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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, May 10, 1916, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1916-05-10/ed-1/seq-7/

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Around the Boise Valley Loop
Caldwell
Nampa
Star
Middleton
Cagle
Today's News from Towns Along the Interurban Line.
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NAMPA AGENT—Hallay Wilton. Phone 485W
CALDWELL AGENT—Keith Miller, Phene 1«4
SETTLERS WILL
' MAKE EIGHT FOR
CHEAPER WATER
Strong Resolutions Adopted
at Meeting of Boise Proj
ect Water Users' Associa
tion at Caldwell.
Caldwell, May 10.—With the view of
securing release through the Interior
department of the national govern
ment, the directors of the Boise-Pay
ette Water TTser's association at their
meeting in this city yesterday renewed
their effort» to inducé the reclamation
^service to keep faith with the settlers
^of this irrigation project, and live up
to the original representation of the
government's agentr, that the cost of
water should not exceed $25 to $28 per
acre. The action of the meeting of
yesterday was in the nature of the fol
lowing resolution, which was adopted
without a dissenting vote, and ls^ of
significance, in view of the fact that it
probably marks the beginning of a long
fight by the settlers:
"Whereas, it is now apparent that the
cost of water rights of the Boise project
will soon be announced, and
"Whereas, raid cost is certain to be
greatly in excess of the cost estimated
at the time of beginning of this pro
ject, viz., $25 to $28 per acre, and
"Whereas, such costs were used with
the knowledge and consent, and prop
erly -directly by the reclamation of ft
cials as an inducement to settlers to
buy homestead entries on these lands.
^hereby making possibl the retain
Panent to the government of the con
struction charges on said project, and,
-Whereas, most of said settlers re
lied on the promise:; and good faith of
the government that such charges only
would be required to be paid, and,
—Vhereas, any charge in excess of
the said $25 to $28 per acre will be a
great hardship on the said settlers,
contrary to their expectations, which
they had a right to expect and confisca
tory of the lands of many of those
who have expended ail their money and
energy for the last si: or more years,
and.
"Whereas, the said settlers are, still
relying on the government to act in
good faith and all fairness with them,
as they have always done heretofore;
therefore,
"Be it resolved that the Water Users'
association of the Boise project now
requests the secretary of the interior
and the reclamation commission or any
other officials having authority to grant
the release asked for l.i Ihene resolu
tions, and that they assure at an early
date that no charge in excess of his
said $25 to $28 per acre will be re
quired."
Settlers in Earnest.
With the probable cost of $75 per
acre staring them in the face, the set
tlers upon these new lands have begun
their fight for existence. They hold
that such a cost of water as that an
nounced would mean confiscation of all
they have, and that they should not
be compelled to assume the burden of
the excess costs of the project incur
red through tile extravagance, for
which they, in no measure, are respons
ible.
The effort to convert their associa
tion into an irrigation district, alleged
to have been advised by government
officials, has met with signal failure,
consequent to the belief that the
fight for reduced water costs would
iherefore be weakened. Out of 2000 set
tlers only 62 has signed the petitions
circulated for a change of organiza
tion, and several of these say that they
did so through not understanding the
situation. Further action in this mat
ter was deferred until the next meet
ing, but the coolness in which the
proposition for the change in organ
isation was made indicates that the
present organization status of the set
tlers will be maintained.
Leading members of the association
emphasised the fact that the national
government is expending millions of
dollars for the improvement of the Mis
sissippi river to the great benefit upon
those adjacent to it, and that sums for
the region of the slope lands of the
southern states, and that it would be
willing to give substantial resistance to
the people who are building up only
the greater sections of the Rocky
mountain region.
A motion was adopted favoring the
furnishing of water this year to the
settlers under the New York canal who
had been advised by the government
that they should sign contracts for
water by the early part of next year in
order to p~cure the same.
DAMAGED GOOD3.
Liberty Theater, May 11, 12 . 13.
« — Adv. M10
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«oxUrfui "Sudaj Mfrawf Bad"
TV.
SCHOOL YEAR IS
NEARING CLOSE
Commencement
Are to Be Held at Star
on May 25.
Exercises
Star, May 10.—The commencement
exercises of the high school of this
place will be held May 25. An elabo
rate program is being prepared for the
occasion and a large attendance is an
ticipated. Four members of the senior
class will be graduated this year. Their
records have been such as to meet the
commendation of the entire faculty as
they have met all the requirements of
the school. The graduating class con
s sts of George Ohl, Carl Burke, Willis
wing and Ella Hall. The work of the
scholastic year just ending has been
HO satisfactory that the entire faculty
bas been re-elected for the ensuing
year
The Parent-Teachers' association
vv m h 0 M its last meeting Friday night
0 f we ek. A special feature of the
mee ting is to be the entertainment of
t he fathers of the town. Miss McCoy,
the state superintendent of public in
struction. will be in attendance and
deliver an address, after which the
election of officers for the ensuing
year w ju occur. A general hope is ex
pressed that the present president,
Dedwith, will be retained because
^er highly effective work during the
present year .
There will be 20 entries from Star in
t | le county athletic contest which
occurs at the fair grounds in Boise
Saturday. In the entire county there
are 175 entries up to the present junc
ture these b eing from the seven larg
est districts in the county.
r \ great many cattle are being
s , llpped out from thl8 sec tion by
Messrs Frogt and Dobson .
LIGHTING SYSTEM AT
CALDWELL PLANNED
Caldwell, May 10.—If present plans of
the oily council of this city are con
summated, the extent of the present
electric lighting: system will be more
than trebled. There are now 23 street
lights, and it is held that there is a
necessity for at least 90. At a meeting
of the city council Monday evening the
proposition of immediate extension was
discussed, but deferred until another
meeting for determination. The city
clerk was instructed to call for bids for
a tile flusher and a tile sprinkler, the
bids to be accompanied by plans and
specifications, and to be passed upon
June 5.
BIG MILK SALES AT
THE CHEESE FACTORY
Meridian, May 10.—Yesterday was a
local
purchase of milk, the purchase of the
day amounting to 17,600 pounds. Al
record breaking day for the
cheese factory as pertains to the daily
though the business of this industry
is already one of great proportions and
is to be regarded as one of the strong
est factors in the business life of this
progressive and prosperous town, its
business sphere is still rapidly extend
ing and adding materially to the trade
of the merchants, the prosperity of the
farmers of all the tributary country
and the general advancement and up
building of the Meridian section. To
be sure, the milk pail is playing no
small part in the accomplishment of
the wonderful prosperity for which the
Meridian country is noted.
MERIDIAN NEWS IN BRIEF.
Meridian, May 10.—The
regular
monthly meeting of the local Building
& Loan A sociation company will be
held tonight. Only routine business
comes up for consideration.
The electric [lower company has a
number of men at work here on the re
pair of the line.
Floyd Hoobler, of Boise, has moved
to this place and taken charge of the
Meridian Pantorium, his brother, Har
old, having taken charge of the Vale
pantorium. Mrs. Hoobler will join her
husband here and they will make this
place their home.
Earl Taylor has returned from Port
land, where he graduated recently in
a college of pharmacy.
Raymond Barnes has accepted a po
sition with the New York Canal cora
pany, as overseer of the spillway.
Merrill Pfost has accepted a position
with the geological surveying corps
and will be stationed in Owyhee coun
ty near the Nevada line this season.
Robert Pfost, who has been connect
ed with the Wilcox pharmacy the past
year, will return to his father's farm
this next week and take charge of it for
the present season.
In the ; ame of baseball played here
lost evening between the local high
school, the latter scored a victory, the
score being 15 to 2.
Robert Dutton, son of Pr. Dutton of
this place, who was one of the success
ful contestants in the Ada county de
clamatory contest. Is receiving the con
gratulations of Meridian people over
his scholastic achievement.
SUCCESSFUL YEAR
FOR THE SCHOOLS
Large Class Will Be Grad
uated From Nampa High
School June 1.
Nampa, May 10.—The scholastic year
just closing is held to have been the
; most effective one in the entire history
of the high echo >1 of this city from the
j viewpoint of efficient work and the
; raising of the educational standard of
j the school. The number of graduates
j is in excess of the number of any re
cent year, there being 42 this year,
j "Class day" will be observed May 26
and "oommencemen* day" will follow on
June 1. at which time O. M. Van Duyn,
j a prominent lawyer of Caldwell, will
; deliver the commencement address,
! The graduating class of this year con
sists of the following: Jeuna Amoreux,
Eunice Badger, Edwin Bradley, Burl
Baker, Irma Bloorntield, Marion Barnes,
Marie Cummins, Fredda Fames, Atla
Elmer, Hose Grosso, Hazel Hamilton,
Harold HasBrouck, Margaret Hattield,
/'eta Hugart, Anna Jacobson, Charles
Jennings, Marie Karcher, Henry King,
Margaret King, Duetta Marks, Victor
Machos, Carran Miller, Ruth Miller,
Ada Middleton. Harry Moore, A va
Moorehouse, Elwin 3'oorehouse, Mae
Moulton, Sarah N*,ttleton, Dales Pat
terson, Sylvena Pechanec, Ada Sandy,
Leslie Smyth, Gladys Stirk, Earl Nt her,
William Winter, Dean Wilson, Julia
Young, Lloyd Young, Charlotte Rob
bins, Gladys Meredith, Kathryn Htan
ford,
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TRADERS' DAY TO BE
OBSERVED SATURDAY
Meridian, May 10.—Traders' day,
which is observed here monthly, will
be held Saturday. The observance of
this event has become one of vast im
port to the town In a business way,
bringing, as it does, hundreds of peo
ple in from all sections of this and
Canyon county. It has served as aa
impetus to local trade and has proven
highly beneficial to the towns in di
versified ways. Epecially has the ob
servance of the day and its consequent
business made the Meridian section
known throughout southern Idaho as
an unexcelled agricultural and stock
raising belt. A large amount of stock
will be offered for sale Saturday. Colo
nel Marsters and son, Leo, the well
known auctioneers, will be in charge of
the sale.
EAGLE NEWS NOTES.
Eagle. May 10.—The students of the
local schools will hold their annual
picnic at Pierce park Friday.
Banker Gardner went to Ola yester
day where he will spend a number of
days looking after business affairs.
Frank Roark, of Ola, is transacting
business in Eagle. He will return
homo tomorrow.
Mrs. Corn, of Star, is the guest of
Eagle friends this week.
The graduating exercises of.the high
school and the grade school will be
held Thursday at the high school.
The Mahaffey & Harris cement busi
are rapidly nearing
| ness buildings
j completion.
Eleven graduates from the eighth
! grade of the Eagle school will receive
diplomas tomorrow night when special
I exercises are to be held. The personal
of the class is Elmyrna Gardner, Clar
e nce Selby, Dorothy Forney, Eliza
| beth Martin, Enid Sullivan, Lena
Fisher. Will Huckba, Guy Moore. Jesse
Donohue, Eugene Selby, C. MeCIurg.
SAGE TEA TURNS
GRAY HAIR DARK
It's Grandmother's Recipe
to Bring Back Color and
Lustre to Hair.
That beautiful, even shade of dark,
glossy hair can only be had by brewing
a mixture of Sage Tea and Sulphur.
Your hair is your charm. It mpkes or
mars the face. When it fades, turns
gray or streaked, Just -i application or
two of Sage and Sulphur enhances its
appearance a hundredfold.
Don't bother to prepare the mixture;
you can get this famous old recipe im
proved by the addition of other ingred
ients for DO cents a large bottle, all
ready for use. It Is called Wyeth's
Sage and Sulphuv Compound. Thin can
always be depended upon to bring back
the natural color and lustre of your.
hair.
Everybody uses "Wyeth's" Sage and
Sulphur Compound now because It
darkens so naturally and evenly that
nobody can tell It has been applied.
You simply dampen a sponge or soft
brush with it and draw this through
the hair, taking one small strand at a
time; by morning the gray hair has
disappeared, and after -another appli
cation it becomes beautifully dark and
appears glossy and lustrous. This
ready-to-use preparation Is a delight
ful toilet requisite for those who desire
dark hair an« a youthful appearance.
It is not Intended for the cure, mitiga- i
tion or prevention of disease.— Adv. I
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Fill your home atmosphere with exquisite lasting fragrance—
ED. PINAUD'S LILAC
The great French perfume, winner of highest international
awards. Each drop as sweet and fragrant as the living Lilac
blossom. A celebrated connoisseur said : "I don't see how
you can sell such a remarkable perfume for 75 cents a bottle"—a
remember each bottle contains 6 oz.—rt is wonderful value. Try it.
Ask your dealer today for ED. PINAUD'S LILAC. For 10 cents
our American offices wilt send you a testing bottle. Write today
ED. PINAUD Bldg., New York
nd
PARFUMERIE ED. PINAUD, Dept M
THE MARKS COMPANY
Blue Serge Suit Week
This is the week to buy your
Blue Serge. Our business on Blue
Serges this week has been very
large, but the balance of the week
should be even greater.
Our lines of Blue Serges were
never as complete as now and a
little time spent looking them
over will convince you that this
is the store and now is the time
for you to get your Blue Serge.
"With over 20 models to select
from its almost sure youll find
what you want here.
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Our Prices Are
Always the
Lowest
Large Assortment
We Are Showing
the New
of
K
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FAthletic
Unions
»1-00 to »5.00
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STETSON
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SOFT
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For Summer Wear
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Our Line of $ 1.50 Shirts Are the Best
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Better Opportunities for Wide
Awake, Energetic Land Seekers!
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The Florida East Coast Railway com
pany is building up its section. It is offer
ing special inducements to settlers who want,
to better their condition. Good climate,
good soil, big crops three times a year, good
market. When you have the land you have
no water to tight about; no annual tolls to
pay in a land that has not felt the hard
times and which is the playground of the
nation in the winter time. Excursions be
ing arranged.
For information and literature write, call at or phone 130,
304 McCarty Building.
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