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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, April 11, 1916, Image 1

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Q EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
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Vol. XXXVI
BOISE, IDAHO, TUESDAY, APRIL 11, 1916.
TEN PAGES
No. 88
VILLA IS REPORTED DEAD
FROM TWO SOURCES OF
DEATH OF THE BANDIT
arranza Embassy at Washington Hears
the Report and Gives It Credence
General Pershing Also Tells of Similar
Report Received at His Headquarters
+++++++++++++++++++++++++


Report From Carranza's Capital.
Washington, April 11.—Unofficial and uncon
firmed reports that Villa is dead which reached
the Carranza embassy today were given some de
+ gree of credence by officials there. The reports
•i* were represented as having come from Carranza's
•I* provisional capital.
*
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*
*
*
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*
General Pershing's Headquarters at the Front, April
10, via Mexican telegraph to Juarez, April 11.—Renewed
reports were received here today by General Pershing
[that Villa is dead and buried. These reports are under in
vestigation. Meanwhile the hunt for Villistas is proeeed
nng with renewed vigor. Mexicans who had seen Villa on
Biis flight south said the bandit looked thin and emaciated
k week ago. Reports, however, are conflicting. One fair
ry good authority stated Villa was able to walk the first
pay after he received his wound, which indicated that no
pones were broken. Aeroplanes today covered several
Irandred square miles of territory scouting over country
heretofore unexplored by the planes.
BEARCHERS SENT TO
I FIND VILLA'S BODY
Queretaro, April 11.—The war de
triment announced today that It has
>ason to believe Villa was killed In
Searching parties have been
Lction.
lent out to find his body.
.VIATORS HEAR
THAT VILLA IS DEAD
Columbus, N. M„ April 11.—Lleuten
.nts Dargue and Gorrell. of the aero
orps, returning In a long distance
Ut from San Antonio, 330 miles
WKh of the border, said reports were
urrent among natives at Santa Ana,
0 miles southwest of Chihuahua, that
rilla was dead of blood poisoning from
ils wounds. Other reports Indicated
tllla was in flight, closely followed by
imerican troops south of Parral.
One hundred Villistas attacked and
acked Santa Rosalia, 65 miles nortli
a st of Parral, two day: ago. Villistas
tere defeated in a. clash with Carranza
roops 60 miles south of Chihuahua
friday.
PASO RECEIVES
NO CONFIRMATION
El Paso, April 11.—Mexican offi
als here have nothing to substantiate
,e unofficial report of the Mexican
nbassy at Washington that Villa is
■ad. Consul Garcia said he hoped it
is true. General Bertani praised the
flciency of American troops now in
He said Colonel Dodd han
exico.
ed his men In a masterly way in the
uerrero fight, holding the Villastas
-g enough to cause them to waste an
mense amount of ammunition and
sn scattering them.
j
IRE TROOPS WILL
BE SENT TO FRONT
Washington, April 11.—A part of the
nerican troops now stationed in
xas may he sent to Mexico to
engthen the constantly lengthening
es of communication of the expe
lon In pursuit of Villa. The war de
rtment Is considering such a plan as
result of the situation along the
rder, which is said to be quieter
in heretofore.
Isona patrols will not be disturbed.
Jfflclal estimates of the number of
5.. in Mexico and on the border
Sable for emergency were given at
Kgar department. General Scott,
Bl of 'staff, announced that 18,665
Bp now constitute the border pa
Knd General Pershing has about
H man In Mexico, Including those
New Mexico and
holding the communication line. How
greatly the mobile army has been
drawn upon for the Mexican expedition
and border service was disclosed by
General Scott. He estimated that only
4000 troops remain in the United States
not engaged on the border.
All state department dispatcher re
port conditions quiet throughout Mex
ico. American Consul Letcher at Chi
huahua Is apparently aiding General
Pershing to get supplies. General Fun
ston reported that General Pershing
had reported being In touch with
IiCtcher and expected that he would get
supplies from Chihuahua.
TtpU 1 A PTO TDOCDd TXT
" A\J 1 \J I ÄUUl ö AJN
POSITION TO TAKE
CARE OF SITUATION
El Paso, April 11.—General Gabriel
Gavira, Carranza commander at Juarez,
announced last night that the forces of
the defacto government were in a posi
tion to take immediate control of the
Villa situation if the American troops
withdrew.
General Gav Ira's statement was
made in connection with the announce
meat of Major General Scott, chief of
.staff of the American army, that the
j purpose of the expeditionary force
j would be considered accomplished
when the Villista bands were dispersed
| or "as soon as the troops of the defacto
! government are able to relieve them of
j the w*rk.''
j now," said General Gavira. "If we
. were able to overcome Villa when he
had 70,000 men, over a hundred can
"We have more men than enough
i nons, and plenty of supplies, we ought
j to be able to dispose of him now when
\ his numbers have dwindled down to a
few hundred. But it is a big territory
to operate In and a single man has
more chance to escape and hide than
a large force would have. However, on
j account of Villa's wounded condition
we think he will be taken soon. If
not, it is hardly likely that without
proper surgical care he will survive
for long.''
The arrival of General Bertani In
Juarez gave renewed force to the re
ports that General Gavira has been
ordered to the field. Nothing was
learned of the whereabouts of General
Petronillo Hernandez, who was said to
have been named as successor to Gen
eral Gavira and who was expected to
reach Juarez yesterday.
Oldest Child's Hospital.
New York. April H.—The new build
ings of the New York nursery and
Child's hospital in West Sixty-first
street, were formally opened today
with a reception and an inspection by
u
Other Woman in the Waite Murder Case
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Mrs. Harry Horton.
New York, April 11.-—In Mrs. Mar
garet Horton, a young and beautiful
contralto singer who aspires some day
to become a star of the Metropolitan
opera, is revealed the "woman of mys
tery," in the life of Dr. Arthur Warren
Waite, dentist charged with poisoning
Ills millionaire father-in-law, John E.
Peck, of Grand Rapids, Mich. She is
the wife of Harry Mack Horton, an
electrical engineer, inventor and dealer
in war supplies, whose home is in this
Mrs. Horton freely admits she Is the
woman who was seen daily with Dr.
Waito in a local hotel from Feb.. 22 to
March 18. She says Dr. Waite fitted up
a "studio" in the hotel so that they
might study music and foreign lang
uages there together. That Dr. Waite
had registered "Mr. and Mrs. A. W.
Walters, New Rochelle," when he took
the room, Mrs. Horton admits, but she
LEADERS IN PLOE
EO SEIZE JUAREZ
ARE EXECUTED
HI Paso, April 11.—Three leaders of
the Diazista plot to seize Juarez and
overthrow the Carranza garrison there
last Sunday were executed by a firing
squad in Juarez today. The condemned
men confessed to the plot before they
were executed,
implicated.
Other Mexicans were
AMENDMENT PASSED
TO THE RESERVE LAW
Washington. April 11.—The senate
today pussed Senator Kern's amend
ment to the Clayton law to permit a
director In a bank In the federal re
serve system to serve on the director
ate of two other banks not In substan
tial competition with the government
bank. It goes to the house. The senate
banking committee recommended the
amendment.
INCREASE IN WAGES
AT THE WOOLEN MILLS
Boston, April 11.—A 10 per cent wage
Increase, effective April 17, was an
nounced today by the American Wool
en company. The increase affects 25,
000 employes. It Is understood here a
similar advance will be made in other
textile Industries in New England
within a few days.
Harry Horton.
] maintains with the utmost earnestness
j that she did not know of that entry on
the register until she saw It in the
j
newspapers. The bags which Mr.
Wait» brought to the hotel, she said,
, were filled with books and pictures for
the "studio."
| It also developed that Walt© and
j Mrs. Horton, who was formerly
j cabaret singer in Cincinnati, studied
I Shakespeare together at the Y. M. C.
I A. school of expression,
Mrs. Horton, refusing to allow Waite
to bedeck her with jewels, consented
finally to allow the handsome young
dentist to pay for her dramatic train
ing. He told her of the fame they
might win together as a "Romeo and
Juliet," and dazzled her with enticing
j visions of a pair that might eclipse
[even the famous Sothern and Marlowe,
At the school Mrs. Horton dropped
! her married title and appeared as plain
j "Miss."
BILL IS PASSED
BY LOWER HOUSE
Washington, April 11.—The house to
today passed the rivers and harbors
appropriation bill, carrying $41,000,000,
by a vote of 210 to 133. It now goes
to the senate.
Millionaire's Daughter Suicides.
Omaha, Neb., April 11.—Mrs. Joseph
E. Howard, daughter of Michael Kil
gallon, millionaire steel magnate of
Chicago and wife of Joseph E. Howard,
actor and writer of popular songs,
committed suicide by shooting at a lo
cal hotel last night. An actress ac
quaintance, who wns with her at the
time, said Mrs. Hoy ard was temporar
ily demented.
A Missouri Merchant
Of course, he wanted to be
shown.
So he made an Investigation
In his own store as to the ef
fects of different kinds of man
ufacturers advertising.
He reached the conclusion that
the only kind that was felt at his
counter was newspaper advertis
ing.
He decided that newspaper
advertising was the only form he
cared to put his business energy
behind.
This Missouri merchant's let
ter Is on qie with the Bureau of
Advertising, American Newspa
Publishers'
World Building, New Ydrk.
Perhaps some manufacturer
would like to see a copy? Sent
on request
Association,
per
EMBASSY
Berlin, April 11.—The German gov
ernment's reply to American Inquiries
regarding the Sussex and four other
vessels which were sunk or damaged
has been delivered to the American
embassy.
Cabinet Holds Meeting.
Washington, April 11.
Wilson and the cabinet met today
without any new information on which
to act In the submarine Issue. Sec
retary Lansing reported that he ex
pected to receive soon Ambassador
Gerard's .dispatch giving the results
of Germany's Investigation Into the
destruction of the Sussex and other
cases.
President
REPUBLICANS OF
ADA COUNTY MEET
To Name 36 Delegates to the
State Convention of Party
to Be Held at Twin
Falls.
(Capital News Special Service)
Meridian, April 11.—The Ada county
Republican convention opened here
this afternoon with the selection of S.
L. Hodgin temporary chairman and
H. A. Lawson secretary. The conven
tion got down to business quickly, fol
lowing short addresses by Chairman
Hodgin, C. F. Koelsch, J. S. Bogart
and others. The delegates were giv
en a royal welcome by the Meridian
people, and although the Inclement
weather probably had as much to do
as anything else with keeping some of
the delegates from attending there was
a good representation.
The naming of credential and other
committees was the first thing taken
up after the convention was called to
order by D. A. Dunning, county chair
man. Following their appointment the
convention took a recess to permit the
committees to meet and make their re
ports. The selection of the 36 dele
gates to the Twin Falls convention had
not been done up to a late hour this af
ternoon. They will probably be named
by a nominating committee and placed
before the convention for approval.
This delegation will be bound under
the unit rule and will be composed of
only such men who can assure the con
vention they will go to Twin Falls next
week. It will be decidedly Borah in
sentiment, the wishes of Idaho's senior
senator being followed out in all par
ticulars.
Considerable enthusiasm was mani
fested at the convention here this af
ternoon on the part of the delegates.
With them the Interests of Senator
Borah were paramount. The mention
of his name was the cue for an out
burst of applause.
To Pass Resolutions.
Resolutions will be adopted by the
convention before adjourning which
will praise the work of the Idaho con
gressional delegation particularly that
of Senator Borah and declare for a
united party at the polls next fall. It
is not anticipated there will be any
great conflict over the naming of the
delegates to the Twin Falls convention
as this county Is entitled to 36 making
It possible to take care of all those
who can possibly attend.
Owing to the rain making autoing
to Meridian almost Impossible many
of the delegates from Boise came over
to Meridian on special ears provided by
the Idaho Traction company.
WILL LEAVE PRISON
New York, April 11.—Former Con
gressman William Willett will be re
leased on parole tomorrow from the
Great Meadow Prison at Auburn,
where he has served a term of more
than a year for attempting to buy a
Queens county supreme court Justice
ship nomination, Willett and Joseph
Cassidy, former boss of Queens county,
were convicted of Improper practices
In connection with the former's at
tempt to obtain the Justiceship nom
ination. Both were fined 11000 and
sent to prison for terms of not more
than 18 months nor less than 12
months. Their minimum terms expir
ed Jan. 12. Cassidy was released Jan.
25, but Willett's* application for parole
was held up until a few weeks ago.
raume now
IN PROGRESS ON BOTH
OF THE MEUSE
Berlin Reports the Capture of More
French Prisoners—Paris Tells ol Vio
lent German Attack on Dead Man's
Hill With Some Success
Berlin, April 11.—(Official)—Fighting on both sides
of the Metise was in progress with great vigor yesterday.
The number of unwounded prisoners taken in this sector
was increased from 22 officers and 549 men to 36 officers
and 1231 men.
British troops made a strong hand grenade attack last
night after intensified artillery preparations against a
German position south of St. El'oi, near Ypres, but the at
tack was repulsed and the Germans still hold the position.
OIL JOBBERS IN
THE HE WEST
Standard Oil Company Dis
solution Decree Declared!
to Be Failure—The Senate
Calls for Information.
Washington, April 11.—Without de
bate th* senate today adopted Senator
Kenyon's resolution directing the at
torney general to submit to the senate
all reports of investigations by his de
partment Into the Standard OH com
pany since the supreme court decree of
dissolution against that company, par
ticularly any Investigation Into gaso
line prices.
Senator Kenyon read a letter from
the Western OH Jobbers' association
which declared Independent oil Job
bers of the middle west would be
driven out of business and faced finan
cial ruin unless an end was brought
to the discrimination In prices of gaso
line dictated by the Standard Oil com
pany. The association petitioned con
gress to supplement the Sherman law
to make effective the decree of disso
lution against the Standard Oil com
pany, declaring It to he the sense of
the association that the disolutlon de
cree was a failure.
PACIFIC MAIL LINES
TO BE OPERATED BY
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
San Francisco, April 11.—Re-estab
lishment of trans-Paclflc service by the
Pacific Mail Steamship company be
tween San Francisco and the Orient,
will be inaugurated on June 17 when
the company's new liner, Ecuador, Is
scheduled to leave this port for Hono
lulu, Yokohama, Kobe, Shanghai, Man
ila and Hongkong.
Announcement to this effect was
made here last night from the offices
of the Pacific Mail Steamship com
pany by J. H. Rosseter, vice president
and general manager. The decision
will restore to the Pacific sea lanes the
house flag of the company which was
a familiar sight there until last Aug
ust, when It was lowered from the
foremast of the Mongolia, which, with
four other vessels of the former fleet,
was sold to the Atlantic Transport
company.
The Pacific Mall Steamship com
pany is the oldest trans-Paclflc steam
ship line. It Instituted the first reg
ular service around Cape Horn; ran
the first "side wheelers" across the
western ocean. Its trans-Paclflc ser
vice was discontinued on November 4,
1916, when the seamen's law became
operativ»
OBTAIN FOOTING IN
FRENCH TRENCHES
Paris, April 11.—(Official)—On the
west bank of the Meuse the Germans
attacked Deadman's Hill last night,
advancing from the Corbeaux wood.
They obtained a footing In a few small
elements of trenches, but otherwise
were repulsed. East of the Meuse the
Germans attacked trenches south of
Douamont village, but were beaten
back with considerable losses. Doua
mont and Vaux have been violently
bombarded.
GERMANS TELL OF
VERDUN FIGHTING
Berlin, April 11.—(Wireless)—Since
Feb. 21 the Germans have captured
over 26,000 French In the fighting
about Verdun. West of the Meuse
about 26 square kilometers of ground
has been occupied, the Overseas Agency
has announced.
The agency says: "German newspa
pers point out that the French now
say Bethincourt was evacuated in ac
cordance with plans previously made.
Nevertheless It has been ascertained
that an order was issued stating: 'This
Important place must be held In all
circumstances.' The fact that over
700 unwounded French prisoners were
taken and French losses in killed and
wounded were far greater, is proof
that the French plan of evacuation
could not he carried out as intended.
According to French reports the new
line runs from the southern corner of
Avocourt wood along the first slopes
of Hill No. 304, thenoe along the south
ern bank of Forges brook, passing
northeast of Haucourt, turning east
ward, crosses the Bethincourt-Esnes
road at a point south of the Junction of
that road with the highway to Chat
tancourt and reaches the Meuse Just
north of Cumleres. The fortifications
of the village of Avocourt were de
stroyed by the German advance of
April 9, as reported."
STANDARD SYSTEM OF
CLEARING HOUSES IN
THECOUNTRYPLANNED
Washington, April 11.—Plans for a
standard clearing-house system to be
put into effect throughout the United
States will be discussed here tomor
row at a conference of the federal re
serve board and the governors of the
12 federal reserve banks. Out of the
conference. It Is believed, will develop
a system under which checks may be
cashed at par la any section of the
United
proposed is abolition, as far as mem
bers of the reserve system are
cerned, of the time-honored custom of
country banks of making collection
charges varying from 10 cents to a dol
lar generally for cashing checks
out-of-town banks. The custom haa
existed for more than 100 years and
inasmuch as a considerable portion of
the country banks revenue Is derived
from these charges, attempts to abol
ish It ha vs been stoutly opposed la the
past
States. Another Innovation
con
on

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