng him
whether there is not a little ex
tra profit on the substitute.
When you see an article ad
vertised In this newspaper, ask
for it by name and Insist on get
ting what you ask for.
THREE SHIPS SUNK
BUT ONE BRITISH
Spanish and Norwegian Ves
sels Are Victims of Tor
pedoes—Crew of Vigo
Was Set Adrift.
London, April 8. — The Spanish
steamship Vigo has been sunk off the
Bay of ..lscay by a German submarine.
The crew was set adrift lna boat and
later picked up by the British steam
ship Polo and taken to Gibraltar.
The British steamship Bendew
sunk and one member of the crew was
lost.
Vks
The crew of the Norwegian steam
ship Arena was taken to Y mu 1 den to
day by a trawler. The Arena was tor
pedoed and sunk by a German subma
rine.
FAVORABLE REPORT
ON ARMOR PLANT BILL
s
Washington, April 5.—The sénats
bill for a government armor plant was
favorably reported by the house naval
committee today, 16 to 8.
CONTEMPT CHARGES
AGAINST MARSHALL
TO BE CONSIDERED
Washington, April 5.—Without oppo
sition the house today adopted a reso
lution for a special committee to con
sider the contempt charges against
Federal District Attorney Marshall of
■New York, which grew out of the In
dictment there of Representative Bu
chanan.
Missouri Q. O. P. to Meet.
Excelsior Springs. Mo., April 5/"—The
advance guard of delegates has arriv
ed here for the Missouri Republican
convention tomorrow. The convention
is to elect four delegates at large to
the national convention, draft a plat
form and nominate presidential elect
ors.
YEAR IN SENATE
ENOUGH FOR HUM
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Thomas Taggart as he looks today.
Thomas Taggart, Democratic na
tional committeeman from Indiana,
recently appointed United States
senator ad interim from that state to
succeed the late Senator Shively, has
issued ar. announcement saying he
will not be r candidats to succeed
himself. This
T Ä W
picture of Senator
taken in Washington
MORE EQUIPMENT FOR
Dispatch From General Pershing Highly
Praises Colonel Dodd lor His Dash
Against Villa s Camp—Tenth Cavalry
In Battle With Bandit Band
Washington, Apri^ 5.—The war department has au
thorized the purchase of 108 more motor trucks and two
gasoline tanks for the American expedition. These will
be formed into companies of 27 cars each to maintain the
greatly lengthened lines of communication. General Fun
ston's dispatch definitely located Colonel Dodd, presum
ably with the Seventh cavalry, on Monday at Providencia.
The dispatch also indicated that General Pershing was
that far south. General Pershing reported under yester
day's date: "Met Colonel Dodd yesterday at Providencia
and got details of his fight with Villa bandits March 29.
Dodd's exceptional iharch with the Seventh cavalry to
reach Villa's camp and the work done by that command
deserve high praise."
The Aero Club of America's offer to sell two aeroplanes
to the government for $1 each has been declined. The
new half million dollar appropriation for more aeroplanes
made acceptance unnecessary.
CAVALE YMENHAVE
ANOTHER ENCOUNTER
WITH THE BANDITS
San Geronlmo, Chihuahua, via aero
plane to Colonla Du-blan and wireless
to Columbus, N. M., April 5.—Two hun
dred American cavalrymen under Col
onel W. C. Biown, Tenth cavalry, de
feated an equal force of Villlstas In the
second engagement of the campaign
Aguas Callentes, 80 miles north
Guerrero, on April 1. This report was
made to General Pershing yesterday by
two Mexican ranchmen, who said that
the Mexican forces lost 80 men and 40
horses, while the Americans suffered
no casualties.
Villa was not with the band, accord
ing to the ranchmen, who asserted that
the American troops believed at first
they had encountered the bandit chief
tain. An investigation showed that he
had not been with the detachment
In Tortuous Country.
For hours the American cavalrymen
followed Manuel Lopez, one of Villa's
lieutenants, and his bandits through
tortuous winding canyons and almost
impassable trails of the mountains.
Believing that they had eluded their
pursuers the' bandits relaxed their
vigilance and before they realized
they were confronted by the troops
of the Tenth cavalry, General Per
shing's old regiment, wplch had been
stationed near the town to Intercept
stray bands attempting to moke their
escape.
Only the most meager details of the
t were brought here
chmen, but in many
ensuing engage
by the Mexican
respects it resembled that of a week
ago at Guerrero. Immediately the
bandits realized the presence of Amer
ican troops they began a hurried, dis
oVganized flight from their camp, some
seizing their ponies and others trying
to make their escape afoot. They went
singly and In small parties, all firing
at the American troops (is they fled.
None took time to aim, Aie ranchman
said, and as a result none of the bul
lets found a khakl-clad mark.
Fleeing in Scattered Bands.
Officers here are Inclined to believe
ropll
mu
that If 30 bandits were killed in the
running fight, that at least as many
more were wounded. It was asserted
also that because of the nature of the
engagement it Is probable that some
equipment supplies and prisoners may
have been captured. The ranchmen
told General Pershing that the Villis
tas were fleeing in scattered bands of
three to five men before the negro
cavalrymen.
Reports reaching here Indicated that
the force encountered by the American
cavalrymen was the largest detachment
of the force defeated and scattered at
Guerrero a werfe ago by Colonel Dodd's
command. These troops were said to
have been* In the vicinity of Bachiniba
pass for several days.
Two American scouts reported to
General Pershing that they had been
fired on by Villa outposts last Friday
within the environs of Bachiniba and
that they had returned the fire but
without result so far as they knew.
Two troops of cavalry, sent to the
town to intercept file Villlstas, reached
there after the command had fled.
AVIATORS FINDING
COUNTRY HARD ONE
FOR THEIR TASKS
At the front In Mexico, General
j Pershing's camp, April 2, by aeroplane
j and motor to Columbus, N. M., April 8.
| —American aviators had many narrow
escapes from Injury while flying
j through one mountain pass on their
j way to Villa territory. Because of
I the altitude the aviators cannot fly
; high above the ground. An aviator
* who flew through the pass said: "I
\ skimmed the wagon road all the way
j over the pass,
Sometimes I thought
the wheels were touching the ground.
Whenever there was a rise In the road
I had to go up to keep from hitting the
ground. When the road dipped the
wind currents carried the machine
down Into the dip."
Mall service to the troops Is one of
the first branches of the service to
perfected. Letter mall, traveling by;
aeroplane, outstripped even fouu
I celerity of transportation,
spondent at the front who was hungry,
; f or coffee and bacon and sleepier,
A corre
j nlgth for lack of enough covers to keep
j ou t the mountain cold, received a let
ter from London, Eng.
letter.
clothing advertisement with two sam
ples of suiting material.
It was a fat
When opened It contained a
BAND OF VILLISTAS
SCATTERED BY THE
TROOPS OF CAVAZOS
El Paso, April 6.—In his attack on
Villlstas at Clenequtta yesterday. Gen
eral Cavazos killed ten and scattered
the band, according to a report by
General Gavira of Juarez. Cavazos
said he was going to follow up tha
fugitive but called on General Gutier
rez to rush forces against Satevo
Nalca. Santa Otrude and other points
where they are supposed to be heading.
Cavazos' losses amount to one man
wounded and a horse killed.
ATTEMPT SURPRISE;
SUFFER HEAVILY
j day by the marriage or Miss Mary
Torreon, Mex., April 6.—A Vlllista
band under Simon Reyes and Chacon
last Saturday attempted to surprise
the gurrison in the mining town of
Parras, several miles east of here. The
garrison under Colonel J. M. Gonzales,
drove off the bandits, killing 43 and
capturing a quantity of arms and a
number of horses.
Miss Harriman a Bride.
New York, April 5.—Two New York
families of prominence were united to
Bishop Harriman and Felix T. Rosen.
The bride is the only daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. J. Low Harriman of this city
and Berryville. Va. She Is a grand
daughter of the late Heber R. Bishop
and a niece of Mrs. W. K. Vanderbilt,
Sr. Mr. Rosen's brother, Walter T.
Rosen, married Miss Lucy Bigelow *
Dodge, a granddaughter of the late
John Bigelow, and only daughter of
the Hon. Mrs. Lionel Guest,

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