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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, December 16, 1916, Image 1

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EVENING CAPITAL NEWS!
For the
Development
of Idaho
WEATHER
Probably snow tonight
and Sunday.
BOISE; IDAHO, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1916.
Yol. xxxvn
No. 154
EIGHT PAGES
VILLA PROPOSAL CANNOT
CONSIDERED OFFICIALLY BY
THE AMERICA N GOVERNMENT
Bandit Has No Standing on:
Which His Offer to Make!
No Further Attacks on
Foreigners Could Be
Given Consideration.
ASSURANCES COULD
NOT BE DEPENDED ON
Past Performances Make
Promises of Little Value'
—Correspondent Tells of
Visit to Bandit Leader
While He Was Occupying
Chihuahua City.
Washington, Dec.
The pacific utterances of
Villa, the Mexican bandit,
sent by a messenger to El
Paso for the enlightenment
of the authorities Tiere, can
hardly be considered offi
cially, it is stated.
Villa asks for a free
hand so far as the Unit
ed States is concerned
in dealing with the Car
ranza government, in
return for which he
agrees not to assault
American citizens.
16.—
The position of this country has been
is pointed out, that the Villa
sit ion could hardly be accepted,
the first ph
piopo
; the United States
nothing to do officially with the
bjrs of Villa and Carranza but is
nly in the
I
i
interested
safety uf American citizens and other
l;m ignore in Mexico.
Moreover, it is plain that in official
not
amiably
■iivies the Villa assurance!
deep credence in view of his
past performances and of hi3 recent
give
threats.
INDULGES IN DARK THREATS.
Tlie other day a New York corre
spondent at El Pas
story of a visit he paid to Villa,
writer said:
The sentry took me to Salazar first.
He was quite friendly and asked
about old friends In the United States,
He also advised me to be careful and
not contradict Villa, nor take too much
of his time, and not to mention hiS|
foot, which was still stiff, although the
wound he received in the Guerrero bat
tle had healed.
After this I was taken to another
the second floor to Villa htm
sont his paper a
The
room on
«elf.
He was Bitting behind a table so
I rould not see his foot, but a cane
nearby chair as
allklng.
was hanging on a
proof that he still had trouble
"Do you come from El Paso?" was
his first question.
"No/' I said, "I am from Europe."
"Well I know," be said, "but weren't
you with me two years ago? Have you
born in El Paso?"
I had.
"Do you know that Jefe Politico up
there?"
I did not know who had that title in
El Paso, and he called nn interpreter.
"Do you know the mayor of El
Paso?"
I understood then what he was driv
ing at,
that I knew his name, but did not like
and answered diplomatically
lum.
know what
"Bueno/' he said, "do v
lid? Chased my wife out of the
he
country like a com
of the street and took her diamond»!
mid rinks away from her.
fellow that if lie were a mn
n peon woman
Tel] thill
he would
ionic down and fikht with me and not
fiirht a woman who is a stranger in
his country. I know him; he i» an ad
vocado for the Cientificos, and Hlpolitoi
"
me Hermano (Villa's brother)—did not
the North Americans try to murder
him?"
He grew excited by this time. I
did not feel any too well and kept!
quiet, so he continued:
PERSHING HA8 TO GET OUT.
"Do you know Pershing?"
X told him no; that 1 only inter
viewed real big generals like von Hin
clenburg and himself, knowing the Ger
warrior was a favorite of his. This
pleased him and ho continued:
"Pershing is violating the sac
red rights of Mexico, and has
got to get out. But I will show
them poco tiempo, that they
cannot violate Mexican rights.
"Do you know Wilson7 I was
I liked him, but at
ii I
his friend.
Agua Prieta he turned traitor to
me and the Mexican cause I rep
sented and helped Carranza—the
bad
of Mexico. I» there
any wonder that 1 chase the
Americans out of Mexico."
1 told him I considered his army very
good and asked what he intended to do
with "the American violators of peace
ful conditions in norther Chihuahua."
He fixed hia eyes on me, and his an
mai
i n.vmmvTTTA
PANCHO VILLA
^asoMMi
a
?
-v.. V:
, >r*
$|j
ill
%
'■
I
in
Li
Ip
§
it" *r»A*b>
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>>•
1:
m ■$,

j
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I

swer was to the point.
"Drive them out, or make them
fight, and after they are gone
ke a gap between the
two countries so wide and deep
that no Americano will ever be
able to steal Mexican land, gold
or oil."
will
RAID # ON COLUMBUS.
By this time there were many people;
waiting to see him and I made a drivel
direct to the point I came down to get. j
"General," I said, "how could
you make the daring attack on
Colonel Slocum's forces at Co
I
1
j
lumbus and get away across the
big plains?"
"Easy," he said. "I was awake;
they were sleeping, and it took
them too long time to wake up."
"You must have had many
men ?"
"Yes, I had about 300."
I did not touch the Santa Ysabel
massacre of Americans, knowing that
Martin Dopez, brother of Pablo l^opez,
who committed the crime, now holds
a general's commission under Villa.
This showed me that Villa, even if he
did not commit the crime himself,
did approve of it.
When I got out on the street I was
challenged by the sentry, "Quien
Vlvi?" and was forced to answer
"Villa/'
FIRE, BELIEVED TO
BE INCENDIARY, AT
LLEWELLYN PLANT
Property Damage of Half
Million at San Francisco
—Private Investigation
Decided Upon.
Los Angeles, Dec. 16.—Fire
which the authorities believe
incendiary, and two explosions,
the nature of which Is being in
vestigated, today destroyed a
greater part of the Llewellyn Iron
works, causing property damage
estimated at over half a million
dollars.
The explosions were reported
to have occurred practically at
the time the fire was discov
ered. Score;; of windows in ad
joining buildings were broken.
The directors of the company
held a meeting* while the fire
was in progress and determined
upon a private investigation of
the fire, supplementing that of
the police.
HUGHES FOR HEAD OF
BAR ASSOCIATION
:
,.
" n -■ ' • - De< '- 1 ' ~ Charles E.
j Hughes has been ranted for the presi
dency ot the New York State Bar as
! soeiation by the nominating committee
of that organization, it was announced
j today.
|
RATES REMAIN SAME
INCREASE GRANTED ON COAST
COUNTRY'S FRUITS. CANNED
GOODS AND OTHER FOOOi
PRODUCTS WILL NOT BE PUT
INTO EFFECT AT PRESENT.
i
Washington, Dec. 16. The Pacifie
coasts entire season's output of dried
fruits, canned gods, wine, beans, bar
ley and other foods will move east un
der prevailing freight rates, notwith
standing the authority given to the
railroads to advance them 10 cents per
hundred pounds.
Such a decision has been reached
voluntarily by the transcontinental
railroads and communicated to the In
terstate commerce commission.
BEPROFESSOR OF
PSYCHOLOGY AT
HARtfARn DIES
llCftlf O I Ihnnil U
VtKYouUDtNLYirKlIM
Hugo Munsterberg, Noted j
Educator, Seized With
Fainting Spell and Passes
Away Just as Physician
Arrives.
VISITED BOISE AND
EXAMINED ORCHARD
Attended Haywood Trial
and Made Study of Slayer
of Governor Steunenberg
—Famous the World Over
as Psychic Expert.
Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 16.—Hugo
Munsterberg, professor of psychology j
of Harvard university, died suddenly j
today while lecturing before a class at
Radcliffe college. He was seized with
a fainting spell on the lecture platform,
Some of the 60 young women, to whom
he was lecturing, went to his assist
ance, but he expired just as a doctor
arrived.
jgg-j
Hugo Munsterberg visited Boise in
during the trial of William D.
I Haywood, charged with complicity in
1 the murder of Governor Steunenberg,
and was here several days as an inter
ested spectator of the proceedings in
j court. The purpose of his visit was to
make a psychic examination of Harry
Orchard, chief witness for the state at
the trial. Not only did he study Orch
ard while he was on the witness stand,
but he conversed with him at length
privately. Later he wrote a magazine
article concerning Orchard.
Professor Munsterberg, who was rec
ognized as one of the world's greatest
psychologists, was a native of Ger
many, but had been a resident of this
country for many years, occupying the
chair of psychology at Harvard during
practically the entire period of his
residence in this country.
PREMIER WILL NOT
BE ABLE TO SPEAK
IN HOUSE TUESDAY
London, Dec. 16.—It appears doubt
ful whether Premier Lloyd George will
be able to go before the house of com
mons Tuesday next. He is making
progrès- toward recovery but it Is-con
sidered unlikely his physicians will
"".r,,'?. ÄS LÆ'.ov.
crnmmt w111 be bv tbat tlme * n » p°
j sition to make a statement regarding
the German peace proposals.
Philip Snowden, Socialist member,
one of the leadsr of the small pacific
ist group In the house of commons,
made it known that he Intends to
state the views of that group in the
commons. Its members believe nego
tiations should be opened, if only to
state the terms of the entente to the
central powers.
At
i
j
Î
j
PAfîTCTKft P.OMP ATtfTPCi !
vumrümiiö
BIG FINES PAID BY
Jefferson City,
Dec. 16.—Five
packing companies each paid $12,GUO j
into the state treasury here today in
settlement of fines of $25,000 imposed
upon them by the Missouri supreme
court for violation of the state anti
trust laws. The payment wa^ made
under agreement with the attorney
general that but half of the fines
should be paid.
Mo.,
GREECE ACCEPTS
TERMS OF ALLIES
Paris, Dec. 16.—An official telegram
announcing that Greece had accepted
unreservedly the conditions of the al
lies was received ut the foreign office
at midnight, according to the Petit
Journal.
BOY HAS A MILLION;
FIGHTING OVER HIM
White Plains, N. Y.. Dec. 16.—Judge
Frank J. Iamb of White Plains is
preparing an action to be brought In
the suprert#- court In behalf of Wil
liam Mills of New Rochelle, for the
purpose of having the name of his son.
William I'roaaman Dec, changed to
The boy Is heir to an estate or $1,
060,01)0 and Tor some time was under
the guardianship of his stepfather, T.
Frederick Lee, of White Plains, hut the
appellate division 1ms decided thnt De
Witt H. Lyon, who was appointed his
general guardiun by Surrogate Saw
yer, shall have the control and eus
tody of the boy. For two years Mr.
I^ee has been fighting the father for
the guardianship of William.
COURT
PROTECTION OF
STAR WITNESS
TH All ATTAfllfO
AIIAUlo
United States Marshal Is
Given Instructions to
Guard C. H. Wax, Cham
pion Wooer, Appearing
Against Rae Tänzer.
GIRL'S WHEREABOUTS
BEING KEPT SECRET
Will Not Be Permitted to
See Wax Before Her Trial
on the Charge of Attempt
ing to Blackmail James
W. Osborne.
New York, Dec. 16.—United t Ates
>j ar3 h a i McCarthy was instructed by
ney Roger S. Wood to take paiticular
precautions to protect Charles H. Wax,
Assistant United States District Attor
the government witness in the prosecu
tion ot Rae Tänzer, from attack.
The attack on ''Oliver Osborne" by
Adolph Menke, Bronx grocer, in re
for the alleged swindling of
con
ve nge
Menke's wife out of $2100, has
vinced the federal authorities there is
real danger in the enmity expressed
against the champion wooer In let
ters received by the district attorney.
a
HIS SAFETY DEMANDED.
"The safety of this man," Mr. Wood
said, "is essential to the government's
case against all under charges in the
effort to get money from James W.
Osborne or blacken his reputation. En
consideratlon
Of
tirely aside
Wax's comfort it is our duty to see
that he is not harmed or intimidated."
The whereabouts of Rae Tänzer and
her sisters are not yet known to Mr.
Wood.
from
SHE CAN'T MEET WAX.
"After thoughtful consideration and
consultation with various persons,"
said former Lieutenant Governor Lewis
Stuyvesant Chanlor, counsel for Rae
Tänzer and her sisters, "I have decid
ed not to allow Miss Tänzer to meet
this man Wax."
Miss Tänzer is under heavy bond
to remain within the Jurisdiction of the
southern district of New York. If she
left the district without notice to the
district attorney and his permission,
her bail bond would be forfeited.
PROMISE OF LENIENCY.
Every facility will be offered to her
to verify the government's belief that
Wax and not James W. Osborne was
the man who made light of her affec
tions and considerable leniency is to be
extended to her if she will correct her
testimony to that effect and become a
witness against the Slades, her former
attorneys.
j
ANOTHER VICTIM.
Federal detectives said they had
found Miss Katharine Masenheimer,
the nurse girl formerly employed in
the household of Frederick Coudert,
who charges that Wax, calling himself
"Angus McDonald," became acquaint
cd with her through a Central Park
flirtation, promised to marry her and
vanished after she had given him $200
of her savings. She will be allowed to
meet "Oliver."
MARRIED MEN DRINK
MORE THAN SINGLE
ONES; THE REASON
St. Louis. Dec.* 16.—Why do mar
ried men spend more time in saloons
than single men?
Now, don't answer "They don't"—
for they do; take it from such a well
qualified-to-speak authority as
commission on temperance of the fed
eral council of the churches of Christ
in America.
In a discussion on "Married Men and
the Saloon," the commission stated:
"Can it be that in many of these
cases the home has fui led to function?
A careful student of the subject re
vealed that about twice as many mar
ried men go to the saloon as do single
"-Thi. may u. a., t. ,i„ »,.1«, ia„i.
r. a sznXSfz k
spend a great deal of time in the com
pany of their sweethearts, who nat
the
urnlly would not visit the saloon with
them."
ALLIES AGREED ON
_.__ v
PURPOSE TO CARRY
WAR ON TO VICTORY^
— — —
Petrograd. Dec. 16.-A.lvi.es carry
ing t)ie report of th Russian duma
favoring a categarical refusai by tlie I
entent* governments to enter into!
peace negatiations under present con-!,
ditions, quote Foreign Minister Pok
rovski as declaring to the duma that
Russia and her allies are as one in thej
conviction that the war must be car
rted on to a victorious conclusion.
ORDERSSMASH/WG DRIVE
By french forces
0 N VERD ™ FRONT
Forced Back to
Battle Was Begun.
Paris, Dec. 16.—As his
last act before assuming
chief command of the
EYench armies on the west
ern front, General Nivelle
today smashed the German
line east of the Meuse along
a front of six miles. The
victory advanced the French
positions two miles and they
are now within a short dis
tance of where the Germans
stood at the outset of the
great Verdun drive.
Military authorities de
scribe the victory as com
plete and crushing and car
ried out without a hitch. Ac
cording to the present count
9000 prisoners were taken in
the drive and 80 guns.
The weather, according to hitherto
accepted notions, was all against the
offensive. It was wet and misty.
French offlcerfe believe this fact un
doubtedly led the Germans to mis
calculate the probability of an attack.
MADE BY FIVE DIVISIONS.
The French plan of attack was
drawn up by General Nivelle, now com
mander-in-chief, with the concurrence
of General Petain, who at that time
was his superior officer. It was made
by five divisions, or close to 100,000
men.
The front which French infantry had
held since the recapture of Douamont
and Vaux dominated In places the
German positions, but at other places
the French were under German fire.
The French advance began at 10
o'clock with each of the five divisions
covering a front of one and a quar
ter miles. Each advanced behind a
screen fire of French guns. They
swarmed rapidly to the German
trenches.
The Germans behind these positions,
surprised by the suddenness of the at
tack, offered comparatively little re
sistance. In the village of Vaeherau
ville, where the Germans Installed a
quantity of machine guns, the strug
gle was sharp but short. More to the
east FVench formations charged the
slopes of Pepper hill, carrying all be
fore them.
As they rushed to the attack the sol
diers cheered and from time to time
the Marseillaise roared by the strong
throated soldiers, could be heard above
the chorus of the cannon.
OHIO WOMEN TEN TO
ONE AGAINST EQUAL
SUFFRAGE IS CLAIM
Wa-shiiigton, Dec. 16. —That the
great majority of American women are
opposed to woman suffrage Is the con
clusion drawn by Mrs. Henry E. Tal
bott of Dayton, president of the Ohio
State Association Opposed to Woman
Suffrage, as a result of a canvass just
completed of 134,^17 women of Ohio,
Of this number 120,7(11 were found to
be opposed, 1,571 were not interested
one way or the other, and 13,140 de- .
sired the ballot.
These figures were given out by Mrs.
Talbott just before leaving Washing
ton, where she had attended the con
vention of the Anti-Suffragists. "They
explained, "the poll
represent," she
taken by professional canvassers from
door to door in Cincinnati, Cleveland,
Columbus, Dayton, Lancaster, Circle
ville, Washington Court House and
Chillicothe. Adjacent rural territories
report the same relative proportions
throughout the state. The cards were
signed by the women of more than
21 years of age, in their own hand
writing.
MARY GARDEN'S COSTLY LINGERIE REVEALED;
WORE FINE LACES IN LAND OF SUFFERING
S.K York, Dec. 16.— A rallie from Parin to the Jum
> wl s ». vs * l,at Mar - v »<* «"««"•• »»» --■•«■fU"«'
un J er g 0 a humiliating PXpcrieiK'e Oil till' ('VC of ll<T <!('
« r> i
parturo for the United States.^
"The innermost secrets of her wardrobe were re-.
Vealcd/' 88 VS the dispntdll, " JlV ,41 board of appraiSPl'S WHO
.
00 ** over lingerie valued at $öÜ00 in connection with an
iHctioU to l'OCOVei' Sj'loOU baluilCt* gjuid to lit' (lllc a Paris 1111
,,
dCl'Weai' COllCCm. *
v ... • . ...
OllC nCWBp&pCF COlUlllGJJ»» OlfHllC lllCluLlIT:
, , . . n i a ,
DC UlCKlllg 111 Ull Cl('G**nCy tO C0\01 OIK S TIPRIl W ITIl |)1 U'P-,
less laces at a moment when women and children are suf
fering from hunger and cold.
"One must
i
MOTHER OF GERMAN
T^™ 8 CE
£
1
■ ...
» «
mb
!
>. ;
/ . Ti * .
! This is a new snapshot of Princes»
Anastasia of Russia, mother of the
Crown Princess of Germany, made in
Paris where she Is now residing.
Needless to say the sympathies of
this royal mother are not the same
as her daughter's.
/
r
m
s*
I
;
I
C >; <•
*
*
m
stnEl
Princess Anastasia.
Most of Yesterday's Losses
"
Regained in Today S!
m j. .
Trading on the Chicago
«.„.j n f nPrmrio
■ DUtUU U1
NEWS THAT PEACE
MOVE MAY FAIL
SENDS UP PRICES
eause gf rt „ that lh(( United stat „
sales showed an advance of as much
as g \y. cen ts a bushel, July jumping to
'
Developments over night were con
strued by the trade as indicating that
paace was s t 1 1 1 a long way off. There,
. ,__, _. .
wa * » w.de.pread ru.h to
buy. In a few moments some transac
tions showed a rise of 10 cents a
Chicago, Doc. 16.—Wheat leaped
upward today in response to the Rus
sien duma'i rejection of peace and be
would not intervene at present. First
bushel.
After the maximum ascent of î0 l /2
cents, sellers were somewhat bolder
and reaction set in. It was more than
half an hour before comparative stead
iness was established at range of 5 to
7 cents up from yesterday's latest fig -
May at the top of the bulge
urea,
touched 1.64%.
GERMANV ONLY
asking FOR A
CONFERENCE OF
RELLIGERENTS
Count von Bernstorff Ex
plains Position Taken by
His Country in Proposing
the Discussion of Peace
Terms. .....
- _J
CONFERS WITH THE "
SECRETARY OF STATE
Purpose of Conference to
Ascertain Position of the
American Government on
Proposal—No Mediation
Offer Made by President.
Washington, Deo. 16.—
Count von Bernstorff, Ger
man ambassador, conferred
today with Secretary Lan
sing, seeking information of
the attitude of the United
States toward the peace pro
posals of the central powers,
to discuss the general sub
ject of peace from this gov
ernment's viewpoint and to
give any information Secre
tary Lansing might desire
on the attitude of the Ger
man government.
TERMS NOT DISCUSSED.
Count VOIl Ben , storff said after a
jq minute talk with Secretary- Lt
sing:
"We did not discuss peace
terms in any way. I have not
received any formal terms, and
the American government knows
officially that no formal terms
have been proposed. All Ger
many suggested is that the bel
ligérants get together and laik.
If that proposal is accepted, defi
nite terms naturally will be dis
cussed, but till then it will not
bo proper to mention them. My
visit to the secretary was for a
purely general discussion."
The ambassador indicated that the
p,a f e f° r tb ® holding of a conference
and the question of whether It
would he by direct negotiation
nr through Intermediaries, were ques
tlons entirely dependent upon the
willingness of the entente allies to dis -
cues the sltuat i on Rt aU . He indicated
also that he had not. discussed the
American action in sending on the
Teutonic notes without comment, as
that was purely a matter for this
country to decide for itself.
NO MEDIATION OFFER.
to the entente allies wlthou' any me
dlation offer by the American govern
ment left only the task of translation
and revision of the phraseology to b.
fi n i s i le( j before they were transmitted.
Secretary Lansing Bald the peace
notes would go forward Immediately,
President Wilson having decided that
they Bhou , d not be accom panied by
HI1V mediation offer of his own. He
President Wilson's decision to for
•d the central powers' peace notes
w
has not determined whether any action
on behalf of peace will be taken later
by the United States on its own ac
count, but is holding himself In readi
In any way possible to
ward bringing the warring nations to
gether.
The course to be pursued was made
ness to ser
(Continued on Pare Five.)
BLUE LAW OF 1642
INVOKED IN SPIRIT
OF RETALIATION
Wateibury, Conn., Dec. 16.—
Michael H. Mockus, a lecturer
invited here by the Lithuanian
colony, lias been arrested for
blasphemy in connection with
utterances about the bible under
a blur law of 1612. It was un
der this saw nient that men und
\ve\re hanged for
women,
witchcraft.
inherited
Mock us
antag
onism on the part of thoae who
felt aggrieved :it Rev. Peter
Kanralsuitis. a Lithuanian pas
tor here, whose efforts resulted
in ti e arrest of persons who had
converted their dwellings into
unlicensed saloons, as charged.
The latest retaliatory atep Is
the arrest of Mockus.
an

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