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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, December 15, 1916, Image 1

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EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
For the
Development
of Idaho
WEATHER
Fair tonight and Sat
urday.
BOISE, IDAHO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1916.
VoL XXXVH
No. 163
TEN PAGES
DEMANDS MADE
DY THE ALLIES
IN ULTIMATUM
MET BY GREECE
Decision to Comply With
Terms Presented by the
Entente Reached at Cabi
net Council Under Presi
dency of King.
WILL PUT A STOP TO
TROOP MOVEMENTS
Encounters Reported Be
tween Royalist Troops
and French Detachment
Near Ekaterina—Further
Categorical Demands to
Be Sent to the Athens
Government
15.—The
London
Greek government has ac
cepted the ultimatum pre
sented by the entente allies,
says a dispatch from Athens
to the Central News Agency
Dec.
J
*
An Athens dispatch to
Rontpvs mivfi indications arc
lv< UTPl S SUNS liKlK toits «It
that, the allied ultimatum
will 1-1P -lPPPntpH in nrinpinlp
\MI1 D6 accepted 111 pi in ipi
1)V King Constantino. The
disnatch sa vs the decision is
llispau 11 hit VS lilt Utt 1 hi on ih,
tile outcome of fl cabinet
pounpil under the nresidenev
c omit il until i tut jut bitituiLy
of the king.
TO MAKE NEW DLMAND3.
Burin Dec. 15.—The allies ore about
to had new categorical demands to
the Athens cabinet,
Petit Parisien. The principal object of
the demands Is putting a stop to the
movement of troops ordered by King
Constantine, with a view of sending
Important force.i to Thessaly.
Encounters are reported between
royalist troops and a French detach
ment near Ekaterina but no confirma
tion has been received.
according to the|
RELY ON SUNDAY TO
TURN FITCHBURG DRY
aged by the swinging of Haverhill,
Brockton and other Massachusetts
cities Into the dry column In the elec-|
lions the past two weeks, the no
license workers of this city are work
Ing with might and main to swing
Fltchburg dry when the question ,s
voted on next Tuesday. The recent
prohibition victories In the cities
around Boston are attributed In large
measure to the Influence of the "Billy"
Sunday campaign.
Acting In this behalf the no-license
workers have engaged the famous
evangelist to come to Fitchburg to
morrow to dfdiver his celebrated ser
mon on "Booze." the same sermon that
Is said to have sliced eight million dol
lars a year off the revenues of a big St.
The drjs have engaged
Fitchburg. Mass., Dec. 15.— Encour
Louis brewery'.
the state armory for the Sunday ad
dress arid are preparing to make the
ilemonstration the biggest thing of its]
kind ever seen in this section of Mas
Bachusetts.
RAILROAD SEEKS TO
RETAIN BOAT LINES
-The interstate
Washington, Dec. la.
commission today resumed
commerce
its hearing on the application of the
York, New Haven and Hartford
New
railroad for permission to retain own
ership and continue operation of Its
Iamg Island Bound steamers, despit"
the prohibition In the Panama canal
act.
PROTEST FROM IDAHO
Complaint Lodged With In
terstate Commerce Com
mission Because of Dis
cr imina tions Which Cause
Losses to Shippers of This
State.
16.—Idaho shippers.
Spokane, Dec.
through the state public utilities com
mission, today protested to the inter
commission through
state commerce
Examiner Thurtell, against the alleged
unjust intermountain rate discrimina
tion.
Witnesses said Idaho suffers from
rate discrimination and attacked the
present method by which the railroads
compute rati s.
Real Ruler of England Is an Editor
Whipped Officialdom Into Condition
Energetic Discoverer of
Lloyd George Wanted
Action and He Seems to
Have Obtained It Through
the Power of the London
Times.
London, Dec. 16.—Although David
Lloyd George, the new premier, is vest
ed almost with the powers of a dic
tator, it Is agreed by all that Lord
Northcllffe, owner of the London Times,
is in effect the driving force of the
government and the virtual ruler of
Great Britain. Said an American crit
ic, who has observed British politics
closely:
"Behind aroused England, behind the
parliamentary, hat waving leadership
stands Northcllffe—the steady, far
seeing, hard driving, practical man,
whose training was got not in law os,
diplomacy, but in life. And the Import!
of it for England Is very great. It
means an end of two things—slowness
and bungling.
"England knowing she Is Immortal,
has always had a comfortable feeling
that she could take her time about
things. But Northcllffe Is not slow and
he cannot tolerate dawdling. For too
many years he has been used—horribly
used—to the swift exactitude of life.
And he does not bungle. You can t
'muddle through' the daily Caesarian
operation of brlrglng the Loudon
Times to birth.
HIS DISCOVERY.
"He has found In Lloyd George an
■his
agent—and an energy—ready to
hand. The one thing essentially great
in Northcllffe lias been that, always, he
knew how to use men. Napoleon at St.
Helena, looking back on his life, said
Ills secret nus tliat he know how to get
out ,,r mrn a11 they had to Blve -
"Some of that faculty Northcllffe
had at the beginning, and he has de
veloped and perfected It through years
of labor Jn t i ie mos t complex of all tho
man-handling occupations—Journalism.
When he * ,lckcd u:> the wlld and ardent
WelBhman> aH one plcka up
he knew precisely what lie
and preciaely vvhat T ' ,0 >' d ° eor & e rou,d
do and wouk , do Ho had n)easured , h e
force and the d irectlon. And he used
It. first of all, to remove the fabric of
old ineptitudes that blocked the way to
swift arid direct actior 11 was In order
i weapon,
vas doing
give Lloyd George arm-room that
he chased away the genteel but cum
bersome coalition.
SOMETHING DOING NOW.
t.
"The most evident thing Is that from
you are going to see the power
now
of government harden, contract, con
dense. affirm Itself more and more.
Parliament is going to cut the cackle
and come to the 'osses. Inevitably—
with that grim, vehement, war-minded
man-handler, lorthcllffe, standing In
the background.
"The heart and kernel of the Lloyd
George ministry will be a war council —
a compact committee of public safety.
This will be a way of giving the public
w h a t jt avants for you nave got to bear
j n fj ie f nc ^ m^t he Is canalizing the
p U t)ii(. will. What he did first was to
r0 use the courage of democracy—the
r. i g h unconquerable courage of PTng
j and _
Halifax, N T . S., Dec. 15.—The Can
adlun torpedo boat Grilse, formerly the
American yacht Winchester, which was
believed to have been lost with all
in mind that Northcliffe's strength lies
What he Is doing now Is only the
work of guidance. He is giving it di
rection."
CANADIAN TORPEDO
BOAT THOUGHT LOST
NOW SAFE IN PORT
hands off the const in the storm Tues
day night, came into the harbor of
Shelbourne, 150 miles southeast of
here, under her own power last night.
Six members of the crew perished in
the storm and a number of others were
injured. The remainder, including all
the officers, were reported safe.
The Grilse left Halifax last Monday
for Bermuda. Tuesday night while she
was still off this coast, a wireless mes
sage announcing that she was in a
sinking condition was picked up. Al
though several ship put -ut to hi r as
sistance, no trace of her was discover
ed. and damage to her wireless outfit
pervented her from sending any mes
sages f.ir the distres calls.
Negro's Head Turns
Watchman's Bullets
Indianapolis, Ind., Dec. 15.— A spacial
d ispatch from Valparaiso, says:
bullet * fircd b *
Three
Edward Breckner, a
watchman, at Oharles Jackeon, colored,
at Kouts, glanced almost harmlessly
off Jackson's head. Two other bullets
went wild. Jackson is now held in
jail on a charge of attempted murder
for slashing Jim Johnson, colored, with
a razor. Jackson turned on Breckner,
night watchman for the Robert Grace
Construction company, whe opened fire.
Jackson fled and was arrested by Con
stable Ralph Knoll.
Brain, Pen and Printer's
Ink Worked Wonders
f «
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c jli T c Kl T c D/ 1 U/I-DC
til I ClY 11 iUwwLKj
-
Recently Appointed Austro
Hungarian Ambassador to
•d -o ... , . „ ,
Be Permitted to Come to
Lord Northcllffe.
SAFE CONDUCT TO
VON TARNOW BY
!
j
This Country.
London, Dec. 15.—The entente pow
i-s have decided to grant safe conduct
to Count Tarnowaki von Tarnow. re
cently appointed Austro-Hungarian
ambassador to the United States.
The foreign office made the an
nouncement, saying the entente had de
cided to grant safe conduct In consid
eration of representations made by the
American government. The American
ambassador has been notified.
1
STRICT NEUTRALITY
THE SWISS POLICY
Paris, Dec. 15.—Edmund Schukthess,
new president of Switzerland, affirm
ed the intention of his country to
maintain strict neutrality, In an In
terview with the Berne correspondent
of the Petit Journal.
Noted Americans Join In "Stop the War" Movement
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Conference commission. Hamilton
Holt is chairman and ths vice chair
men are Gov. Arthur Capper of
Kansas, Prof. Irving Fisher of Yale,
Dr. George W. Kirchwey of Colum
bia, Miss Jane Addams, John Hays
Hammond and Dr. John Harvey
it may make toward a just and Kellogg. An important figure in the
lasting peace.'* They have organized i movement is Jacob Schiff, the New
to this end the American Rational | York financier. _
V
Left to right, top: Gov. Arthur
Capper, Hamilton Holt and Amos
Pinchot. Bottom: Dr. George W.
Kirchwey, Irving Fisher and Jacob
Schiff.
Many noted Americans have join
ed in a national "stop the war" cam
paign, the avowed purpose of which
>■ "to support our govgtBinopt in any
effort
I0IIT THE OLIVE
branch; willBY
BEGOODBANDIT
Overtures to American Gov
ernment Made in Which
It Is Agreed to Cease
Depredations on Ameri
can Property.
PLANNING ATTACK
ON SANTA ROSALIA
Forces Massed South of
Chihuahua City Prepara
tory to New Movement—
Report of Killing Ameri
cans in Mexico Confirmed.
El Paso, Dec. 15.—Villa,
through representatives
here has made overtures to
the United States and prom
ised to cease his depreda
tions upon American prop
and discontinue killing
Americans found in Mexico,
it was announced today by a
prominent government
i l f ent here ; , He ref . elTed to
the reported overtures as
,. vnla ' holding out the oIivc
branch.
PLANS NEW ATTACK.
San Antonio, Dec. 15.—Advices re
ceived at army headquarters Indicated
Villa Is planning an attack on Santa
Rosalia. According to a report to Gen
eral Eu listen. a large number of Villa
followers have been massed south of
Chihuahua City preparatory to moving
against Santa Rosalia.
• TO CLOSE THE MAILS TO
LIQUOR ADVERTISEMENTS •
Washington, Dec. 15.—A bill •
• prohibiting the transmission of •
• liquor advertisements by mall •
• to anyone except licensed deal- •
• ers or agents was favorably re- •
• ported today by the houss post- •
• office committee. It is aimed •
• at the so-called mall order •
• liquor business In dry territory. •
ir
THE BRITISH PREMIER
WOMEN'SCLOTHES
TO COST MORE BUT
NOT SO SHOCKING
Increase of 20 Per Cent Pre
dicted by Designers—
Short Skirt and Flaring
Skirt to Go.
4
Chicago, Dec. 15.—When Mr.
Family Man figures up the H. C.
L. for 1917 he will probably find
from 16 to 20 per cent tacked on
the bills sent home by his wife's
dressmaker. This Is the predic
tion made by the members of the
Designers' Association of Wo
men's Clothes, who are gathering
In Chicago today for their bi
ennial convention. In discussing
the cost of other problems tho
designers will consider the fash
ions In women's clothes for the
coming year.
MODESTY COMES BACK.
Modesty Is coming back Into
Its own, according to members
of the association, who believe
that lines, drapes and designs are
more desirable thin shocks. The
short skirt must go. Also the
flaring skirt. The clinging
straight lined garment will be
worn by women this spring.
The regular sessions of the
convention will begin at the Ho
tel LaSalle tomorrow. In con
nection there will be an exhibi
tion of gowns designed by mem
bers of the association. Singing
models will furnish a pleasing
Innovation at the exhibition.
Fifty Chicago vocalist models
have been engaged to sing as
they appear In each new stlye In
the convention halls.
DISASTROUS FIRE AT
OSKALOOSA, IOWA
Oskaloosa Iowa, Dec. 15.—One fire
man was seriously burned and proper
ty valued at a quarter of a million dol
lars was destroyed by a fire here to
day which spread until It burned all
the buildings within the area of a city
square.
PLAN ILLINOIS HIGHWAYS.
Danville, 111., Dec. 16.—The Illinois
Highway Improvement association met
In conference here today to plan a
comprehensive campaign for a system
of good roads that will embrace the
entire state. Delegates from practically
every county of the state were on hand
when the meeting was called to order
by W. G. Edens of Chicago, president of
the association.
No Steps to Be Taken by the American
Government In Peace Move, Further
Than Forwarding German and Austrian
Communications, Until Views of Lloyd
George Become Known
Washington, Dec. 15.— President Wilson probably
will not finally determine on any formal steps in connec
tion with the peace proposals of tho central powers until
after David Lloyd George, British prime minister, haw
spoken in the house of commons Tuesday.
In the meantime through American diplomatic repre
sentatives in the capitals of the entente powers.
American government will keep in close touch with
situation.
TO MOVE CAUTIOUSLY.
the
the
No formal comment was forthcoming
today, either from the White House
or the state department It Is known
to be the belief of most of the cabinet
members that the American govern
ment should move cautiously and do
nothing to imperil Its Influence for
peace.
President Wilson Is known to attach
great Importance to the possibility of
establishing an association of nations
to maintain peace. He outlined In def
inite terms the procedure he would
take In Initiating a peace movement In
the course of a speech he delivered here
last May before the League to En
force Peace.
LANSING MEETS PRESIDENT.
Secretary Lansing today held his
first personal conference with the
president since the peace proposals of
the central powers was made public.
It was said the formal notes from
Germany and Austria might go for
ward before night and necessarily, In
view of the probability that the presi
dent would take no Independent action
until after Lloyd George has spoken,
they will be accompanied only by for
mal notes of transmittal.
DISARMAMENT PROP08ED.
The German embassy last night au
thorised the statement that It was
certain, should representatives of the
belligerents meet to discuss peace
terms, that one of the most important
subjects for discussion would be that
of limited universal disarmament. The
German view Is said to be that any
peace would be worthless which did
not make unnecessary armament on a
scale approaching that which existed
before the war.
It was suggested that actual forma
tion, a shas been proposed In some
nations of leagues to enforce peace,
necessarily would have the effect to
bring about a limited disarmament.
The German chancellor has said Ger
many would be glad to enter a league
to prevent war.
The German view further Is Indlcat
ed as being generally opposed to In
temational coalitions as they have ex
isted In the past, on the ground that
such coalitions are opposed to the
maintenance of peace rather than con
ducive of it.
POPE WILL ISSUE
PROCLAMATION TO
ALL BELLIGERENTS
London, Dec. 16.—A Zurich dispatch
to the Tageblatt of Berlin, as for
warded from Copenhagen by the Ex
change Telegraph company, say's the
pope
Christmas proclamation to all the bel
ligerents.
few days will Issue a
in
SECOND SON OF KING
GEORGE NOW OF AGE
London, Dee. 15.—The twenty-first
birthday anniversary of Prince Albert,
second son of King George, was cele
brated at Windsor today. The bells of
St. George's chapel and of Windsor
parish church were rung, and at noon
a salute of 21 guns was fired In the
Long Walk. Windsor Great Park.
Prince Albert Is recuperating from a
recent illness and hopes soon to be
able to return to active service in the
navy. While serving on the battle
ship Collingwood at the outbreak of
the war. the prince was stricken with
appendicitis and operated on. In Sep
tember last It was found necessary to
perform a second operation to remove
an abdominal abscess.
BIG WAGE INCREASE
BY THE STEEL TRUST
New York, Dec. 15.—The w^ge In
crease recently announced by the
United States Steel corporation goes
Into effect today, benefiting a total of
200,000 employes. The advance aver
ages 10 per cent and applies to virtually
all the employes of the big corporation,
including the clerical forces In the of-!
flees as well as the thousands of work-j
ers employed In the company's mills
and mines. It is estimated that the
raise will add ut least $20,000,000 to the
annual payrolls of the corporation.
WHEAT VALUES
CRASH BECAUSE
OE PEACE TALK
Chicago, Deo. 18.—Wheat crashed
down in value today on account of
peace reporte. First eales shewed a
fall in some cases of 8% cents a bush
el, May touching $1.58. Prices varied
as much as 5 cents at the same Instant
in different parts of the pit.
The opening range for May, tho ehief
trading option, spread all tho way
from $1.58 to $1.63. The waves of soil
ing were accompanied by oxoiting
breaks In values.
SYMPATHY WITH STOCKS.
Besides the German embassy state
ment referring to limitation of arma
ment, the smash in wheat prices waa
due largely to yesterday's and this
morning's breaks in the New York
stock market. Yesterday's big decline
in New York came too lata to have
much influence here until teday.
The decline at the outset today oar
rled wheat prices down about 18 eants
a bushel since the first pesos offer
came from Berlin.
MARGINS SWALLOWED UP.
Within an hour the loataa widened to
10% cents a bushel. May tumbled to
$1.56 on the closing out of aocounts in
which margins had bean swallowed up
completely. As compared with priese a
month ago the market at this stage was
down more than 45 cents a bushel In
December delivery.
Washington Banker
Boss of Inaugural
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tho inaugural ceremonies Maroh ♦
next, as chairman of the local exeeu
tive committee. Boing an inaugural
chairman is a man-size job for •
chairman must not only boss a célébra
tion that br ; . gs thousands of visitors
to Washington but must raise a large'
Robert N. Harp««.
Washington, Dee. 15.— The president
of one of Washington's leading 'banka,
Robert M. Harper, will have oharge of
amount of money to pay the billas

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