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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, December 18, 1916, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1916-12-18/ed-1/seq-3/

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BOTH PARTIES!
OUTLINE PLANS
FORM FUTURE
Republican Leaders Talk
Over Situation and Make
Suggestions for Reorgani
zation and Early Prepara
tion for 1920.
SOME IN FAVOR OF
SPRING CONFERENCE
Others Inclined to the View
That Rest Cure Is What
Is Most Needed—Demo
crats Also Looking After
Political Fences.
ahead and the people appear to be 1
•orfelted with politic«, the political !
. , , , , .... 1
leaders do not intend to permit them !
te have a rest. Republicans in many ;
•tatea are assembling committees to
VUn for the reorganization of their
party on line« for victory tn the next
Biennial election.
In Ohio for example a committee of
nine party leaders are to meet in a
few days to talk over the party situa- ,
tlon in that state and to plan for the j
future. This committee of nine in- ;
cludes Governor Willis, Myron T. Her- i
rick the late candidate for senator who'
went down to defeat with Willis in
general Republican wreck in that state, !
Benator Harding, Rud K. Ilynicka of |
Cincinnati, national committeeman and j
a representation of Progressives. j
DEMOCRATS ALSO ACTIVE. j
It was learn d today that the Demo- '
cratic leaders are i lanning also. The I
Woodrow Wilson Independent league, i
of which former Representative VVil- \
liam Kent was chairman and in which j
Charles R. Crane, Norman Hapgood j
and others of more or less prominence
This bureau was established to boost
(Q&ptt&l News Special Service)
Washington, Dec. 18.—Although the
»residential «lection is four years
in independent politics were conspicu
ous is to be continued and active work
will go on. The Jonathan Bourne Re
publican publicity bureau with Its ten
thousand dollar a year editor in George
H. Aloses, of New Hampshire. Is to
keep up its work and Bourne and ex
nway are out passing tho
to replenish the smouldering politl
Senator Hei

I hers.
liduey of John W. Weeks for
Rater It kept up a desig
ning in tho campaign, Mr. Bourne
lining personal responsibility for
Word had gone out
his bureau will tight to drive out
tho Progressives. Just now it is feed
ing largo gobs of boiler plate matter
to country papers attacking F
Hitchcock, whose chief offense was
that he failed to be named as chairman
and therefore is responsible for Hughes'
defeat.
t
»st Of its output.
that
I
nk H.
STILL ANOTHER PROJECT.
Another coterie of "reorganizers" ap
peared in Washington last week.
Medill McCormick, newly elected con
gressmon-at-large from Illinois and
former Bull Moose leader, was the
prime, mover in the project. A private,
as given by Mr. McCormick j
several old guard leaders, i
William !
dinner
*t which
among them Representative
McKinley of Illinois, were present and
Chester H. Rowell, Progressive Repub
lican leader of California, represented
the Progressive thought. A half dozen
or more leaders representing the two
wings of the party were at the dinner
but It came to nothing.
Some of those present asked that no
mention be made of their presence as
they doubted the wisdom of the under
Mr. McCormick's
followers believe there should he a na
tionwide conference soon at which the
old guard and thr> Progressive Repub
licans should try to get together. This
'hieapo probably
about mid-winter if the plan goes for
ward.
taking.
'regressive
Is to be called for
THIRD PARTY CONFERENCE.
Matthew Hale, art ing chairman of
the third party Progressive remnant
has already called, a meeting of his
committee sympathizing friends for the
Manhattan hotel tk plan for a national
conference of third party Progressives.
So there appears to be no such thing
as the traditional "calm after the
storm" that has raged in politics this
conference next spring
to rejuvenate the Republican organi
year.
Senator Borah said today that he
believed that
zalion might not be a bad thing. S
iitor Harding said today that he be
lieved It would be a good thing to give
the old party "about six months of the
rest cure." Frank H. Hitchcock is busy
conferring with friends and
lieutenants and there are those
former
rho be
I
licve that the "Blond** hope" ns
friends refer to him. will yet lead the
party out of the wilderness.
PRESIDENT MARRIED
ONE YEAR AGO TODAY
Relatives. I
the j
Washington, Dec. 18.
friends and admirers throughout
country remembered the President and
Mrs. Wilson with messages of greet
ing tods> 011 the occasion of tho first
rv of their wedding. At tie
nnivrr
;
While Ho,
i. raid no plans lud 1
been made for a celebration of the
u I Versai y and it was probable the oh
servante of the day would be confined I
to a small dinner party to which rel.i- 1
lives of the two families and a few ill
le i
1 1
timute friends hud been invited.
Cut glass sale at Con W. Hesse, 1002
Main.—Adv
tf
Around the
J. R. STOTTS, REPORTER,
l
NAMPA AGENT
Halley Wileon. Phone 4*9W
,
Meeting to Be Held in In
, , « t, . I
terest Of Diverting Boise
River Water to Tract.
OF BLACK CANYON
Caldwell, Deo. It. —At a special
meeting of the Commercial club of this
city tonight, a campaign of opposition
to the effort of Elmore county citizens
against the divergence of water from
the Boise river for the reclamation of
the Black Canyon Irrigation project
will be launched, and there will be no
cessation of effort upon the part of the
special commttteo recently appointed
by tho club for this purpose to bring
the vast area of fertile lands embraced
In this project into profitable agricul
tural operation with the least possible
delay.
Through the strong support being
given them for securing federal assist
ance by Senator Borah, the settlers of
the Project are highly optimistic over
the probable outcome of their efforts
for the reclamatiln of the project at an
eally date. The Commercial club and ;
(he buglness men of this city give
the Bettler3 uf the projeot the fullc3t !
mea3Ur8 of Bupport .
Caldwell, Der. 18.—The banquet riv
on tho football tram of the high school
of the city by their fellow students Sat
thelurday evening at the high school bulld
ing proved one of tho most enjoyable
social functions of the past month. Fol
low ing the banquet which was enjoyed
by 75 students and members of the
faculty, James Cook who has dis
tinguished himself this year os one of
the most proficient football players in
southern Idaho, was elected captain of
the team for the ensuing year,
Professor Edward Burns of the high
school faculty, presided as toast
master. Those responding to toasts
were Coach Max Houghton, Captni"
Joseph Ewing, Professor O. L. Neal,
Ted Turner, Dr. F. M. Cole and Super
intendent H. H. Clifford.
Tomorrow evening the members of
the team aie to be presented with tho
new sweaters which has been secured
for them by tho Commercial club and
business mon of the city in apprécia
tif their highly creditable reco/d
of the year.
I
j
j
BANQUET GIVEN FOR
THE FOOTBALL TEAM
ti<
JOINT SESSION HELD
BY SUNDAY SCHOOLS
Eagle, Dec. 18 — A precedent
vhich
may bo followed mon frequently in
the future by th-* church of
Eagle was set here Sunday morn
ing, when the Sunday schools of the
churches united for their morn
ing services.
A week ago the Methodist Sunday
school sent an invitation to the Bap
list church to meet with them the
know th® attendance iu
1
lowing week. The Baptist school im
mediately accepted the invitation, and
preparnt'ens were made to make It a
big day That it was a day of large
'proportions may be seen when wc
up to
Mr. Randall of the Boise T. M. C.
A. was down to talK to the boys' class.
Tne greatest regret of those present
war that he could not speak longer. He
later addressed the entire audience
with a most Interesting application of
the word Loyalty.
Besides this treat Mrs. Ormsby was
there with her char act eristic good
cheer. She made a short talk, in which
she offered a new slogan for the new
year, and urged the members on to
greater and better things.
Two special mus'cal numbers, a
vocal duet b> Misses Elizabeth Martin
r né .Lena Fisher and a selection by
the I,agio quartet, added a variation to
the program and takes its place
among the notable success*^ of the
\s Inter.
DEPUTY WARDEN TO
LOSE HIS POSITION
.Nampa, Dec. 13.—Pleading guilty to
disorderly conduct on Saturday night
in th,s ' before Police Judge D. D.
Hobart this morning, W. M. Brown, of
l-oise. a deputy state game warden,
as fined $5 and costs. Brown did not
ha\e the money with which to pay his
but upon promising Judge Ho
hart that he
Id send him the
am °unt of the fine within the next few
t,avs . he was allowed to return to
Boise.
That Brown will lose hi« office as a
consequence of the affair is one of the
1 1 dc\elopmenis of the case, Chief
o ,,1<e ' irr > Maloney just having
IV l f P ^° ni ° l n3 i r y tl0n from
I h, m °f. Bol8e ' t0 tttke
his official star from him.
FOUND GUILTY ON
CHARGE OF LARCENY
I Nampa, De, . 18 . Finer, of $25 and
j costs were allotted Frank Sanehz nnd
Irtoral. two Mexicans, this
morning In the court of Justice o. T.
Moore fer the thcfl
•xegon Short Une railroad
luv. I lie charge
m> 11 I etng pett-
Neither of the nom had th»
'eto|
if nacki
from
llm local
•■-pot
' esterda>
; proferi ed against Hie
1
Garçon',
I money w ith which t*
1 '
*' ir county Jail at Caldwell where they
will serve tho fines out at the rate of
$2.0« a day. Tim
iorn
pa; Ins fine and
n consequence both were taken to
packages included
tobacco and other articles ol' minor lm
I
Boise Valley Loop
RHONE «R4» BOISE
CALDWELL AGENT
K. Millar, Phones 452R er 8S
Meridian News In Brief.
Meridian, Deo. 1*.—A canvass of the
vote of the recent election of the
Nampa-Merldian Irrigation district at
which H. B. Carpenter was elected as a
director to succeed himself will be
made at a meeting of the directors of
the district at Nampa today. The bids
for the bonds of the district In the sum
of $365,000 recently refunded by the
electors of the district at a special
election will be opened at a meeting of
the directors at Nampa tomorrow.
Re ^ B Ä ILtZ
past several weeks looking after busi
ness Interests.
Mr. and Mrs. William Day enter
tained at a card party Saturday even
ing.
The local pool hall has been pur
chased of H. Kennedy by Edward Hart
man.
Frank Erlckaon, of Atlanta, Is visit
ing here as the guest of his sister, Mrs.
Ada Swann, and will probably spend
the winter here.
Miss Esther Swann was a Boise vls
Itor Saturday evening.
Volney Watts spent yesterday In
Boise as the guest of friends.
John Baird, editor of the Meridian
Times, was a business visitor to Boise
Saturday evening.
J. D. Pigg Is a Boise visitor today.
O. A. Remington Is a business visitor
to Nampa today.
Mrs. J. A. Flood is the guest of
Boise friends today.
L. C. Russell is transacting business
In Rolse t0(lav .
j
Carl Star is a buslners visitor to
Boise today.
George E. Atwater, the local real es
tate man, Is among the local people
transacting business in Boise today.
Deputy Sheriff W. J. Herron of
Boise Is a business visitor here today.
A reception was accorded the I. O.
O. F. lodges of the neighboring lntor
urban cities and towns by the local
lodge Saturday evening. Forty mem- '
hers of the Boise lodge were in attend
ance as well as many from other iriter
urban cities and towns. A highly en - ;
joyable affair Is reported.
Nampa Brevities.
Nampa, Dec. 18.— H. C. Bradley Is
a business visitor t. Caldwell today. |
G. A. Remington of Meridian, sec-'
retary of the Xampà -Meridian irri-j
gatton district, is a business visitor in
the city today.
John D. Orr of Boise of the Idaho
Power company, was a business visit
or in the city today.
D.r. Ralph Falk and Harry Falk of
Boise, visited In the city yesterday.
DIVORCE CASE ON TRIAL.
Caldwell, Dec. 18. The trial of the
case of Walter F. Wade against Elsie
E. Wade, an action for divorce, is in
progress before Judge. Bryan in the
district court today and will probably
consume the entire day. In his com
plaint the plaint Iff alleges that he and
his wife were married in Portland dur
ing Xovember. 1914. and that he was
deserted by bis wife in Imbler, Ore.,
In June, 1915.
, . IA ,
few ,1*™} >" that community.)
ft few months since, was arraigned in
district court this morning upon the
! amended information filed against him
! by County Attorney ft. A. Griffiths and I
will enter a plea before the
the new charge tomorrow morning at
9: 30.
TO ENTER PLEA.
Caldwell. Deo. 18.—Charles Craw- j
ford, the Fargo farmer charged with '
having assaulted II. H. Cross, his;
rt to
^DEATHS—FUNERA'^5
O'NEIL—James O'Neil, aged 54;
vpors riinri G,, n ,Piv ... , r.. i, > rr i
KÄ Ä a ;«!
for nearly two years. Miners consump- j
tion and asthma caused his death. Mr.
O'Neil was a pioneer 0 f ,„e Wood :
river country where he followed niln
In if. in 1888 he moved to Rocky Bar)'
and for a. time made hi, home in that!
section and at Atlanta. He was elected !
sheriff and also assessor of Elmore'
!
county and for 18 years lived at Moun
tain Home. He is survived by his wife,
Mary T. O'Neil, and seven children,
Mrs. Annie Josephine Everett an(1 1
James A. O'Neil of Atlanta. Mary of
Einmett and Larkin. Allen and William j
of Mountain Home. The funeral was
Held this morning at St. John's cathed- j
ral and burial was in St. John's ceme- :
tery.
1
MARCH—The funeral of Mrs. Mandy
y. March was Held this afternoon at
| Fry & Summers chapel. The
v fo«B were conducted by the Salvation!
Army and burial was in Morris Hill |
cemetery.
GOODWIN—Mrs. Belle Goodwin,
aged 63 years, died at 10 o'clock this
morning at the home, 1118 Lee street.
She is survived by her husband and
several children. The funeral will be
| j ie ld tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock
pyy & Summers chapel.
II. J. Reynold* will official« and bu.
rial will be in Morris Hill cemetery,
Rev.
WRIGHT -Job,. M. Wright. aR^d 49
years, died Sunday ni B l,t at 8 o'clock
al a local hospital from injurloa re-I
ceived Friday night In a logging comp
of the Rolse-Payetie Dumber company.
Mr. Wright was brought, to Boise Sat -1
urday morning In an unconm'iou« con
dit ion and never regained conscious
ness. Report.-, are meager concern
ing the acident. but it is understood
that he sas stineK by a log It is not.
known whether or not ho leaves any
relatives. Among his personal effects
ners found some loiters 18 and 20
years old, but none of recent date. The
body is at the Fry & Summers morgue
nwaiting funeral arrangements while
the lumber company is attempting to
locate friends or relatives by wire.
Make This A Christmas Your
Relatives or Friends Will Remem
her For Years to Come———
HAPPY IS THE CHRISTMAS WITH A MUSICAL INSTRUMENT IN IT. WE WILL BE HAPPY T O
MAKE YOU AND YOUR FAMILY HAPPY, TO HELP YOU SURPRISE THEM ON CHRISTMAS MORN
ING WITH A PIANO. PLAYER PIANO OR TALKING MACHINE.
We will sell you a fine $350 piano for
$258
($10 will send this piano to your home Christmas.)
We will sell you a $600 Player-Piano for
$415
($25 will send this player-piano to your home Christmas.)
We also have one repossessed Kimball piano, like new, worth today, $350; $220 is the amount due on this piano. It is
a genuine bargain at .
$220
($8 will send this to your home Christmas.)
We have one beautiful Lagonda Piano, regular $465. You could not tell this from a brand
takes $290 to pay this out.
new piano and it only
($10 will send this to your home Christmas.)
We have one $750 fine Player Piano exactly like new, $4(îO will finish paying for this.
($25 will send this to your home Christmas.)
We also have several excellent used pianos from
$75 to $145
($5 will send either to your home Christmas.)
We carry a complete line of $1 5 to $75 Talking Machines.
($5 will send either to your home Christmas together with several fine records.)
We carry a complete line of fine $75 to $250 phonographs.
.($5 to $10 will send either to your home Christmas, together with several records.)
A Beautiful Music Bag or Music Satchel would be greatly appreciated for Christmas, we have them from 500 to $12
We also carry a complete line of UKULELES, GUITARS. VIOLINS, HARMONICAS. In fact everything musical.
THE
BOISE
Our store will be open every evening until
Christmas.
We want you to call—make our large, com
fortable lobby your meeting and resting place—
whether you need anything in our line or not.
EMPIRE BLDQ.
BOISE I DA HO
__ Ä !
CLOSES STRONG
!
!
. . . _
Belief That British Prem- 1
ipr'q Snppfh Will Hold
lei b opeecil W 111 XXUIU
Out Little Hope for Peace '
*
Advances Prices.
,
I
j
'
j
C' icago, Dec. 18. Pro-German fore
casts that a peace conference would be
j
held about Jan. 15 and that the war
90 days had a bearish
I
On the ensuing decline in prices, how- i
would end h
effect today on the
cheat market here.
or, buyers took hold with more free- !
, . . . ... i
Join a ml brought about a rail'.
Trade was of only moderate volume.
j
. •
: 11 ' ^'" M ' V *71-4 wm foUowcd
' u •' V , ' „ ,
1 ' « —wnal setback all around and
1 ' 1 " 11 "" '"i" S ' ™ ^
! " slisht n , et „ B *"•
A big merease of l mted State* v.s
Hupply totaled to a fresh set- ,
! back in prices, but subsequently de- 1
,ere shown, the result
of !
i ble
l M ,l . Ul ' u,ns
1 ^em.ngly of growing pess.slsm hat
Lloyd George s reply tomorrow to Gor
j mam " ullld ,lut entourage hopes
j
:
I
!
1
<
1
1 peace.
'Plie close .ranged 3-4c to 2 1-2c
higher.
Wheat-May 1.64 1-2, July 1.37.
Corn—May 93 3-8c, July 92 7-Sc.
I iats—May 53 1-2c, July 51 l-4c.
Pork—Jan. 25.80, May 26.50.
|
j
j
LIVESTOCK MARKETS.
Chicago.
(Capital News Special Service.)
Chicago, Dec. 18. — Hogs—Market
to shade higher. Bulk,
light. 9.20 <& 10; mixed,
heavy, [email protected]: rough, [email protected]
Cattle—Market steady to 10c low
er. Native beef,
steers, [email protected] 10.15; cowc
! I
9.75^10.10; I
9
;
!
I
restern 1
7(h) 11.65;
and
heifers, i
3.75 @10.
Sheep—Market [email protected] lower. Weth
ers, [email protected]; lambs, 11 @13.25.
, r *° U * spT'u*' SVr^ce.)
Sout) , 0maha . I)P0 . I8 ._ H og*- Re
, r . ip|p ,.. unn iMnrkpt 3lcadv to 5 low
r| . B „, k <1 to- ran*« 9 25'a99r.:
mixcd and butchers.'9.50W9.90; good to
, hoaV v, 9 .S.Vo 9 . 9 ;.; rough heavy,
r, ,9 «n ; light, 3.2
I
( ■aille. Receipts. 10,500. Market !
sloe killers in in is lower; feeders]
slead Beeves. 7.25®lt.50; cows h nG !
heifers. 4 50® 8.3*, stockers and feed -1
pigs, 7 . 00 !
•<! 9,85 ;
ers. 5.75®8.2.>; good westejn rangers.
7.75®9: poor to mediun .
calves, 8®10.
Sheep—Receipts,
slow, 10 trio lower.
9.50: yearlings, 8.i0®10.75; feeders, 7
ffi9; lambs, 12 ® 12.70; feeders, 11®
6.75® 7.75,
Market
10,000.
Wethers, $.25®
12.50; ewes, [email protected]
North Portland.
(Capital News Special Service.)
North Portland, Dec. 18.—Cattle
E.25®7.25.
Hogs—Receipts, <'025. Market 5 slow
or. Prime heavy, 0.65 1 ®0.80 ; light,
9 . 350 ) 9 . 60 ; mixed. s.no®> 9 . 55 ; rough,
8 - 65l ® 915; b'e 3 - *[email protected]
Sheep—Receipts, 120. Market nn
ha "E^- wethers, s®».7t ; iambs,
U.i»[email protected]
25 higher,
heavy, 7.50©
6 @6.50; calves,

LOCAL MARKETS.
Wholesale.
Ranch butter, per pound....25c to 30c ;
Fresh ranch eggs, per case .512.GO
[email protected]$2.75
.$2.25
. $2.00
.$ 1.00
.$1.00
.$2.50
. $ 1.00
.$1.00
Honey, per cas« ....
potatoes, per hundred
Cabbage, per cwt ....
Pumpkins, per ewt.
Squash, per cwt.
Q n j ons
per cwt .
Carrots, per cwt. . .
T , r
,ur • P s * P er w
App.es. per Pox .........1.25 to ,1.50
Aifaifa. per Un. loose ■.,11.00
Alfalfa, per ton. baled .,12.00
Timothy per ton, baled .$16.00
wheat ner ewt
V ! - at. per w t.
Rarl^v per ewt.
.
Butter fat.
-Vilk for butter fat. per pound
Creamery butter, per pound
Cube butter, per pound .
biggs, per case .
[email protected]$2.10
.$1.70
.$1.65
.$1.65
Rye, per cwt.
Dairy Produce.
per pound ....
37c
41c
40c
...38c
.$11
Livestock and Poultry.
Cows, per cwt. $4(7/'$4.50
Steers . $5®$5.5f |
Prime veal, per pound . 7c
Prime logs, per cwt
Medium hogs ....
. .$8.65
.$8 @8.25 j
Rough heavy hogs [email protected]
Turkeys, per lb., live weight
Lard, tierce-base, per lb.lSl&cj
'sheep, per cwt. [email protected]$5.50
(Spring lambs, per pound.6c
18c
.10 11c
Hens, per pound .
Geese, per pound, live weight ....8
Ducks, per pound ....
Retail.
.9c
.$2.50
. 2c i
Potatoes,
Pumpkins, per ib.
Squash, per lb.
Cauliflower, per head .17M.*c
Ranch eggs, per dozen .45c
Storage eggs, per dozen.
Ranch butter, per lb.
Creamery butter, per lb
Apples, per box.
Sugar, per cwt, canc
per cwt....
. 2c
49c
. [email protected] j
. [email protected] }
$1.50 to $2.50
.$8.50
$8.25
Reet sugar, per cwt.
Flour, straight grades, per 48
pound sack .
High patent, per 48-pound sack
.*2.25® 2.85 i
,
.. »2.38® 3 no;
T-oeal lard. 10.|h. pall.$2 15
Eastern lard, 10-pound pali. »2.25 :
,.. 0 ,| ol e n e. per pail.05c«»2.18 :
Hens, per Ib
R Jasting chickens, lb.
spring fr' s
Turkeys, per pound .
Geese, per pound.
Ducks, per pound.
.210
. ync 1
.30c I
. 18c j
Solid Gold Signet Cu t Buttons, $5.00. j
Hitchcock, Jeweler.
—Adv.
Open evenings.
MAJESTIC
TODAY AND TOMORROW.
GREAT WESTERN
PHOTO PLAY
A story of a man who loved peace so well, he fought like
a fiage full of tigers to get it.
GEO. WALSH
STAR OF "THE BEAST" IN "THE MEDIATOR."
KNIGHT & HOWELL
CARTEL! BROS.
Virtuosi of the Harp,
Banjo and Guitar.
SLAM BANG
COMEDIANS.
The Majestic runs continuously every day in the week
from 1 p. m. to 11:30 p. m.—Come any time.
Headquarters
For Xmas
CANDIES
CAKES
ICE CREAM
fiZiS J
. I
C
Y
FRUIT CAKE
PLUM PUDDING
LEB KUCHEN
CANDY CANES
POP CORN BALLS
GINGER BREAD MEN
ANIMAL COOKIES
20c HARD MIX CANDIES
CHRfSTMAS STOCKINGS, SNAPPING MOTTOES. ETC. PLACK
YOUR ORDER EARLY AT
30c CREAM MIX CANDIES
40c PAN ASSORTMENT
60c CHOCOLATES
Boas Kandy Kitchen
115 N. 8th St.
Phon« 1251-J

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