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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, May 01, 1916, Image 1

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Q EVENING CAPITAL NEWS 0
\v
BOISfe, IDAHO, MONDAY, MAY 1, 1916.
Vol. XXXVI
TEN PAGES
No. 108
%
LEADERS IN REBELLION SURRENDER
GOVERNMENTS NOW
IN FULL CONTROL
OF SITUATION
. Post Office Retaken and Is Found to Be
. Badly Damaged—Rioting Continues
In Rural Sections of Ireland

London, May 1.—It was officially announced today that all rebel leaders in Dublin
tad surrendered.
The Irish commandant, J. H. Pearce, who is now a prisoner, is a school master. He
was wounded in the leg. Before being captured he took a most active part in the upris
ing and was looked to as the head of the movement. The post office, which was in the
rebels' hands most of the week, when retaken was found to have been badly dam
aged by fire and shot. j
Reports from provincial districts show that the greatest disturbances outside
the city occurred in the county Meath, where armed rebels last night were terrorizing
the countryside. Many prisoners were captured here with weapons in their hands.
Hundreds of others were detained on suspicion of complicity in the outbreak. One
man was caught in a chimney from which he had been sniping for four days and nights.
He held a position of trust in the qffice of a steamship company. The casualties up to
last night were said to be very numerous, although the troops did not suffer as heavily
as might have been expected.
BACKBONE OF THE
REVOLT IS BROKEN;
LEADERS IN JAIL
London, May 1.—The backbone of the
revolt in Dublin has been broken and
the rebel leaders there have sent mes
sengers to various counties ordering
the rebels to surrender, according to an
official statement issued In London.
The main body of the Sinn Fein
rebels In Dublin surrendered during
the course of the day.
There was, however, considerable
fighting throughout Sunday In Dublin
and the suburbs. It was especially se
1 vere at Balls bridge, outside Dublin.
Proclsmstion .Issued.
The proclamation Issued by "provi
sional president" Pearce, advising the
surrender of all the rebels, follows:
"In order to prevent the further
•laughter of unarmed people, and in the
hope of saving the lives of our follow
ers, who are surrounded and hopeless
ly outnumbered, the members of the
provisional government at headquart
ers had agreed to unconditional sur
render and the commanders of all the
units of the republican forces will order
their followers to lay down their arms."
RESTORATION OF
PEACE WILL BE A
DIFFICULT TASK
Kingstown, May 1.—Although the
principal leaders of the rebel move
ment have laid down their arms and
. advised their followers to acquiesce In
an unconditional surrender, there Is no
doubt that there will be still great dif
ficulty In restoring peace In Dublin and
the surrounding districts, for numerous
small bands of rebels evidently either
have not received the leader's orders,
or doubt the authenticity of the orders
and have determined to continue guer
Ilia warfare.
Dublin is filled with small bands lo
cated In staunch houses and other
buildings, who have always been able
to escape by subterranean passages as
soon as the attack of the soldiers had
proved too strong and who then re
opened hostilities from some unexpect
ed quarter.
That the situation In Dublin was still
regarded as dangerous last night, de
spite surrender of a majority of the
rebels, was indicated by the fa t that
few persons were permitted to pene
trate Into the city through the rigid
military cordon vhlch surround It. A
number of police officers from King
stown, who went to Dublin in their uni
farms, hoping to be able to 'lve some
assistance, were turned hack by the
guards.
No one Is allowed to enter Dublin
without written permission from the
highest authority and then only at his
own risk. Moreover, the people are
warned that this risk is considerable,
as stray bullets are likely to meet the
visitor from some unexpected quarter.
The food situation In Dublin Is pre
carious. Thirty-four free food depots
were opened Sunday, stocked for the
most part with food, commandeered
from various places by the military.
The food Is belr doled out In tiny por
tions after a rigid examination Into the
necessities of the applicant,
Food also is short In Kingstown and
many of the necjssarles of life cannot
Be obtained a* any price.
GERMAN ATTACKS ON THE
VERDUN FRONT REPULSED
BY THE FRENCH
Paris, May 1.—(Official)—German troops in dense
masses attacked violently last night positions captured by
the French north of Deadman's hill on the Verdun front.
The French defeated the attâck, the Germans suffering
"enormous losses." Two simultaneous counter attacks
by the Germans on a trench captured yesterday north of*
Cumieres were repulsed. At Hill No.' 304 and in the Vaux
region the bombardments are incessant. A French aerial
squadron bombarded a supply munitions depot south of
Thiacourt and a camp near Spincourt.
1
DAVID UMAR
I
j
Washington, May l.—The supreme
court today affirmed the conviction of
David Lamar, the "Wolf of Wall
street," In the New York federal courts
on charges- of impersonating Repre
sentative Palmer to J. P. Morgan's
mother with Intent to defraud, Lamar
Is under a two-years' penitentiary sen
tence. Today's action Is final In the
courts.
POCATELLO MAN IS .
THROWN FROM AUTO;
INSTANTLY KILLED
(Capital News Special Service.)
Idaho Falls, May 1.—William L Sell,
of Pocatello, was instantly killed about
« o'clock last evening by being thrown
from an automobile about one mile
south of Idaho Falls.
In company with Barney McGavery
and Aaron Elliott and his two children,
they had been visiting relatives Id this
city during the day and left for home
abou 8:30 o'clock. Mr. McGavery driv
ing the car with Mr. Sell and one of
the children on the rear seat. Mr. Sell
stood up, It is thought, to look over at
the speedometer when the car struck a
low place in the road. Mr. Sell being
thrown out, striking squarely on the
top of his head on the hard ground. His
head was split wide open, his brains
and parts of skull being scattered for
40 feet.
The body was brought to the city and
«hipped to Pocatello. Mr. Sell was 65
years of age, and was employed as
janitor of the court house at Pocatello.
WILL SPEED UP
THE WORK OE
Washington, May 1.—Another move I
to speed up the legislative program in \
congress In order that adjournment |
may be had as soon as possible,
started today by Democratic leaders of
both houses. Calling up the Philippine
Independence bill under special rule
providing for Its disposition In one day
marked the beginning of the clean-up
campaign In the house.
» as
PRESIDENT IS ASKED
TO INTERVENE IN CASE
;
Washington, May 1.—President Wil
son today received an appeal to Inter
vene In the case of the Mexicans re
cently convicted In federal court
murder In connection with the Villa
raid on Columbus. He telegraphed Gov
ernor McDonald, of New Mexico,
questing Information about the cases.
of
m
HMWORHSINFIUIICE
ARE DAMAGED IT HRf
Cherbourg, France, May I,—Fire of
unknown origin Saturday night par
tially destroyed the branch here of the
Creusot gun works

FORD FOR PRESIDENT? DETROIT MAN
SAID TO HAVE BACKING OF W. J. BRYAN
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Left to right, top: W. J. Bryan and
Rudolph Spreckels. Bottom, Geo.
B. McClellan and Henry Ford.
W. J. Bryan wilt bolt the Democratlo ticket and aupport Hanry Ford for
president if the latter is nominated by a naw peace party, it is declared on
pood authority. Other backers of Ferd weuld be Rudolph Spreokele, San
Francisco multi-millionaire, and George B. McClellan, former Tammany mayor
of Now York.
•*v>.
*sS*R$3Bt
W J
SHERIFF AND RANCHER KILLED
WHILE HEADING POSSE IN
SEARCH OF THIEVES
Fort Collins, Wyo., May
Cheyenne, Wyo., and Nels
of Cheyenne, were shot and
of Box Elder, Colo., while
thieves. The thieves escaped.
shooting has not been
watched the thieves' camp
down at dawn. About 4
The posse found Roach and
Two men, believed to have
Roach and Nelson, were
here by Sheriff Cook and a
were heavily armed. The
ried by one of the men as
_ __ _ _ __ __ _
H Lï m
SENT BACK TO
I
\
|
Washington, May 1.—The supreme
court today held that Ignatius Timothy
Tritch Lincoln, former member of the
British parliament and confessed spy,
; must go back to England for trial on
the charge for which he was arrested.
mi SWAT
YOUNGSTOWN PLANTS
IS PUT INTO EFFECT
Youngstown, May 1.—About 2000
machinists employed In various Indus
trial plants here did not report for
duty today. As a result of meetings
held Sunday there Is a possibility that
the number of Idle men will be great
ly augmented before the day Is over.
Land Office Register Named.
Washington, May I.—President Wil
son today nominated John L. Wiley of
Spokane to be register of the land
office at Spokane.
1—Frank Roach, sheriff
Nelson, a rancher 18 miles west
killed early today northwest
heading-a posse hunting horse
Responsibility for the
established. Roach and Nelson
all night; planning to rush it
o'clock three shots were heard.
Nelson dead.
been the slayers of Sheriff
captured 27 miles northwest of
deputy from here. The
officers identified the gun
belonging to Roach.
of
men
car
_ _
uS.AOoro R
HEAVY LOSSES
.
! March and Aprl1 are * rlven a * 20 ' 000 1"
Berlin, May 1.—(Wireless)—Brit
ish casualties In Mesopotamia during
a Turkish dispatch to the Overseas
News Agency,
POLICE ON DUTY AT
THE HARVESTER PLANT
Chicago, May 1.—One hundred pa
trolmen and 60 mounted polios were on
duty today about the Blue Island ave
nue plant of the International Har
vester company here to prevent disor
ders at the opening of the plant with
strike breakers. About 6000 employes
of the twine making department of the
plant struck for higher wages a week
ago.
Norwegian 8hip Is Sunk.
London, May 1.—The Norwegian
steamer Mod has been sunk, accord
ing to Lloyds. She was a vessel of
863 tons and was owned In Chris
tiania.
NOW AWAITING WORD
FROM THE PRESIDENT
Resumption of the Conferences at 0
Paso and Juarez Expected Late Today
or Tomorrow—Coded Reports Are
Forwarded to Washington
El Paso, May 1.—The resumption of the Scott-Fun
ston-Obregon conferences to consider American military
problems in Mexico may not be undertaken until late to
day or possibly tomorrow, or until Washington has had
time to review General Scott's coded reports, the last of
which was forwarded early today. General Obregon be
lieves the conferences will be concluded this week.
INSTRUCTIONS ARE
SENT TO GENERALS
SCOTT A>ïD FUNSTON
Washington, May 1.—Additional In
structions wer« today sent Generals
Scott and Funston by Secretary Baker
after conferring with the president
and Secretary Lansing. It is under
stood they make plain that what
ever la agreed upon at the conference
must not be based on any Immediate
recall of General Pershing's forces.
But tine More Conference.
El Paso, May 1.—General Funston
announced today that only one more
conference will be held with General
Ozregon. He said it would be brief.
GENERAL PERSHING
PREPARES TO MEET
ANY CONTINGENCY
Field headquarters, Namiqutpa, May
It (Radio via Columbu».)—General Per
shing Is concentrating his forces that
he may plan for every possible future
emergency. Scattered bands of Vll
llstas are being given no respite. Col
umns of cavalry are riding mercilessly
on the trails of fugitives who are now
in groups of two or three or singly,
making their way far into the wilder
ness of the mountainous region In an
attempt to escape the Americans. The
new motor ambulances which recent
ly reached field headquarters are being
given their final test in active service,
carrying wounded from Parral and
Tomocqulto to the field hospital at
Cofbnia Dublan.
ORDERS TO TROOPS
TO PROCEED SOUTH
COUNTERMANDED
Columbus. N. M.. May 1.—Orders to
the regiment of Infantry stationed at
Colonia Dublan to proceed south have
™ tNT N0W
in SICHT ON THE
Peace Strength Is Fixed at
180,000 Men, With Plans
of an Expansion to 250,000
in War Time.
Washington, May 1.—A regular army
of 180,000 men at peace strength has
practically been agreed upon by the
senate and house conferees on the
army bill. With plans for expansion
as provided for In the bill, which was
passed by the eenate this would pro
duoe an army of about 250,000 men la
war strength. The bill as It passed
the eenate fixed the peace strength at
260,000 men.
Home Life Company May Mutualize.
New York, May 1.—Stock owners of
the Home Life Insurance company will
meet' tomorrow to act on the plan re
commended by the directors for mu
tualizing the corporation. If approved
by the stock ownerB, the proposal will
then be submitted to the policy hold
ers. The plan provides for the pay
ment of 3460 and accrued dividend for
each of . the 1200 shares of stock out
standing.
been countermanded. Rapid develop
ments are belleved to be the reason for
the change. However, It is known a
number of General Obregon's cavalry
are making their way south along the
line of communication.
NO CHANGE IN THE
PLANS FOR KEEPING
TROOPS IN MEXICO
El Paso, May 1.—Mexican and Amer
ican conferees over the disposition of
the American forces In Mexico marked
time Sunday while Generals Hugh L.
Scott and Frederick Funston awaited
word from Washington as to the next
step to be taken In the negotiations
with General Obregon.
The report of the American repre
sentatives on the first conference went
forward by wire early Sunday morn
ing. On the answer of President Wil
son and Secretaries Lansing and Bak
er to Its recommendations depends the
future status of the conference.
The Facts Developed.
In the meantime the following facte
developed:
That to date the apparent Intention
of the Waehlngton government to keep
General Pershing's columns In Mexico
has not been changed.
That General Obregon, In Saturday's
conference, served no sort of notice on
Generals Scott and Funston that could
be construed as an ultimatum demand
ing Immediate withdrawal.
That the desire of the defacto gov
ernment for withdrawal was again
stated, but that the only discussion
along this line was regarding the ad
visability of an American retirement.
That there was considerable discus
sion of the possibility of eff^tlve
American and Mexican co-operation In
the eradication of scattered Villa band
it groups.
That thera is a strong possibility
there will be only one more conference
held, that depending on the wishes of
the Washington government.
That while the present negotiations
are proceeding, shipments of supplies
to the American expedition's front are
going forward uninterruptedly, among
other supplies leaving the Columbus
base Sunday being nine truckloads of
ordnance.
Withdrawal Question Uppermost.
They are understood to have tried to
Impress on the American representa
tives their claim that political condi
tions in Mexico are such that they can
not be responsible fqr any eventuali
ties that may result from continued oc
cupation of Mexican soil by American
columns. They are said also to have
laid stress on tbe fact that the position
of the Carranza government would be
extremely delicate if the expeditionary
movement were not ended.
«
DIG TRANSPORT
TORPEDOED DY
c
Berlin. May 1.—(Wireless to the
Associated Press)—It la reported from
Saloniki that a German* submarine has
torpedoed a large transport
It Is said the transport was tor
pedoed off Kara Burnue, 10 miles east
of Saloniki. This is the second In
stance In which a transport has been
reported torpedoed near Saloniki. Thii
report is contained in a dispatch frost
Zurich,

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