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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, May 10, 1916, Image 6

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1916-05-10/ed-1/seq-6/

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BURLEY RETIRES
FROM SERVICE OF
THE SHORT LINE
Spent 37 Years of His Life
in Railroad Work With
Company—Has Seen the
System Grow.
After a period of service covering
more than 37 years, D. E. Burley, gen-t
eral passenger agent of the Oregon
Short Line, has retired. Mr. Burley
Is succeeded by D. S. Spencer, who,
for years, has been assistant general
passenger agent of the Oregon Short
Line.
Mr. Burley began his railroad career
as traveling passenger agent of the
Union Pacific with headquarters In
Baltimore ill 1879. He was transfer
red to Philadelphia 10 years later, and
in 1891 he was appointed general agent
of the company in Salt Lake City. The
Union Pacific and Oregon Short Line
company were segregated in 1897 and
Mr. Burley was made general passen
ger aèrent of the last-named line, a po
sition which he occupied until his re
tirement.
When Mr. Burley became general
passenger agent of the Short Line the
road roughly resembled
»hears.
pair of
one blade running from
Granger to Huntington, the other from
Salt Lake to Butte, bisecting at Poca
tello. There were no branches other
than the Wood River and Mackay
lines. Passenger trains were few and
equipment light. Such equipment as a
steel coach and electric-lighted sleeper
or modern diner w'ere unknown. Be
tween the time of Mr. Burley's advent
as general passenger agent and his re
tirement more than 1000 miles of
branch lines were built in Idaho alone.
Block signals and other devices for
the protection of passengers were in
stalled, heavier rails were laid through
out and .millions of dollars were
pended In equipment. In HffiP of this
development Mr. Burley bore an active
part.
He was largely responsible for the
construction pf the Yellowstone Park
ex
jg
Integrity
True Value
New Silk Dresses
Special at $15.00
Afternoon Dresses of taffeta and crepe de chine,
in smart new styles—not an ordinary Dress in the lot
—practical models that arc carefully finished, in
black, navy, gray, tan and green.. Just 28 of these
Dresses and each one is different from the other,
afternoon or street wear one of these stylish Dresses
will prove to be very desirable,
sizes.. Every Dress in this group is worth 820.00 at
least. Special price now $15.00.
For
Women's and misses'
Matchless Skirt Values
At this price we
show a splendid assortment of
fine Dress Skirts, in very newest flare styles; made of
extra quality serge, poplins, chuddah cloths, gaher
dines, novelty and fancy checks; some of them very
effectively finished with new pockets, novelty belts,
braid and fancy buttons. Tlenty of all sizes to 36
waist. A big showing in black and
Matchless values, every one of them, at.. .
$ 5.95
navv.
Entire Stock Suits Now at Reduced Prices.
(Select yours tomorrow at a saving)
ABC Co., 212 N. 8th St.
\u
Summer Excursions
East and "West
Via
Oregon Short Line
(Union Pacific System)
EAST
Low rates to Denver, Colorado Springs, Pueblo,
Omaha, Kansas City, St. Louis, Memphis, Chicago,
Minneapolis, St. Paul, and many other points.
SALE DATES—
May 13, 17, 20, 24, 27, 31, June 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, 21,
24, 28; July 5, 12, 19, 26; August 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; Sep
tember 6, 13.
LIMIT
October 31, 1916.
WEST
Low rate excursion tickets on sale daily, May 1st to
September 30th, inclusive to Spokane, Portland, Ta
coma, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles and San
Diego.
LIMIT
October 31, 1916.
See any O. S. L. Agent for rates and further detail*
or write, D. S. Spencer, General Pateenger Agent,
Salt Laka City,
line, which had Its first northern term
inus at St. Anthony and was later ex
tended through Ashton to the gateway
of the western wonderland. It was Mr.
Burley who made the first scouting ex
pedition through the territory and he
returned so enthusiastic over its pos
sibilities that he did not hesitate to
strongly recommend the immediate
construction of the line.
Mr. Burley was equally zealous In
the opening of other territory tributary
to the Short Line. He early saw the
possibilities of the Carey act and was
foremost In presenting the advantages
of the new plan to the outside world.
The rapid development of the Twin
Halls section was due In no small
measure to Mr. Burley's efforts and It
is as an efficient and tireless colonizer
that he will be longest remembered by
those familiar with his work.
It is understood that Mr. Burley plans
to spend his remaining years, which his
friends all hope will be many, in en
joying the rest he has so well earned.
The promotion of D. S. Spencer to
succeed Mr. Burley Is a recognition of
long, faithful and efficient sersrlee. Al
though still a young man, Mr. Spencer
has been in the employ of the Short
Line for more than 40 years, beginning
as a messenger boy. He has thousands
of friends throughout the lntermoun
tain country and has abundantly dem
onstrated his ability to make good in
any position.
J. B. Durham, chief clerk In the gen
eral passenger office, succeeds Mr.
Spencer as assistant general passenger
agent. This is another reward of mer
it, for Mr. Durham has been in the
passenger department of the Short
Line since 1897 In various capacities.
Fertilizers for tawns, garden, field*.
W. S. & G. Co. Phone 323. 9th and
Grove.
tf
ANNOUNCEMENTS.
(No announcements will be received
after 10 a. m. on the date of publica
tion).
The Hyde Park W. C. T. U. will meet
at the home of Mrs. Paul Pizey, 170r>
North Fifteenth street, Thursday af
ternoon at 2:30 o'clock. All members
and friends are invited.
All members of the Brotherhood of
American Yeomen are requested to turn
out in force to the meeting Thursday
evening. The lady members are re
quested to provide a lunch for two.
DAMAGED GOODS.
Liberty Theater, May 11, 12, 13.
— -Adv. M10
READY FOR ACTION
IN SHORT ORDER
Second Infantry in Best ofj
Condition for Service if
the Call Comes From the
President.
GOVERNOR AUTHORIZED
TO MAKE APPOINTMENTS
Governor Alexander received
the following telegram today:
"Washington, May 8, 1916.
"The Governor of Idaho,
"Boise, Idaho:
"The act approved May 4
provides for appointments to
West Point from enlisted men of
the national guard, 22 to be ad
mitted to th military academy
July 10 of tins year, as a result
of a competitive examination to
be held June 6. The competitive
examination will be the same an
the regular examination for en
trance to the academy. Candi
dates must be between 19 and 22
years of age, unmarried, and
must have served as enlisted
men not less than one year on
July 10, 1916. You are requested
to select not exceeding three
well-qualified candidates who
are Willing and to astruct them
to report to the commanding of
fleer at Vancouver barrackc,
Washington,
1916, for mental and physical
examination. Forwar•' this of
fice by letter the full name, com
pany, regiment, date of birth and
postoffice
giving tin requirements will
follow.
o
9 a. m.,
June 6.


* •


address.
Pamphlets
"McCAIN,
''The Adjutant General."
The officers of the Second infantry,
Idaho National Guard, would not be
surprised if orders were received at
any time now calling out the Second
regiment for duty on the Mexican bor
der.
I. The Second regiment is well equip
ped for an emergency. Not only is it
well stocked with munitions, but has a
large supply of the necessary camp
equipment, etc. The fact that a con
signment of 600 pairs of shoes was
received by Major Woodson Jeffreys,
who has charge of the government's
property, for the regiment, may have
more significance than has been attach
ed to them. A rangefinder valued at
$600 has also been added to the regi
ment's equipment. It has been in
stalled at the guard headquarters and
is attracting not a little attention.
Adjutant General Crow and Sergeant
I Bowling, sergeant-instructor of the
regiment, a regular army non -commis
j sioned officer detailed to give instruc-jn
lion work, are expected back from
10-days' trip to the northern part of
I the state today or tomorrow. They
have been quietly investigating the
militia companies in northern Idaho.
! The reports received at the regimental
headquarters are to the effect that
jthe companies are in excellent condi
It ion.
"If the regiment is ordered out we
litre in good condition to move," said one
one the officers today. "We have all
t he necessary equipment and could en
train within a surprisingly short time.
I would not be in the least surprised if
orders were received to send the Regi
ment to the border. We are subject
to war department orders at any time
and I am very thankful to say the régi
ment is ready for work if called upon
to move.''
SOUTH SIDE IMPROVEMENT
CLUB TO GIVE PROGRAM
The South Side Improvement club
will hold an entertainment Friday
night, May 12, in the South Side Ini*
provement club hall, to which the pub
lic is invited. The following program
will be given:
Piano Duet .
. .Misses Grave and Mabel Thompson
Play, "Bluebeard and Cinderella," by
Miss Creary's troupe from Collister
Six Readings by Winners of Gold and
Silver Medals
Song
Charles Williams
ITCHING BUSIERS
ON BOY'S HEAD
Got Worse. Affected Ears, Neck
and Face, Scratched Day and
Night. Terribly Disfigured. j
HEALED BYCUTICURA
SOAP AND OINTMENT
"When four months old my hoy suffered !
with blisters and a kind of scaly skin on his
head.
I got some salve and he didn't
seem to Improve but got worse and his oars,
neck, and face were affected. He scratched
day and night the itching was so Intense,
and we had to keep his hands pinned the
whole time,
flamed, and he didn't have a hair on his
head.
The skin was sore and In
It was just a rap of sore eruptions,
and his fare was terribly disfigured.
"He got so bad we had to keep a mask on
his face.
I
The trouble lasted for months,
when a lady told my husband about
Cuticura Soap and Ointment, and we got
them. The third day I noticed a big
improvement and in two weeks my boy
was healed." (Signed) Mrs. II. A. Thiele.
348 6th St., Milwaukee. Wis., Oct. 26, 1915.
Sample Each Free by Mail
With 32-p. Sldn Book on requeet.
drees post-rani —Cntlewra, D.p«. X, Bee.
ten.'* Sold throughout the world.
M
STATEMENT BY THE
Committee of 100
To the Voters of Boise:
E ARE about to take part in one of the most important elections ever held
in this city. It is a time when public-spirited men and women should
sink personal interests and prejudices and stand together in the cause of
pure and efficient government. After full consideration of the grave is
sues confronting the people at the coming recall election, we feel it our duty
to set forth publicly what we believe to be the controlling considerations in this cam
paign.
W
Five months ago, proceedings were started for the recall of Mayor Robinson. The
men in charge of the proceedings were representative men of the community and the
movement was distinctly marked by freedom from bitterness or violence. It was based
on a widespread belief that conditions in municipal administration had become intol
erable.
Within a few days after the movement was begun, another voluntary committee,
the so-called Peace Committee, was organized, consisting, in large part, of personal
friends of Mayor Robinson. The membership of this Peace Committee was of a very
high order. The names and character of its members invited confidence. The Recall
Committee and the Peace Committee met in the most friendly and conciliatory spirit.
Among men thus actuated solely by devotion to the public interest, it was not diffi
cult to come to an agreement. In a public statement signed by the Mayor himself and
by the Peace Committee, including the Mayor's personal friends and supporters, it
was acknowledged that serious mistakes had been made in the municipal administra
tion and the most explicit personal assurances and guarantees were given that the
abuses of which just complaint had been made should not be permitted to recur and
that henceforth the city government would be carried on in such a manner as not to
justify a renewal of such complaints. At the same time, the Mayor publicly apologized
for the statements made by some of his supporters to the effect that the recall
ment had been instituted or was supported by the vice and liquor interests of the city.
On the strength of these pledges and assurances, given under the most solemn circum
stances and binding obligations of honor, the recall proceedings were abandoned.
Almost immediately thereafter, the Mayor began to give evidence of utter contempt
for the promises and assurances so solemnly given. The city government rapidly de
generated into a state of such hopeless incompetency that the Mayor was repudiated
by some of the very men who had become his sponsors and guarantors. So arbitrary,
so lacking in respect for the sanctity of the law or the obligation of a pledge, so utter
ly incompetent has the administration of the city government become, that it has
seemed to many that no remedy was available except the application of the recall.
Councilman Eichelberger has so completely allied himself with the Mayor in the ad
ministration that it was deemed necessary, also, to invoke the recall as to him. Prom
inent among the men instituting the present recall movement are some of those who, as
members of the Peace Committee, succeeded in averting the former recall proceedings.
We agreed to dismissing the former recall proceedings because we believed the
Mayor would keep his promises of reform. He has failed to keep them. He has disap
pointed both the people of the city and the men who became his sponsors.
In this grave and critical situation, we deem it the duty of sober minded law-abiding
citizens to see to it that Mayor Robinson and Mr. Eichelberger are recalled from office.
The public interests call imperatively for the election of Mr. Hays and Mr. Stevens and
the breaking away from the terrible incubus of incompetent, mismanagement and vio
lation of the law in our city government. After a time of stagnation, we are entering on
a period of great prosperity. To be condemned to continue under the handicap of the
utter incompetence and demoralization now characterizing the conduct of the city's
affairs would be nothing short of a calamity. The Mayor's pretense that he stands for
the enforcement of the law is a pitiful evasion of the charges of abuses and violation of
the law of which he stands accused by the conscience of the community.
m ove
R. F. M'AFEE.
ERNEST NOBLE,
CRAIG COFFIN,
LEO J. FALK,
M'KEEN F. MORROW,
HERBERT LEMP,
CRAWFORD MOORE,
J. H. BLACK,
SHERMAN M. COFFIN,
R. K. DAVIS,
W. E. PIERCE,
F. H. PARSONS.
GEO. W. FLETCHER,
L. C. MERRELL,
J. S. SPRINGER,
MAX MAYFIELD,
REILLY ATKINSON.
RALPH FALK,
HARRY K. FRITCHMAN,
W. J. COUGHLIN,
C. J. SINSEL,
A. GORESCZKY,
C. F. HUMMELL,
OTTO JONES.
FRANK ENSIGN,
E. M. ROGERS,
WM. HOWELL,
J. F. KOELSCH,
BERNARD LEMP,
GEO. B. WOOD,
M'CREADY SYKES,
JOHN EWALD.
JOHN W. VEATCH,
J. G. H. GRAVELEY,
WM. NORTHROP,
BRADLEY SHEPPARD,
EDWIN DAVIS,
CHARLES WILHITE,
C. J. NORTHROP,
E. M. HOOVER,
HENRY Z. JOHNSON,
HENRY L. FALK,
H. E. DALTON,
O. H. ALLEN,
H. L. MORRISON.
EDWIN SNOW,
H. J. M'GIRR,
WEBB REEVES,
A. E. WEAVER,
E. F. TUCKER,
LESTER FALK,
W. G. JENKINS, JR.,
F. C. WILLS,
H. J. SYMS,
W. A. MENDENHALL,
JOHN A M'DEVITT,
E. H. PEASLEY,
W. N. SWEET,
HOWARD STEIN,
F. H. BRANDT.
W. J. M'LEOD,
CHARLES VAN DORN,
W. R. TELLER.
JOE SULLIVAN,
GUSTAV KROEGER
JOE PERRAULT, JR.,
CHARLES F. KOELSCH,
J. JACKSON,
P. E. CAVANEY,
R. M. D. CHILDS,
J. E. SCHOOLER,
I. M. MARKS,
L. W. ENSIGN,
C. H. LINGENFELTER,
J. B. ELDRIDGE,
A. W. BRAND,
J. H. HOPFFGARTEN,
GEORGE W SMITH,
J. F. COLVIN.
JOE PENCE,
W. L. ASH,
A. F. GRAVES,
C. E. THUM,
PROSPER AVELENE,
ARTHUR HODGES,
W. V. REGAN,
H. S. BETTIS,
C. F. MANN,
LEON SIMPSON.
H. N. COFFIN,
C. F. ADAMS,
T. K. LITTLE.
WILLIAM KRULL,
P. B. CARTER,
F. C. HORN,
T A VHPW
JAMES S. TORRENCE,
W. J. CAMPBELL.
MATEO ARREGUI,
GEORGE A. ANDERSON

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