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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, April 16, 1916, Image 11

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1916-04-16/ed-1/seq-11/

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Reliability
UR absolute faith in the Max
well car is due to two reasons:
First, we have known that
the Maxwell Company uses nothing
in the entire car but the very best
that money can buy. We have
known that the steel is scientifically
heat treated, that the car is built
under the supervision of able engi
, that every car is rigidly tested
r times before it leaves the
o
-eers
many
factory.
Second, we have known that the
big and well established company
behind the car is building for the
future, that they value a satisfied
owner above everything else.
I
Now that the Maxwell has set the
World's Motor Non-Stop Mileage
Record, by travelling continuously
for 44 days and nights—-averaging
500 miles per day—you will under
stand the benefits you personally
may derive from the Maxwell policy.
Did you ever hear of any car going
22,000 miles without once stopping
the engine, without any repairs or
readjustments, with only one gallon
of gasoline to every 22 miles?
There is no reason why you
shouldn't nave a reliable, service
able and economical Maxwell car.
The first cost is low, the operating
cost is low and our pay-as-you-ride
plan makes the purchase easy for
everyone.
I
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I
I
Let us see you about this now,
before our allotment is exhausted.
Touring Car, $655. Roadster, $635
I
Prices F. O. B. Detroit
I
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xa&v
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BANNOCK MOTOR SAIfS CO.
I
1008-10-12 Grove St.
Phone 28
distributors for
X
m Hmr «rr strr/ct
7Kt
*1085
F. O. B. Detroit
I
•'Mm
P
fk
Think Before You Buy
Merc number of cylinders'does not of itself rep
resent the most for your money.
You should figure on added parts, and added
adjustments to keep them nicely In tune; on economy; on
quality.
If the performance of more cylinders is enough
better to make the other elements worth while—then you
have bought a greater value.
But consider these things well : and do the
Hupmoblle the justice of testing its performance, its com
fort, and its quality.
COFFIN & BEGLAN
924 Front St., Boise, Idaho
Phone 195.
IDAHO BOY MADE
CENSOR OF NEWS
AT THE BORDER
Important Duty Assigned to
First Lieutenant Otto L.
, ,
Brunzell, Native Son OX
flwvTlPP finuntv
wjriicc vyuuiiojr.
(Staff Correspondence)
Emmett. April IB.—First Lieutenant
Otto L, Brunzell, a native son of Idaho,
having been born near Silver City in
Owyhee county in 1879, lias the dlstinc.
tion of being the first officer named as
censor of American army news on the
Mexican border. He is the flrBt Amer
ftione Compton Transrer Co. for the
best moving Job you ever had. Phons
48.—Adv. tf
.1,
U,
*
lean censor to say what news concern
ing the movements of the army shall
be withheld from the public. He Is a
member of the Twentieth infantry sta
tioned with the army at Columbus, N.
M.
First Lieutenant Brunzell Is a grad
uate of the College of Idaho at Cald
well. and later graduated from the
University of Idaho at Moscow. From
his boyhood up he always had the
army in view, and kept the army in
view throughout his school years at
the College of Idaho and the Univer
sity of Idaho, He received his ap
pointment to the United States mili
tary academy at West Point from
United States Senator Shoup. He
graduated from West Point in 1904.
For a number of years he was sta
tioned at Fort Russell, Wvo., and for
three years served in the Philippines,
having returned from there in June,
1915.
Lieutenant Brunzell is said to be the
only native born son of Idaho who, as
a graduate of West Point, is now In
active army service. After the Mexi
can trouble is over it is expected he
will be stationed at Fort Douglas at
Salt Lake.
His parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. M.
Brunzell. are living at Brunzell, Owy
hee county, where Mr. Brunzell has
been the postmaster for 22 years. They
are among the oldest settlers In Owy
hee county. They naturally take a
justifiable pride in the steady prog
ress their son is making in Uncle
Sam e army.
Even So.
(From Judge.)
The partners who had never been
well mated were having their dissolu
tion of partnership quarrel.
"You've been playing the baby act,"
said one, "ever since we went into
business together!"
"Yoif bet I have," said the other
promptly. "I've been putting up my
head against you cheek."—Strickland
Gil Ilian.
*
4- MOTOR PROBLEMS 4*
4
Motoring Department—Please give
me what information you can about the
preparations on the market to put in
gasoline to increase mileage? Are they
any good or only fakes? What is
their composition? The price charged
seems rather high. 1 am afraid they
might injure my engine.
While there may be a numbe.' of
preparations on the market used in
gasoline for the purpose of increasing
the mileage it a question whether
the additional expense is offset by the
increased mileage obtained.
It is reasonable to assume, however,
that if a good grade of gasoline is
used satisfactory results will be ob
tained without adulteration.
Would not advise using any foreign
liquids in the gasoline for the pur
pose of obtaining better results unless
you are entirely familiar with the na
ture of the liquid used. It is possible
that injury may result to the motor if
certain chemtculs are employed in the
gasoline.
F. G.
Motoring Department—Will you
please inform m3 the kind of gasoline
that the racers usi ? The gasoline I
use doe not seem to be up to the
standard. READER.
In racing cars the best grade of
gasoline obtainaole Is used. The cost
1« slightly greater, but the results are
better. It is more refined, and tests
about 76. The gasoline purchased at
the average garage tests about 66.
Motoring Department—Probably two
years ago in y ear developed
knock, which Is now so pronounced
that It is annoying. The sound is ruth
er sharp, something like a slap or click
resulting from striking together two
pieces of steel. It is not the thump
usually heard when a babbit bearing
la loose. I have had all the bearings
carefully tested. They are in good
sha; . It seems that the noise must
be caused by oontr.ct between the pis
tons and cylinders. Piston-pin bear
ings arc in good shape. There does not
seem to be enough play In pistons to
cause a knock. In fact I have tried to
slight
replace old pistons with .005 oversize
pistons, but they would not go into the
cylinders. Fan you suggest a remedy?
Would an extra gasket on top of the
cylinders help? The knock Is most
pronounced when spark Is advanced;
and 1* especially noticeable when more
gas Is turn on. Have new rings on pis
tons. J. O.
If the knock is due to piston slap
the installation of oversize pistons
would not be advisable without rebor
ing the cylinders. Perhaps one of the
cylinoe. i Is worn oval in shape.
The next time you have occasion to,
remove pfStons It would be advisable
to caliper the cylinders In order to de
termine their true condition. When
the cylinders are rebored and
oversize pistons fitted there can be no
SAXONS HAVE PART
IN VILLA CHASE
El Paso Dealer Donates
Cars to the Quarter
master Corps.
_

Saxon motor cars are playing a part i
In the chase of the United SUtes
troops after Pancho Villa, bandit and
Mexican revolution leader.
Just as the sturdy race which gave
them their name always played a prom
inent part In the warfare of the Brit
ish Isles and the northern part of
Europe, so are the motor cars giving
m
their best to the service of Uncle Sam
along the sluggish Rio Grunde. At El ^
Paso, Tex., where a large number of :
troops have been stationed since the
border mobilization in 1913, three Sax
on motor cars were sold to United
States army officers before the pursuit
of Villa and they were used by the of
ficers for trips about the border.
First Lieutenant Guy H. Wyman of
the Eighth cavalry is the owner of a
Saxon Six and Second Lieutenants
Welton M. Modisette and William A.
Robnrg of the Fifteenth cavalry both
have Saxon Four roadsters.
Cars Pressed Into Service.
When the United States decided to
enter Mexico in pursuit of Villa and
the border was thrown into a fever of
excltepient, these three officers found
a practical use for their motor cars in
patrol duty and messenger service In
tfnd about El Paso. The cars were
pressed Into service because they cov
ered ground faster than a horse and be
cause the sand and mesquite of the
border country offered no obstruction
to them.
At the same time F. O. Cavln, Saxon
dealer at El Paso, placed three other
machines at the service of the govern
ment. He took cars from his stock for
this purpose and offered them to the
army officers. Mr. Cavin hesitated a
bit at doing this but finally decided to
give them without consulting the fac
tory. When he wired what he had done
he had the unqualified approval of H.
W. Ford, president and general manag
er of the Saxon company.
Mr. Ford Is a strong believer in pre
paredness and has himself taken an
active interest In the movement for
military training in this country. He
assured Mr. Cavin that the Saxon com
pany stood ready to help the govern
ment in Its great task of supplying the
flying column of General Pershing.
The cars which were loaned to the
army were all Sqxon "Sixes" and they
have found a readÿ use In the quarter
master corps. One of them is being
used dally by a major of that depart
ment and it has traveled hundreds of
miles in the last two weeks.
The sturdy construction of the Saxon
motor cars makes them particularly
adaptable to the rough roads and
prairies of the border country, accord
ing to Mr. Cavin. Their light weight
permits them to travel through the
sand and their mechanical perfection
ha s given them a reliability that Is
needed for this sort of work. Except
for the motor truck companies there are
few motor cars being used by the
forces now in Mexico. The country
makes them less practical than horses
for messenger work. On the border the •
motor car ic feasible and Saxon has its
place t.t the top among the types In
use.
as
piston slap.
Motoring Department — Have had
battery troubles. Some one suggested
that I put In a magneto. Will this give
more power to the car? Would like
to avoid the expense of a magneto.
Do you think the dry cells would over
J. B.
If the storage bi ttery is in goo I
condition and the electrical system
properly adjusted you should experi
ence no difficulty with battery igni
tion. A great majority of modern cars
employ the battery systems with ex
cellent results.
The magneto is good and very re
liable, but it hardly seems necessary
to entail the expense of installing a
magneto In your case.
Perhaps some defect in the wiring
system is causing the trouble. Dry
cells are not satisfactory for ignition
purposes.
come the difficulties.
Motoring department.—Am driving
- roadster and when not in use
keep ear jacked up, putting the jack
under housing of differential. Please
advise If this causes too much strain
H. L.
The axle housing should certainly
be strong enough to support the weight
of this car. This should not be done, |
however, with cars of the heavier ;
type. It Is best to jack up on both I
sides of the axle.
a
at this point.
Motoring Department.—Kindly nd
vise me of a good way to restore tho
.freshness to a mohair top (1914 make» |
i after the dl« has been brushed out.
S. J. :
The top should be brushed briskly j
with a stiff brush. When this Is dono j
it should be sponged thoroughly with i
soap and water. Plenty of soap suds \
and energetic sponging should clean it
efficiently. Further thun this nothing
can be done without destroying the
rainproof quality of the cloth.
Motoring Department.—Have a -
car with four-cylinder engine which
runs smooth hut make» a clicking
noise. Am unable to locate trouble. !
P. C. !
The clicking may be due to loose
valve push rods. Quite often If these
are adjusted more closely the noise '
will be reduced. You may find that
the noise is due to the eide thrust of
the valve push rods. When these be- i
come worn a side slap and click do
velop as the cam hits the roller of the
push rod. Lost motion In water pump ^
or starter couplings will cause a click.,
■ Perhaps you may find, on close inspec- |
:
Hon. one of the coupling heads loose
on the shaft. These are usually keyed
pinned to shaft but work loose ut
j times.
■1,7-tr-tr-Jr- 1 ;;
r\
/
C
V
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S trength — Economy—Service
-ip
a
TJ|1
Saxon "Six" $815
i
The price of the Saxon "Six,"
f. o. b. Detroit.
, 1 l' e Saxon "Six' is the only car in its price class with the following high grade,
thoroughly proved features:
Six-cylinder Motor. Saxon design, manufactured by Continental.
Rayfield Carburetor.
Atwater Kent Ignition.
Honeycomb type Tedders Radiator.
Saxon Dry-plate Clutch, absolutely smooth in operation, and trouble-proof.
Timken Axles.
Timken Bearings throughout the Chassis, best made.
Helical Bevel Drive Gear.
Cantilever Springs, all Vanadium Steel. Saxon owners never have trouble from
broken springs and are never annoyed by rattling spring clips.
Saxon "Six" will climb hills better than any other car in its price class;
Saxon Six" will idle better at slow speed on high gear than any other car in its
price class.
Saxon "Six" will show more speed than any other car in its price class.
Saxon "Six" will give all five passengers a more comfortable ride over all sorts of
road conditions than any other car in its price class.
Saxon "Six" will show a higher average mileage per gallon of gasoline than any
other car in its price class.
Saxon "Six" will accelerate faster than any other car in its price class.
In fact, the Saxon "Six" will give a better all-around performance under all condi
tions of city and country driving than any car selling within several hundred dollars of
its price.
both touring car and roadster types, is now $815
L üî
[DU.
lUi
|uc
Lf.
1
UCa
We are prepared to demonstrate the truth of these statements to any prospective
automobile buver.
Saxon Motor Sales Co. ^
PHONE 35
NINTH AND GROVE.
ic[Uc]
c
1
3T
Buy at The New York Store andSave
SHOES FOR MEN
This is a sure place to save, üur customers are continually telling us
that they save money by trading here, so yye are Justified in telling *t
to you. We do not put out a few "leaders" and stop there, but every
article in the Store is priced at Isst.
Our stocks are made up of special purchases, are secured at special
prices, we do business at less expense than others, and we give our
customers the benefits by pricing all of our merchandise specially low.
Our increasing business is proof that we are satisfying many, and we
invtte the opportunity to cater to your merchandise needs. One call
at the Store will convince you that this is a sure place to eave.
We sell dandy values In men's
Shoes at 82.60, 83.75, 83.00 and up.
There's a saving to be made on
every pair at the prices named and
we have full and complete stocks in
a number of good makes. A good
line of men's Riding Boote at our
usual low pricee.
VOU'Ll TRA6Ë HÉRË SÔÔT T
ER OR LATER—WHY NOT
8QONER7_
BOYS'
HATS
BOYS'
SUITS.
65cts
$2.50
; H
• ••••
• ••
WORTH TO $1.50
V 0
AGES 7 TO 17
[>
M
This is the place to buy the boy that new hat.
We have a nice line of Boys' Telescope Hats
thut are easily worth to 81.50 each and there's
practically no limit as to desired colors.
Your doubts ns to whether to buy the boy's
new Suit should be decided in our favor.
You may buy the boy a Suit here made of
good wearing material—a serviceable Suit, at
considerably less than the same grade of Suit
can be bought elsewhere.
These Suits may be had in either light er
dark patterns und there's a good choice of
either.
Suits in sizes from 7 years to 17 M Eft
years, priced very low at.
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Blacks, browns, grays, blues, greens, all
cleverly trimmed with silk ribbon bands.
Kl
a
You can save money by buying the boy's hat
here, for the*« worth more hat* are
being sold at.....
65c
»■ A
PAJAMAS FOR MEN
BOYS' $2.50 OXFORDS
PRICED HERE $1.35
OUR SALE OF
WOMEN'S SHOES
85c
These Pajamas are In large size*
only, but they are wonderful
values for large men.
Worth from 81.30 to 83.50 the
suit. Pajamas made of good ma
terials, in staple colors, nicely
trimmed and made by well
known, reliable manufacturers.
Tremendous savings if we have
your size.
Ozford time is fast approaching, and
right at the opening of the season
we sell them for considerably less.
Boys' Oxfords that are 82,50 values,
and every pair will give good ser
vice. If you want to save money,
now is the time and this the place
to buy these 82.60 values
at, the pair..
Have you profited by our sale of
women's Shoes?
We still have good lines of stap'e
Shoes for women, at surprisingly
low prices and In addition, we
are selling women's oxfords and
pumps In gun metals and patent
leathers, worth to 84.00 ÇS OE
at, the pair. V I «V J
$1.35
25c SHOE POLISHES FOR 15c
MEN'S SPRING SUITS $8, $10, $12.50
AND $15
romblnation box of liquid shoe polish and paste. In
black or tan; regular 25c values, for 15c. "Magic
Water-proof Oil," a 25c seller, for 15c. Other lines of
shoe polish proportionately reduced.
We are prepared to supply you with your Spring Su't,
rith the "class" and quality desired, and
furnish you
still save you money.
The New York Store
Black and Blue Serges and fancy mixtures in both
plain and fancy English models. At any one of the
four prices you may make big sayings.
Main Street, Just the Other 8ide of Eighth Street
A SURE PLACE TO SAVE.

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