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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, April 22, 1916, Image 4

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EVENING : CAPITAL : NEWS
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Published Every Afternoon and Sunday Morning at Boise. Idaho, a City at
30,000 People, by
THE CAPITAL NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED. _
__ i
Society Editor. 313-J '
==—====¥=
RICHARD STOrçY 8HERI DAN. __
Entered at the Poat Office at Boise, Idaho, as Second-class Mall Matter
Editorial Booms. 234;
-Business Office. 234:
Phon<
BOISE, IDAHO, SATURDAY, APRIL 22, 191«.
• •••••••••••••••••••
PLOWING.
I watch the farmer plow; he's busy at It now; he deftly tools his
One minute he says,
of mules, and whacks them with a bough.
Next time, "HawI" says he; the mules, they haw, and strain
The plow point strikes a stone; the
span
"Gee!"
and draw upon the double-tree,
farmer heaves a groan; and then his nibs surveys his ribs, to find the
Then, finding he is whole, he takes a ten-foot pole, and
The
broken bone.
prods the mules, and says. "You fools, such tricks I will not thole!"
plowshare does not scour, and he, for half an hour, suspends the rules
and lams the mules with wondrous vim and power. To turn the furrow
o'er—it is the oldest chore; man's tilled the earth since Adam's birth.
And ever, as he walks, he picks up clod» and
and will forevermore,
rocks, in West and East, to pelt hls beast, hls horse or mule or ox.

C&aa %J1\m09mm
Protected by the
Adams Newspaper Service, New York.
e

FREE SPEECH.
Free speech is, of course, a safeguard to liberty. But
free speech is sometimes confused with public speech and
with a loss of the sense of propriety. James H. Maurer,
president of the Pennsylvania State Federation of Labor,
m the Washington Irving high school, New York, deliv
ered a vigorous speech, which involved the state constabu
lary quarrels in Pennsylvania, class misunderstanding,
preparedness and the American flag. The next morning
several of the leading papers, including the Times, quoted
Maurer as saying: "To hell with the Stars and Stripes."
There was naturally a feeling of indignation that a
public school platform should be abused in this manner.
It was taken for granted that Maurer had been correctly
quoted. Mayor Mitcliel felt that the matter was serious
enough to require investigation. At a closed hearing, con
ducted by the president of the hoard of education, twelve
witnesses were questioned, including two reporters. One
reporter—from the Times—reiterated his statement.
The other wavered. Among the remaining ten there was
sufficient doubt, in the opinion of the examiner, to exon
erate Maurer from the offense of direct utterance. That
is, the speakei', although he might have used the words,
or their equivalent, did so by quotation, the original ex
pression being attributed by Maurer to a member of the
Pennsylvania constabulary. According to his own admis
sion, however, Maurer, later in his speech, used the fol
lowing language: "When these preparedness folks ask
where my patriotism stands in the face of the story I just
told you, I felt like telling them to go to hell.
The incident ought to supply a double warning. The
Pennsylvania labor leader, on his own statement, made
use of words not tending to smooth the way of the Penn
sylvania federation, or establish harmony between the
federation and the state police. He was guilty of impro
priety, at least, in dragging into a sectional labor contro
versy the subject of national defense, and consequently he
risked the danger of misquotation. On the other hand, it
is of the utmost importance that all speech in public,
whether legitimately "free," or unpatriotieally violent,
be correctly quoted. Justice to the speaker, whether agi
tator, educator or minister, demands correct representa
tion. But deeper yet lies the demand for protecting true
free speech.
9$
KEEP AN EYE ON SILVER.
Have you followed the recent rise in the price of sil
ver^ In the past year about 10 cents an ounce. Who is
buying silver and advancing the price? Certainly not the
United States. Circumstances abroad, where in two years
a debt of thirty billions of dollars has been incurred by
the allied nations, may throw some light on this interest
ing subject.
Europe is hopelessly bankrupt aud the day of settle
ment can be somewhat mollified if the debtors can pay in
a depreciated currency. A long step in this direction
would be the remonetization of silver. When John Bull
was a creditor of the whole earth gold was all he wanted,
but John Bull as a debtor is a different matter, and he
would be glad to pay in silver, the only means in fact by
which the enormous debt can ever be paid.
Now here is the prediction: After the war is over the
allies will remonetize silver. They are the buyers now.
This alone will create a new value to all the silver on
earth, at least five thousand million dollars toward paying
their debt. In addition it will give a new purchasing
power to the silver countries of Asia, Africa and South
America. Ocean freights will all be in the power of the
allies, and arranged for their convenience and profit.
Trade destroyed by the war will be built up by giving
foreign countries a new power to purchase.
And where will Uncle Sam be? He will as usual come
in at the tail end of the procession and shape his finances
at the dictation of Europe. He will humbly accept his ad
vances on account of the *war in silver at $1 an ounce,
which he is now selling to these sharp gentlemen at 60
cents.
Look out then for silver at a dollar an ounce. Look out
for a trade combination against Uncle Sam that will put'
Ms foreign business in great jeopardy. And watch Johnny
Bull advocate the silver rehabilitation as the salvation of
a ruined world, of which he will be the unselfish leader.
Sugar is steadily going up in price, so that the world
presently may have to take its adversity unsweetened.
Ain't it awful Mjabel?
HARRY'S WIFE
&y M.R.S.
£VA. LEONARD
THE CULTURED YOUNG WIFE SUFFERS BECAUSE ANOTHER WOM
AN HAS A HAT LIKE HERS.
"What do you think? My milliner
made another hat exactly like mine
and sold it!" Bertha Folsom's eyes
blazed with anger.
"It certainly was very careless of
her," remarked her husband with a
. straight face.
"Careless! It was
Inexcusable. The
idea of having
someone else wear
ing a hat like mine.
I paid enough for it
to have It an ex
clusive style," she
rejoined,
"Yoo're right
there," agreed Har
i
»
*
.'V
ry.
"You Bhould have
had the pattern
destroyed the way
Mrs. Galt Wilson
did," remarked the
elder Dr. Folsom,
with a twinkle .In
hls eye. Harry tele
graphed his approval of the Joke, but
Bertha, intent on her grievance, did not
see the point.
"Why Is It such a calamity for a
woman to wear a hat like someone
else's when hundreds of men's hats are
made on the same model and not one
of them suffers because of it?" asked
the old man whimsically.
"Women's hats should be exclusive
unless they wish to belong to the
common herd," replied Bertha. "Men's
clothing is classy because of the work
manship of the tailor, or the manufac
turer in the case of hats."
"How arbitrary the dictates of fash
ion are." Mrs. Folsom remarked.
Bertha looked at her with an expres
sion that said: "Much you know
about styles." Mrs. Folsom
no way conspicuous for her dress.
'S.

TALKS ON THRIFT
Savings Bank Centennial Series.
+
♦<
Thrift.
Without me no man has ever achiev
ed success, nor has any nation ever be
come great. '
I have been the bed rock of every
successful career, and the cornerstone
of every fortune.
AH the world knows me and most of
the world heeds my warning.
The poor may have me as well as
the rich.
My power is limitless, my application
boundless.
He who possesses me has content
ment in the present and surety for the
future.
I am of greater value than pearls,
rubies and diamonds.
1 Once you have me, no man can take
me away.
I lift my possessor to higher planes
4*
4*
4* Dinner Stories. 4»

4*
A Bradford man who has in his
employ an Irishman recently had oc
casion to engage a new cook, and it
was this Celt's wife that was given
the job.
One
said to the Irishman:
"Do you know, Pat, for a woman of
her figure, your wife has remarkable
poise?"
"Yis, sor," said Pat
best I iver tasted."
enlng the head of the house
"They're the
An anecd >te Illustrating the mis
placed earnestness of a serious school
boy was recently related by Weedon
Grossmith. As a question in arith
metic, a facetious inspector who was
visiting a school propounded the fol
lowing: "If a cat fell into a bottom
less pit and climbed up two feet for
every three it fell, how long would
it take to get out?" The majority of
the scholars sat silent, with & puzzled
air, but one boy set to work assidu
ously and began to cover his slate with
calculations. The inspector noticed this,
and at length said:
"Here! Stop that! Haven't you
the sense to see that the cat couldn't
possibly get out?"
"Oh, yes, he could, sir!" replied the
boy brightly. "If you'll only give me
time I'll bring him out in Australia!"
The afternoon at the new neighbor's
had passed very pleasantly. James,
Jr., cried when told that It was time
to go home.
"Never mind," said the lady consol
ingly. "You can come again."
"It ain't that," said James, Jr., "It's
the walloping 1 am going to get from
Henry. When I get home he'll say
'Halves,' and If I have to tell him that
you didn't give me anything he will
think I'm telling a story and punch my
head for it."
ssstssssssssststss
One Year Ago in the War. .•
April 22. 1915—Germans first •
used asphyxiating gases in the e
battle of Yprea; England stop- e
ped .all shipping Intercourse •
with Holland and announced •
that certain British ports would •
be closed; rumored In London •
that British navy was about to e
deliver Its great attack on Ger- •
man fleet; routed Turks, pur- •
sued by British and Arabs, lost e
6000 men in Mesopotamia.
e.eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
Spring.
Spring is looked upon by many aa
the moat delightful season of the year,
but this cannot be said of the rheu
matic. The cold and damp weather
brings on rheumatic pains which are
anything but pleasant. They can be
relieved, however, by applying Cham
berlain's Liniment. Obtainable every
T. Th, S.
where.—Adv.
"Wasn't the workmanship of both
the hats in question all that could be
desired?" persisted the old man.
"Oh, I suppose so." Bertha seemed
at a loss how to answer. "It Is differ
ent with women's clothes."
"How different?" he persisted.
"It Is the way they do," answered
Bertha weakly.
"Who are 'they' that decide what
kind of a hat you shall wear," laughed
the old man.
"The same they' who dictate to you
that you must wear a collar," retort
ed Bertha.
"I guess you have me there," chuck
led Mr. Folsom. "I would not dare
to go without a collar. I'd be a fool to
try It." Bertha tossed her head In tri
umph.
"I think the difference is thlB: Men
dress to be comfortable, so they will
not be hampered In their work. Wom
en dress to attract attention."
"Now, Harry!" expostulated his
mother.
"Of course I mean the ultra stylish,
thq extremists who go to all lengths
in the extreme of every style."
"I never could be persuaded that a
stiff collar could be the extreme of
comfort." Bertha's tone was sarcastic.
"Oh, we get used to it," grinned
Harry.
"And we get used to the discom
forts of our dress."
"I do not see how you can, for the
styles change so often." Mr. Folsom
could not long stay out of the argu
ment.
"Is that why you women wear heavy
white fur in dog days and in zero
weather have the collars of your
blouses open to the fifth rib?" asked
Harry.
"Don't be vulgar. Harry," said
Bertha, rising from the table.
(To he continued.!
of living, increase his earning power,
and bring to realization the hopes of
his life.
I make a man weil dressed, well
housed and well fed.
I insure absolutely against the rainy
day.
I drive want and doubt and care
away.
1 guarantee those who possess me
prosperity and success.
I have exalted those of low degree
and those of high degree have found
me a helpful friend.
To obtain me you need put out no
capita! but personal effort, and on all
you Invest In me I guarantee dividend:;
that last through life and after.
I am as free ah air.
I am yours if you will take me.
I am thrift.
Last Seven Days of Jesus
—the Man.
Jesus the Sleeper.
Through the dark and silent night
'Till the early Sabbath light
Moon and stars ihetr vigil keep
O'er their Maker, there asleep
Darkhess, solitude are there.
Covering His face, so fair.
Softly there His body rests
As the birds in downy nests.
Heavy cross and thorny crown
Press no more. His body down.
Rests the Savior's form so dear.
Safe from sword and cruel spear.
Sabbath dawns from night's deep gloom
Sunshine watches o'er His tomb
'Till the night, so calm and deep
Comes o'er Him, her watch to keep.
(Easter Even)
Starry eves watch Him (hey love
Watch Him from the clouds above,
Watch His form within the tomb,
Through two nights of awful gloom,
Nights all dark with deepest woo,
IVith the Savior lying low
Sorrow to His chosen band
Seeing not His guiding hand
Where is now His kingly right''
Where their earthly hopes so bright?.
He the sleeper! Where is He?
From gfim death can He get free?
CAR,R1E CHRISTIAN KUNKEL Y.
Spring.
Spring Is looked upon by many as
the mçst delightful season of the year,
but this cannot be said of the r' eu
matte. The cold and damp weather
brings on rheumatic i air.s which are
anything but pleasant. They can be
relieved, however, by applying Cham
herlain's Liniment. Obtainable every
T. Th. S. :
where —Adv.
Special to Ladies for 10 Days
#1.00 Up
.. 7tlc Up
.. SOc Up
Lsdies' Suits dry or stesm «cleened
Ladies' Coats, white or colored ...
Waists .
GENTS 3PECIAL CLUB RATES
4 Suits Clssnsd and Pressed and 12 Shoe Shines—$2.00 per month.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED.
SANITEX CLEANING CO.
PHONE 325
809 BANNOCK
WILLIAM L. ALLEN, M. D.
SPECIALIST—PRIVATE AND CHRONIC DISEASES OF MEN
201-4 MeCarty Bldg., Bolee, Idaho.
Practice limited to the treatment of the ailments of men. I treat by
scientific methods Nervous Diseases, Nervous Debility, Kidney and Blad
der, all Urinary and Chronic Private Diseases of Men. Varicocele, Hydro
cele, Strictures and Prostatic Troubles treated by the meet up-to-date
methods.
Consultation FHEIÇ.
Off lots 201-4, McCarty Bldg., Boiss. Idaho.
Weak, Weary Womea :
Learn the Cause of Daily Woes and
End Them.
When the back aehea and throbs.
When housework is torture,
When night brings no rest nor sleep,
When urinary disorders set in, \
Women's lot is a weary one. ;
Doan's Kidney Pilis are tor weak
kidneys.
Have proved their worth in Boise, j
This is one Boise woman's testimony, j
Mrs. E. M. Abbott, State and 26th j
streets, Boise, says: "One of our fam- j
ily had to give up work for several ■
weeks. This one suffered terribly from
a lame and aching back and could
hardly stoop as every move brought
on pains across the back. Doan's Kid
ney Pills were, procured at Charles L.
Joy & Co.'s Drug Store, and they acted
like magic, going to the root of the i
trouble and bringing immediate'relief.
Continued use made a complete cure. 1
I have used Doan's Kidney Pills my
self, for bad attacks of backache and
have always had relief."
Price 60c, at all dealers. Don't sim- i
ply ask for a kidney remedy—get ,
Doan's Kidney Pills—the same that
Mrs. Abbott had. Foster-MllbUrn Co.,
Props., Buffalo, N. Y.
b*
*







DAILY LESSON IN HISTORY.
One Hundred Year. Ago Today.
1816—Generdl Charles D. S.
Bourbaki, who commanded the
French arrrty of the east in the
Franco-Prussian war, bom at
Pau. Died Sept. 27, 1897.
Seventy-five Years Ago Today.
1841—The Chinese Emperor,
in reply to the British demand
for the legalization of the opium
trade, said: "Nothing will In
duce me to raise a revenue from
the vice and misery of my peo
ple."
Fifty Years Ago Today.
1866—Henry W. Allen, noted
Confederate soldier and ex-gov
ernor of Louisiana, died In the
City of Mexico. Born in Virgin
ia, April 2», 1820.
Twenty-five Years Ago Today,
1891—The flagship of the re
volutionary party In Chile was
blown up by a torpedo and up
wards of 200 lives lost.
e
e
f

O
e
:
-
o
Citizens Coal Co. have moved from
1126 Main street to 108 No. 9th street,
and will handle all kinds of feed and
poultry supplies, garden seeds. Call
and get our prices on poultry
stock foods.—Adv.
and
A26
Choice Spring Lamb
FOR EASTER.
Boise Butcher Co.
Phone 59.
811 Idaho St.
Have Your Piano Tuned.
Our tuning department Is of the
highest efficiency. - Chargee reasonable.
Only house In Boise that satin tlnlshes
cases. Makes your piano look like new.
HOME OF THE '
CHICKERINO PIANO
822-824 IDAHO ST.
The Idan-ha
LEADING .HOTEL OF BOISE
Europsan Plan.
In the center of everything.
Commercial and Stockmen'a
Headquarters,
FIRST-GLASS CAFE
Cafeteria and a la carte service.
Lunch, 12 to 2.
Dinner, 5 to 8 p, m,
Bates, without bath, $1.00 up. With
bath, $1.50 up.
V ROBERT AIK MAN, Manager,
THE BRISTOL.
BOISE'S POPULAR HOTEL.
European P:an,
Complete In every detail.
Daily rates, V5e to 31.50.
Weekly Rates: 33.50 up.
Special rates to permanent guesta.
M. PARSONS. Manager.
HOTEL GRAND
Commercial Men's Headquarters—
Most Attractive Lobby in the StMa
strictly Modern. Oenulcr Priesa
BOISE'S NEWEST HOTEL
HE value of a bank connection is best cited by
the fact that—every successful business per
son has one.
Build up your fund for independence at the*
Pacific National Bank
OA R RRR A ARARRRRRAR AR WRRARWRARfM M WWRAWWARARRMRRRRR R RWRRF
ANNOUNCEMENT!
I HAVE BEEN ABLE TO REPLENISH MY SUPPLY OF NOVOCAIN.
THE GERMAN DRUG USED IN NERVE BLOCKING, THE NEW
PAINLESS DENTISTRY--MY SUPPLY IS LIMITED.
DR. F. W. CRICHFIELD, Falk Big.
St. Joseph Live Stock Serum Co.
Producers of Highly Potent and Reliable
Anti Hog Cholera Serum
Under U. S. Veterinary License No. 4«
Our serum Is manufactured In a state where the foot-and-mouth dis
ease has never existed. Distributed In Idaho through the State A
Veterinary Department at Boise. Idaho. ^
Write or wire your orders to State Veterinarian.
Live Stock Shipments
Consigned to us at Union Stoek Yards, North Portland, Ore„ receive
our prompt attention and expert service until eold and waighed, Wa
operate on both the Portland and Seattle marketa. Let ue tell your
cattle, hoga or aheep on the highest m arket. Consign shipments to
WILLARD COMMISSION CO.
LIVE STOCK COMMISSION MERCHANTS
OREGON
NORTH PORTLAND,
Parma Water Lift
i ALL METAL CONSTRUCTION—AS LASTING AS IRM
A8 DURABLE AS GRANITE
The cut represents the style of the Parma Water Lifter, a
is perfected after three years' Improvements. It is the b<
for the money of any pump now on the market. Where tl
water lifter is known It needs no recommendations, t
have for the trade this year four sizes, viz.:
No. 2—Capacity 30 inches, 300 gallons per minute, lift!
8 feet per H. P.
No. 8—Capacity 60 Inches, 600 gallons per minute, lifti
6 feet per H. P.
No. 4—Capacity 100 inches, 1000 gallons per minute, li
ing 214 feet per H. P.
No. 6—Capacity 200 Inches, 2000 gallons per minute, It
ing 1 foot per H. P.
Use Any Power With Belt Transmissh
These lifters are of the submerged type n]
should stand In from 20 to 30 inches of wat
Usee either electricity or gasoline engine. Th
have no valves ar checks to clog and cai
trouble, and need no priming for they are alwa
primed when in the water. They are made w J
an Incline or vertical discharge pipe as need
, These lifters are nicely adapted for lift!
water from wells for stock or Irrigation pv
■■ poses, and are good for any lift up to 50 fey,
the above rating. Above that they require m!
power, and for a long (very long) pipe more power Is needed.
This pump can be made to lift more or less water as needed, by vary!
the speed at which it Is run, A slow speed puts up a smaller amount!
water 'than does a faster speed.
Conwepondeno# Solicited.
L. G-. ROSE, Parma, Idaho.
MANUFACTURER AND 8ALESMAN.
T7
These
Prune
rr-i
Irees
Grown by
Caldwell Nurseries
NOW READY TOR DELIVERY
Je>
High grade nuraary stock of all klnda In larga assortment, ImMN
fruit and ahade traaa, berry planta, vines, roaaa and ahniMmy, Gw
ua your rush orders. TRY OUR EVER-BEARING STRAWBERRY
PLANTS—75c PER DOZ.
Caldwell Nurseries
CHARLES T. HAWKES, Mgr.
CALDWELL., IDAHO.
Dunhams Oaklawn Farm
THE HOME OF THE PERCHERON
BRANCH BARN AT POCATELLO, IDAHO.
Don't let anyone make you believe our Stallions one high prloed be
cause they are Bred at the World'e greateet Breeding Establishment.
This makes them better for we know how to breed PERCHERONS.
Our prices are always reasonable, every horse is Guaranteed to be s
breeder and sold on terms to suit. Write for information and catalog to
WILLIAM T. TRACY, Manager, Pocatello, Idaho.
Bam Comer Fourth and Lender Streets.
Korinek Remedies Make Sick Animals We
[Keep your horse* working for you—in the /SeW—not in ti
■table eating their heads off. Get the utmost in product*
from your cows. Keep all fam animals thrifty by using «
Korinek Veterinary Tonic* and Remedies. See your dealt
. , Write fee FIKK ADVICE akMrtrtsrtM aehn.ts,
S KORINEK REMEDY CO., Kenton «ta. PORTLAND, Of
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