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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, April 08, 1916, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1916-04-08/ed-1/seq-1/

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D EVENING CAPITAL NEWS C

Vol. XXXVI
EIGHT PAGES
BOISE, IDAHO, SATURDAY, APRIL 8, 1916.
No. 85
TROOPS ON FRESH TRAIL OF VILLA
r* ftîïïM
CLUE AND CAVALRY
IS IN PURSUIT
New Movement Undertaken and General
1 Pershing Is Firm In the Conviction
That He Is On the Right Track
I Expeditionary Field Headquarters, South of Namiquipa, April 7, by Aeroplane and
I Wireless to Columbus, N. M., April 8.—American troops are on a fresh trail of Villa as
a result of reports made by an army aviator and observer who have returned from
what may prove one of the most important scouting flights of the campaign.
New cavalry columns were hurried outward today while other columns in the field
were taking a new direction. Th,e new movement, coupled with reports received, in
creases General Pershing's conviction that the troops on a' new trail of Villa, opened
several days ago, following reports made by the aviator, are on the right track. The
American line of pursuit is now 400 miles long.
Some of the difficulties encountered by the troops threading their way through the
Bweky passes is indicated in the aviator's report. He was obliged to drop messages in
a small parachute to the advanced detachment. New reports of Villa's flight received
today said because of wounds Villa was riding on a stretcher carried on the shoulders of
|men and that he was accompanied only by a small personal bodyguard and rear guard.
The flight, made over 80 miles of territory hitherto explored, developed informa
tion which the military authorities consider valuable and of importance. Reports by
the aviators showed that somewhere south of Satevo a cavalry column was making
p thrilling ride, which may equal in importance that upon Guerrero by Colonel Dodd's
command. The flyers were at a height of 8000 feet when they discovered the cavalry
column to which they were carrying dispatches filing through a wooden canyon. They
floated slowly down until they were within the troops' perspective, then making sure
pey were American cavalrymen, landed. One airman caught a grazing horse and rode
p the waiting Americans, five miles away, without saddle or bridle and with only a bit
pf rope about the animal's nose to guide. Troops confirmed reports that Viila had
peen wounded, but had no other details. The aviators reported the Mexicans
bered friendly.
encourt
UDO PEOPLE
FORCED ID WALK
TO THEIR WORK
rospect of Settlement of
Street Car Strike More
Remote Than Ever—All
Demands Rejected.
Toledo, April 8.—With prospects of
■BUement of the street car tie-up
HPe remote than ever, thousands of
leople walked to work today in a driv
kig snowstorm. The hundreds of motor
lusses presser into service were inade
luate and several were wrecked by
[kidding. The final break in the con
rer.ces between the officials of the
impany and the union came early to
ty. The company refused to concede
le closed shop policy, the right of
en to wear union buttons while on
lty and to reinstate discharged men.
UDGE REFUSES TO
San Francisco. April 8.—Federal
idge Van Fleet today refused to dis
tallfy himself from sitting further in
• foreclosure suit brought by the
luitable Trust company against the
astern Pacific railroad. The trust
mpany charged that h^ waâ biased
td prejudiced.
[DS FOR RELIEF
OF THE BELGIANS
New York, April 8.—Today, which is
Le birthday anniversary of the Belgian
[ng, has been selected by the Dugh
rg of the American Revolution H an
Lproprlate occasion for conducting a
Ltion-wlde campaign for additional
[aids to relieve the destitute non-com
Ltants In Belgium and northern
lance. The organization has request
its members throughout the coun
100,000 strong, to sell small Bel
la flags on the streets. It is also
Lwested that the women selling the
E« should be dressed in white and
E- the Belgian national colors. The
Eceeds of the sales will be turned
Eto the commission for relief in
PROPOSED USE
RATES millE
Washington, April 8.—The proposed
increase in rates on Iron and steel ar
ticles from the terminals of the Great
-.orthem and other railroads on the
North Pacific coast to Spoka..o, Port
land, and ether points in Idaho, Wash
ington and Orej -n was today found
unreasonable by the interstate com
merce commission.
BARNES FORCES LOSE
IN NEW YORK STATE
New York, April 8.—Frederick C.
Tanner will continue to be chairman of
the New York Republican state com
mittee. An attempt by William Barnes
and his followers to oust him from the
position at the meeting of the com
mittee here for organization purposes
was defeated by a vote of 87 to 63.
CONFESSION MADE TO
Los Angeles, April 8.—James Moran,
who surrendered himself to the federal
marshal at San Diego and was brought
here, confessed today to aiding In the
Liberty street ferry postal robbery two
months ago In New York, when be
tween half a million and a million dol
lars in securities was stolen, according
to a postal inspector. Moran was with
out money when he surrendered.
LARGEST CLOCK IN
COUNTRY STARTED
Boston, April 8.—The biggest clock
on the American continent began to
tick today at the top of the tower of
the new Boston customs house. The
clock is 395 feet above the street
level and is visible practically all over
the city. Each fuce, or dial, of the Im
mense time-piece is 21 feet across, and
nearly 66 feet in circumference. Bach
of the figures on the dials Is three
feet three Inches high and two feet
three inches wide. The minute hands
are 16 feet from tip to tip and the
hour hand measures 10 feet In length.
At night the figures and hands of the
clock will be illuminated with more
than 300 electric light*
SHIP IS SHELLED
BÏ A SUBMARINE;
MADE IIS ESCAPE
Sends Out Wireless to Other
Ships — Austrian Trans
port and Three British
Vessels Are Sunk.
Marseilles, April 8.—The large French
steamer Colbert was shelled without
warning by a submarine in the Medit
erranean, but being under full head of
steam escaped her aggressor by
perior speed, at the same time sending
out a w ireless warning of the subma
rine's presence to other ships.
Austrian Transport Sunk.
Paris, April 8.—(Official)—A French
submarine has sunk an Austrian trans
port in the Adriatic.
su
British Lose Three.
London, April 8.
sels have been lost.
Three British ves
The steamship
Braunton and schooner Clyde of White
stable were blown up.
saved. The Bteamship Chantala
sunk.
The crews were
was
DATE SET FOR VOTE
ON PENDING ARMY BILL
Washington. April 8.—The senate to
day agreed to vote April 18 on the
reorganization bill and all Its amend
ments, and to limit the debate to 10
minutes to each senator In
day, beginning April 13.
army
any one
GOVERNMENT NITRATE
PLANT IS CONSIDERED
Washington, April 8.—Proposals to
Incorporate In the army increase bill
provisions for a government nitrate
plant were debated when the senute
resumed work on the tncusure today.
Several senators oppose the project on
the ground that it is Socialist!*
SJliVTSSSSf^Bi
the verdun region
4 > 4»«t»4*4»<l»4»4»«l»4»'i'4»4»4»«i'4*4»<t»«l»4»«|>«|»4>4>4

French Position Is Captured.
Berlin, April 8.—(Official)—The Germans 4*
•I* have captured a French position over two kilo- 4»
4» meters wide in the Verdun region west of the 4»
•b Meuse.

4»4*4 , 4»4*4»4»4*4*4*4*4»4»4'4*4»4*4*4»4»4»4»4»4*4«
Paris, April 8.—(Official)—The Germans have
newed their attack south of Haucourt in the Verdun
gion and gained a footing in two small field works be
tween Haucourt and hill No. 287.
Fighting with hand grenades between Bethincourt and
Chattancourt turned to the French advantage. East of
the Meuse there has been intermittent bombardment of
French positions. Near Fort Vaux a German hand gren
ade attack was repulsed.
*
4
*
re
re
GERMANS NOT RESPONSIBLE
FOR SUSSEX EXPLOSION
Berlin, April 8.—The German government is 4*
4* able to announce that no German submarine or 4*
4* warship was responsible for the explosion which 4»
4» damaged the British steamer Sussex.
4*

4*
4
4*4*4»4 , 4*4'4*4»4*4'4*4*4 , 4 , 4'4»4'4*4*4*4*4»4»4 > 4'
TRIAL OF STUDENT
FOR MURDER TO K
CALLED MONDAY
Young William Orpet Must
Answer the Charge of
Killing Lake Forest High
School Girl.
Chicago. April 8.—The district attor
ney of Lake county Is busy gather
ing his witnesses and completing other
necessary preparations for the trial of
William Orpet. the young student of
the University of Wisconsin who Is ac
cused of killing his former sweetheart,
Marian Frances Lambert, a high
school girl of Lake Forest, a North
Shore suburb of Chicago. The trial is
set to begin Monday before Judge Don
nelly, sitting in the lake county court
at Waukegan. That counsel for the de
fense will attempt to secure a post
ponement of the trial until next fall
is generally expected. It Is also Inti
mated that a change of venue will be
asked, owing to the wide puDllclty
given the case in Lake county. Both
moves on the part of the defense prob
ably will be opposed by the district at
torney, who has Intimated his readi
ness to proceed with the trial on the
date fixed.
The youth and social standing of
young Orpet and Miss Lambert, to
gether with the method adopted In the
alleged murder and the motive that is
said to have impelled the crime, have
combined to attract country-wide at
tention to the case. Many persons have
drawn a parallel between the case and
that of Clarenoe V. T. Richeson, the
young clergyman of Cambridge, Mass.,
who was tried and electrocuted several
An Advertisement Is a
Promise
It la made openly In public
print.
You have a right to expect a
full measure of quality and a
fair price.
You have a light to expect
the advertiser to keep the prom
ise in every particular.
No sane man would spend
money for advertising unless
be expected to.
The advertising wouldn't pay
him. The public would not re
spond the next time he had
something to offer.
Patronize the atores which ad
vertise In this newspaper.
years ago for the murder of his sweet
heart by sending her cyanide of po
tassium. The same method of commit
ting the crime, according to the allega
tions in the Orpet case, w'as that adopt
ed by Richeson In ridding himself of
the girl for whom he no longer cared.
And both love tragedies, If the allega
tions in the Orpet case are true, had
their beginning in the world-old tri
angle—two women and a man.
Gave Hia Version of Affair.
Orpet was arrested on Feb. 12 last
and formally charged with the murder
] of Miss Lambert. His arrest came after
! strenuous hours In which _the young
man repeated time after time his ver
j sion of his last meeting with the high
school girl, whose body had been found
a few days before by her father, half
buried in the snow In a patch of woods
near her home.
of
Chemical analysis revealed that
quick-acting poison had caused her
death.
of
of
is
be
of
is
There was no evidence of a
struggle, and she had not been mis
treated. A man's footprints In the
snow beside the tracks of the girl and
an unexplained telephone message di
rected attention to Orpet, who was
known to have been the most inti
mate friend of the dead girl. The two
had been students at school together
and their fathers were employed In the
same capacity-es gardeners on one of
the great estates at Lake Forest.
Friends of young Orpet and Miss
Lambert, during the period of their
close friendship, generally expected
that a marriage would follow their
romance when the two grew older, al
though no formal announcement of
their engagement had been made.
The Old Familiar Story.
A change In the relations between
the two occurred, however, after young
Orpet went to Madison and became a
student at the University of Wiscon
sin. It was the old familiar story of
another young woman entered the
young man's life. His letters to Miss
Lambert became less frequent and
were different In tone. The ardent
passion of the young high school girl
remained the same, however, and let
ters found after her death revealed the
fact that she had appealed to her
sweetheart for a return of the old love.
After his arrest Orpet at flrat pre
sented an apparent alibi. But after
hours of grilling he admitted that he
had been with the girl In the woods
and took the officials to the spot where
the body was found. At the same time
he solemnly declared his Innocence of
her death.
The youth admitted he had gone in
secret to Lake Forest to see his former
sweetheart, and to tell her that he was
preparing to marry another girl. She
protested, he said, and they had a
quarrel, but he Insisted he had no
thought of harming her nor any Idea
that she would seek self-destruction
after he left her.
It la expected that one of the prin
cipal witnesses for the prosecution will
be David James, a deaf mute teamster,
who told the authorities that on the
day of the tragedy he had seen Miss
Lambert with a man in the woods
where her body was found, and that
the man pressed a bottle to the girl's
I lip*
GIN FUN8T0N
NOT FOR TNE CAPTURE
OR DEATH OF BANDIT
Dispersal of Villa's Outlaw Band That
Attacked Columbus Object of the Ex
pedition-General Funston Has Not
Reported Orders Carried Out
4*4*4*4'4*4*4*4*4 , 4»4*4*4*4 , 4 , 4 , 4 , 4*4 , 4 , 4*4*4»4*4*
No Preparations for Withdrawal.
Washington, April 8.—Secretary Baker said 4»
4 • today most emphatically that there was "abso- 4»
4* lutely no basis of any kind" for reports that prep- 4»
4* arations were under way for the withdrawal of 4»
4* American forces from Mexico. He said the 4*
4* American troops were moving rapidly south and 4*
4* that orders to General Funston following the Co- 4»
4* lumbus massacre were unchanged.
4*
4*
4*
4*
4*
4
4*4*4*4*4*4'4*4*4*4 , 4»4»4 , 4»4»4'4*4»4»4*4*4'4»4*4*
Washington, April 8.—The original order given Gen
eral Funston on March 10 for the American punitive
pedition into Mexico, made public today for the first time
at the war department, did not include direction for the
death or capture of Villa but was principally directed to
the dispersal of Villa's outlaw band that attacked Colum
bus March 9.
General Funston 's orders read: "You will promptly
organize an adequate force of military troops under com
mand of Brigadier General Pershing and will direct him
to proceed promptly across the border in pursuit of the
Mexican band which attacked Columbus. These troops
will be withdrawn to American territory as soon as the
defacto government is able to relieve them of this work.
In any event the work of these troops will be regarded as
finished as soon as Villa's band is known to have been
broken up.
Major General Scott declared that General Funston
had not yet reported the task accomplished and would
press no opinion as to whether he believed the orders to
General Funston had been completely carried out.
ex
ex
Claim Object Has Been Accomplished.
El Paso, April 8.—That American troops, having
complished their object in destroying Villa's military
power and should therefore withdraw from Mexico with
out delay, was the view expressed today by a well known
member of the Carranza government, speaking unoffi
cially.
ac
The punitive force,
4 i
99
he said, "has done all it could
expect to do. It has shattered Villa's forces. Villa is now
a fugitive, robbed of all the prestige and power he held
among the people. The peons may be ignorant, but they
are no fools. They never again will respect a man who
turned tail and ran like a coward before the Yankees
without even making a stand.
"In the meantime it must be admitted the Mexican
people have behaved well toward the American troops.
But to allow them to remain in Mexico indefinitely with
20,000 men hunting for a single bandit who may not be
caught in months is another matter. To allow them to
continue their progress to the south indefinitely is still
more serious. With Villa crushed, now is the logical time
for the punitive force to withdraw."
Bill AUTHORIZES
GOVERNMENT TO
CALI I917CLASS
London, April 8.—The Hague reports
that a bill has been submitted to the
second chamber of the Dutch parlia
ment to authorize the government. In
view of the extraordinary circum
stances, to call up, if necessary, the
recruits of the 1917 class.
Found Guilty of Murder.
New York. April 8.—Giuseppe Arch
lello was last night convicted of the
murder of Barnett Balt, a poultry deal
er, ta November, 1914.
FROMGERMANYON
LOSS OF VESSELS
Washington, April 8.—President Wil
son, who left last night on the May
flower for a week-end cruise, will
turn to Washington late today. Snow)
and sleet are given officially as the
cause of the return. Secretary ten
sing said there had been no new in
formation received from Germany con
cerning the submarine situation, but
It was expected at any time. Secre
tary tensing expects to see the prési
dent tonight.
re-

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