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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, May 12, 1916, Image 8

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DELEGATES FRON
TWO PARIS NAY
JOIN ON SPECIAL
Republicans and Progres
sives Likely to Go on the
Same Train to the Chicago
Conventions.
The Republican ..ad Progressive
party delegates to the two Chicago
convenions to be held June 7 will go
from Idaho to ihe Windy City on the
same "Borah Special" If the arrange
ments now under way are successfully
carried out. The two parties have a
total of 36 delegates and alternates.
All of these delege.es and alternates
were selected with the understanding
they would go to the. national conven
tion. In order to secure a special train
to take the delegatee east It Is neces
sary to have a guarantee that 75 pass
engers will make the trip. If members
of the combined delegations go the
first big step to assure the special is
taken. It is believed by those who are
working on the plan that it will go
through.
The expense attached to the trip
both going and returning will only be
slightly over $100. The tlcaets are good
returning until Oct. 31 so that dele
gates, should they desire to visit in the
east or middle west after the conven
tion, may do so. The northern Idaho
delegates can come to Boise and start
krith the special as cheaply as they can
leave their own home cities for Chi
cago. This eliminates one of the ser
ious difficultés It was at first believed
was in the way of the special train.
They may also return to their respec
tive homes afte. the convention on
other roads. C. F. Koelsch and C. A.
Ulmer, secretary of the Republican
state central committee are working on
the special and Paul Davis, secretary
of the Progressive state central com
mittee, is negotiating with the dele
gates elected by his party to ascertain
If they will come in on the proposed
combination plan.
To Get Together Anyway.
. ,, . ...
•There is no reason at all why both
of de egate^should not go on the
san.e spec-al to Chicago, sold a prom
Jilterdn? •T^ n f2t BC o7 S the B
ere^ m te tJ lr », r h
they are gome: to get together at Chi
. .. .. ,
cago anyway behind the same presi
„ t «w, _
dential nominee. I am absolutely con
Dannkiu««
zldent of that. The Republican party
will nominate the kind of a man that
both parties demand, or I am very
much mistaken. Chairman Perkins of
the executive committee of tbi Pro
gressive party -, quoted as stating
that even his party will not Insist cn
Theodore Roosevelt being nominated
regardless of the fact the Progressive
party is positive he is the right man.
Roosevelt may be the Republican and
the Progressive party nominee. No man
can say he will not be at this time.
Mr. Perkins' statement, however shows
that the Progressives wi'.l not be in
aistent as to this. Such a statement
affords a common ground on which
the two parties can get together. They
may decide on Roosevelt, thev may de
clde on Borah they may decide on
Hughes, or someone else. Senator
Borah's chances are as good as any
one's and we will go to the convention
urging him as the logical compromit e
candidate. I think It would be an ex
cellent thing for the two delegations
and others intending to attend the
convention, to go on a 'Borah Spe
cial'."
The proposed "Borah Special" will
be made up of four Pullmans,
diner, one observation car and
baggage car. It will start from Boise,
if the plans under way are successfully
negotiated.
The Republican delegates and alter
Unite ! States Senator William E.
one
one
Republican Delegates.
nates to the national eonventijn are
as follows:
SUFFRAGE WORKER
IN JUNE 7 PARADE
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Mrs. Joseph L. Bowen.
One of the prominent women who
Will march in the Chicago suffrage
parade on June 7 is Mrs. Joseph L.
Bowen, -who was responsible for the
establishment of the juvenile coart
in Chicago and the various courte
that grew out of it, such as the court
of domestic relations, the morals
court, and the girls' court She was
Instrumental in securing the investi
gation of public dance halls and in
prohibiting the sale of liquor in them,
pnd her work for suffrage has been
pxtremely activa.
Borah, United states Senator Jams«
H. Brady, J&meB P. Atlshle, E. R.
Whltla, Stanley Eaaton, E. H. Dewey,
Pred W. Goodins, ,*ohn W. Hart. The
alternates are: H. C. Baldridge, R. C.
Beach, Ezra Burrell, C. F. Koelsch. W.
E. Lee, I. EL. Rockwell, L. R. Thomas,
Otto M. Van Tassell
Progressive Delegatea
The Progressive delegates to tl.e
national convention are: R. S. Sheri
dan, H. E. McElroy, Paul Da via, J M.
Ingersoll, C. O. Pearce, A. D. Ash
baugh, W. A. White, J. H. Gipson, W.
A. Lee, C. W. Evans, L. M. Earl, F. J.
Walmsley, J. L. Kennedy, Chris Jen
sen, A. L. Swim. S. T. Jordan.
ADVENTISTS TO HOLD
ANNUAL CONFERENCE
AND CAMP MEETING
The Seventh-day Adventists of the
southern Idaho conference will hold
their nnnual conference and camp
meeting at Boise this year on the fair
grounds. The tent city Is under course
of erection now and every convenience
is expected to be In readiness for the
opening meeting this coming Thurs
day night. The large pavilion, 50x70,
is expected to be raised today for the
general assemblies and business ses
sions. Between 70 and 80 family tents
are being pitched to accommodate the
members from southern Idaho and
eastern Oregon, who will live on the
grounds. A restaurant will be con
ducted on the grounds as well as a
store to accommodate the needs of the
campers. One feature will be a book
tent displaying for sale Bibles, books
and magazines. Speakers from Wash
ington, D. C., California, Washington
and Oregon will be present to occupy
the appointments to be announced
later. The "Canvas City" will be the
center of interest for the 10 days be
ginning May 18.
Of MINING MEETING
The mining men of the state are in
rece , t at the >t of the ldahC(
Mjn , assoclation , through th „ cour .
t uf senators Borah and B rady, of
8pliat ® document No. 233, containing an
account of the meeting at Washington,
^ ... . ,
D. C., Dec. lb, 1915, of the Mining and
_. , ^ . . f* .
Metallurgical Society of America in
,, . .. ... .. .
collaboration with the American Min
., . . v .....
'ï* f 0 .""' , 6 Tu m",
of Ml , nl " g E "? nee "' , ""T ? Ilning
"«Ration. the Montana Society of
Engineers, the California Metal Pro
? uce " association the Spokane Min
T S ■ °TT, the ^ 6 ™ d , a M ! ne 0per '
at fl ora association, the Colorado Sclen
tific 8 ° ciat ?'' W " h re P re8 f n tatives from
severa l Chambers of Commerce and
°P eratln 8 mines,
Ths P ur P° se ot meeting was to
ur 5® upon congress the earnest wish
U}® 11 «ngaged in the mining in
dus 1 r 5' that the archaic mining laws of
the Uti ite <3 States be revised; that the/!
revised In whole; that a commis
8 ' on he properly authorized for this
Purpose, and in which program the
minin B society, the mining press and
f h e mining operators of the country
wer ® united.
The Majestic.
A' record of 38 years on the legiti
mate stage and a star for over a quar
ter of a century, is the proud record
of John Mason, star In the new Equit
able society drama "The Reapers" to
be seen at the Majestic today and to
morrow. Mr. Mason's stage successes
are so numerous that they have be
come familiar to all. "The Idlers,"
"The Christian" and "Mice and Men"
are a few of them. Clara Whipple,
who was recently seen In "Blue Grass,"
plays the feminine lead opposite Mr.
Mason. The Harry Watson, Jr., com
edy and News'Weekly will close the
picture program and two acts of vaude
ville will offer music, singing, dancing,
magic and Illusion, the music and
singing being done by the Imperial
„ , „ ,
Royal Ballet troupe of four people, and
the nmgic by "Hine, the Man of Mys
tery."
CATTLE AND HORSE
GROWERS ARE ACTIVE
,
GRAND—Mrs. J. L. Steward, Mrs.
J. !.. Reynolds, Emmett; Louis Klein,
Quartzburg; R. M. Horn, Jordan Val
ley; Will Proctor, Seattle; W. P. Me
^Donald, Jordan Valley; W. C, Rice,
L. E. Dillingham, of Mackay, secre
tary of the Idaho Cattle and Horse
Growers' association, in writing to
Boise men interested in the association,
states that he Is simply dumb-founded
by the universal interest shown and
that upon returning to Mackay from
the meeting held recently with the
state land board, he has been constant
ly replying to Inquiries from all quar
ters and was swamped by the abund
ance of mail and that It would take at
least 26 organizers to meet the re
quests made for meetings to be held.
He has left Mackay for Bear Lake
county, where a series of meetings has
been arranged and expects to obtain at
least 200 members In that county.
About 1000 members have joined the
association since the Boise meeting
and additions to the membership are
being received dally by mall.
HOTEL ARRIVALS.
IDANHA—Alex Ball, Cincinnati; Mr.
and Mrs. W. B. Gay, New York; H.
D. F.
Lake; Eugene Weiss,
Provo; R. B. Rogers, W. C. Kennedy,
Salt Lake ;
York; R. Stayner, Pocatello; J. F.
Fink, Portland; F. L. McCasley, Kuna;
Jessie Concelmo, Nyssa; F. Eua, Kan
sas City; J. Huston, Pendleton; I.
Cutcheon, Salt Lake.
A. Leson, J. G. Dion, Burly;
Block, Salt
8am Mosslcany, New
a wonderful sale of Sedgley suits Saturday
made doubly attractive by offer of choice of
SILK PETTICOATS ABSOLUTELY FREE
8ale 8tart* 10 o'Cloek Saturday Morning.
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Be Here at 10 a. m. Sharp.
)
Think what this special sales event
means to the woman in need of a
suit. First, a positive saving of
from $4.50 to $11.50 on the suit
purchased and in addition to that
your choice of a first quality Taf
feta petticoat absolutely free. Can
you afford to allow such a tempt
ing offer pass unheeded?
PETTICOATS
FREE.
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Lot 1
All $22.50 and $25.00
SEDGLEY SUITS
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$ 17.95
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With each suit in this lot 70 a
choose any Silk Petticoat in
the house up to $4.00, Free
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Lot 2
All $27.50 to $30.00
SEDGLEY SUITS
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BEAUTIFUI TAFEETA PETTICOATS, FREE
SATURDAY
$ 22.95
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OFFER
EXTRA
ORDINARY
n
With each suit in this lot 70 a
choose any Silk Petticoat in
the house up to $5.00, Free
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Lot 3
All $32.50 to $39.50
SEDGLEY SUITS
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$ 27.95
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With each suit in this lot you
choose any Silk Petticoat in
the house up to $6.00, Free
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Window$
the petticoats offered free
WOMENS
APPAREL &
MILLINERY
the suits in this event
T
—are all fresh new garments, shown in
a wonderful variety of plain and
changeable Taffetas, and in more than
three dozen distinct styles, some with
jersey tops, all with fitted waist bands.
These are regular stock Petticoats,
every one thoroughly up to the Sedg
ley quality in every detail.
—include a bewildering showing of the
season's newest productions in silks,
combination of silk and serge as well
as wool suits, more than 200 suits di
vided into three unusually attractive
lots. Sizes from 15 to 46 are represent
ed. No mail orders can be handled in
this special sales event.
^ J BOISES
V HOUSE OF
^ COURTESY
Overland Bldg.—Eighth St.
T. O. DÜV.ANBJY. Mgr.
W. Weight, Caldwell; R. E. Whitten,
Grimes Pass; H. B. Hardy, J. D.
Hardy, Tacoma; W. H. Shane, Em
mett; -Javld L. McLean, Pearl; C. G.
Close, Lewiston.
BRISTOL— B. M. Tennyson, Poca
tello; H. Graham and family, E. Ran
dall, Stockton, Cal.; W. C.
Placerville; W. W.
Brassey,
Owens, Burley;
Frank Smith and son, Nampa; E. L.
C'asad, Diversion Dam; L. C. Dlchus
and wife, Dillon, Mont., R. H. Frank
jlin, Ustlck; James F. Boone, Caldwell;
John J. Cato, Chlcacgo; Mrs. A. B.
Drake, St. Louis;
M. B. Parkinson,
Nampa- L. G. Arlus, Chicago; J. C.
Pebon, Max Goston, Portland; V. L.
Haddox, Omaha, Neb.; G. D. Hall,
Des Moines, Iowa; James D. Hall, Salt
Lake.
[
The Weather.
FORECAST FOR BOISE AND VI
CINITY—Fair tonight with heavy
frost. Saturday, fair and warmer.
DAILY REPORT—Highest temper
ature yesterday, 63; lowest tempera
ture this morning, 28; mean tempera
ture yesterday, 39.
CONDITIONS — Low atmospheric
pressure overlies the southwest and
the extreme northeast, while a great
area of high pressure reaches from
the north Pacific coast to the middle
and south Atlantic states. The
weather has been fair except at a few
northwestern and middle-western
points. Lower temperature prevails
Oiver most of the country. Freezing
weather has occurred generally from
Oregon and Washington eastward to
the Dakotas and southward over Nev
ada and Utah. At Lewiston, Idaho, the
temperature fell to 32 degrees, which
Is the lowest May temperature on
record at that place. Fair weather Is
expected to continue In Boise and its
vicinity tonight and Saturday, with
heavy frost tonight and higher tern
perature by Saturday afternoon.
HIGHEST TEMPERATURE ELSE
WHERE—Boston, 78; Buffalo, 54; Chi
cago, 64; Denver, 68; Des Moines, 70;
Galveston, 80; Havre, 54; Helena, 42;
Huron, 64: Jacksonville, 92; Kansas
City, 66; Knoxville, 84; Memphis, 78;
Montreal, 64; New Orleans, 90; New
York, 76; North Platte, 66; Oklahoma,
82; Phoenix, 94; Pittsburg, 68; Poca
tello, 48; Portland, 58; St. Louis, 70 ;
Salt Lake, 50; San Francisco, 68;
Seattle, 66; Spokane, 54; Winnipeg, 48
G.JWashington, 80,
LOG DRIVE DELAYED
BY COLD WEATHER
(Capital News Special Service.)
Horseshoe Bend, May 12.—The Mioh
igan-Idaho log driving camp has been
located here for the past five days. The
weather has been so cold that the log
drivers laid up tiH warmer weather
set in. They started today to drive the
OBREGON'S BRIDE
SENDS MESSAGE TO
AMERICAN WOMEN
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Maria ' r apU Obregon.
Senora Maria Tapis Obregon,
bride of General Obregon of Mexico,
has sent this c essage to American
women: "The vom n of Mexico have
ideal of free womanhood toward
which they are striving. The road
may be long and .veary, but we will
achieve our dream at last With you
we shall eventually form a fret sis
t eihood of the was tern contine nt.'*
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bp
logs down the river from here,
great bulk of the 3,200,000 feet of logs
to be driven to the mill at Emmett is
In the river at this point.
The
H. A. Turner of Burley Is in the city.
V. L. Haddox of Omaha Is a guest at
the Bristol.
L. A. Carntne of Deary is registered
at the Pacific.
R. M. Hon Is a Boise visitor from
Jordan Valley.
G. D. Hull of Des Moines, la., is In
the city on business.
W. P. McDonald of Jordan Valley is
a guest at the Grand.
R. E. Stayner of Pocatello is a vis
itor In the city today.
James F. Boone was a visitor in
Boise today from Caldwell.
Mrs. Mallnda Marcellus has gone to
Portland to visit relatives.
George Alden of Diasbury, Canada,
Is a new arrival in the city.
Mr. and Mrs. 8. C Déchus are vlsit
ors in the city from Dillon, Mont.
F. D. McCauley came in last night
from Kuna on a brief business trip.
Mrs. Edith Porter and Miss Isabel
Karnes have gone to Portland to visit.
Frank Thompson Is over from
Horseshoe Bend on a short business
trip.
C. L. Johns, a banker of Haines, Ore.,
is a Boise business visitor for a few
days.
W. C. Rice and G. W. Wright of
Caldwell were transacting business m
the city yesterday.
Mr. and Mrs. George Schweitzer will
leave tomorrow for Pennsylvania
points on an extended visit.
R. E. Whitten came down from
Grimes Pass last night and will re
main In the city for a few days.
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Gay of New
York have taken rooms at the Jdanha.
They expect to be In the city for some
time.
Mrs. Lee McClellan left today for
Champaign, 111., to be present when her
son graduates from the state univer
sity, which is located there.
Miss Gaddis L. Gant of Washington,
Ind., arrived here last evening and is
visiting her father, A. J. Gant, owner
and manager of the Coca Cola Bottling
; company.
Best by test HIAWATHA COAL.
phone 323. Lump 37.50. stove )7.
il
FARMERS TO HOLD
FORTH TOMORROW
The weather man has been very un
kind to the farmers' public market
the past few days, not only In the se
vere damage done to fruits and tender
vegetables, but also in the "frost" ex
perienced by the "ice cold lemonade"
offer that has been put on by the
farmers the past several market days.
The weather man now promises to
warm things up, however, and the
farmers are therefore going to once
more hold out free honey sweetened
lemonade as a drawing card for pat
THINGS THAT NEVER HAPPEN
By GENE BYRNES
I INTtMOEO TO
' 6CT A HAIR CUT. MASSA6E,
SHAMPOO, SINÄC AND SOME.
HAIR TONIC Sut Too have
50 MANV Cu3TOMt*5
WAITING, I WOULDN'T
TO DELAY
HKC
THtK SO
Pi SHAVE INSTEAD*
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Cwrilk«.
ronage at tomorrow's market.
The new and permanent quarters
opposite the Central fire station at
Sixth and Idaho streets now put up a
very attractive appearance, the final
coat of white enamel having been ap
plied to the counters this week, and
the farmers are becoming more op
timistic over their new location every
larket day, the patronage having In
creased rather than fallen off, which
is a source of much encouragement as
a considerable loss of patronage was
anticipated In the new location until
the housewives of the city could get
accustomed to the new plaoe. ,

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