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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, May 04, 1916, Image 1

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£0 EVENING CAPITAL NEWS C
Vol. XXXVI
BOISE, IDAHO, THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1916.
TEN PAGES
' No. Ill

AMERICAN TROOPS TO WITHDRAW
NO DEFINITE TIME /s
FIXED AT THE
CONFERENCE
United States Troops Will Go No Farther
i South Than Their Present Base
Co-Operation Is Promised
Washington, May 4.—General Scott's report on his conferences with General Ob
regon, laid before the president by Secretary Baker, is characterized by qfiicials as
"satisfactory." The report is understood to provide for the use of Mexican railways
but sets no definite time, such as 60 days as has been reported, for the withdrawal of
General Pershing's forces.
After his-conference with the president, Secretary Baker said no announcement
on General Scott's report -was ready but the president might issue a statement later.
He indicated the final decision on all points had not been reached, but General Scott
would be informed so he might have another conference with General Gbregon.
It is understood the tentative agreement with General Obregon provides that the
American troops will not go farther south than they now are and will be withdrawn as
soon as the Carranza government convinces the United States of its capacity to pro
tect the border territory. It also provides for the co-operation of the Carranza troops
for the cleaning up of the bandits.
WESTINGHOUSE
STRIKE TO CLOSE
President of Company Will
Meet Committee of Strik
ers—No Further Violence
Is Reported.
Pittsburg, May'4.—E. M. Herr, pres
ident ef the Westinghouse Electric A
Manufacturing company, whose plants
are eloeed because of the strike of 16,
000 workers for an eight-hour day, told
^ committee of strikers today he would
be unable to discuss a settlement with
them until tomorrow. Federal and
state officials are endeavoring to bring
the company and men together. While
almost 1000 state troops are on duty
In Turtle creek valley, conditions
about the closed plants are quiet.
Unrest Is manifested In other parts
of Allegheny county. Seven hundred
IPress Steel Car company employes
nave Joined the 2000 already out. Po
lice are guarding the McKinney Manu
facturing company's factory, where girl
strikers attacked those who refused to
Join them and ducked one girl In a
horse trough.
Mfatleeippi Valley 8uffragiets.
Minneapolis, May 4.—Minneapolis Is
to be the ecene next week of one of the
largest and most notable gatherings of
suffrage workers ever held In this part
of the country. The occasion will be
the annual conference of the Missis
sippi Valley Suffrage aeosclatlon, rep
resenting the organized workers In
more than twenty states.
I
Double Jointed Co
Operation
Mr. Manufacturer:
The local dealer has the final
word ae to whether your goods
sell In large or small quantities.
—You need hie co-operation.
He does not believe that ad
vertising In mediums of "nation
al circulation" helps him much,
and he does not enthuse over
' goods so advertised. That's a
condition, not a theory. To ar
gue about whether he Is rigbt or
wrong. is unprofitable.—You
. need hie co-operation.
If you advertise In the mer
chants local newspapers .you
comply with his Idea and gain
hie support.—You get his co
operation.
Co-operation Is an operation at
which more than one must oper
ate.—Get that?
If you are interested In the
new way of increasing sales,
write to the Bureau of Advertis
ing, American Newspaper Pub
lishers Association, World Build
ing. New York.
»
IS ARRESTED
London, May 4.—James M. Sulli
van of New York, formerly American
minister to Santo Domingo, has been
arrested In Dublin on the charge of
complicity In the Irish rebellion.
Sullivan sailed from New York last
July for Liverpool with his wife and
son, saying he was going to Ireland
to visit his mother. He said he expect
ed to be back In New York by Sept.
1. Shortly before, he said, he was vir
tually asked to resign his post as min
lster to the Dominican republic, as a
result of an Investigation by a com
mission. Sullivan's appointment was
generally credited to Bryan who In
looking for a place for Sullivan wrote
Receiver General Vick In the Domini
can republic asking "What positions
have you at your disposal with which
to reward deserving Democrats?" Sul
livan was exonerated by Bryan but the
charges would not down and a second
investigation resulted in his resigna
tion.
STREET CAR MEN OE
CLEVELAND ACCEPT
OFFER OE COMPANY
Cleveland, May 4.
By a vote of 1223
to 496 the street car men today vot
ed to accept the compromise offer of
the Cleveland Railway company on the
men's wage demand, thus eliminating
all chance of a street car strike here.
ANOTHER CONTINGENT
OE RUSSIAN TROOPS
JÜSÜÜÜ5
gent of Russian soldiers arrived here
Utah 8tste Capitol Completed.
Salt Lake, May 4.—Govemore and
other official representatives of all the
states are to be invited to come to Salt
Lake the first of next month to attend
the formal opening of Utah's magnifi
cent new state Capitol. The opening
Is to be made an occasion for elaborate
ceremonies and festivities,
capitol was built at a cost of *2,260.000
and Is one of the most imposing public
structures In the west. It Is construct
ed largely of Georgia marble and Utah
onyx. The building stands on an emi
nence and Its huge dome
viewed from every part of the great
Salt Lake valley.
The new
may be
REBELS IS STILL
House to House Search Be
ing Made in Dublin by the
Officers—Food Prices Are
High.
. .
h 18 beln * made and notices post
e<5 everywhere warning any who_
harboring rebels that they will be liable
to arr ® 8 ! and punishment During the
\ height of the revolution butter sold at
j * 2 a P° u nd. flour at J1 a pound apd po
tatoes at 63 cents, because of shortage.
Postage stamps prepared by the short
lived Irish republic ready for issue
found. >
Dublin, May 4.—The round up of
rebels Is still going on rapidly. The
Sinn Fein crusade was conducted
openly that most of its adherents
known to the police. A house to house
so
■ - a
are
were
LENIENCY IS URGED
BY IRISH LEADERS
London, May 4.—The only protest
voiced in parliament yesterday against
the execution of three leaders of the
Irish revolution came from Paurence
Ginnell, who Is classed as a National
ist, but Is actually an independent.
John Redmond, leader of the Irish par
liamentary party, Joined Sir Edward
Carson, leader of the Irish Unionists,
in a plea for leniency towards the
great mass of re\\>lutionlsts.
In his speech explaining his resig
nation as chief secretary for Ireland,
Augustine Birrell confessed he had
miscalculated the strength and serious
ness of the Sinn Fein movement,
paid tribute to the Irish race and said
he hoped good might come from the
grave events at Dublin. Birrell ad
mitted he had been urged by
He
many
who possibly knew Ireland better than
he did, that it was the government's
duty to suppress the Sinn Fein and
take away their arms.
fflOPACWM HAS NOW
Tll/m Tlir PAAII AI"
IAKEN THE FORM OF
SENDING OE LETTERS
Washington. May 4.-Printed letters
protesting against any step which may
lead to war with Germany began pour
in* in by the thousands upon members >
of congress today as a sequel to the j
telegraph propaganda which swamped j
the capitol adn telegraph companies
last week. Even the congressmen's
names were printed on the envelopes.
Everything gave evidence the letters
were prepared by the thousands and
required only the written signatures.
|ÄS«
by civilians
London, May 4.—Reuter's Amsterdam corre- 4*
spondent says information regarded as trust- 4*
worthy states that Metz, capital of Lorraine, of 4*
about 60,000 population and rated as one of the 4»
strongest fortresses of the world, 15 miles north 4*
of the fighting line and 40 miles east of Verdun is 4*
being evacuated by the civil population.
4 »
4 »
4 *

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4 -
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4*
4*
«I* «I» «I* «I* «I* «I» «I* «I» «I» «I« «I* «I* «I» ||» «I* «I» «I» «I» «|| «I* «I»
GLENNS FERRY WOMAN
SHOOTS AND KILLS HER
HUSBAND AND DAUGHTER
(Capital News Special Service)
Glenns Ferry, May 4.—As a result of a
domestic tragedy here last evening C.
T. Shoemaker and his nine-year-old
step-daughter arj dead, and Mrs. Shoe
maker, their slayer, Is under arrest on
the charge of murder. Mrs. Shoemaker
confessed that she fired the shots which
caused the deaths of her husband and
daughter, and will be taken to Moun
tain Home tonight by Sheriff Stevens,
who was called her« Immediately after
the tragedy. ^
The fatal shooting occurred last eve
ning at 5:80 o'clock In the Shoemaker
home. Mr. Shoemaker, who was night
engineer In the Oregon Short Line yard
here, - as shaving when the trouble
arose. According to Mrs. Shoemaker's
story they had quarreled and she be
lieved her life was In danger. She has
been very guarded In her statements,
and as there was no other eye-witness
it has been difficult to learn the exact
facts.
Until the Inquest was held last night
It was supposed that Mrs. Shoemaker
shot her child accidentally while she
was shooting at her husband, but In her
testimony at the Inquest she made no
such claim. It Is now believed that In
«ER WILL IKY TO
GO BACK TO SENATE
Chicago, May 4.—William Lorlmer,
acquitted last night on charges con
nected with the failure of the La Salle
Street Trust & Savings bank, of
which he was president, announced to
day he would again be a candidate tor
the United States senate from which
he was ousted. "I will re-enter poli
tics as soon as I have paid off the de
positors In the bank," he said. "I ex
pect to have my. financial affairs
cleared up within a year."
HOW HELEN KELLER "HEARD" CARUSO
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When Enrico Caruso was at Atlanta last week Helen Keller, the world's
moat famous blind and deaf woman, placed her fingers on his lips and throat
and "heard" him sinf the "Lament of Samson" from 8aint-Saens' opera,
"Samson and Delilah." Through the medium, of her marvelously sensitive
fingers the matchlets voice of the great tenor was transmitted to her soul as
she sat and listened. Her lips apart, her sfghtless eyes wet with tears, she whis
pered over and over again: "Wonderful, wonderful."
"Though I cannot see your face, I can feel the pathos of your song," said
Miss Keller, -
And Caruso replied with his Ups against her hands: "In your lingers I can
feel your souL In your blue eyes your soul Is shining;"
a
C.
on
and
be
has
she
her
no
In
her frenzy she shot her child, who was
near her husband at the time. The
shooting was done with a 38-caliber re
volver. '
The coroner's Jury returned a verdict
that Shoemaker and the girl died as
results of revolver wounds Inflicted by
Mrs. Shoemaker. After the shooting
Shoemaker staggered into the yard and
fell dead. He was shot through the
head. The girl, who was shot In the
stomach, lived about half an hour.
Immediately after the shooting the
town marshal took Mrs. Shoemaker
Into custody and notified the county
sheriff and coroner at Mountain Home,
both officers "hurrying to the scene. A
Coroner's Jury was empaneled and what
little evidence which would throw light
on the tragedy was presented. As Mrs.
Shoemaker admitted the shooting the
usufl formal verdict was returned. ; ' '
Mr. and Mrs. Shoemaker had both
been married before. He was U years
old and his wife was 30. They came to
Glenns Ferry from Helena, Mont, about
six months ago. They had no children
of their own, but Mrs. Shoemaker's
daughter by her former marriage, the
unfortunate victim of the tragedy, lived
with them.
INDORSEMENT GIVEN
preparedness plans
of
tor
Washington, May 4.—The . National
Conservation congress, In resolutions
adopted today, Indorsed the naval con
sulting board for Industrial prepared
ness, approved military training and
urged more liberal legislation for their
support Water control, except for in
terstate purposes, the report contends,
belongs to the state and the lands nec
essary for the development of water
power should be held In subordination.
reply to
Secretary Lansing Without Information
Regarding the Conference Between Em
peror William and Ambassador Gerard
»
Senator Stone Is Optimistic
Washington, May 4.—Secretary Lansing announced
today that Ambassador Gerard had cabled he expected to
receive today the German reply to the American note de
manding an immediate abandonment of present subma
rine warfare practices.
Secretary Lansing is said to be withcftit information
regarding Ambassador Gerard's conference with Em
peror William. Chairman Stone of the senate foreign re
lations committee, called on Secretary Lansing today.
"Judging from newspapers the tensity of the situation
with Germany is very much less than it was," said Sena
tor Stone. "It also appears they have reached an agree
ment on the border." Senator Stone said there was no
occasion for congressional action as the situation now
stands.
Secretary Lansing announced late today that he had
received a dispatch from Ambassador Gerard containing
indications of what Gerard believed would constitute
Germany's reply to the American note on submarine war
fare. Secretary Lansing declined to make public the dis
patch or any part of its contents, or to say what the indi
cation was, on the ground that the dispatch was highly
confidential. The communication received by Secretary
Lansing was immediately sent to the president. Secre
tary Lansing said it was not certain that Gerard's deduc
tions were absolutely correct, as he had not seen the text
of Germany's reply.
ZEPPELIN L-20
WRECKED IN
London, May 4.—The Zeppelin L-20
which was wxecked falling In Hafso
Firth, Norway, belonged to the squad
ron of five airships which attacked
the east coast of England and Scot
land Tuesday night, according to a
member of the crew. Sixteen men on
the Zeppelin were rescued and In
terned by Norway, according to a Cop
enhagen dispatch. One of the crew
said the Zeppeline were forced by gun
fire and adverse weather to cut short
their attacks and that, owing to lack
of benzine the L-20 was unable to
keep company with the other raiders.
Driven eastward by a strong wind, it
was hurled against a mountainside.
THIRTY YEARS SINCE
THE HAYMARKET RIOT
Chicago, May 4.—Veterans of the
Chicago police department recalled to
day as the thirtieth anniversary 6f the
great Haymarket riot. In which seven
members of the police force were killed
and many others seriously injured In
an attempt to disperse a mob of an
archists assembled In the Haymarket
square. As the column of 180 police
men eloeed In' on the gathering they
were attacked with dynamite bombs
and revolvers. Of the anarchist lead
ers concerned in the oj trage, three
were hung, a fourth committed sul
elde while Swatting execution, two were
sentenced to life Imprisonment and
another given a sentence of 15 years,
The three who had been imprisoned
were pardoned by Governor Altgeld in
1893. Oscar Neebe, the member of the
band who was given a 15-year sentence,
died at hia home In this city a little
more than a week ago. He was the
lgst survivor of those tried and con
vie ted in connection with the riots.
FRENCH TROOPS
CONTINUE TO
A
Paris, May 4. — (Official) — Thu
French advance In the Deadman's hill
district on the Verdun front continued
during the night The gains made yes
terday were Increased and consolidated.
As a consequence of the French ar
tillery preparations at Deadman'a hill
two Germane surrendered Baying they
were the sole survivors of the men In
their trench. Elsewhere west of tha
Meuse there was active artillery fight
ing. A grenade engagement occurred
In Ajrocourt wood. Near Vaux, east
of the Meuse, an artillery enoounter
occurred. French artillery destroyed
a munitions depot at Grande Dune,
Belgium.
a
Germans Admit Lose.
4.—(Official)—The
Berlin,
May
French have obtained a foothold In
one German advance poet south of
Deadman's hill.
MARRIAGE OE COUNT.
BONI IS HELD VALID
Rome, May 4.—The validity of the
marriage of Count Boni de Caatellane
to Anna Gould, now Duchess of Talley
rand. was confirmed today In a decis
ion by the commission of cardinals ap
pointed to consider the olalm of the
count for an annulment of the
riage. The count haa applied several
times to the Vatican for a ruling that
the marriage was Illegal.
mar
NOMINATION IS
ACCEPTED BY HAYS
S. H. Hays, fortner attorney general
of Idaho, selected by those interested
in the recall as a candidate against
Jeremiah W. Robinson, this afteraooa
officially accepted the nomination bj
signing the required acceptance blank
wblch was filed with the city clerk h|
Henry Z. Johnson. ..

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